Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses  (Read 690933 times)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1815 on: June 28, 2017, 11:13:53 AM »
     The severe FDNY budget cuts during the 1970s "War Years" resulted not only in approximately 50 disbanded units, many closed firehouses, massive layoffs, reduced manning, worn-out apparatus and equipment - but also reductions in FDNY programs - to include Fire Marshals. 

     1977 - the "Summer of Sam" - NYC experienced terrorism from a serial killer - David Berkowitz (aka the "Son of Sam" http://murderpedia.org/male.B/b/berkowitz-photos-2.htm ) - who attacked 8 young couples, killing and wounding many.  When he was finally arrested, investigators discovered he was also a serial arsonist, responsible for thousands of fires in NYC.  FDNY Fire Marshals had to stop an arson investigation that could have led to an earlier Berkowitz arrest.  Arson investigation reductions - another impact of the severe budget cuts during the War Years.

     "In the mid-1970s, fire marshal Mike DiMarco was staking out David Berkowitz’s Bronx home after his yellow Ford Galaxy was spotted fleeing the scene of two trash fires set on City Island in the Bronx. “We had him under surveillance for months, watching his car late at night when we didn’t have any fires to run off to,” says DiMarco. But when Berkowitz moved to Brooklyn, the cut-to-the-bone fire marshal division dropped the tail, Berkowitz forgotten until he was arrested for the Son of Sam murders.  ( from http://nypost.com/2010/05/16/why-the-bronx-burned/ )

     Berkowitz' arson log had over 1000 FDNY arson incidents with date, boro, location, FDNY box number and radio code for alarm:

     

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1815 on: June 28, 2017, 11:13:53 AM »

Offline nfd2004

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1816 on: June 29, 2017, 02:47:24 PM »
     The severe FDNY budget cuts during the 1970s "War Years" resulted not only in approximately 50 disbanded units, many closed firehouses, massive layoffs, reduced manning, worn-out apparatus and equipment - but also reductions in FDNY programs - to include Fire Marshals. 

     1977 - the "Summer of Sam" - NYC experienced terrorism from a serial killer - David Berkowitz (aka the "Son of Sam" http://murderpedia.org/male.B/b/berkowitz-photos-2.htm ) - who attacked 8 young couples, killing and wounding many.  When he was finally arrested, investigators discovered he was also a serial arsonist, responsible for thousands of fires in NYC.  FDNY Fire Marshals had to stop an arson investigation that could have led to an earlier Berkowitz arrest.  Arson investigation reductions - another impact of the severe budget cuts during the War Years.

     "In the mid-1970s, fire marshal Mike DiMarco was staking out David Berkowitz’s Bronx home after his yellow Ford Galaxy was spotted fleeing the scene of two trash fires set on City Island in the Bronx. “We had him under surveillance for months, watching his car late at night when we didn’t have any fires to run off to,” says DiMarco. But when Berkowitz moved to Brooklyn, the cut-to-the-bone fire marshal division dropped the tail, Berkowitz forgotten until he was arrested for the Son of Sam murders.  ( from http://nypost.com/2010/05/16/why-the-bronx-burned/ )

     Berkowitz' arson log had over 1000 FDNY arson incidents with date, boro, location, FDNY box number and radio code for alarm:

     

 The entire decade of the 1970s, "what a group of years that was in NYC and for the FDNY".....

 1) There was the massive closing of fire companies and firehouses - laying off for the first time in history (300 - ?), members of the FDNY. All while fires were beyond a staggering amount.

 2) July, 1977 there was the Blackout when the FDNY responded to 2,000 (?) fires. Many buildings being set on fire after being looted. That went on for 24 hours straight.

 3) July, 1977 there was the huge Boro Call in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, when dozens of buildings burned taking out several blocks. There was also a problem with water pressure due to the number of illegally opened hydrants on a very hot, humid day.

 4) Times Square wasn't what it is today. You couldn't bring your kids there. For the right price you could buy all the sex and drugs you wanted. The homeless would camp out there and be looking for your donation.

 5) There was the "Son of Sam" as he called himself. Randomly attacking and murdering younger couples throughout the city. People were afraid to go out not knowing where he would strike next.
  *** NOTE - Site member Tom E., aka "guitarman.." worked with him in a post office in Yonkers. Never knowing that at night this individual was actually "The Son of Sam", responsible for all those murders.

 I'm sure it is difficult today to understand how bad things really were then when reading this. For the guys that were there and talk about it, "they aren't lying". It was totally out of control.

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1817 on: June 30, 2017, 01:02:36 AM »
   Correction: I worked with him at the Bronx General Post Office at Grand Concourse & 149th St. I was on the 8am to 4:30pm day shift and he was on the 4pm to 12:30am afternoon shift so we crossed paths around 4pm. Notice that one of the alarms he logged was on 5/26/77 for Bronx box 2245 at River Ave. & 151st for a 10-19 (single engine) outside rubbish fire. That location is less than 3 blocks from where he worked.  ;)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1818 on: July 13, 2017, 08:15:15 PM »
Engine 268/Ladder 137   Firehouses     Location 259 Beach 116th St   Rockaway Park, Queens  "The Beach House"     Division 13, Battalion 47

     Engine 168 organized 111-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd in firehouse volunteer Atlantic Engine 1   1905
     Engine 168 became Engine 268                                                                                          1913
     Engine 268 moved to new firehouse 259 Beach 116th St w/Ladder 137                                 1913
     Engine 268 moved to 92-22 Rockaway Beach Blvd at Engine 266                                          2000     
     Engine 268 moved to 259 Beach 116th St                                                                           2000
   
     Ladder 137 organized 259 Beach 116th St at Engine 268                                                      1913

     Bn 47 located at 259 Beach 116th St at Engine 268                                                              2000


111-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd firehouse:

     

     Note:  Engine 286 was organized in 1905 as a combination engine and hose company with two officers, two engineers and eight firefighters.  Ladder 137, when organized in 1913, probably would have had 2 officers and ten firefighters.


259 Beach 116th St firehouse "The Beach House":

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Firehouse historical landmark:

     http://s-media.nyc.gov/agencies/lpc/lp/2527.pdf


Engine 268:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 137:

     

     

     

     

     

     
 
     

     

     

     


Engine 268/Ladder 137 videos:

     

     

     


Ladder 137 Medals:

     FF JOSEPH A. Q COURTNEY FF. LAD. 137 JUN. 20, 1950 1950 1951 CONRAN

     FF CONRAD J. Q ROHE, JR. FF. LAD. 137 MAR. 24, 1965 1965 1966 DOUGHERTY

         


Engine 268/Ladder 137 LODDs:

     FF Bertram Butler, Ladder 137, September 17, 1941, Heart attack while training in quarters

         

     FF John Clarke, Engine 268, June 3, 1973

     RIP.  Never forget.


Rockaway fire history:

     1892:

         

     1916:
     
         

     1922 Arverne Conflagration:

          https://www.gendisasters.com/new-york/11781/arverne-ny-fire-jun-1922


     1960 Hurricane Donna, September 12: 

         


     2001 American Airlines Fight 587 crash kills 265, November 12: 

          https://issuu.com/fdnyfoundation/docs/rockaway-plane-crash-kills-265--wnyf-

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Airlines_Flight_587

          http://stevespak.com/fires/queens/plane.html


     2012 Hurricane Sandy, October 26-30:

          FDNY removed the majority of its units from the Rockaway neighborhood because of extreme danger. Engine 268 and Ladder 137 remained.

         

         

         

          http://www.nyc.gov/html/fdny/html/events/2012/110812a.shtml
 
          http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/rockaways-fire-fighters-work-24-hour-shifts-blaze-dangers-amplify-article-1.1199997

          http://www.qchron.com/editions/queenswide/fdny-honors-boro-heroes-from-sandy/article_5ca55ab7-01cf-5a9e-b83d-10ef5e0217e2.html


Pre-FDNY volunteer era (note - Engine 268 organized in Atlantic Engine 1 firehouse when disbanded):

     ATLANTIC ENGINE 1 196 Washington Ave.  Mar. 1, 1887 to Sep. 1, 1905
     SEASIDE ENGINE 1 Boulevard near Henry Feb. 5, 1895 Sep.  1, 1905
     ATLANTIC HOSE 1 9 Grove St. Mar.   6, 1890 Sep.  1, 1905
     SEASIDE HOSE 1 Boulevard near Henry Jan. 13, 1888 Sep.  1, 1905
     VOLUNTEER HOSE 2 Boulevard near Eldert Oct.   2, 1887 Sep.  1, 1905
     REMSEN HOSE & CHEMICAL 3 Boulevard near Pier Ave. Jan. 28, 1895 Sep.  1, 1905
     OCEANUS LADDER 1 Boulevard & Bayview Ave. Dec. 30, 1882 Sep.  1, 1905
     SAM MEYERS LADDER 2 Pier Ave. near Boulevard Mar. 20, 1897 Sep.  1, 1905

          


Engine 268/Ladder 137 new "drive-through" firehouse proposal:

     

     https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170703/rockaway-park/rockaway-park-firehouse-beach-116th-fdny-flood-resilient

     http://rockawaytimes.com/index.php/news/1075-fdny-banking-on-a-new-home-116th-firehouse-too-rich-to-rescue

     https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20160620/rockaway-park/crumbling-rockaway-firehouse-may-be-cheaper-move-than-repair-officials


Rockaway Park neighborhood:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockaway_Park,_Queens

     http://www.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/queens/rockaways/beach116th/index.htm


Rockaway history:

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockaway,_Queens





     

     

     
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 12:48:17 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1819 on: July 14, 2017, 03:11:53 PM »
Engine 268/Ladder 137 new "drive-through" firehouse proposal:

     

     https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170703/rockaway-park/rockaway-park-firehouse-beach-116th-fdny-flood-resilient

     http://rockawaytimes.com/index.php/news/1075-fdny-banking-on-a-new-home-116th-firehouse-too-rich-to-rescue

     https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20160620/rockaway-park/crumbling-rockaway-firehouse-may-be-cheaper-move-than-repair-officials

NYC is very different than most areas.  This article presents some general pros/cons of drive-thru firehouses:


"Fire Apparatus Site" - "Do You Really Need A Drive-Through Station?"  Don Collins  08/31/2016
   
"Drive-Through Pros:

There is less opportunity for an accident in a drive-through station if the driveway, apron, and entry portals are designed correctly and the driver and officer remain alert until the apparatus is in quarters and the motor has been shut down. I have heard it many times: “There are a lot fewer accidents per mile going forward than there are accidents per mile going backward. This may be true, but I know of at least one accident in Virginia where the apparatus floor roof was collapsed by pulling an aerial into the station from the rear apron. It can happen if you neglect to retract the outriggers!

Drive-Through Cons:

It takes considerably more lot size to have a drive-through station. In the absence of a corner lot and side street, you will need enough room for a driveway connecting the street to the rear apron. The driveway must go down the right side of the station (right side being defined as viewed from the street). You will need an apron in the rear that is at least 80 percent of the length of the longest anticipated apparatus to be housed at the station in order to maneuver the apparatus into its bay such that it is parallel to the stall. The driveway will have to extend beyond the end of the apron before turning to the apron. All drives to the rear apron should be such that the driver is only making right turns. Only right turns afford the driver of a fire apparatus with the best vision of potential obstructions. The radius connecting the left side of the driveway to the left side of the apron should be at lease 25 feet in length. On a recent project in Ohio, the rear driveway alone added $125,000 to the project cost. That is money that could have gone into improving the quality of the station.
You will also need a driveway on the other (or left) side of the station as an “alarm” bypass. If an alarm is transmitted for your apparatus while you are on the driveway or apron returning to quarters, you do not want to drive through the station in responding. Doing so might jeopardize the safety of firefighters from a second piece of equipment as they cross the apparatus floor heading to their seat assignment. The bypass drive can also serve as a staging area for “visiting” apparatus during joint training events. Having a rear apron does not negate the need for a front apron long enough to accommodate the longest apparatus to be housed in the station. You still may have a need to stage an apparatus on the front apron.
Most stations designed as a drive-through that I have visited no longer function as such. The back of the stall has become the parking spot for another active company or medic unit, or a reserve apparatus, or rescue boat, or equipment trailer, or some other equipment needing to be sheltered that does not even belong to the fire department. 
It does not have to be equipment with wheels to negate a drive-through setup. The space behind an apparatus often becomes the storage spot for all that other “stuff” we seem to collect without having the slightest idea of where it is to be stored—everything from portable grills to training props.
Drive-through stations need a service hydrant at the rear apron. But, knowing that there are times when it will not function as a drive-through, consider putting a second hydrant on the front apron. Drive-through stations need hose bibs on the exterior at all four corners of the apparatus floor to ensure convenient access for a garden hose hookup to wash down apparatus after a run. 
In visiting stations I have yet to witness an apparatus return to the station via the rear apron, stop and discharge a firefighter for the sole purpose of making the exhaust hookup before entering the station. The exhaust hookup has always been completed after the apparatus has stopped at the “staged” position. Maybe it is because the hookup has been left dangling at the far end of the station. Not hooking up the exhaust negates the purpose of having the exhaust 50 percent of the time. On the other hand, I have witnessed a back-in station where the apparatus stopped short of the door, discharged a firefighter who retrieved the hookup dangling just inside the door placing it on the exhaust pipe before backing into the station was resumed. Maybe we need the manufacturers to provide hookups that automatically track to the rear of the station once that have disengaged from the apparatus.
Drive-through stations require interior bollards at the front bay doors.
All the surface area dedicated to apparatus movement required for a drive-through station compounds the issue of storm water runoff detention. 
Drive-through stations require twice as many apparatus bay doors. Maintenance issues are potentially doubled. Twice as many doors means twice the opportunity for air loss and a corresponding increase in apparatus floor heating cost.
Selecting a drive-through configuration means the loss of the back wall as a place for storage cabinet, racks, etc. and the possible location of some of the apparatus floor support rooms. This will compound getting all the support spaces you need along the two side walls. 
If you must have a drive-through station, strongly consider picking a site that will allow the apparatus floor to be turned parallel the street. This will cut down on the amount of pavement required to get the apparatus in and out of the station. Drive-through stations with the apparatus floor turned to be parallel the street have been constructed in Carrboro, North Carolina, and Columbus, Indiana, among other places."

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1820 on: July 14, 2017, 05:27:17 PM »
^^^^^^^ The "cons" in the above article certainly state many of the reasons why it would be a waste of money & space in a NYC FH.

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1821 on: July 15, 2017, 08:39:28 PM »
Mack Thanks as always for your diligent history posts...in regard to this photo from reply 1800 above i remember my Father telling me about when certain Pumpers responded to the Island they had to unbolt the front bumper to fit on the elevator....     https://postimg.org/image/hfphe20eh/

Online lucky

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1822 on: July 15, 2017, 10:42:12 PM »
The Ahrens Foxes that were assigned on multiple alarms to Welfare Island had special back steps that folded up to shorten their length in order to get into the elevator.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1823 on: July 15, 2017, 11:17:50 PM »
There were 5 Ahrens Fox pumpers fitted with hinged rear bumpers in 1941 to fit in the Queensboro Bridge elevator.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1824 on: July 16, 2017, 03:57:33 PM »
Mack Thanks as always for your diligent history posts...in regard to this photo from reply 1800 above i remember my Father telling me about when certain Pumpers responded to the Island they had to unbolt the front bumper to fit on the elevator....     https://postimg.org/image/hfphe20eh/

The Ahrens Fox pumpers modified with a folding rear step to fit in the Queensboro Bridge elevator in 1941 were:  E 23, E 65, E 74, E 21 and E 260.

     

     Ahrens Fox apparatus:  http://www.nyfd.com/calderoneA/foxes2.html

     Note:  These pumpers were about 27 ft long, about 6 ft longer than most FDNY pumpers, which was why the folding rear step was needed for the elevator.


An elevator was built in the "Elevator Storehouse" in 1919 next to the bridge.  It housed an elevator that transported cars and people from the Queensboro Bridge down to the present-day Tramway Plaza. There were traffic lights on the bridge to enable turns into Elevator Storehouse.  In addition, the Elevator Storehouse contained storage space and a reception ward for the island's Metropolitan Hospital. The building's main lobby was on its top floor, was nicknamed the "upside-down building" and was featured in Ripley's Believe It or Not for its peculiar design. With the opening of the Welfare Island Bridge, the Elevator Storehouse closed in 1955 and was demolished in 1970.

     

     

     

     Note:  a circular ramp to the top of the 130 ft Elevator Storehouse was planned but never constructed.


A trolley transported passengers from Manhattan and Queens to a stop at the Elevator Storehouse.  They could then descend to Welfare Island. 
 
     

     http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/qborobr.html

     Note:  the Welfare Island trolley was the last operating trolley in NYC and NY state:

         


Roosevelt Island Bridge - opened 1955 - between Astoria Queens and Welfare Island (now Roosevelt Island):

     https://newtownpentacle.com/tag/roosevelt-island-bridge/

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roosevelt_Island_Bridge


Engine 260 - 1st due Roosevelt Island:

     
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 05:12:38 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1825 on: July 16, 2017, 06:37:26 PM »
Engine 260 - 1st due engine - Roosevelt Island

     


Ladder 116 - 1st due ladder - Roosevelt Island:

     


Engine 261 was closed in 2003:

     https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170627/long-island-city/reopen-fdny-engine-company-261-dutch-kills

     http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/06/23/long-island-city-firehouse/

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1826 on: July 19, 2017, 10:23:59 PM »
Engine 228   Location 436 39th Street   Sunset Park, Brooklyn   Division 8, Battalion 40 

     Engine 28 BFD organized 945 4th Avenue                                 1890
     Engine 28 BFD new firehouse 436 39th Street                           1891
     Engine 28 BFD became Engine 28 FDNY                                    1898
     Engine 28 became Engine 128                                                 1899
     Engine 128 became Engine 228                                               1913
     Engine 228 moved to 4210 12th Avenue at Engine 282             1994
     Engine 228 returned 436 39th Street                                       1995
     Engine 228 moved to 4210 12th Avenue at Engine 282             1995             
     Engine 228 returned 436 39th Street                                       1996

     Battalion 40 organized 436 39th Street at Engine 128               1906
     Battalion 40 moved 5011 7th Avenue at Engine 278                  1917

     Purple K Unit 228 organized 436 39th Street at Engine 228        1995


Engine 28, Brooklyn Fire Department:

     

     


436 39th Street Firehouse:

     

     

     

     

     

     


     Note:  Engine 228's firehouse received Landmarks Preservation Commission status on July 19, 2013.  The Romanesque Revival style firehouse was designed by William Moran for the Brooklyn Fire Dept.


Engine 228 apparatus:

     

     

     

     


Engine 228 video:

     


Purple K 228:

     

     


Engine 228 members:

     1891

         

     1944

         

     2002

         

     2017

         


Engine 228 Medals:

     FF MICHAEL B DOREY  APR. 4, 1903  1904 BROOKLYN CITIZENS MEDAL

           

          FF DOREY 1907:
 
         


     LT JAMES SHERRY  OCT. 10, 1908  1909 BROOKLYN CITIZENS MEDAL

         

     FF EDWARD F. B MC CORMACK   MAY 4, 1909  1911 BROOKLYN CITIZENS MEDAL

         

     PROB FF JOHN J. B KUBINSKI   NOV. 25, 1958  1959 FDR MEDAL

         

     CAPT ROBERT J. B VERDONIK   JAN. 24, 1976 1977 BROOKLYN CITIZENS MEDAL


Engine 228 LODD:

     FF Joseph Kenavan, Box 5-1488-228, January 25, 1976  FF Kenavan was killed by a drunk driver while extinguishing a car fire.  Driver also injured other members of Engine 228.

     

     RIP.  Never forget.


Engine 228 (then Engine 128) 4th Alarm 1908 - first due:

   


Engine 228 1930:

     


Sunset Park, Brooklyn neighborhood:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunset_Park,_Brooklyn


Industry City (aka - Bush Terminal)

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industry_City


Bush Army Terminal World War II:

     http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/milrr/batbtww2repat.html

     http://openbuildings.com/buildings/bush-terminal-profile-34038


Bush Terminal Explosion and Fire - December 3, 1956 - 10 fatalities:

     https://www.flickr.com/photos/fdnyhome/sets/72157659609034583/











« Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 04:16:48 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1827 on: July 20, 2017, 08:15:04 AM »
"Brooklyn Pier Fire" or "Luckenbach Fire"  -   December 3, 1956  -  77-1499-66-44-36   -   Marginal & 35th Streets  - 1516 hrs - South Brooklyn - "Miracle on 35th Street"

Engine 228 was first due for a pier fire at the Bush Army Terminal in South Brooklyn.  While fighting a pier fire which was already a 5th alarm, a terrific explosion of stored explosives occurred resulting in 10 deaths and multiple injuries.  Amazingly, no firefighters were lost in the blast although the explosion happened - after the 5th alarm was transmitted - and while many firefighters were already operating.  Numerous additional fires, building collapses and medical emergencies were then received after the blast.  Rescue 2 provided life-saving first aid to many injured members.  Marine 1's website has an excellent WNYF summary of the pier fire and explosion "Miracle on 35th Street" (link below).

"Four minutes after the original alarm was transmitted, Act. Lieut. Al Kraemer, Eng. Co. 228, sent in the second. The third, fourth and fifth alarms were sent in at intervals of approximately seven minutes. Shortly after the fifth alarm was transmitted but before the fourth and fifth alarm assignments were in position — heavy traffic in the area slowed down their response — the blast occurred. Two Borough Calls were subsequently sent out."

"The first due unit, Eng. #228, had rolled onto the pier but were turned back by the heat and melting tar. Act­ing Lieutenant Al Kraemer sent the second alarm — one of the few times an acting officer had given such an order. This unit was operating on the north-side of the pier, opposite #278's posi­tion when IT happened. The blast rolled them all up a ball of arms and legs. Dom Proscia received a painful back injury. Out in front of the pier, MPO Frank Porcella started praying. He thought sure that his company had been wiped out. Joe Beetle thought his best bet would be to go overboard if it blew again."

"Lieutenant Robert E. Lindgren (note - father of one of our site members and later Captain Eng. 248 and BC 38th Bn) of Ladder Co. 101, detailed to Eng. 202, was running back to his Company (that is, 202) with Donald Holton with orders to stretch in when the blast caught them 25 feet up from Marginal Street. Both were thrown to the ground. He lost his boots, helmet and wrist watch. He got up and continued running through the debris raining down to the pumper further up 35th Street. Since he couldn't fit under the new cars parked about, the pumper was his best bet. He found that sev­eral firemen and five civilians had the same idea. Art Leavitt, 202's MPO was looking toward the pier for a sig­nal from Lt. Lindgren as the ball of fire rose high in the air and then seemed to boil over toward him. His first shocked conviction was that all the firemen on the pier roof had been killed. As debris began crashing down, he ducked under the pumper. Several days later when a WNYF representa­tive interviewed him, Leavitt still found it hard-to believe that no fire­men had been killed. "It's a miracle," he said."

"The waterfront area for blocks around the pier, after the blast re­minded many of a wartime bombing. Glass and debris cluttered the streets. Most of the windows in all buildings within three blocks of the pier were shattered. More than 250 civilians were injured and ten killed. It seemed that the firemen nearest the fire were in­side of the circle of destruction caused by flying debris. Heavy traffic in the area delayed the additional units—per­haps saving their lives. Both adjacent piers were shambles—doors on the pier to the north were blasted in and sev­eral small fires started. On the pier to the south where many spectators were injured, walls were blown in and roofs and skylights were lifted off. A pile of lumber blazed up and a-lighter caught fire and was set adrift. The freighter Greek Victory was tied up at the land end of the north side of the fire pier. Several small fires started aboard be­fore she was cut loose and maneuvered to safety. Her whistle blew con­tinuously adding to the general din of fire sirens and shouting spectators.

     Marine 1 website:  http://marine1fdny.com/miracle_35th_new.php  ("Miracle on 35th Street - Brooklyn Pier Fire")article from WNYF January 1957)

     Additional site:  http://theweeklynabe.com/2013/05/15/the-industry-city-brooklyn-fire-and-explosion-1956/

     FDNY site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/fdnyhome/sets/72157659609034583/


     
« Last Edit: July 22, 2017, 09:54:17 AM by mack »

Offline johnd248

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  • Aux. Lieut. at E. 248 1964-73
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1828 on: July 20, 2017, 03:00:28 PM »
I was playing some after school basketball in the gym of PS 249 on Caton Avenue; this was probably three to four miles from the blast and one of the gym windows blew out and into the gym.  Interestingly, Artie Leavitt, the MPO of E 202, went on the be a Lieutenant at Engine 248 just the way Bob Lindgren became the Captain of Engine 248 before going on as Battalion Chief in the 38 Battalion.

Strange how I can remember so much from 1956.

Offline raybrag

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses
« Reply #1829 on: July 20, 2017, 03:04:34 PM »
Like you, John, I can remember lots about 1956 (gee, Maureen Markey was cute).  Just don't ask me about yesterday.  :P
Ray Braguglia
Newport News VA