Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses  (Read 661656 times)

Online 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1785 on: June 11, 2017, 09:45:34 AM »
^^^^WELL SAID^^^^^

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1785 on: June 11, 2017, 09:45:34 AM »

Offline manhattan

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1786 on: June 11, 2017, 10:05:40 AM »

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1787 on: June 11, 2017, 12:49:21 PM »
Two housewatch areas in that house. One on the 298 side and the other on the 275 side. It was like watching a parade when the whole house responded together and you were standing on the corner of Jamaica Avenue & 162 street.


There would be 24-26 FFs working each tour - a busy firehouse.  And different than two company FDNY firehouses.  Were there walls inside the firehouse to separate companies? Why two housewatches - size of firehouse or city policy requirements? Was there one kitchen, or more? A lot roast beef and potatoes were cooked for meals.  Separate bunkrooms?  Was there adequate parking as the neighborhood developed?   


For a period of time between 1908 and 1925, NYC built firehouses with walls between companies, and therefore separate housewatches.  GMan compiled a good summary a while back: 

"If you go back in time, most ladder companies had their own firehouses including many that had a solid wall between the engine & truck side and separate housewatch desks: 1(w/E7-1 & 7-2), 2*, 3, 4, 5*, 6, 7, 8*, 9*, 10, 11, 12, 13*, 14, 15, 17*, 18, 19, 20*, 21*, 22*, 23, 24, 25(w/E74), 26*, 27(next to E46), 28*, 30, 34(w/E84), 35*, 38(w/E88) 39, 40, 41(w/E90), 42(next to E73), 43(w/E91-1 & 91-2) 44(w/E92)), 45(w/E93-1 & 93-2), 46(w/E81), 47(next to E64), 49(on Nelson Ave. directly behind E68), 77(w/E153), 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 118(365 Jay St. w/R-2), 122(next to E220), 123, 124(w/E271), 125, 126, 127(w/E275, 298 & 299), 131(w/E279), 132(w/E280), 134(w/E264 & 328), 136(w/E287), 140(w/E291), 142(w/E285), 144(w/E295), 146(w/E229), 147(w/E281), 148(w/E282), 149(w/E284). [* means double company]"


The explanation for the firehouse separation is believed to be a NYC law or policy which was also posted by site member, 811: 

"I was told during that period, that when they built these houses, there was a city law stating a house could only have one Captain even if it contained two companies. So to beat this law, they built two separate houses with a common wall."

When you look at G-Man's list of ladder companies that had a house to themselves, whether it was a stand alone building, one building but with a wall between companies, a building with its own address distinct from the engine company, or a building that no longer has an engine, clearly a majority of ladder companies had their own house at one time.

G-Man's list with a few additional:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (2 different houses), 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18 (2 different houses, Bronx and Manhattan), 19 (3 different houses), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 34, 35, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 58, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 118, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 129, 131, 132, 134, 135, 136, 140, 142, 144, 146, 147, 148, 149, 161, 175 

Co-located houses but with their own address:
27, 36, 37, 38, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 58, 77, 117, 120, 121, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, 129, 131, 134, 146, 147, 148, 149, 151, 152, 157, 160, 163

Co-located houses with walls:  (as noted by others on this site)
25, 27, 34, 38, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 58, 77, (118?), 122, 124, (127?), 131, 132, 134, 136, 140, 142, 144, 146, 147, 148, 149

57% of the ladder companies were housed alone or separately, at one time.  Only Baltimore had more, 60%.

« Last Edit: June 12, 2017, 12:08:01 AM by fdhistorian »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1788 on: June 11, 2017, 11:04:41 PM »
Two housewatch areas in that house. One on the 298 side and the other on the 275 side. It was like watching a parade when the whole house responded together and you were standing on the corner of Jamaica Avenue & 162 street.


There would be 24-26 FFs working each tour - a busy firehouse.  And different than two company FDNY firehouses.  Were there walls inside the firehouse to separate companies? Why two housewatches - size of firehouse or city policy requirements? Was there one kitchen, or more? A lot roast beef and potatoes were cooked for meals.  Separate bunkrooms?  Was there adequate parking as the neighborhood developed?   


For a period of time between 1908 and 1925, NYC built firehouses with walls between companies, and therefore separate housewatches.  GMan compiled a good summary a while back: 

"If you go back in time, most ladder companies had their own firehouses including many that had a solid wall between the engine & truck side and separate housewatch desks: 1(w/E7-1 & 7-2), 2*, 3, 4, 5*, 6, 7, 8*, 9*, 10, 11, 12, 13*, 14, 15, 17*, 18, 19, 20*, 21*, 22*, 23, 24, 25(w/E74), 26*, 27(next to E46), 28*, 30, 34(w/E84), 35*, 38(w/E88) 39, 40, 41(w/E90), 42(next to E73), 43(w/E91-1 & 91-2) 44(w/E92)), 45(w/E93-1 & 93-2), 46(w/E81), 47(next to E64), 49(on Nelson Ave. directly behind E68), 77(w/E153), 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 118(365 Jay St. w/R-2), 122(next to E220), 123, 124(w/E271), 125, 126, 127(w/E275, 298 & 299), 131(w/E279), 132(w/E280), 134(w/E264 & 328), 136(w/E287), 140(w/E291), 142(w/E285), 144(w/E295), 146(w/E229), 147(w/E281), 148(w/E282), 149(w/E284). [* means double company]"


The explanation for the firehouse separation is believed to be a NYC law or policy which was also posted by site member, 811: 

"I was told during that period, that when they built these houses, there was a city law stating a house could only have one Captain even if it contained two companies. So to beat this law, they built two separate houses with a common wall."

When you look at G-Man's list of ladder companies that had a house to themselves, whether it was a stand alone building, one building but with a wall between companies, a building with its own address distinct from the engine company, or a building that no longer has an engine, clearly a majority of ladder companies had their own house at one time.

G-Man's list with a few additional:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (2 different houses), 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18 (2 different houses, Bronx and Manhattan), 19 (3 different houses), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 34, 35, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 58, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 118, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 129, 131, 132, 134, 135, 136, 140, 142, 144, 146, 147, 148, 149, 175 

Co-located houses but with their own address:
27, 36, 37, 38, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 58, 77, 117, 120, 121, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, 129, 131, 134, 146, 147, 148, 149, 151, 152, 157, 160, 163

Co-located houses with walls:  (as noted by others on this site)
25, 27, 34, 38, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 58, 77, (118?), 122, 124, (127?), 131, 132, 134, 136, 140, 142, 144, 146, 147, 148, 149

57% of the ladder companies were housed alone or separately, at one time.  Only Baltimore had more, 60%.

Thanks for the information, fdhistorian.  Both you and Gman - good research. 

It is possible the number of single ladders could possibly go even higher with some temporary unit location changes, either engine or truck moves, that may not make location history lists.  Ladder 161, for example, moved to disbanded Engine 244's old Coney Island firehouse from 1968-1971.  Engine 245 moved in with Engine 318/Ladder 166 and Bn 43 relocated to Engine 246/Ladder 169 until their new firehouse was built on the W 8th Street location.  Ladder 161 was a single ladder company for three years.


Coney Island firehouses:

2919 W 8th Street firehouse Engine 245/Engine 326/Ladder 161/Bn 43 1904-1968:

     

     

     




2929 W 15th Street firehouse Ladder 161  1968-1971:

     

     


2919 W 8th Street firehouse Engine 245/Ladder 161/Bn 43 1971:

     

     

« Last Edit: June 11, 2017, 11:15:49 PM by mack »

Offline 1261Truckie

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1789 on: June 12, 2017, 12:37:37 PM »
Quote "Mack, I don't know how you do it, but I do enjoy and look forward to your posts regarding old firehouses and the companies that used them. Thank you for all you do and I await the next installment." Enquote

I agree, Mack. Thanks for all your hard work

Offline t123ken

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1790 on: June 12, 2017, 04:32:51 PM »
Speaking of Engine 245, if anyone has been or is going to Deno's Wonder Wheel Amusement Park in Coney Island or Jenkinson's Boardwalk in Point Pleasant, NJ, one of the amusement rides there for little kids is a fire engine ride. 
The manufacturer of the ride, W.F. Mangels, had its factory on West 8th Street in Coney Island, I think where the DMV is now.
They numbered their engines "245" after Engine 245, whose quarters were and still are down the street.

I'm sure these rides must be in other locations as well.
Has anyone seen any others?

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1791 on: June 12, 2017, 09:49:38 PM »
Speaking of Engine 245, if anyone has been or is going to Deno's Wonder Wheel Amusement Park in Coney Island or Jenkinson's Boardwalk in Point Pleasant, NJ, one of the amusement rides there for little kids is a fire engine ride. 
The manufacturer of the ride, W.F. Mangels, had its factory on West 8th Street in Coney Island, I think where the DMV is now.
They numbered their engines "245" after Engine 245, whose quarters were and still are down the street.

I'm sure these rides must be in other locations as well.
Has anyone seen any others?

Great info t123ken.  The manufacturer of these fire engine kiddie rides which have been around for years and are still in operation in many places and at state fairs and carnivals - was a Coney Island company across the street from Engine 245.   Pinto Brothers, or Mangels, was at 2450 W 8th Street, across from the old Engine 245/Engine 326/Ladder 161/Battalion 43 firehouse until the street was widened in 1954.
 
     Old 1948 Billboard
     

     https://amusingthezillion.com/tag/ride-manufacturer/

     http://brooklynology.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/post/2009/08/31/WF-Mangels-and-his-Amusing-Career.aspx

     

"The Pinto family had a factory on West 8th Street. Pinto rides turn up less frequently than Mangels ... Pinto Bros Mfg. Amusement Devices, Coney Island, NY, USA. Among the kiddie rides that they manufactured and advertised for sale were a carousel, ferris wheel, rocket, roller coaster, miniature trains, sail boats, fire engine and pony carts.

In June 1948, the Billboard reported that Pinto Bros three new kiddie pony and cart rides built in their shop at 2940 West 8th Street were featured at Feltman’s park, in McCullough’s lot adjoining the Dangler on West 15th and Surf, and in Asbury Park. The brothers Albert and Silvio, along with their cousin Henry and father Silvio Sr., also operated a variety of other rides in Coney Island, including a Mangels Whip, a Scrambler, and the Tornado roller coaster and Spook House.

When the widening of the street for the New York Aquarium construction swallowed up their shop in 1954, they continued to manufacture ride parts for customers and operate rides. In 1959, the Pinto family bought the Cyclone roller coaster, which they operated before selling it to the City a decade later. According to a post with reminiscences of the Pinto Brothers on the Coney Island History Project’s blog “Ask Mr. Coney Island,” a pony and cart was restored at the Merry-Go-Round Museum in Sandusky, Ohio."

     

« Last Edit: June 13, 2017, 09:23:18 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1792 on: June 15, 2017, 12:16:43 AM »
Engine 245/Ladder 161/Battalion 43 and Engine 318/Ladder 166  -  Coney Island 1970s

Neighborhood:
 
     

     

     

     

     
     Mermaid Avenue

     

     
     Mermaid Avenue

     
     Mermaid Avenue

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     Box 3553 - Mermaid Avenue and W 15th St -Terminal Hotel - fires, drugs, prostitutes, stabbings  - later became multiple alarm

     
     Coney Island - 213 high pressure hydrants

     
     Coney Island Pumping Station - Brooklyn dispatcher notified Station to turn high pressure system on when CI box was transmitted

Fires:

     
     Box 3535 Surf Avenue and W 30rd Street - store fire - 1973

     
     Mermaid Avenue

     
     Box 3522 Surf Avenue and W 37th Street - bar fire - 43rd Battalion on arrival

     

     
     Bungalow fire

     
     Box 3524 Mermaid Avenue and W 24th Street

     
     Box 3589 Boardwalk and W 22nd Street - bathhouse fire 

     
     Box 3589 Surf Avenue and Stilwell Avenue - hotel and restaurant - multiple fires

     
     Box 3586 Boardwalk and W 15th Street - bathhouse burned down

     
     Box 3586 Boardwalk and West 15th Street - bathhouse fire

     
     Box 3592 Boardwalk and W 29th St - pavilion fire

     
     Box 3558 Surf Avenue and Stillwell Avenue - multiple fires

     
     Box 3587 Boardwalk W 17th Street - remaining Steeplechase Park rides and concession buildings - multiple fires

     

     


     http://www.theconeyislandblog.com/?p=952

     http://www.classicnystreetgangs.com/crazyhomicidesinc.htm

« Last Edit: June 15, 2017, 07:43:33 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1793 on: June 15, 2017, 04:47:28 PM »
Ladder 110   Firehouses    172 Tillary Street     Fort Greene, Brooklyn      Battalion 31, Division 11

     Ladder 10  Brooklyn Fire Department organized 264 State Street      1891
     Ladder 10 Brooklyn Fire Department became Ladder 10 FDNY           1898
     Ladder 10 became Ladder 60                                                         1899
     Ladder 60 became Ladder 110                                                        1913
     Ladder 110 moved 365 Jay Street former at Engine 207                   1949
     Ladder 110 moved 172 Tillary Street at Engine 110                          1972             
           

Ladder 10 BFD 245 Pearl Street:

     

     

     


Ladder 110 365 Jay Street with Engine 207/Battalion 31:

     

     Notes - former BFD Headquarters; former quarters of Ladder 68(118)/Water Tower 6/Searchlight Engine 3/Rescue 2/Division 10; Ladder 110 shared quarters with Engine 207/Battalion 31 1949-1972

          https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Old%20Brooklyn%20Fire%20Headquarters

          http://www.brownstoner.com/architecture/building-of-the-day-365-jay-street/
     
   
     


Engine 207/Ladder 110/Super Pumper (disbanded)/Super Tender (disbanded)/Satellite 6/Field Comm Unit (relocated)/MERV/Battalion 31/Division 11/Brooklyn Boro Command firehouse  172 Tillary Street:

     

     

     

     

     


     2nd Alarm - roof fire - April 30, 1906 - 172 Tillary Street firehouse:

         http://www.firstduephotos.com/Fire-Service-Photography/Fireground-Photographs/FDNY-2-Alarms-on-Tillary-St/i-BhCSG3n


Ladder 110:

     

     

     

     

     

     


Videos:

     

     


Ladder 110 FDNY Medals:

     CARL A. MONTELIN FF. LAD. 110 FEB. 27, 1908 1908 1909 HURLEY

         

     JAMES J. C. B STEUER FF. LAD. 110 MAR. 15, 1942 1942 CRIMMINS

     FRANCIS J. B RYNIKER FF. LAD. 110 MAR. 15, 1942 1942 1943 JOHNSTON

     FRANCIS P. V. B O'BRIEN FF. LAD. 110 DEC. 24, 1950 1950 1951 DOUGHERTY

     PETER J. M EISEMANN FF. LAD. 110 NOV. 11, 1957 1957 1958 JOHNSTON

          Note:  In 1978, BC Eisemann, 42nd Battalion, was "All Hands" chief at Waldbaum's fire.

     THOMAS R. B JONES FF. LAD. 110 DEC. 12, 1961 1961 1962 FDR

         

     ANTHONY L. B MOTTI LT. LAD. 110 JUL. 22, 1971 1971 1972 STIEFEL

         

     DONALD H. B MISCHKE FF. LAD. 110 FEB. 10, 1973 1973 1974 JOHNSTON

     JOSEPH P. B FLYNN LT. LAD. 110 JUN. 12, 1978 1978 1979 FDR

     THOMAS J. B AZEVEDO FF. LAD. 110 APR. 21, 1988 1988 1989 LA GUARDIA

     KEVIN C. B KANE FF. LAD. 110 SEP. 12, 1991 1991 1992 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

         

     MICHAEL P. BROWN, FF LAD. 110 JUL 11, 2000  CRIMMINS
          - Gas explosion on State Street by Engine 226
          - http://www.nytimes.com/2000/07/12/nyregion/blast-levels-a-brooklyn-building-3-people-are-missing.html
               - Thanks t123ken

     ROBERT PAV, CAPT  LAD 110 MAY 12, 2005  CINNELLI

          2005 Award Winner: "Captain Pav, Ladder 110"  By FDNY.NET on December 1, 2005 in Awards Dinner
 
          "Within the fire service, many fires traditionally begin very early in the morning, when most occupants are sound asleep. The morning of May 12th, 2005, was no exception, when the members of Ladder 110 in Brooklyn were called out at roughly 7 a.m. for a report of a structure fire in the Gowanus Houses on Baltic Street. As Captain Robert Pav, a 19-year veteran of the job, guided his crew first-in to the box, it was apparent that they had a working fire on their hands – and with victims trapped. A fire involving the living room area of 74-year-old Dorothy Bradford and her 35-year-old daughter Jaqueline was between them and the front door, leaving them no way out. As Ladder 110 Firefighter Terence Brody, assigned to the Irons position that day, broke open the front door, he and Captain Pav were confronted with two burning sofas, with flames rolling across the ceiling of the apartment. Behind the flames they could hear both women screaming for help. Despite conditions in the interior of the apartment that indicated a potential deadly flashover situation, and without the protection of a hose line, the firefighters made the decision to make a rescue by going directly through and past the fire room to where the victims lay, in a bedroom beyond. “The couch on the right was incinerated and the couch on the left was burning,” says Captain Pav, “and we went right through the middle.” The choice to do this goes against every instinct a firefighter has, and against everything they’re taught. For Brody, the decision to go through the fire room wasn’t made as easily. “I didn’t want to crawl past it at first,” he says, “but I did anyway.” Their decision to do so, however, enabled them to find both mother and daughter huddled in a dark bedroom beyond, gasping for air next to an open window. Firefighter Brody immediately led daughter Jaqueline out of the apartment to safety, but in spite of her peril, elderly mother Dorothy was afraid to leave her apartment; she was afraid of the smoke, and was afraid that her legs would give out before she got to safety. “I can’t do it,” she told Captain Pav at the time, “I can’t hold my breath.”  “She was terrified,” says Pav. “She was just trying to stay by the window.”  So Captain Pav did the second thing that firefighters are taught never to do, compromise your own safety by giving your air mask to someone else. “The smoke was so thick, it was hard for myself to go without a mask,” he said. However, despite the conditions and his suffering, Pav stayed with Mrs. Bradford in the safety of the bedroom until the fire was knocked down and a member of Rescue 2 came to lead her out of the apartment to safety. Unselfish acts are a staple of irefighting duty, but to deliberately place yourself in harm’s way by putting the safety of victims above your own is what makes the efforts of Captain Pav so special and so worthy of recognition.

     TERRENCE F. BRADY,  FF  LAD 110  MAY 12, 2005  KANE

          "BRAVEST SAVE 2 FROM B'KLYN FIRE" NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Friday, May 13, 2005, 12:00 AM

          "CRAWLING THROUGH a tunnel of fire, the city's Bravest rescued a terrified elderly woman and her daughter from a burning Brooklyn apartment yesterday morning. The blaze blocked the front door of the women's apartment in the Gowanus Houses, leaving 74-year-old Dorothy Bradford and her daughter, Jacqueline, 35, with no way out. Homing in on the women's screams, FDNY Capt. Robert Pav and Firefighter Terence Brody broke through the door and crawled 70 feet between two burning sofas around 7 a.m. "The couch on the right was incinerated, and the couch on the left was burning - and we went right through the middle," Pav told the Daily News. "I didn't want to crawl past it at first, but I went anyway," Brody said hours later. The Ladder 110 firefighters found the mother and daughter huddled in a dark bedroom, gasping for air next to an open window on Baltic St. Brody led Jacqueline out to safety, but her mother didn't want to move through the choking smoke. She was afraid her weak legs would give out. "I can't do it," Bradford moaned, trembling in her nightgown. "I can't hold my breath." Pav, a 19-year veteran, placed his oxygen mask on the woman's face. "The smoke was so thick, it was hard for myself to go without a mask," Pav said. "She was terrified. She was just trying to stay by the window. " Minutes later, firefighters doused the flames and a Rescue 2 firefighter helped Pav lead Bradford to the hallway. Bradford and her daughter were taken to Long Island College Hospital, where they were treated for minor injuries and released hours later. The fire appeared accidental, but it was being investigated, officials said. tsclafani@nydailynews."
 

Ladder 110 LODDs:

     FF John Carey, Ladder 110, died from injuries from collision with Engine 226 responding on 2nd alarm for box 33-155 on September 28, 1907

         


     FF Frank A. Maher, Ladder 110, died from injuries from accident responding to alarm for fire April 29, 1909

         


     FF Kevin C. Kane, Ladder 110, died due to roof collapse at fire in E. New York when Ladder 110 was relocated to Ladder 107 September 13, 1991 Box 22-1918

         

          https://www.scribd.com/document/64076386/FDNY-report-on-fatal-fire-September-13-1991

          http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/02/nyregion/firefighter-s-death-rallying-cry-fatal-blaze-91-comes-symbolize-dangers-cutbacks.html
       
         



     Lt Paul Mitchell, Ladder 110, World Trade Center, September 11, 2001

         

         

         

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/paul_mitchell_46_fire_lieutena.html
 
      RIP - Never forget.


Ladder 10 BFD Early History:

"HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 10 - A BUSY FIRST YEAR.

It was on Aug., 1, 1891, that Commissioner ENNIS declared Hook and Ladder Company No. 10 duly organized and ready for active service.  Located in a district bounded by Johnston Street, Nevins Street, First Place and Smith Street, and on the west by the water-front, the company has a vast amount of the most valuable property in the city under its protection. It responds to calls from 117 boxes on a second-alarm, the remotest box being at the end of Red Hook Point.   The company is quartered in a model two-story structure on State Street, near Boreum Place.   The cellar of the house has been fitted up as a gymnasium and among the appliances for developing the muscles of the men are rowing-machines, Indian clubs, dumb bells, heavy and light hammers and quoits.  The house is furnished with the latest improved second-class Hayes truck, and three of the handsomest and quickest working horses in the Department.   "Larry," "Billy" and Dick" are their names, and their colors are black, dark-brown and dapple bay.   They can get out of the house with ease in twelve seconds. " Billy," who is nearly seventeen hands high and weighs over 1400 pounds, prior to coming to Truck No. 10 served five years with Truck No. 2. and he is so well-versed in the telegraph alarm system that no amount of persuasion will induce him to leave his stall on a " test-call."   Two days after the organization of the company another member was added to the roster, whose name does not appear on the pay-rolls at Fire Headquarters.   He was diminutive in size when he first entered the door of the truck-house and he wore a fur coat which in color resembled a tortoise shell.   He carried no "grip," but his general demeanor indicated as he settled himself in a chair, that he had come to stay; and stay he did, for every man in the company took the young stranger by the paw, christened him " Patsey," and adorned him with a silver collar.   Good warm milk and an occasional piece of meat developed " Patsey " into a full-fledged fire cat. In the gymnasium he took lessons in "high vaulting" and " running jumps," at which he has become an expert.   His favorite place of sleeping was on the men's coats on the extreme end of the extension ladder.   One day as he was taking an afternoon nap, an alarm sounded from Box 58, corner Hoyt and Warren Streets.   As a rule "Patsey" was on the alert at the first sound of the gong, but on this particular occasion he was not aroused from his slumbers until the truck was on the way to the fire.  At Dean and Pacific Streets, Fireman Collins discovered "Patsey" with his nails buried deep into one of the coats and to all appearances enjoying the situation.   When the truck arrived at the fire "Patsey " was transferred to the driver's seat and covered up with a coat, from which position he seemed to enjoy the excitement.   The men who make up the company are intelligent, temperate, conscientious and brave, and since they have been banded together under the same roof have experienced all the hardships and perils incident to the life of a fireman.

Foreman JAMES FRANCIS MURRAY has been in many perilous positions, and though his name is not on the roll of " life-savers," it is not because he stood back when human life was in peril. He was born in Brooklyn, July 12, 1851.   He was appointed a fireman Sept. I, 1878, and assigned to Engine No. 4. While with this company, on Oct. 22, 1881, he was promoted to the grade of Foreman. In Feb., 1890, he was transferred to Engine No. 10, and on Aug. 1, 1892, was transferred to the company which he now commands.   At the glass house fire in State Street, he had his foot severely injured, and at the Wallabout Market fire in the summer of 1890, he was overcome by heat and smoke for a time.

Assistant Foreman THOMAS STEVEN COPPINGER is a native of Brooklyn, born Nov. 23, i86o.   He was appointed to the Department March 17, 1888, and was assigned to Engine No. 4 and afterward transferred to Engine No. 26.   While in the latter company, on June 1, 1891, he was promoted to be Assistant Foreman and sent to Engine No. 1, from which he was transferred to the present one.   On March 2, 1890, while a member of Engine No. 26, he assisted Foreman DOOLEY in rescuing a woman from the third story of No. 362 Atlantic Avenue.   On Aug. 31,1890. at a fire in the tenements Nos. 452 and 452 1/2 Atlantic Avenue, Mr. COPPINGER found in a dark bedroom on the third floor of No. 452, a three-year-old child named Charles SCHMIDT, who, but for his prompt arrival, would have perished.   The heat was intense and the smoke stifling, but the brave young fireman fought his way through it with the child in his arms and reached the street in safety.

ANTHONY A. COOKE, the driver, beams with good-nature.   Since he was able to toddle about in short clothes he has been around horses, and as he grew to manhood his love for them increased.   As a driver there is none better in the Department, and he is happiest when he sits behind handsome " Billy " and his mates and gives them their heads for a long run.   Mr. COOKE was born on Hamilton Avenue, May 25. 1856.   He donned a fireman's uniform on Feb. 18, 1887, and since that time has been the driver of Engines Nos. 3 and 26, and Trucks Nos. 1, 5 and 10.   At a fire at No. 359 Fulton Street he stood on the roof and held the rope which saved the lives of David and Sarah GOODMAN, who were tenants of the fourth floor, and had been cut off from all other means of escape.

LESTER AUGUSTUS ROBERTS has a fresh, clear complexion, kindly blue eyes and a most amiable disposition.   He is tall, broad-chested, strong-limbed, and a perfect athlete in muscular development.   He is of a literary turn of mind, and during his thirty years of life has been around the world.   He was born in Brooklyn. March 10, 1862, and served in the United States Navy from April 3, 1878, to March 10. 1883 and was an apprentice on board the U. S. S. "Alliance" when that vessel made her famous voyage to the Arctic regions in search of the lost steamer " Jeannette."   Mr. ROBERTS is as brave as he is good-looking and intelligent.   He was made a fireman April 1, 1885, and assigned to Truck No. 1.   While with this company in July, 1885, he saved the lives of John and Ellen MCGRATH at a fire, corner of Hicks Street and Hamilton Avenue. On the night of Aug. 31, 1890, at No. 452 Atlantic Avenue, he took a very active part in the rescue of several persons.   On Feb. 22, 1892 at No. 395 Fulton Street, Mr. ROBERTS, then a member of Truck No. 10, assisted in getting Jacob MICHAELSON and Mrs. GOODMAN out, and caught the latter's baby, which had been thrown by the frantic mother from the fourth story window.

JOSEPH BARRETT was born in Ireland, Aug. 6,1866, and became a fireman March 21, 1888.   He has since done duty with Engines Nos. 3 and 26 and Trucks Nos. 1 and 10. Aug. 31, 1890, he found Mrs. DORSHEIMER and her son on the third floor of the burning building. No. 422 Atlantic Avenue, and carried them to the roof of the adjoining building. He also assisted in the rescue of Jacob MICHAELSON and Mrs. GOODMAN at No. 359 Fulton Street, Feb. 22, 1891.

JOHN MICHAEL RYAN is a native of Brooklyn, and was born July 7, 1864.   He was made a fireman June 12. 1889, and at the fire. No. 359 Fulton Street, in Feb.. 1891. assisted in saving Samuel Goodman and his wife.   On Jan. 9. 1892, as he was passing No. 98 Union Street, he heard the cry of " Fire," and running quickly to the third story found Josephine RICOLO, eighty-four years old, enveloped in flames, caused by the explosion of a kerosene oil stove.  He smothered the flames with his heavy overcoat and carried the woman down to the basement and summoned an ambulance.

HENRY W. MALONEY was born in Brooklyn. Jan. 7, 1864, and on June 15, 1885, became a member of the Fire Department.   He was attached to Truck No. 5 on Aug. 31, 1890, and assisted in rescuing James DONNELLY his wife, sister-in-law and two children from the top floor of No. 452 1/2 Atlantic Avenue.   On Dec. 22, 1891. at No. 344-46 Smith Street, at great personal risk he worked his way up to the third floor of one of the houses, where he found Louisa and Alice MOTTERAN, and carried them down the fire-escape to a place of safety.

WILLIAM E. COLLINS was born April 19, 1867, in Brooklyn, and his appointment to the uniformed force dates from Aug. 11. 1891.  Although young in the business he has a record for saving the life of a woman at No. 117 Atlantic Avenue, on Dec. 24, 1891. 

JOHN KELLY was born in Brooklyn, Oct. 5, 1867, and became a fireman Oct. 29. 1890.   On arriving at a fire at No. 38 Atlantic Avenue. Sept. 27, 1891, he was told that a boy named Edmund RALPH was asleep in a dark bedroom on the first floor.   It was impossible to reach the boy by the stairway, so Kelly climbed the fire-escape at the rear of the house, and after groping about in the dense smoke succeeded in reaching the lad, who was by this time nearly suffocated, and carried him out to the street.

EDWARD FINN, also a native of Brooklyn, was born Aug. 9, 1836, and after serving some years in the United States Navy, joined the uniformed force at its organization, Sept. 15. 1869.   He has been an active worker at all the big fires since that time. and fortunately escaped without injury.

WILLIAM FRANCIS Down was born Sept. 4, 1862, in Brooklyn, and since he became a fireman. Dec. 3, 1888, has served the Department faithfully and well.

PATRICK JOSEPH SULLIVAN was born in King's County, Nov. 27. 1865, and after passing the civil service examination with a good percentage, was duly appointed a member of the uniformed force, Oct. 29, 1890.

JOHN PADIAN is a native of England, and first saw the light in St. Helens, Lancashire County, on July 13, 1861.   He was made a fireman March 31, 1892, and although young in his career, has the mettle in him to make an efficient member of the force. While the company has been in existence the men have had a great number of fires which required many hours of hard labor to subdue.   Among them were the chemical works at ,the foot of Jay Street; Baum's building, comer Myrtle Avenue and Bridge Street; Pinto's stores. Red Hook Point; Smith & Gray's clothing house, and the sash and blind factory fire at Fulton and State Streets.   On the first day of the water famine in Brooklyn they were summoned to a fire, comer of Court and Butler streets, and on their return from that fire they were called out again to a fire at Carroll and Court Streets.

     - from "OUR FIREMEN : THE OFFICIAL HISTORY OF THE BROOKLYN   FIRE   DEPARTMENT"


Ft. Greene Neighborhood:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Greene,_Brooklyn

   





« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 06:16:09 PM by mack »

Offline t123ken

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1794 on: June 15, 2017, 05:18:58 PM »
Add to Ladder 110's medal recipients:

FF MICHAEL P. BROWN, JULY 11, 2000 (gas explosion on State Street by Engine 226) CRIMMINS      



Offline nfd2004

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1795 on: June 15, 2017, 05:50:13 PM »
 Todays Reply (#1724) alone, by "mack", an amazing story in itself. Then add everything else together with this entire collection. The histories, the members, the photos, the stories, the videos, the patches, etc. An amazing job done here. "Actually, I've never seen anything like it. Thanks "mack".

 And THANK YOU to all those who have contributed as well. Making this a complete history of every firehouse within the largest city in America. 

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1796 on: June 15, 2017, 06:56:59 PM »
Add to Ladder 110's medal recipients:

FF MICHAEL P. BROWN, JULY 11, 2000 (gas explosion on State Street by Engine 226) CRIMMINS

Will do!  Thanks for correction.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1797 on: June 16, 2017, 06:04:59 PM »
FF Peter J. Eisemann, Ladder 110 awarded 1958 Johnson Medal - advanced to Battalion Chief:

BC Peter J. Eisemann, 42nd Bn, August 2, 1978 - Waldbaum's Fire - BC Eisemann responded with aide FF Harold Hastings as "all-hands chief on 75-3300 at 0849 hrs.  BC Eisemann was on roof when collapse occurred.


     http://www.fdnysbravest.com/Walbaum38thAnniversaryFinal.pdf

     http://www.commandsafety.com/2010/08/01/the-waldbaum-fire-collapse-fdny-1978-remembrance/


     

     

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1798 on: June 17, 2017, 12:12:17 PM »
Mask Service Unit (MSU)  FDNY Fire Academy, Randalls Island

MSU  FDNY Fire Academy, Welfare Island  (approximately 1962-1975):

     1962:
     

     1971:
     

MSU  FDNY Fire Academy, Randalls Island     (1975-present)

     

     


MSU Vehicles:

     1960s:

     

     1980s-1990s:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     2000s:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



MSU Videos:








Randalls Island:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randalls_and_Wards_Islands

     http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/islands-of-the-undesirables-randall-s-island-and-wards-island


     

     
 
     

     

« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 10:42:52 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1799 on: June 19, 2017, 12:45:41 AM »
Engine 49   Firehouses   Blackwells Island (later Welfare Island)   4th Division 10th Battalion 

     Engine 49 organized Blackwells Island                            1882
     Engine 49 new firehouse Blackwells Island                      1882
     Engine 49 new firehouse Welfare Island (name change)   1949
     Engine 49 disbanded                                                     1958

Engine 49 Blackwells Island firehouse built 1882 (pictures taken approx 1962 - new FDNY Fire Academy location)):

     

     

     
   
     


Engine 49 new firehouse Welfare Island built 1949 (pictures taken approx. 1960 and 1971):

     

     

     Notes:

     - Description of new firehouse: "On the west side was a modern fire station housing Manhattan Engine Company No. 49, just relocated to Welfare Island. The new firehouse, the first to bless the island, featured a unique brick and glass hosedrying tower, a lounge terrace, recreational facilities, a well-lit bunkroom and generous locker and washroom facilities." - "Blackwells Almanac" Roosevelt Island Historical Society

     - Firehouse used by Mask Service Unit after Engine 49 disbanded in 1958)


Engine 49 apparatus:

     1918 hose wagon:
         

     1928 hose wagon:
         

     1938 Ahrens Fox pumper:
         

     1939 Shop-built pumper (after use by Engine 324):
         


Engine 49 LODDs:

     Engineer William H Rush, Engine 49, November 14, 1906

          - Thrown from apparatus responding to alarm.


     FF Bernard Delmar, Engine 49, October 6, 1951

         


     RIP.  Never forget.



Blackwells Island fires:

          - 1904 laundry building fire:

               

          - 1906 greenhouse fire:

               

          - 1921 cottage fire:

               

          - 1951 hospital fire:
               
               


Engine 49 assigned to 4th Division 10th Battalion (1948):

         

          - Note:. Engine 49 listed having 2 pumpers and 1 65-ft ladder apparatus.


Engine 49 housewatch journals:

      - 1912:

         

         

         


     -1921:

         

               - Notes:  Engine 49 had 2 platoons - 1 officer/1 engineer/8 FFs per platoon; 5 inmates assigned - waiter/cook/kitchen help; apparatus - 1 Christer tractor steamer/1 combination chemical hose unit/1 city service ladder   

         

         

         


Blackwells Island/Welfare Island/Roosevelt Island history:

     - Called Hog Island, Manning's Island, Blackwells Island (named after Robert Blackwell, a farmer), Welfare Island (1921-1971) and currently Roosevelt Island (1971-present)

               

               http://collections.mcny.org/C.aspx?VP3=SearchResult&VBID=24UAYW644DD9&SMLS=1&RW=1280&RH=909

     - Purchased by NYC in 1828.  City and state built prisons, hospitals, mental health asylum, lighthouse and other medical buildings. 

     - Island was accessible by ferries from Manhattan and Queens

         
 
     - Island accessible by elevator from Queensboro Bridge (1930):

         


     - Welfare Island Bridge was built in 1955.

         

               - Note: bridge made island accessible to Queens FDNY units response; Engine 49 disbanded 3 years after bridge opened

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roosevelt_Island_Bridge


     - Additional history:

          - http://www.correctionhistory.org/html/chronicl/nycdoc/html/blakwel1.html

          - https://4girlsandaghost.wordpress.com/2011/10/05/new-york-city-lunatic-asylum/

          - http://www.nyhistory.org/community/blackwells-island

          - http://gothamist.com/2012/05/12/blackwells_island.php

     - Blackwells Island originally protected by volunteer fire company and hospital firefighters

          - February 13, 1858 fire destroyed hospital which was rebuilt

          - Engine 49  - a combined (engine/truck) company - was organized in 1882 in temporary quarters until a new firehouse was available later that year.

     - Welfare Island (1921-1971):

          - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2177073/Welfare-Island-Black-white-photos-1940s-use-New-York-City-island.html

          - Home of FDNY Fire Academy 1962-1975

               - https://www.flickr.com/photos/fdnyhome/sets/72157629548038400/

               - https://www.flickr.com/photos/95364995@N00/sets/72157604056697044/

     - Roosevelt Island - renamed 1971

          - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodore_Roosevelt_Island
   
          - FDNY SOC firehouse current location:
 
               

               
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 03:53:40 PM by mack »