Author Topic: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop  (Read 158406 times)


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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #315 on: June 26, 2018, 08:26:41 PM »

Offline scoobyd

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #316 on: June 26, 2018, 08:30:23 PM »
When WCBS changed formats in the middle of the night, it was known for a while as....JACK!    No DJ's or on-air personalities, just music on shuffle.

Offline 68jk09

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #317 on: June 26, 2018, 08:51:10 PM »
Yes that was what it was called for a short period "JACK radio or music" it was switched over without ant explanation on a Saturday night( if i remember) & it SUCKED".....i had my the FM radio in my garage/workshop plugged into the light socket so as soon as the light was switched on the radio played until the light was shutoff when i left all the while playing 101.1......that night it changed i kept fooling with the tuner dial thinking it wandered off the station but no luck...the next day when i went into my neighborhood Deli that always played 101.1 the first thing the owner said to me was "what happened to 101.1 ? i can't get it" thats when i realized it was changed from the broadcast station....after a short period though this Jack radio announced it was going back to the old format with "some updates" ......that too basically sucks especially in more recent times when they have thrown in some rap crap.....there also was an AM station maybe 103 ? of low wattage that i could only pick up on the LIE when entering Nassau while heading out East in LIDville...that also has been gone for a few years now it is still on the air but no Doo Wops.

Offline 68jk09

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Offline mack

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #319 on: June 27, 2018, 08:18:49 AM »
Everyone had a small transistor radio - with a set of ear plugs.  Transistor radios were all made in Japan. They were cheap.  Used 9 volt batteries.  Had a cheap leather case.  Black in color.  And lasted until you dropped them 3 or 4 times.

Everyone usually were listening to "77 - WABC".  Sometimes the "WMCA Good Guys".  You could fall asleep at night with your radio sounds plugged in your ear.  Radio was primarily AM stations in the 1960s.  You could also listen to baseball, football, hockey and basketball games, too.  At night, you could get a broader range of stations from other cities, like Philadelphia.   

        http://www.musicradio77.com/WABCDJ.html

 


Offline memory master

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #320 on: June 27, 2018, 02:35:36 PM »
You could also listen to another NYC AM station for the "top 40." 1050 WMGM. I recall on-air personalities such as Jerry Marshall, Peter Tripp, Dean Hunter and Ted Brown was the "morning drive" guy. I don't recall if Ted Brown came over from WNEW 1130 or went to WNEW after WMGM became an "easy listening" station known as WHN 1050.

Offline manhattan

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #321 on: June 27, 2018, 10:26:15 PM »
You could also listen to another NYC AM station for the "top 40." 1050 WMGM. I recall on-air personalities such as Jerry Marshall, Peter Tripp, Dean Hunter and Ted Brown was the "morning drive" guy. I don't recall if Ted Brown came over from WNEW 1130 or went to WNEW after WMGM became an "easy listening" station known as WHN 1050.

Two questions: Didn't Ted Brown have a radio partner (maybe his wife) called "The Redhead"?  Was it Ted Brown who did a publicity stunt of living in, and broadcasting from, a station wagon hanging from a crane for a week or so at the Americana Hotel (today's Sheraton) construction site at Seventh Avenue and 52 Street around 1960?
« Last Edit: June 27, 2018, 10:28:08 PM by manhattan »

Offline memory master

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #322 on: June 28, 2018, 02:16:05 PM »
Yes, Ted Brown at one time had the "Red Head" as a partner. I believe it was his wife and that was on his WNEW days for a while. As far as the crane stunt, you got me there. I don't recall that. He used to end his morning show by saying, "Warm up the coffee mama, I'm comin' home."
« Last Edit: June 28, 2018, 02:18:24 PM by memory master »

Offline memory master

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #323 on: June 30, 2018, 08:00:57 AM »
Eugene Pitt, Lead Singer of the "Jive Five" passed away on June 29. The group had hits with "My True Story", "What Time Is It" and other songs in the doo-wop genre. The group started in the 50's singing on the corner of Myrtle Avenue & Hart Street in Brooklyn. I suppose E218 had many nights of harmony drifting into their quarters. I had the honor of meeting Eugene and the group at Westbury Music Fair in the late 80's when I worked, part-time, at the now defunct WGLI 1290 which was an oldies station. Rest in peace Eugene and thanks for the memories.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2018, 06:00:42 AM by memory master »

Offline guitarman314

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #324 on: July 01, 2018, 01:26:53 AM »
   I had the honor of playing behind Eugene Pitt and the Jive Five many times including concerts at Westbury Music Fair back in the 1980's. After one of the Dick Fox shows Eugene arranged for a jam session of performers from that show at a private home in East Meadow where we all sang and played until the following Sunday afternoon. His group's harmony was among the best in the circuit and they always shined bright during impromptu accapella singing sessions backstage.

Offline mack

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #325 on: July 01, 2018, 10:51:59 AM »
   I had the honor of playing behind Eugene Pitt and the Jive Five many times including concerts at Westbury Music Fair back in the 1980's. After one of the Dick Fox shows Eugene arranged for a jam session of performers from that show at a private home in East Meadow where we all sang and played until the following Sunday afternoon. His group's harmony was among the best in the circuit and they always shined bright during impromptu accapella singing sessions backstage.


"I'm a Happy Man":

     

Offline mack

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #326 on: July 01, 2018, 11:05:29 AM »
The Rivingtons were a 1960s doo-wop group, known for their 1962 hit novelty record "Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow". The members were lead vocalist Carl White (died January 7, 1980), tenor Al Frazier (d. November 13, 2005), baritone Sonny Harris, and bass singer Turner "Rocky" Wilson, Jr.. Frazier was replaced by Madero White for a period in the late 1970s.

The Rivingtons had originally been known as the Sharps and had had success in the charts with Thurston Harris's "Little Bitty Pretty One" in 1957. They then appeared on several Duane Eddy recordings whenever extraneous sounds of rebel yells were required, including Eddy's 1958 hit "Rebel Rouser".  They also recorded on Warner Brothers Records as The Crenshaws in 1961. Their first hit as the Rivingtons was "Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" in 1962. Like many such songs, it began with the bass chanting nonsense syllables (in this case the title), followed by the tenor singing over repetitions of it.  "Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow", an even more baroque rewrite of the theme, failed to sell, but they returned to the charts the following year with "The Bird's the Word". The B-side of "Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow" was "Waiting".

After their two hit singles, the Rivingtons struggled to hit the charts. However, "Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" and "The Bird's the Word" were revived in 1963, thanks to a Minnesota-based group called the Trashmen recording the "Surfin' Bird", made up from the Rivington's songs' nonsense syllables. The Trashmen made it in a record shop and passed it off as their own.  In fact, it was just a medley of the Rivington's choruses minus the verses. The Rivingtons' manager reported it to their lawyers, and the Trashmen were ordered to add the surnames of the Rivingtons to the credits. Because of the publicity in Billboard, the Trashmen had to share the writing credits on the recording and a later version as a sign of good faith. "Surfin' Bird" itself was revived in the 1970s by the Ramones and the Cramps.

The Rivingtons recorded several more songs in the 1960s, but their recording career ended after the Columbia single "A Rose Growing in the Ruins" failed to sell. They began performing live again in the 1970s, with Madero White replacing Al Frazier.

Carl White died of acute tonsillitis at age 47 in his Los Angeles home. Al Frazier, Sonny Harris and Rocky Wilson played the oldies circuit extensively throughout the 1980s, replacing White with Clay Hammond until 1987, then Andrew Butler into the 1990s. In 1989, the Rivingtons appeared in an episode of L.A. Law as a doo-wop group, "The Sensations". They were later featured in a 1990 episode of Night Court, "Razing Bull", as Mac's former group-mates "The Starlites".  - Wikipedia


The Rivingtons - "Papa Oom Mow Mow":

     


The Rivingtons "Bird the Word":
     
     



Beach Boys "Papa Oom Mow Mow":

     


McHales Navy"Papa Oom Mow Mow":

      



« Last Edit: July 01, 2018, 11:15:26 AM by mack »

Offline 68jk09

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #327 on: July 02, 2018, 01:55:43 AM »

Offline memory master

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #328 on: July 02, 2018, 06:34:52 AM »
Nice find Chief, thanks. If only.....

Offline nfd2004

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Re: The Ventures/Days of Doo Wop
« Reply #329 on: July 02, 2018, 08:17:50 AM »


 Once upon a Long Time Ago, we didn't walk out of our classrooms. We Pledge Allegiance to the Flag at the beginning of the day. We even said a morning prayer. We were taught how to add and subtract using our own minds. We learned what the Fourth of July was really all about.

 We respected adults and the police. We knew that if we didn't, we are probably in some big trouble.

 We rode our bikes. We played touch football and stick ball together. Some played hide and seek or hop scotch together. There were big Fourth of July parades as we celebrated Our Freedom.

 We had great family picnics and holidays together. We all went to our friends house to celebrate their birthdays together.

 During the summers my favorite day was Tuesday's. My father told me if I was good, he would bring me to the firehouse he worked at to pick up his paycheck. That was such a special treat for me because not only did I get to sit on the rigs, but he would also buy me a 10 cent soda from the soda machine on the apparatus floor. Then I'd sit at the kitchen table with some of the guys thinking that I was a Fireman (as they were called then) too.

 As us kids grew up sometimes we even sang together. Sometimes guys/gals went on to become well known Doo Wop singers as we view and remember those Greats here.

 If we got a part time job to earn some extra money in the neighborhood, we sure appreciated it.

 As a teenage kid I worked after school and on weekends as a clerk in a neighborhood drug store. I remember calling my adult neighbor by his first name (Sam) and my boss giving me the third degree that "I DO NOT Refer to adult customers in this store by their first name - it was ALWAYS Mr or Mrs".

 Many of us, now senior citizens, talk about how LUCKY we were to grow up in such a different time. We would do it all over again if given the chance.