Author Topic: FLY CARS.  (Read 8772 times)

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10680
  • Gender: Male
FLY CARS.
« on: February 05, 2017, 10:10:43 PM »

wsj.com
In Bronx, ‘Fly Cars’ Aim to Speed Up Emergency Care

Thomas MacMillan
Feb. 4, 2017 9:00 a.m. ET
By the end of an eight-hour shift in the Bronx, paramedic Barbara Aziz had treated a man who had broken his leg falling from a building, revived another man who stopped breathing after a heroin overdose and cradled a moments-old baby girl born unexpectedly in a public-housing apartment.

Ms. Aziz and her partner had responded to 13 emergency calls—two to three times more than a typical paramedic crew in the Bronx. The reason: She was behind the wheel of a “fly car,” not an ambulance.

Ms. Aziz’s red Ford Explorer is one of 10 specially equipped sport-utility vehicles that rolled out last year in the Bronx as part of a pilot program designed to improved emergency response in the New York City borough with the most medical calls per person in the past year.

The fly cars allow paramedics, the most highly trained first responders in emergency medical services, to respond to priority calls without taking patients to the hospital. That task, which Ms. Aziz estimates can take paramedics away from responding to calls for at least an hour, is handled by ambulances that respond along with the fly cars.

The Fire Department of New York had a record number of medical calls last year. The fly cars are a response to that increase as fire departments nationwide play a bigger role in emergency medical care.

New York City firefighters and emergency medical staff members together responded to 1.44 million medical emergencies last year, up from 1.03 million in 1996, according to department statistics.

The city has added $40 million for more ambulance shifts over the past two years and lowered the average response time for medical calls by 21 seconds since 2015, according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

The fly car program came out of a steering group that Fire Commissioner Dan Nigro put together to look at innovations in emergency medical services, said Ed Dolan, FDNY’s deputy commissioner for strategy and policy.

Along with the fly cars, the department created a five-ambulance “tactical response group” in the Bronx that can be deployed wherever needed, rather than being assigned to a specific geographic area like other ambulances.

New York is also testing a computerized triage system for 911 dispatchers, to replace a set of flip cards now used to prioritize medical calls. The system, expected to be fully implemented this spring, will allow for better data collection so that the department can determine, for instance, which questions being asked by dispatchers are wasting precious seconds and which are eliciting needed information.

“What we’re finding is that response times have improved more in the Bronx than any other borough,” said Mr. Dolan.

Ms. Aziz, the paramedic who is also a supervisor, said she thinks the tactical response group, more than the fly cars, are responsible for the faster response times. But the fly cars are allowing her and other paramedics to respond to more calls, she said.

During her 13-call shift, she had to help transport patients to the hospital only twice.

“The good thing is, if we’re not needed, we don’t have to hang out there,” she said. “The [ambulance] can take the patient and we can be available for the next call.”

Nycfire.net

FLY CARS.
« on: February 05, 2017, 10:10:43 PM »

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2281
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2017, 03:58:28 AM »
And guess what....she doesn't say how often the they have to wait for a bus to transport the patient due to the fact that there are none available. Strange how Metro-Tech forgets that equation. All smoke and mirrors.

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10680
  • Gender: Male
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2017, 04:52:26 AM »
And guess what....she doesn't say how often the they have to wait for a bus to transport the patient due to the fact that there are none available. Strange how Metro-Tech forgets that equation. All smoke and mirrors.
Yes & like back when transporting on a Rig in the hose bed or stopping a gypsy cab for transport  after agreement w/the patient & or family  is now forbidden.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2017, 04:56:40 AM by 68jk09 »

Offline FDNY793727

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 812
  • Gender: Male
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2017, 04:42:16 PM »
Not to mention how often they get tied up doing roles as supervisors as well. While this may be helping a little bit, it's not really a solution.

Offline baileyjeff

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 462
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2017, 12:48:34 PM »
When a fly car is dispatched to an assignment they are dispatched with a BLS ambulance who can transport.

Offline lucky

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 309
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2017, 03:31:32 PM »
Can a paramedic turn over patient care to an EMT? Is that a lower level of care?

Offline baileyjeff

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 462
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2017, 03:38:44 PM »
Yes, after ALS evaluates the patient they can turn the patient over to a EMT.

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10680
  • Gender: Male

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2281
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2017, 06:20:52 AM »
I recall when he was the Staff Chief in charge of EMS at the time of the merge he came to the Elmhurst station to ride a bus as an observer. This latest press release is more smoke and mirrors as usual. jmho

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10680
  • Gender: Male
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2017, 06:59:05 AM »
The "smoke & mirrors" is overwhelming at times.

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1677
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2017, 12:37:39 PM »
That's the whole point of smoke and mirrors: get people so confused and frustrated that they'll stop asking pertinent questions and trying to find out what's being hidden and who's coming out ahead on the deal.

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10680
  • Gender: Male
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2017, 06:37:17 PM »
And how many NYC Fire Alarm Boxes still do not work?

Offline LoadingUptheBox

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 153
  • Gender: Male
  • Thank a Vollie, Support a Vollie, Be a Vollie!
    • Rick Charles Photogrpahy | Polaris Imagery
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2017, 08:48:03 PM »
Call it whatever you want at least they are trying to be innovative.  Rapid access to patients by a Medic car may be they difference between life and death even if a BLS bus is still 15 minutes away. Reversing Heroin ODs and identifying STEMIs are perfect examples.  With all the baby boomers retiring the EMS demands on the system are only going to go up. I applaud them to try to deal with rise in call volume and identify what works.
Raised in the Upper West Side (near E76/TL22); Hopeless FDNY Buff/Photographer; 12-year USAF Vet; Member, Chancellor Vol. Fire-Rescue, Spotsylvania County, VA (cvfr.net) and Richmond (VA) Vol Rescue Squad

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2281
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2017, 05:54:05 AM »
75VA I totally agree with the idea. However, this concept was tried many years ago and on the surface it looks great but when you get down to the 'inner workings' and the operational side it's not what it appears to be. That's why it didn't last in the previous attempt. I can only hope that they fine tuned the plan and learned from the past.

Offline scoobyd

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 291
Re: FLY CARS.
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2017, 12:08:48 PM »
The real problem in NYC is that about 95% of medical calls do not require the emergency response of a trained professional.  For the engines in the CFR program, the number is about 99%.  Highly trained and motivated people break down after a while, because they are doing a relentless amount of pointless work.  Top performers in any field need to feel a sense of personal gratification. 

 

anything