Author Topic: My younger Buff years  (Read 480841 times)

Offline mack

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1725 on: February 17, 2019, 11:25:12 PM »
Additional audios from War Years - heavy fire activity in Brooklyn:

     

Nycfire.net

Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1725 on: February 17, 2019, 11:25:12 PM »

Offline manhattan

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1726 on: February 18, 2019, 12:42:08 AM »
Great, Mack - thank you.

Offline nfd2004

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1727 on: March 03, 2019, 09:31:49 AM »
 I received this story from a Retired FDNY Member named Dan P., I think his user name here is "JohnnyGage". Some of the guys on this site have met Dan. I think he worked Ladder 112, Ladder 31, Ladder 38 and Ladder 5. I first met him at the Rock when he was the chaffer of Ladder 5, a long time ago.

 Anyway, here is the story that I thought other members of this site might be interested in reading too.

 ### Quote ###:
 "I recall one time going into work with Jack (I'm not sure the Jack he may be referring to). Must have been a weekend and company drill day. But what a day this would be. We took both rigs across 169th St to Tiffany Street where there was the usual 6 story vacant. The engine hooks up to the hydrant and the boss comes over and tells me to get up on the deck gun. I recall the hose cover being messed up. The MPO shows me how to maneuver the deck gun. He then opens up the deck gun and tells me to just keep shooting the stream into the various windows of "imaginary fire".

 "Now I must digress here. Back on Long Island, I was a young junior fireman for my local community. We were never allowed to climb on the apparatus, unless maybe, filling a booster tank, much less touch any equipment on the apparatus. For drill night we were going to do some real firefighting tactics. We were allowed to stretch two lengths of 1 1/2" from a parking lot fire hydrant, fully geared up, under strict supervision. We positioned ourselves behind the nozzleman who was given strict orders to open and close the nozzle s l o w e l y. We made sure our foot positioning was correct in order to take off the pressure. The third man maintaining the line. When the nozzleman moves this way, you move that way etc, etc. You know what I mean. We made sure all movement was performed like a well rehearsed play. We felt like Real Firefighters. This was serious business. All with 60 psi from the hydrant, some hose and water. Anyway, we had fun.

 So back to that day. Prior to going to that drill the engine was going to flush out quarters. The housewatch man grabs two lengths of 1 1/2", hooks up to the hydrant in front of quarters, washes down the back of the apparatus floor. I'm amazed that he is doing this by himself without any backup - crazy ! Only then he gives me the knob. And by myself, I'm thinking this is unheard of. I need a backup, strict supervision and a third guy. This is serious S###. He tells me, "you got it kid" and walks off to do something else. I flushed the front half of the apparatus floor and sidewalk with an open bore nozzle in glory. Wait until I tell my junior firefighting colleagues. I was in Heaven. The next surprise was at the drill site and deck gun. What a surprise".
 ### End of Quote ###.

 Thanks Dan, aka JohnnyGage, for that story. What a different time it was. Any young guy who had any interest in the fire dept., the FDNY was the place to be. I can certainly relate also. From the FIRST story I told on this thread of celebrating my 21st birthday with my buff buddy, Timmy, who has since passed away.

 We both later became firefighters in Connecticut. Without a doubt from our earliest years of buffing until our retirement, the FDNY taught us all so much. Maybe its because then the FDNY was so good to us and wasn't afraid to let us get involved. From my first day back in 1968 of riding with Rescue 2 and seeing how those guys worked, I believe had a HUGE Impact on guys like myself. We got an education you just couldn't get from reading a book.

 There's a lot of friends I have who would readily say the same thing. The FDNY taught them all so much. Many became high ranking officers and taught the younger members what they had the chance to learn themselves.

 But it all began with the FDNY. I think it's safe to say that perhaps THREE GENERATIONS of Firefighters have learned because of the workings of guys like the one that let Dan P, aka "JohnnyGage", use the deck gun and operate a hose line.

 To this day, some 30, 40 or 50 years later, we all still talk about it and how grateful we are that we had a chance to be a part of it.

 THANK YOU to the Members of the FDNY who taught us all so much. Most of us never realized at the time of how it would affect our entire lives.   

 
« Last Edit: March 03, 2019, 09:34:53 AM by nfd2004 »

Offline manhattan

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1728 on: March 04, 2019, 12:23:47 AM »
"Most of us never realized at the time of how it would affect our entire lives."  Bravo.  Well said, Bill.

Offline 1261Truckie

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1729 on: March 04, 2019, 02:09:50 AM »
A lot of life was lived during those years, a lot of lessons were taught and a lot of lessons were learned. My sincere thanks to the members of this site who share their stories, share their memories and keep the history of that era alive.

Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1730 on: March 04, 2019, 07:43:27 AM »
I received this story from a Retired FDNY Member named Dan P., I think his user name here is "JohnnyGage". Some of the guys on this site have met Dan. I think he worked Ladder 112, Ladder 31, Ladder 38 and Ladder 5. I first met him at the Rock when he was the chaffer of Ladder 5, a long time ago.

 Anyway, here is the story that I thought other members of this site might be interested in reading too.

 ### Quote ###:
 "I recall one time going into work with Jack (I'm not sure the Jack he may be referring to). Must have been a weekend and company drill day. But what a day this would be. We took both rigs across 169th St to Tiffany Street where there was the usual 6 story vacant. The engine hooks up to the hydrant and the boss comes over and tells me to get up on the deck gun. I recall the hose cover being messed up. The MPO shows me how to maneuver the deck gun. He then opens up the deck gun and tells me to just keep shooting the stream into the various windows of "imaginary fire".

 "Now I must digress here. Back on Long Island, I was a young junior fireman for my local community. We were never allowed to climb on the apparatus, unless maybe, filling a booster tank, much less touch any equipment on the apparatus. For drill night we were going to do some real firefighting tactics. We were allowed to stretch two lengths of 1 1/2" from a parking lot fire hydrant, fully geared up, under strict supervision. We positioned ourselves behind the nozzleman who was given strict orders to open and close the nozzle s l o w e l y. We made sure our foot positioning was correct in order to take off the pressure. The third man maintaining the line. When the nozzleman moves this way, you move that way etc, etc. You know what I mean. We made sure all movement was performed like a well rehearsed play. We felt like Real Firefighters. This was serious business. All with 60 psi from the hydrant, some hose and water. Anyway, we had fun.

 So back to that day. Prior to going to that drill the engine was going to flush out quarters. The housewatch man grabs two lengths of 1 1/2", hooks up to the hydrant in front of quarters, washes down the back of the apparatus floor. I'm amazed that he is doing this by himself without any backup - crazy ! Only then he gives me the knob. And by myself, I'm thinking this is unheard of. I need a backup, strict supervision and a third guy. This is serious S###. He tells me, "you got it kid" and walks off to do something else. I flushed the front half of the apparatus floor and sidewalk with an open bore nozzle in glory. Wait until I tell my junior firefighting colleagues. I was in Heaven. The next surprise was at the drill site and deck gun. What a surprise".
 ### End of Quote ###.

 Thanks Dan, aka JohnnyGage, for that story. What a different time it was. Any young guy who had any interest in the fire dept., the FDNY was the place to be. I can certainly relate also. From the FIRST story I told on this thread of celebrating my 21st birthday with my buff buddy, Timmy, who has since passed away.

 We both later became firefighters in Connecticut. Without a doubt from our earliest years of buffing until our retirement, the FDNY taught us all so much. Maybe its because then the FDNY was so good to us and wasn't afraid to let us get involved. From my first day back in 1968 of riding with Rescue 2 and seeing how those guys worked, I believe had a HUGE Impact on guys like myself. We got an education you just couldn't get from reading a book.

 There's a lot of friends I have who would readily say the same thing. The FDNY taught them all so much. Many became high ranking officers and taught the younger members what they had the chance to learn themselves.

 But it all began with the FDNY. I think it's safe to say that perhaps THREE GENERATIONS of Firefighters have learned because of the workings of guys like the one that let Dan P, aka "JohnnyGage", use the deck gun and operate a hose line.

 To this day, some 30, 40 or 50 years later, we all still talk about it and how grateful we are that we had a chance to be a part of it.

 THANK YOU to the Members of the FDNY who taught us all so much. Most of us never realized at the time of how it would affect our entire lives.


Thanks Willy for sharing my recollection. This is my first post on your wonderful, insightful and informative network. Let me first say how appreciative I am of the abundance of history of the FDNY that is shared with many viewers. I am glad to be aboard! To fill you in on the above story, I was referring to my "Uncle" Jack Mayne, a fireman with L 31.  This was the recollection of a 14 year old teen who would spend a day tour with Jack on Intervale Av during the summer months and other school recesses. The rig I was referring to was E 82's 71 Mack  that "mack" posted a photo of in another thread.
I had a wonderful career with the companies you mention above. I started my career in E 88 working with the legendary Captain "Tough" Timmy Gallagher and now Lt Jack Mayne who was now in L 38. A few years later I crossed the floor and got to work with Jack, even had the pleasure to drive him! How about that dream come true! I retired from L 31 due to circumstances beyond my control, but another dream come true as to have had the honor to work in such historic firehouse. Sadly Uncle Jack is gone, so is Tough Timmy, but I will promise to post some new additions and fond memories of these war heroes, and a couple of others that I had the pleasure and good fortune to work with.

« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 07:26:26 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline nfd2004

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1731 on: March 04, 2019, 08:29:59 AM »
 Dan, aka "JohnnyGage", I am glad that you have officially joined us.

 On a side note here - in the "News of Members" (News and Events Section), on page 51 - reply #758, there is a video posted, along with a brief story about Dan, aka "JohnnyGage".

 http://nycfire.net/forums/index.php/topic,26011.msg163248.html#msg163248 
« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 08:31:57 AM by nfd2004 »

Offline 1261Truckie

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1732 on: March 04, 2019, 09:37:02 AM »
Dan/Johnny Gage,
Welcome to this site. Enjoy and have fun. Looking forward to your stories
Jim (aka 1261truckie)

Offline mack

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1733 on: March 04, 2019, 09:37:29 AM »
Dan, aka "JohnnyGage", I am glad that you have officially joined us.

 On a side note here - in the "News of Members" (News and Events Section), on page 51 - reply #758, there is a video posted, along with a brief story about Dan, aka "JohnnyGage".

 http://nycfire.net/forums/index.php/topic,26011.msg163248.html#msg163248

Thank you Dan.

     

Online mikeindabronx

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1734 on: March 04, 2019, 09:58:01 AM »
"JohnnyGage" welcome

Offline johnd248

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1735 on: March 04, 2019, 10:15:58 AM »
Johnny Gage: please remember that Willy D's "younger buff years" were back when they had horses.

Offline manhattan

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1736 on: March 04, 2019, 12:45:47 PM »
Welcome aboard, Dan/Johnny Gage.  Glad you've joined us.

Offline fdce54

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1737 on: March 04, 2019, 01:46:16 PM »
Welcome to the site, Dan. Willie D is the enforcer on the site so don't get on his bad side.

Offline raybrag

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1738 on: March 04, 2019, 02:20:13 PM »
Welcome to the site, Dan.  I agree with Frank (fdce54) about Willie . . . but you can usually scratch his itches with a couple of Big Macs. And I think John(d248) is wrong . . . they hadn't discovered horses when Willy retired.  Here's a photo of him about 5 years before he retired, along with his company's newest apparatus . . .


Ray Braguglia
Newport News VA


Offline 68jk09

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Re: My younger Buff years
« Reply #1739 on: March 04, 2019, 06:27:02 PM »
Welcome aboard Dan.