Author Topic: OUR MILITARY.  (Read 133245 times)

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2012, 08:27:50 PM »
VET DOGS......  http://www.vetdogs.org/

Nycfire.net

Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2012, 08:27:50 PM »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2012, 01:03:19 AM »
Our Honored War Dead-September October & November 2012-Honor & Remember
        November 2012 Heroes

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew G. Kantor, 22, of Gillette, N.J.
Staff Sgt. Dain T. Venne, 29, of Port Henry, N.Y.
Spc. Ryan P. Jayne, 22, of Campbell, N.Y.
Spc. Brett E. Gornewicz, 27, of Alden, N.Y.
Pfc. Brandon L. Buttry, 19, of Shenandoah, Iowa
Spc. Daniel L. Carlson, 21, of Running Springs, Calif.
Staff Sgt. Kenneth W. Bennett, 26, of Glendora, Calif.
Capt. James D. Nehl, 37, of Gardiner, Ore
Sgt. Matthew H. Stiltz, 26, of Spokane, Wash
Staff Sgt. Rayvon Battle Jr., 25, of Rocky Mount, N.C.
Sgt. Channing B. Hicks, 24, of Greer, S.C.
Spc. Joseph A. Richardson, 23, of Booneville, Ark
Lance Cpl. Dale W. Means, 23, of Jordan, Minn
Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin R. Ebbert, 32, of Arcata, Calif.
Cpl. Christopher M. Monahan Jr., 25, of Island Heights, N.J.

October 2012 Heroes

Sgt. Thomas J. Butler IV, 25, of Wilmington, N.C.
Sgt. Jeremy F. Hardison, 23, of Maysville, N.C.
Sgt. Donna R. Johnson, 29, of Raeford, N.C.
Sgt. 1st Class Aaron A. Henderson, 33, of Houlton, Maine
Sgt. Camella M. Steedley, 31, of San Diego, Calif
Warrant Officer Joseph L. Schiro, 27, of Coral Springs, Fla.
Staff Sgt. Justin C. Marquez, 25, of Aberdeen, N.C.
Sgt. Thomas R. Macpherson, 26, of Long Beach, Ca
Sgt. 1st Class Ryan J. Savard, 29, of Sierra Vista, Ariz
Cmdr. Joel Del Mundo Tiu, 49, of Manila, Philippines
Spc. Brittany B. Gordon, 24, of St. Petersburg, Fla
Sgt. Robert J. Billings, 30, of Clarksville, Va
Pfc. Shane G. Wilson, 20, of Kuna, Idaho
Chief Warrant Officer Michael S. Duskin, 42, of Orange Park, Fla
Staff Sgt. Kashif M. Memon, 31, of Houston, Texas
Sgt. Clinton K. Ruiz, 22, of Murrieta, Calif
Cpl. Alex F. Domion, 21, of Richfield Springs, N.Y

September 2012 Heroes

Spc. Kyle R. Rookey, 23, of Oswego, N.Y.
Staff Sgt. Jeremie S. Border, 28, of Mesquite, Texas
Staff Sgt. Jonathan P. Schmidt, 28, of Petersburg, Va.
Lance Cpl. Alec R. Terwiske, 21, of Dubois, Ind
Chief Warrant Officer 2 Jose L. Montenegro Jr., 31, of Houston, Texas
Chief Warrant Officer 2 Thalia S. Ramirez, 28, of San Antonio, Texas
Sgt. Kyle B. Osborn, 26, of Lafayette, Ind.
Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible, 40, of North Huntingdon, Pa.
Sgt. Bradley W. Atwell, 27, of Kokomo, Ind
Sgt. Sapuro B. Nena, 25, of Honolulu
Spc. Joshua N. Nelson, 22, Greenville, N.C.
Pfc. Genaro Bedoy, 20, of Amarillo, Texas
Pfc. Jon R. Townsend, 19, Claremore, Okla.
Sgt. Jason M. Swindle, 24, of Cabot, Ark
Gunners Mate 2nd Class Dion R. Roberts, 25, of North Chicago, Ill.
Staff Sgt. Orion N. Sparks, 29, of Tucson, Ariz.
Sgt. Jonathan A. Gollnitz, 28, of Lakehurst, N.J.
Sgt. 1st Class Riley G. Stephens, 39, of Tolar, Texas
Sgt. 1st Class Daniel T. Metcalfe, 29, of Liverpool, N.Y

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2012, 02:04:59 AM »
MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT PASSES TO A HIGHER LEVEL !
Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, the Senate's second-longest serving member, has died at age 88, his office announced.

He had served as chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, the Senate Commerce

Committee and was the first chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, according to his office.

Inouye earned the Medal of Honor for charging a series of machine gun nests in Italy during World War II.

From his Wikipedia
Military service (19411947)

Inouye was at the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941 as a medical volunteer.[6]

In 1943, when the U.S. Army dropped its ban on Japanese-Americans, Inouye curtailed his premedical studies at the University of Hawaii and enlisted in the Army.[6] He volunteered to be part of the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team.[7] This army unit was mostly made up of second-generation Japanese Americans from Hawaii and the mainland.[8]

Inouye was promoted to the rank of sergeant within his first year, and he was given the role of platoon leader. He served in Italy in 1944 during the Rome-Arno Campaign before his regiment was transferred to the Vosges Mountains region of France, where he spent two weeks in the battle to relieve the Lost Battalion, a battalion of the 141st Infantry Regiment that was surrounded by German forces. He was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant for his actions there. At one point while he was leading an attack, a shot struck him in the chest directly above his heart, but the bullet was stopped by the two silver dollars he happened to have stacked in his shirt pocket.[9] He continued to carry the coins throughout the war in his shirt pocket as good luck charms until he lost them shortly before the battle in which he lost his arm.[10]
Inouye as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Army

On April 21, 1945, Inouye was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily-defended ridge near San Terenzo in Tuscany, Italy called Colle Musatello. The ridge served as a strongpoint along the strip of German fortifications known as the Gothic Line, which represented the last and most dogged line of German defensive works in Italy. As he led his platoon in a flanking maneuver, three German machine guns opened fire from covered positions just 40 yards away, pinning his men to the ground. Inouye stood up to attack and was shot in the stomach; ignoring his wound, he proceeded to attack and destroy the first machine gun nest with hand grenades and fire from his Thompson submachine gun. After being informed of the severity of his wound by his platoon sergeant, he refused treatment and rallied his men for an attack on the second machine gun position, which he also successfully destroyed before collapsing from blood loss.

As his squad distracted the third machine gunner, Inouye crawled toward the final bunker, eventually drawing within 10 yards. As he raised himself up and cocked his arm to throw his last grenade into the fighting position, a German inside fired a rifle grenade that struck him on the right elbow, severing most of his arm and leaving his own primed grenade reflexively "clenched in a fist that suddenly didn't belong to me anymore".[11] Inouye's horrified soldiers moved to his aid, but he shouted for them to keep back out of fear his severed fist would involuntarily relax and drop the grenade. As the German inside the bunker reloaded his rifle, Inouye pried the live grenade from his useless right hand and transferred it to his left. As the German aimed his rifle to finish him off, Inouye tossed the grenade off-hand into the bunker and destroyed it. He stumbled to his feet and continued forward, silencing the last German resistance with a one-handed burst from his Thompson before being wounded in the leg and tumbling unconscious to the bottom of the ridge. When he awoke to see the concerned men of his platoon hovering over him, his only comment before being carried away was to gruffly order them to return to their positions, since, as he pointed out, "nobody called off the war!"[12]

The remainder of Inouye's mutilated right arm was later amputated at a field hospital without proper anesthesia, as he had been given too much morphine at an aid station and it was feared any more would lower his blood pressure enough to kill him.[13]

Although Inouye had lost his right arm, he remained in the military until 1947 and was honorably discharged with the rank of captain. At the time of his leaving of the Army, he was a recipient of the Bronze Star Medal and the Purple Heart. Inouye was initially awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his bravery in this action, with the award later being upgraded to the Medal of Honor by President Bill Clinton (alongside 19 other Nisei servicemen who served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and were believed to have been denied proper recognition of their bravery due to their race).[14]
REST IN PEACE SIR !

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #33 on: December 26, 2012, 05:51:43 PM »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #34 on: December 26, 2012, 07:05:17 PM »
Charles Durning RIP...... Military service

Durning served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Drafted at age 21, he was first assigned as a rifleman with the 398th Infantry Regiment, and later served overseas with the 3rd Army Support troops and the 386th Anti-aircraft Artillery (AAA) Battalion. For his valor and the wounds he received during the war, Durning was awarded the Silver Star and three Purple Heart medals.[1]

Durning participated in the Normandy Invasion of France on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and was among the first troops to land at Omaha Beach. In Episode S03E09 of the program Dinner for Five, which also included Burt Reynolds, Dom DeLuise and Charles Nelson Reilly), Reynolds spoke about Durning's service career for him, as Durning didn't like to talk about it much. Reynolds revealed that Durning was in a group of gliders who overshot their landing zone and that he had to fight alone all the way back to the beach. Reynolds also stated that his own father was there fighting about 15 yards away and that Durning was probably the most decorated veteran (then) still alive from World War II.[2] Some sources state that he was with the 1st Infantry Division at the time, but it is unclear if he served as a rifleman or as a member of one of the division's artillery battalions.[citation needed]

Durning was wounded by a German S Mine on June 15, 1944, at Les Mare des Mares, France. He was transported to the 24th Evacuation Hospital. By June 17 he was back in England at the 217th General Hospital. Although severely wounded by shrapnel in the left and right thighs, the right hand, the frontal region of the head, and the anterior left chest wall, Durning recovered quickly and was determined to be fit for duty on December 6, 1944. He arrived back at the front in time to take part in the Battle of the Bulge, the German counter-offensive through the Ardennes Forest of Belgium and Luxembourg in December 1944.[3][4]

After being wounded again, this time in the chest, Durning was repatriated to the United States. He remained in Army hospitals to receive treatment for wounds until being discharged with the rank of Private First Class on January 30, 1946.

He was nominated for an Emmy Award for his portrayal of a Marine veteran in "Call of Silence," an episode of the television series NCIS, first broadcast November 23, 2004. Drawing on his first-hand knowledge of the lingering effects of battle-induced stress, Durning's character turns himself in to authorities, insisting that he must be prosecuted for having murdered his buddy during ferocious combat on Iwo Jima six decades earlier.[5] The real truth of the incident only becomes known for certain when the guilt-stricken veteran goes through a cathartic reliving of the battlefield events.

Durning is well known for participating in various functions to honor American veterans. He was the chairman one year of the U.S. National Salute to Hospitalized Veterans.[6] He was an honored guest speaker at the National Memorial Day Concert for many years, televised by PBS every year on the Sunday evening of Memorial Day weekend.

In April 2008 Durning received the National Order of the Legion of Honor from the French consul in Los Angeles, awarded to those who served with distinction in France. During the ceremony, Durning spoke about his wartime experiences.[7]
   



Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5039
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #35 on: December 26, 2012, 07:43:03 PM »
No wonder they called them the Greatest Generation.

 Rest in Peace Charles Durning.

 My father, George Dennis, who passed away a few years ago was a Combat medic in WWll stationed somewhere in France. Like most, he never talked much about his time there. Except I remember he hated the cold. He told me how in a fox hole, with pine needles for bedding, his toes froze. Even though he became a career firefighter, he never liked the cold New England Winters.

  Recently a you friend of mine got discharged. He was also a Medic, but over in Afganstian. He spent two tours there. He is the son of a retired firefighter that I worked with. When he was young he wanted to be a firefighter. He still wants that job, and it is my hope that some lucky city will get young Tommy C jr as a firefighter in their city.

 

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #36 on: January 12, 2013, 01:15:00 AM »
I am standing at attention & rendering a salute......    http://news.yahoo.com/afghanistan-hero-gets-medal-honor-234245155--abc-news-politics.html

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2013, 04:17:29 PM »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2013, 09:29:13 PM »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #40 on: February 11, 2013, 07:22:24 PM »
US Army Medal Of Honor recipient.........   The citation reads:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3rd, 1863, has awarded in the name of Congress the Medal of Honor to Staff Sergeant Clinton L. Romesha, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
Staff Sergeant Clinton L. Romesha distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a Section Leader with Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, during combat operations against an armed enemy at Combat Outpost Keating, Kamdesh District, Nuristan Province, Afghanistan on October 3rd, 2009.
On that morning, Staff Sergeant Romesha and his comrades awakened to an attack by an estimated 300 enemy fighters occupying the high ground on all four sides of the complex, employing concentrated fire from recoilless rifles, rocket propelled grenades, anti-aircraft machine guns, mortars and small-arms fire. Staff Sergeant Romesha moved uncovered under intense enemy fire to conduct a reconnaissance of the battlefield and seek reinforcements from the barracks before returning to action with the support of an assistant gunner.
Staff Sergeant Romesha took out an enemy machine gun team, and, while engaging a second, the generator he was using for cover was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, inflicting him with shrapnel wounds. Undeterred by his injuries, Staff Sergeant Romesha continued to fight, and upon the arrival of another soldier to aid him and the assistant gunner, he again rushed through the exposed avenue to assemble additional soldiers.
Staff Sergeant Romesha then mobilized a five-man team and returned to the fight equipped with a sniper rifle. With complete disregard for his own safety, Staff Sergeant Romesha continually exposed himself to heavy enemy fire, as he moved confidently about the battlefield engaging and destroying multiple enemy targets, including three Taliban fighters who had breached the combat outpost's perimeter.
While orchestrating a successful plan to secure and reinforce key points of the battlefield, Staff Sergeant Romesha maintained radio communication with the tactical operations center. As the enemy forces attacked with even greater ferocity, unleashing a barrage of rocket-propelled grenades and recoilless rifle rounds, Staff Sergeant Romesha identified the point of attack and directed air support to destroy over 30 enemy fighters.
After receiving reports that seriously injured soldiers were at a distant battle position, Staff Sergeant Romesha and his team provided covering fire to allow the injured Soldiers to safely reach the aid station. Upon receipt of orders to proceed to the next objective, his team pushed forward 100 meters under overwhelming enemy fire to recover and prevent the enemy fighters from taking the bodies of their fallen comrades.
Staff Sergeant Romesha's heroic actions throughout the day-long battle were critical in suppressing an enemy that had far greater numbers. His extraordinary efforts gave Bravo Troop the opportunity to regroup, reorganize and prepare for the counterattack that allowed the Troop to account for its personnel and secure Combat Outpost Keating.
Staff Sergeant Romesha's discipline and extraordinary heroism above and beyond the call of duty reflect great credit upon himself, Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
 

Offline grumpy grizzly

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2913
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #41 on: February 11, 2013, 07:34:58 PM »
Where do we find those who think of their country before themselves. Not a 18 year old who can dunk a basketball but do nothing else, yet many praise his actions. Those who have met the evil eye do not shy from it, they become strong with resolve and will triumph. Thanx for all the MEN and WOMEN who sacrafice their future plans for our present plans. GG
FAC 20 TASS 68-69 SVN. Hue/PhuBai , Boston Spark from 71-79, Chicago 79-15, Bloomington/Normal 2015- present

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #42 on: February 19, 2013, 11:12:32 PM »
HONOR & REMEMBER ..............................

Lest We Forget

January 2013 Heroes

Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman, 28, of Chester, Va.
Sgt. David J. Chambers, 25, of Hampton, Va.
Sgt. Mark H. Schoonhoven, 38, of Plainwell, Mich.

December 2012 Heroes

Lance Cpl. Anthony J. Denier, 26, of Mechanicville, N.Y.
Sgt. 1st Class. Darren M. Linde, 41, of Sidney, Mont.
Spc. Tyler J. Orgaard, 20, of Bismarck, N.D.
Petty Officer 1st Class Nicolas D. Checque, 28, of Monroeville, Pa
Staff Sgt. Wesley R. Williams, 25, of New Carlisle, Ohio
Staff Sgt. Nelson D. Trent, 37, of Austin, Texas
Staff Sgt. Nicholas J. Reid, 26, of Rochester, N.Y.
Sgt. 1st Class Kevin E. Lipari, 39, of Baldwin, N.Y.
Cdr. Job W. Price, 42, of Pottstown, Pa
Sgt. Enrique Mondragon, 23, of The Colony, Texas
Pfc. Markie T. Sims, 20, of Citra, Fl

November 2012 Heroes

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew G. Kantor, 22, of Gillette, N.J.
Staff Sgt. Dain T. Venne, 29, of Port Henry, N.Y.
Spc. Ryan P. Jayne, 22, of Campbell, N.Y.
Spc. Brett E. Gornewicz, 27, of Alden, N.Y.
Pfc. Brandon L. Buttry, 19, of Shenandoah, Iowa
Spc. Daniel L. Carlson, 21, of Running Springs, Calif.
Staff Sgt. Kenneth W. Bennett, 26, of Glendora, Calif.
Capt. James D. Nehl, 37, of Gardiner, Ore
Sgt. Matthew H. Stiltz, 26, of Spokane, Wash
Staff Sgt. Rayvon Battle Jr., 25, of Rocky Mount, N.C.
Sgt. Channing B. Hicks, 24, of Greer, S.C.
Spc. Joseph A. Richardson, 23, of Booneville, Ark
Lance Cpl. Dale W. Means, 23, of Jordan, Minn
Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin R. Ebbert, 32, of Arcata, Calif.
Cpl. Christopher M. Monahan Jr., 25, of Island Heights, N.J.

October 2012 Heroes

Sgt. Thomas J. Butler IV, 25, of Wilmington, N.C.
Sgt. Jeremy F. Hardison, 23, of Maysville, N.C.
Sgt. Donna R. Johnson, 29, of Raeford, N.C.
Sgt. 1st Class Aaron A. Henderson, 33, of Houlton, Maine
Sgt. Camella M. Steedley, 31, of San Diego, Calif
Warrant Officer Joseph L. Schiro, 27, of Coral Springs, Fla.
Staff Sgt. Justin C. Marquez, 25, of Aberdeen, N.C.
Sgt. Thomas R. Macpherson, 26, of Long Beach, Ca
Sgt. 1st Class Ryan J. Savard, 29, of Sierra Vista, Ariz
Cmdr. Joel Del Mundo Tiu, 49, of Manila, Philippines
Spc. Brittany B. Gordon, 24, of St. Petersburg, Fla
Sgt. Robert J. Billings, 30, of Clarksville, Va
Pfc. Shane G. Wilson, 20, of Kuna, Idaho
Chief Warrant Officer Michael S. Duskin, 42, of Orange Park, Fla
Staff Sgt. Kashif M. Memon, 31, of Houston, Texas
Sgt. Clinton K. Ruiz, 22, of Murrieta, Calif
Cpl. Alex F. Domion, 21, of Richfield Springs, N.Y
RESPECT DUE !

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #43 on: February 27, 2013, 10:25:34 PM »
ANGEL FLIGHT.....Bless them all ! 

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10825
  • Gender: Male
Re: OUR MILITARY.
« Reply #44 on: March 09, 2013, 03:34:28 AM »
Cutbacks in Education benefits to those serving......a total disgrace.....maybe this is part of his plan to water down the American Military....... http://www.stripes.com/news/army-suspend....troops-1.210999

 

anything