Author Topic: OUR MILITARY.  (Read 178660 times)

Offline 68jk09

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #525 on: July 05, 2018, 08:08:50 AM »
FROM ANOTHER SITE AUTHORED BY A POSTER.....Media's self-importance never dies

An Associated Press photographer died. He was the fellow who took the picture of a fully armed paramilitary immigration enforcement officer taking a screaming child of six by force who was hiding with an adult in a closet, as the Clinton administration had no compunction about separating a Legal Immigrant from his family on American soil.

The Associated Press ran a 749-word obituary on the photographer, Alan Diaz. It was an interesting story -- AP hired him after he took the SWAT team-crying kid photo.

But the story was a bit much, and a reminder of the media's overblown sense of importance. The word iconic appeared four times.

Which brings me back to a story I shared with readers three years ago about Melvin Garten, a real hero. His death brought no AP obituary because he never got a byline.

I wrote this three years ago.

Toby Harnden, the Times of London reporter who has covered war with the troops and United States politics with equanimity, tweeted on May 6, 2015: "Trumpeter, food blogger, actress, golfer get New York Times obits today, but this man has his death notice paid for by family."

The man whose family had to pay for his obituary was Melvin Garten, the most decorated and forgotten soldier at the time of his death.

Let's fix that.

Heroes are born and made. Melvin Garten was born May 20, 1921 in New York City, where he became another smart Jewish boy attending City College of New York. Japan's sneak attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, greatly altered his immediate plans. Upon graduation from CCNY, he joined the Army and became a paratrooper. He then married his girlfriend, Ruth Engelman of the Bronx, in November 1942. She was a war bride. Everyone said the marriage wouldn't last, and they were right because the marriage ended on January 9, 2013 -- the day she died.

Melvin went off to the Pacific Theater of the war, where he participated in what can only be described as an audacious airborne raid of Los Banos in 1945, rescuing more than 2,000 U.S. and Allied civilians from a Japanese prison camp. He was a highly decorated soldier, earning the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, a Presidential Unit Citation and the Purple Heart with three Oak Leak Clusters for his wounds in battle. He was tough and handsome and courageous.

Ruth stayed home. She was a neophyte in the art of homemaking, and with him fighting overseas, she didn't get much chance to be a housewife. But Melvin eventually and luckily came home, and on October 29, 1946, she gave birth to the first of their two sons, Jeffrey. Four years later, son Allan followed.

As would war. At dawn on Sunday, June 25, 1950, with the permission of Stalin, the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel behind artillery fire. Melvin was back in combat. Captain Garten proved his mettle again as commander of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. President Eisenhower awarded him the Distinguished Service Cross.

The citation reads: "Captain Garten distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Surang-ni, Korea, on 30 October 1952. On that date, observing that assault elements of Companies F and G were pinned down by withering fire on a dominant hill feature, Captain Garten voluntarily proceeded alone up the rugged slope and, reaching the besieged troops, found that key personnel had been wounded and the unit was without command. Dominating the critical situation through sheer force of his heroic example, he rallied approximately eight men, assigned four light machine guns, distributed grenades and, employing the principle of fire and maneuver, stormed enemy trenches and bunkers with such tenacity that the foe was completely routed and the objective secured. Quickly readying defensive positions against imminent counterattack he directed and coordinated a holding action until reinforcements arrived. His inspirational leadership, unflinching courage under fire and valorous actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and are in keeping with the cherished traditions of the military service."

Back in the states, Ruth dealt with an infant and a toddler amid a crowd of wives of junior officers facing similar circumstances. They served as both mother and father, often moving to a new Army post with little if any help from their soldier husbands. In his 30 years in the service of our country, she made 30 moves -- six of them overseas. This difficult life is an American tradition as old as our nationhood. Ruth learned a lot as an Army wife. Her sons and her husband appreciated it -- as would the wives of the soldiers who later served under him.

Having served at Luzon and Pork Chop Hill, Captain Garten came home and the family moved around. Ruth took care of her men.

"I never even bought my own clothes," Melvin told Mike Francis of the Oregonian a few months before her death. "I never went shopping. It was not a part of my life. As an Army wife, she took care of those things."

Her sons Jeffrey, an economist, and Allan, a federal prosecutor, said their father was in charge when he was home. But Jeffrey told the Oregonian: "She is definitely the glue that held the family together. Wherever she was, that was our home."

Their sons were in their teens when the Vietnam War erupted. Melvin earned his Combat Infantry Badge for the third time -- perfect attendance as those men with that distinction of serving in those three wars called their service. The Army put him in command of the 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry in 1968 and he reinvigorated the unit, calling it the No Slack battalion. Just as he almost completed the turnaround, his jeep ran over a Vietcong mine, sending shrapnel to his leg and to his head. Another war, another Purple Heart, only this time it cost him his leg. The military sent him to Walter Reed to recuperate.

Ruth went alone, shielding her sons from the news, as they were in college. She wanted to see how he was. Melvin was in horrible condition. His head wound was more serious than their sons realized. For nearly a year, he worked to recover from the explosion. Melvin wanted to stay on active duty as a one-legged paratrooper. She supported his decision. They had to appear before a medical board. Ruth told the Oregonian, "When I got there, they wanted to know only one thing. 'Was he as difficult a man before was wounded as he is now?' one board member asked. 'No difference,' I answered. And he passed."

His assignment was as post commander of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, home of the Airborne and Special Operational Forces, a nod to his sterling and exemplary service under fire. Ruth relished the role of the post commander's wife, visiting with the Army wives each day, for a talk and drinks. As the colonel's wife, Ruth treated them as her daughters, dispensing advice and encouragement, one Army wife to another.

The first part of their marriage was about to end. He retired as the most decorated man in the Army at the time with the Distinguished Service Cross, four Silver Stars, five Bronze Stars, five Purple Hearts, two Legion of Merits, two Joint Service Commendations, a Combat Infantry Badge for each of three wars, and a Master Parachutist Badge with two combat jump stars. Melvin paid dearly for those awards, but so did Ruth. She was one of the few women to receive five telegrams over the years informing her that her husband was wounded in combat. And by few, I mean I do not know of another.

But his retirement in Florida began three wonderful decades for them. Their children were grown and they had each other. She was still a Mom. When her eldest son Jeffrey married Ina Rosenberg, she knew nothing about cooking. Ruth got her a subscription to the Time-Life cookbook series, which sent a new book every month. This fascinated Ina. Today, Ina Rosenberg Garten is better known as the "Barefoot Countessa" on the cooking show that bears that name on the Food Network.

In 2000, Ruth and Melvin moved to Oregon to live near Allan. Doctors diagnosed her as having Parkinson's. Mike Francis interviewed Melvin and their sons 11 months before her death. Melvin said, "All these things she put up with. All the things she did for the family. She kept our lives going for 70 years. And she's going downhill now."

Following her death on January 9, 2013, the family buried her in Arlington, where all our military heroes belong. He joined her there following his death on May 2, 2015.

Nycfire.net

Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #525 on: July 05, 2018, 08:08:50 AM »


Offline nfd2004

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #527 on: July 11, 2018, 07:59:28 AM »
 While stopping at one of my local Dunks (Dunkin Donuts) yesterday (7/10) for a quick "pick me up", I met a 94 year old U.S. Navy Vet of WWII.

 He was wearing his WWII cap so I started talking to him. He told me his entire family was in the military. Not only himself, but his two brothers, and his two sons, who are now 70 and 72 years old. All apparently doing well and also retired military members.

 He showed me his drivers license and he was born in 1924.

 He still drives a car and I asked him how often he comes to this Dunks. He told me every day he makes the rounds but he has about four or five that he regularly visits. Talking to that guy "made my day".

 When we left I was behind him a few cars back. I got to tell you, he puts most of us to shame with his driving ability.

 I sure hope I get to see him again. I'm going to send his picture that I took to a couple of guys here and maybe one of them can post it on here.

 What a Great Guy.

Offline grumpy grizzly

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #528 on: July 11, 2018, 10:07:44 AM »
Working for Enterprise Car rental I am all over Central Illinois. At a McDonalds outside of Champaign I have had the honor to meet one of the few survivors on the Indianapolis tragedy.
FAC 20 TASS 68-69 SVN. Hue/PhuBai , Boston Spark from 71-79, Chicago 79-15, Bloomington/Normal 2015- present

Offline mack

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #529 on: July 11, 2018, 04:20:38 PM »
While stopping at one of my local Dunks (Dunkin Donuts) yesterday (7/10) for a quick "pick me up", I met a 94 year old U.S. Navy Vet of WWII.

 He was wearing his WWII cap so I started talking to him. He told me his entire family was in the military. Not only himself, but his two brothers, and his two sons, who are now 70 and 72 years old. All apparently doing well and also retired military members.

 He showed me his drivers license and he was born in 1924.

 He still drives a car and I asked him how often he comes to this Dunks. He told me every day he makes the rounds but he has about four or five that he regularly visits. Talking to that guy "made my day".

 When we left I was behind him a few cars back. I got to tell you, he puts most of us to shame with his driving ability.

 I sure hope I get to see him again. I'm going to send his picture that I took to a couple of guys here and maybe one of them can post it on here.

 What a Great Guy.

A WWII veteran to salute:

     

Offline manhattan

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Offline manhattan

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #531 on: July 26, 2018, 01:30:14 AM »


Offline 68jk09

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #533 on: August 25, 2018, 12:33:08 AM »
CAMP LEJEUNE WATER ISSUES....   "CAMP LEJEUNE WATER CONTAMINATION PRESUMPTIVES

Effective 3/14/2017, the VA established presumptive service connection for diseases associated with exposure to contaminants in the water supply at Camp Lejeune.

The presumption of service connection applies to active duty, reserve and National Guard members who served at Camp Lejeune for a minimum of 30 days (cumulative) between August 1, 1953 and December 31, 1987, and are diagnosed with any of the following conditions:

adult leukemia
aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes
bladder cancer
kidney cancer
liver cancer
multiple myeloma
non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
Parkinson’s disease
In the early 1980’s, volatile organic compounds, trichloroethylene (TCE), a metal degreaser, and perchloroethylene (PCE), a dry cleaning agent, as well as benzene and vinyl chloride, were discovered in two on-base water supply systems at Camp Lejeune. The contaminated wells supplying the water systems were shut down in February 1985.

The area included in this presumption is all of Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River, including satellite camps and housing areas.

Our office can assist you with applying for this benefit, or any of the benefits listed on these pages. Please call us at 910-253-2233 to schedule an appointment."

Offline manhattan

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #534 on: August 25, 2018, 12:49:27 AM »
Thanks for posting this, Chief.  I'm passing it on to some people.

Offline mack

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #535 on: August 25, 2018, 12:54:23 AM »
CAMP LEJEUNE WATER ISSUES....   "CAMP LEJEUNE WATER CONTAMINATION PRESUMPTIVES

Effective 3/14/2017, the VA established presumptive service connection for diseases associated with exposure to contaminants in the water supply at Camp Lejeune.

The presumption of service connection applies to active duty, reserve and National Guard members who served at Camp Lejeune for a minimum of 30 days (cumulative) between August 1, 1953 and December 31, 1987, and are diagnosed with any of the following conditions:

adult leukemia
aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes
bladder cancer
kidney cancer
liver cancer
multiple myeloma
non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
Parkinson’s disease
In the early 1980’s, volatile organic compounds, trichloroethylene (TCE), a metal degreaser, and perchloroethylene (PCE), a dry cleaning agent, as well as benzene and vinyl chloride, were discovered in two on-base water supply systems at Camp Lejeune. The contaminated wells supplying the water systems were shut down in February 1985.

The area included in this presumption is all of Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River, including satellite camps and housing areas.

Our office can assist you with applying for this benefit, or any of the benefits listed on these pages. Please call us at 910-253-2233 to schedule an appointment."


Chief - thanks for posting. 

Marine veterans, and any other Service veterans, who were stationed at, trained at, went to school at Camp Lejeune in the 1950s/1960s/1970s/1980s who have any of the illnesses listed should contact the VA ASAP.

Offline manhattan

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #536 on: August 25, 2018, 09:55:39 PM »
United States Senator and Captain, U.S.N. (Ret.) John McCain has died.  The word "hero" is so often over-used that it has, in many cases, become trivialized.  John McCain, a man of honor, principle and integrity truly belongs among that honored pantheon.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2018, 10:02:27 PM by manhattan »

Offline nfd2004

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #537 on: August 25, 2018, 11:24:12 PM »
United States Senator and Captain, U.S.N. (Ret.) John McCain has died.  The word "hero" is so often over-used that it has, in many cases, become trivialized.  John McCain, a man of honor, principle and integrity truly belongs among that honored pantheon.

 In this video, a famous singer named Tony Orlando tells a story about Senator John McCain. Senator McCain suffered and was tortured as a POW during the height of the Viet Nam War.

 Tonight (8/25/18) Senator McCain is to be honored and remembered for his service to Our Country.

 Here is that video as Tony Orlando tells the story of his first introduction to then, POW John McCain, who was sitting in the front row for his performance.

  

Offline manhattan

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #538 on: August 26, 2018, 12:26:26 AM »
Thanks for posting that, Bill.  It's a wonderful tribute to an extraordinary gentleman, an American to be admired in the past, now and throughout the life of our Great Nation.

Offline 68jk09

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Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #539 on: September 08, 2018, 05:44:26 AM »
Rob O’Neill, the Navy SEAL who claims to have killed Osama Bin Laden, challenged President Barack Obama to say “radical Islam” on Friday.
Obama delivered a long rebuke of President Donald Trump in Illinois on Friday and specifically knocked the president for his reaction to the Charlottesville neo-Nazi marches last summer. (RELATED: Obama Hits Campaign Trail, Goes Off On Trump: ‘We Can’t Just Put Walls Up Around America)
“How hard can that be, saying that Nazis are bad?” Obama asked.
SEAL Team 6 member O’Neill shot back at the former president on Twitter, questioning when he would finally acknowledge the reality of radical Islamic terror. (RELATED: Former Obama State Dept Official Explains Why They Never Said ‘Radical Islam)
“Nazis are bad,” O’Neill wrote. “Now try saying, ‘Radical Islam.'” (Obama Refuses To Say Islamic Terrorism During Military Town Hall)