Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 161362 times)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1080 on: May 04, 2019, 09:53:36 AM »
Does anyone know where the Sealtest  plant shown in the 1st photo was. There was a Sealtest facility on Atlantic avenue just west of the Van Wyck Expwy. but it doesn't look like the area. Just curious.



Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1080 on: May 04, 2019, 09:53:36 AM »

Offline nfd2004

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1081 on: May 04, 2019, 11:48:59 AM »
Great stuff "mack", your research is outstanding!

 "mack", I am quite sure that "JohnnyGage" isn't the only one that feels your research is outstanding.

 You started this thread on December 31, 2017, as a follow up to your original FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies. That original Firehouse thread has hit well "over" - ONE MILLION Views. Nothing else compares.

 It has been mentioned before that your work and dedication to this topic needs to be preserved within the history of the FDNY. For now and for the future generations to see. These stories are talked about today and will be talked about tomorrow. By not only Active and Retired Firefighters of New York City, but perhaps firefighters across the World. As well as buffs and historians who are also interested in the history of the largest fire department in this country.

 This newer addition called: "FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section", has already reached well "over" 100,000 views in less than one year and a half. Even the name adding the words "2nd Section" fits in well as the FDNY once had fire companies that were referred to as "the 2nd Section".

 We THANK YOU "mack" for all the work you have put into this for us.

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1082 on: May 04, 2019, 05:19:38 PM »
^^^^^ Yes Thank You mack....tremendous research compiled into your posts...keep them coming...i hope there is a way to log these into something to keep for generations to come.

Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1083 on: May 04, 2019, 06:35:30 PM »
Mack, as I have said before, your research and historical data is amazing, your contributions to this network are incredible...the bee's knee's, the cat's meow... I always look forward to your post as I know I will learn something new. Thanks for all that you do, I appreciate your efforts!
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 07:57:01 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1084 on: May 06, 2019, 07:31:50 PM »
Engine 42 firehouse 1781 Monroe Avenue  Mt. Hope, Bronx  Division 7, Battalion 19 “No Truck”  “Da OK Corral”

     Engine 42 organized 1192 Fulton Avenue former volunteer firehouse     1874
     Engine 42 moved to 1180 Fulton Avenue                                             1891
     Engine 42 new firehouse 1192 Fulton Avenue                                      1892
     Engine 42 new firehouse 1781 Monroe Avenue                                    1915

     Ladder 56 organized 1781 Monroe Avenue at Engine 42                       1968
     Ladder 56 moved to 2417 Webster Avenue with Engine 48                   1981

     Battalion 17 located at 1781 Monroe Avenue at Engine 42             1904-1905

     Tower Ladder 44 located at 1781 Monroe Avenue at Engine 42       1997-1998


Pre-FDNY:

     Lady Washington Engine Company 1 was a volunteer company located at 1192 Fulton Avenue where Engine 42 was originally organized. The volunteer company used a hand-drawn and hand-power engine named the "White Ghost" which was painted on front of carriage. "Morrisania Exempts" and "Organized June 7, 1875" were painted on the sides and on back of the pumper. The pumper also had wheels with copper hub bands and iron tires; body painted white; running gear painted maroon striped gold and black; a hinged hand pole; hose; nozzles; and ropes. The pumper was built in 1851 and used by the Lady Washington Engine Company 1 until 1874, when Morrisania was annexed to New York City and Engine 42 was organized in their firehouse.

     Lady Washington Engine Company 1:
     
         

         


1781 Monroe Avenue firehouse:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     

     

     

     
« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 04:05:11 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1085 on: May 06, 2019, 07:32:48 PM »
Engine 42 (continued)


Engine 42:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 42 members:

     


Engine 42 helps FDNY candidates - January 2019:

     

     
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 07:45:44 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1086 on: May 06, 2019, 07:33:20 PM »
Engine 42 (continued)


Engine 42:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1087 on: May 06, 2019, 07:35:59 PM »
Engine 42 (continued)


Engine 42 1st due - El Hoyo Social Club Fire - August 8, 1988:

     

     DIVISION 7 TRAINING AND SAFETY NEWSLETTER - FEBRUARY 2017 - 1748-54 JEROME AVENUE, BRONX, N.Y. (CORNER OF EAST 175 ST.)
 
     On August 21, 1988, the weather was warm and sunny.  In the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) in the Bronx, routine tasks were being conducted and Multi-Unit Drills were taking place.   

     At 1748 Jerome Avenue in the Bronx, a single story taxpayer stood at the corner of E. 175 Street.  The building was 50 feet x 100 feet.  The building contained six stores, four fronting on Jerome Avenue, and two fronting on East 175 Street.  In the cellar of this building, there was an illegal social club called “El Hoyo” (aka:  “The Cave” or “The Hole”).  The only entrance to this illegal club was off of the Jerome Avenue side.  There was a stairway approximately 10 feet from the front of the building.  The stairway entrance was flush with the floor and the wooden stairway was steep.   

     Inside the club in the cellar, the ceiling was low (7 feet).  There were candles burning in the club.  There was a bar towards the front of the occupancy.  There was no sprinkler system, automatic alarms or fire extinguishers in the social club.  There was no emergency lighting.

     There was a confiscated salad oil bottle filled with gasoline that a patron brought to the club a week before.  A Bouncer searched a man attempting to enter the club with the container on his person.  The Bouncer found the container, and then ejected the patron.  The Bouncer kept the container filled with gasoline.  It was being stored behind the bar.   

     At around noon, the club was filled with patrons.  There were estimates from the Fire Marshals that there were as many as 150 people in the small club.  Loud music was playing.  It was a party atmosphere.  The salad oil container filled with gasoline was discovered to be knocked over.  A barmaid attempted to clean up the spill coming from the container when suddenly, the fluid ignited.  The possible ignition source was from one of the candles burning at the bar area.  The fire spread quickly and the entire club filled with smoke.  The heat and smoke banked down due to the low ceilings. 
 
     The area where the fire started was near the stairway, the only exit out of the occupancy.  Panic ensued as the patrons flooded the exit.  The people charged up the steep wooden stairway until the means of egress was no longer passable.  The only exit out was being consumed by fire.  Many people were able to escape, some could not.  The exiting patrons had to climb through the thermal levels.  The heat was unbearable as they came closer to the ceiling level.  There were eight trapped people.  They were trapped in the El Hoyo Social Club inferno.  Three of the trapped occupants worked their way to the rear of the social club.  They were able to breach a wall that lead to the occupancy to the rear of the club, the cellar of Joe’s Auto Repair.  On the floor of the cellar of the auto repair shop were tires, auto parts, and general debris.  The three escaping people became overcome with smoke as they attempted to traverse across the cellar floor of Joe’s Auto Repair.
     
     Outside, someone ran to the fire alarm box at the corner of Jerome Avenue and West 175 Street.  The Bronx Communications Office received ERS (Emergency Reporting System) Box 2935 at 1237 hours.  Engine 42, Engine 75, Ladder 33, Ladder 27 and Battalion 19 were dispatched.  Captain Michael Giovinazzo was working overtime in Engine 42 for the day tour.  As they approached Jerome Avenue from E. 175 Street, he could see a large cloud of smoke in the sky.

     
     Photo courtesy of Steven Spak

     At 1240 hours, Engine 42 arrived and transmitted a 10-84 and a 10-75.  Engine 46 and Engine 43 were dispatched.  The Bronx Fire Dispatchers also sent Rescue 3 and Ladder 59 due to numerous phone calls reporting a fire in a social club.  These units were sent before Engine 42 arrived. 

     

     Battalion Chief Michael Towey of Battalion 19 arrived at the fire at 1241 hours.  He saw:  1) Many civilians in the street in a frenzy attempting to help the Firefighters as they arrived; 2) Smoke and fire coming out of the crack in the sidewalk between the building and the sidewalk; and 3) A heavy fire condition in the stores at ground level that had extended from the cellar social club occupancy.  He called the Bronx Fire Dispatcher and requested ambulances respond for the numerous injured people and the New York Police Department (NYPD) respond for crowd control.  At 1244 hours, B.C. Towey transmitted a 2nd alarm.
 
     

     

     Capt. Giovinazzo of Engine 42 ordered his Firefighters to stretch a 2 ˝ inch hand line to the entrance to the El Hoyo Social Club.  Fr. Jim Fearon had the nozzle.  He had an arduous task of trying to advance the hose line down the stairway to the social club.  Capt. Giovinazzo mistakenly thought the stairs had burned away.  Engine 42 lied prone on the floor trying to knock down the fire coming out of the stairway opening.   

     Ladder 33 arrived as the first due Ladder Company led by Capt. Jimmy Gallagher.  Also working in Ladder 33 that day were Fr. John Rafferty, Fr. Joe Maggi, Fr. John Clarke, Fr. Anthony Pascucci, and Fr. James Graney.  They saw the fire was extending upward and into three of the four stores on the Jerome Avenue side and into the cockloft.  They commenced forcible entry of roll down gates.  They laddered the front of the building and started performing a search of the area above the fire.

     

     
 
     Ladder 27 was the second to arrive Ladder Company.  Captain Richard Jacquin of Ladder 59 was working overtime in Ladder 27 for the day tour.  Also working in Ladder 27 was Fr. Tom Murphy, Fr. John Clavin, Fr. Dennis Fennell, Fr. Joe Kisonas and Fr. Jim Forsyth.  Fr. Murphy positioned Ladder 27’s apparatus on the exposure 4 (E. 175 St.) side of the building.  He raised the aerial ladder to the roof.  Captain Jacquin, Fr. Fennell and Fr. Forsyth went towards the entrance to Joe’s Auto Repair shop. 

     

     

     There were several civilians frantically trying to raise the roll down gate of the repair shop.  The civilian’s efforts jammed the roll down gate.  It was stuck and it was only raised 2 feet above the floor.  Heavy smoke was coming out of the gate.   

     

     

     

     Captain Jacquin deployed his search rope and he, Fr. Fennell and Fr. Forsyth entered the auto repair shop.  The smoke condition was heavy and fire was raging in the cockloft.  They made their way toward the rear of the shop.  They came upon two large dogs that had succumbed to the smoke.  As they made their way deeper into the shop, they found an open stairway.  High heat was coming out of the stairway.  They descended the stairway, into the rising heat.  Half way down the stairway, they found and unconscious man.  Captain Jacquin removed him to the outside of the building where he was turned over to EMS personnel that started CPR.  Ladder 27’s forcible entry team continued their search for trapped occupants. 

     Captain Jacquin re-entered the cellar where he found Fr. Dennis Fennell with an unconscious female.  He helped Fr. Fennell carry the victim up the stairs and over the obstacles deep in the auto repair shop to the street.  Fr. Fennell began resuscitation on the female victim.   While Ladder 27 was making entry into the auto repair shop, Fr. Ed Marcoux of Ladder 59 used the saw with the metal cutting blade to gain better access to the auto repair shop.   

     

     Captain Jacquin reentered the cellar for the third time.  When he made it down the scorching cellar stairs, he found Fr. Jim Forsyth with an unconscious male.  He was struggling to remove him to safety.  Both he and Captain Jacquin were able to remove the unconscious man to the street where resuscitation efforts were started.

     Deputy Chief Tom Moran of Division 7 was dispatched on the 10-75.  As he was responding, D.C. Moran requested that an additional Battalion Chief be dispatched to act as a Victim Tracking Coordinator.   

     

     

     

     

     

     When he arrived, he was briefed by Battalion Chief Mike Towey of Battalion 19.  B.C. Towey was put in charge of the attack on the Jerome Avenue side of the building.  Then, at 1249 hours, Deputy Chief Moran transmitted a 3rd Alarm. 
 
     Deputy Chief Moran decided to employ an alternative attack point.  He ordered Ladder 44 to open a sidewalk cellar gate on the exposure 4 side of the building.  The El Hoyo occupancy was one occupancy away from the sidewalk cellar gate entrance.  Battalion Chief Bill Peterman of Battalion 17 was ordered to supervise this operation.  Ladder 44 was being led by Captain Ed Handibolde.  Lieutenant Gary Connelly of Engine 92 ordered his firefighters to advance a hose line into the sidewalk cellar gate.  The heat was high enough that Lieutenant Connelly feared flashover in the narrow cellar entrance.   

     

     

     
 
     The alternative attack plan that was being conducted by Engine 92 and Ladder 44 was showing progress.  Ladder 44 was able to breach a gypsum block wall which led them to the bar area of the El Hoyo social club.  Engine 92 was able to extinguish the fire near the front of the cellar occupancy.

     

     Deputy Chief Moran of Division 7 developed a command structure for the fire.  He was unable to establish a Command Post for at least 20 minutes into the fire due to the uncontrolled frenzied civilians in the street.  He deployed Battalion Chief Towey of Battalion 19 to the front of the building, Battalion Chief Peterman to the operation at the sidewalk cellar gate on exposure 4, Acting Battalion Chief John Ievolo of Battalion 27 was sent to supervise the roof and the rear of the building, and Battalion Chief Tom Rappe of Battalion 56 was put in charge of coordinating search efforts from the rear of the building. 

     

     Unable to advance a hose line into the cellar from the front of the building (Jerome Avenue), Capt. Gallagher of Ladder 33 ordered his members to enter the store over the fire to cut a hole to vent the fire away from the stairway.  Fr. John Clarke and Fr. Jack Rafferty of Ladder 33 entered the store above El Hoyo and performed this tactic.  Engine 75 moved their back-up hose line into the store to protect these firefighters. 

     

     Engine 42 was lying on the floor with the hose line trying to get an angle with their hose stream to attempt to cool the cellar ceiling.  Engine 92’s hose line was making progress in the cellar.  Ladder 33’s forcible entry team made it down the interior stairs and began searching for trapped occupants.  Captain Jimmy Gallagher of Ladder 33 found an unconscious male near the bar area.  This male was removed up the stairway to the street where CPR was administered.  One minute later, another two fire victims were found near the bar area.  Another minute passed, and another fire victim was found near the rest rooms.  There were now seven victims found and removed from the building.  CPR was being administered in the street to these victims.   

     

     Deputy Chief Tom Moran of Division 7 was now experiencing the nightmare of every Fire Chief; multiple fire victims in an uncontrolled fire.  With the initial reports of between 60 to 200 people trapped, Chief Moran transmitted a 4th Alarm at 1312 hours.  One minute later, another fire victim was found by the rear bar.  This would be the last fire victim of the El Hoyo Social Club. EMS personnel informed Deputy Chief Moran that some of the victims that were removed from the cellar inferno had been declared dead.  A make-shift morgue was set up at the gas station across the street on E. 175 Street.  Six of the eight trapped people would eventually perish.   

     

     The Rev. Julian Deeken, a Fire Department chaplain, administers last rites to covered bodies at a temporary morgue that was set up at scene of the five alarm fire in the Bronx that erupted in basement of El Hoya Social Club. 

     

     Operating firefighters were physically and emotionally exhausted.  Deputy Chief Moran transmitted a 5th Alarm for relief purposes at 1332 hours.  The fire was placed “Probably will Hold” at 1352 hours and declared “Under Control” at 1407 hours.   

     

     FDNY Firefighters were pushed to their limits trying to rescue the poor souls that were trapped in this illegal social club.  Ladder 33, Ladder 44, and Engine 92 were awarded Unit Citations.  Fr. James Forsyth of Ladder 27 was awarded the “Thomas E. Crimmins Medal”, Fr. Dennis Fennell of Ladder 27 was awarded the “Walter Scott Medal” and Captain Richard Jacquin of Ladder 59 was awarded the FDNY’s highest medal, the “James Gordon
Bennett Medal.”

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     (from http://www.fdnysbravest.com/El_Hoyo_Social_Club_February_Newsletter_2017.pdf)
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 07:49:09 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1088 on: May 06, 2019, 07:41:44 PM »
Engine 42 (continued)


Engine 42 medals:

     JOHN J. MC DERMOTT CAPT. ENG. 42 JUL. 21, 1979 1980 TREVOR-WARREN

         

     ALL MEMBERS ENG. 42 APR. 5, 1991 1992 ELSASSER
       
         


Engine 42 LODDs:

     LIEUTENANT HOWARD CARPLUK, ENGINE 42 (DETAILED ENGINE 75), AUGUST 28, 2006

         

         

          Lieutenant Howard Carpluk, Jr., Engine 42 (detailed to Engine 75). Bronx Box 3-3-2797, 1575 Walton Avenue, died August 28th, 2006 - Probationary Firefighter Michael Reilly, Engine 75, also perished with at Box 3-3-2797.

     SECOND FIREFIGHTER DIES AFTER BLAZE IN THE BRONX - NY TIMES  By THOMAS J. LUECK and MARIA NEWMAN AUG. 28, 2006

          A second firefighter died from a blaze in a 99-cent store in the Bronx on Sunday where he and three colleagues crashed through a collapsing floor, city officials said.

          Fire Lt. Howard J. Carpluk Jr., a 20-year veteran, died today at Montefiore Medical Center, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta said. On Sunday, his fellow firefighter, Michael C. Reilly, 25, also died in the same fire.

          Lieutenant Carpluk, 43, had been transferred to Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx on Sunday for specialized cardiac care after the fire put him in an advanced state of heart failure, doctors said. He worked out of Engine Company 42, while Firefighter Reilly, who had graduated from the New York City Fire Academy less than two months ago, had worked for Engine Company 75.

          "Today, New York City has lost another one of its Bravest," said Mayor Bloomberg.

          The fire on Sunday, which began just after noon, gutted the Mega 99 store in the Mount Eden neighborhood of the Bronx and damaged a cellphone shop in the same single-story building. Witnesses and fire officials described it as a horrifying ordeal in which more than 100 firefighters continued battling the blaze even as they learned that five of their colleagues were trapped inside.

          The three other firefighters who were injured when the floor collapsed were taken to Jacobi Medical Center, where fire officials said their conditions were serious but stable. At least eight other firefighters were treated at Jacobi for less serious injuries and released; a total of 23 firefighters suffered some injury at the blaze, the department said.

          The cause of the fire was still under investigation, but Mr. Bloomberg said it did not appear to be of a suspicious origin. Witnesses who looked on from a fourth-floor window directly across the street from the fire said they had seen a heavy rooftop air-conditioner fall in, with enough force to crash through the floor beneath.

         

          Commissioner Scoppetta said of the loss of the two firefighters: "In less than 24 hours, we have lost two courageous men, a young probie at the start of his career and an accomplished veteran who dedicated 20 years of service to New York City. It is a heartbreaking loss for the Fire Department.’’

          In his 20-year career, Lieutenant Carpluk was awarded two citations for bravery, including one award for a rescue in 1988, when he carried out two unconscious men he found in the bedroom of a fire-engulfed apartment in the Bronx. A resident of Yaphank, he is survived by his wife, Debra, his 10-year-old daughter, Paige, and his 14-year-old son, Bradley.

          Mr. Bloomberg said he met with the men of Engine 42 this morning.

          “They told me how the lieutenant faced each and every challenge before him bravely and unflinchingly,’’ he said in a statement. “Yesterday was no different.’’

          Firefighter Reilly was taken to Bronx Lebanon Hospital at about 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, arriving with no discernible pulse or heartbeat, a doctor at the hospital said, adding that he could not be revived.
Firefighter Reilly, who lived in Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County, had worked for smaller fire departments, in Ramsey, N.J., and Stratford, Conn., and had fought fires as a marine in Iraq.

          He had just graduated from the New York City Fire Academy in early July. Working as a New York City firefighter “was his lifelong dream,” said Ronald C. Nattrass, the fire chief in Stratford.

          Firefighter Reilly is survived by his parents, a brother and a sister. “All he wanted to do in his life was to be a firefighter,” the mayor said.

          The fire started in a back room at Mega 99, at the corner of Walton and East Mount Eden Avenues, and spread quickly, according to accounts by Mr. Bloomberg, fire officials and the owner of the convenience store, Anis Shaibi.

          Mr. Shaibi, 28, said he was in the store with three employees and a customer when one of the employees yelled that flames were shooting out from the area of a refrigerator in the back of the store.
Photo

          Firefighters consoled each other Sunday outside Engine Company 75. It was the unit of Firefighter Michael C. Reilly, who died on the job.

          “I thought it was something small, and I got my fire extinguisher, but it got big so fast,” Mr. Shaibi said. “When I saw everything falling off the ceiling, I told everyone to leave.”

          One witness, Jashira Abreu, a 25-year-old medical assistant, said: “The air-conditioner went in, and then the whole ceiling went in. I was in shock because it was so surreal.”


          https://nypost.com/2006/08/30/crippling-loss-felt-by-comrades/

          http://www.backstepfirefighter.com/2010/08/26/illegal-renovation-kills-fdny-lieutenant-and-probie-2006/

          http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/29/nyregion/29profile.html?_r=0

          http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/reports/face200627.html

         



     FF KEVIN A. ROONEY, ENGINE 42, JAN.22, 2017

         

          FF Kevin A. Rooney died from WTC-related illness.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tremont,_Bronx


     RIP.  Never forget

« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 07:53:08 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1089 on: May 06, 2019, 07:42:39 PM »
Engine 42 (continued)


Mt Hope, Bronx:

     








Offline turk132

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1090 on: May 06, 2019, 08:01:55 PM »
Mack, TL 44 was with E42 when their quarters was renovated, E92 went to E50 and Batt 17 went to R3, not sure of the year. They had to swap the 95' TL for a 75 ' TL to fit in quarters.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1091 on: May 06, 2019, 08:03:10 PM »
1970s/1980s/1990s R&Ws:

     1975 

         

     1976

         

     1984

         

     1990

         

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1092 on: May 06, 2019, 08:06:23 PM »
Mack, TL 44 was with E42 when their quarters was renovated, E92 went to E50 and Batt 17 went to R3, not sure of the year. They had to swap the 95' TL for a 75 ' TL to fit in quarters.

Thanks - I will try to get dates.

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1093 on: May 06, 2019, 08:16:10 PM »
Mack, TL 44 was with E42 when their quarters was renovated, E92 went to E50 and Batt 17 went to R3, not sure of the year. They had to swap the 95' TL for a 75 ' TL to fit in quarters.

Thanks - I will try to get dates.
  They swapped their 95ft. Mack TL for TL17's 75ft. TL.

Offline nfd2004

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #1094 on: May 06, 2019, 09:43:19 PM »
 The El Hoyo Social Club fire was only about 3 miles away from another historic social club fire on Southern Blvd and East Tremont Ave, in a place called "Happyland" - where 87 people died.

 Both fires occurred within two years of each other.

 

anything