Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 30448 times)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #255 on: June 19, 2018, 12:32:01 AM »
Queens All Hands Rescue Co. 4 February 1, 1995

     

Manhattan  10-75 Park Ave / 18th St., January 25, 1995

     


Queens 1980s:

     
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 12:35:43 AM by mack »

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #255 on: June 19, 2018, 12:32:01 AM »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #256 on: June 19, 2018, 06:11:58 PM »
Brooklyn Ladder 124 Tonka Truck  1994

     




Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #257 on: July 02, 2018, 02:10:19 PM »
Engine 307 1953 Ward LaFrance 750 GPM Pumper w/250 gallon tank

     



« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 02:41:04 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #258 on: July 05, 2018, 01:43:47 PM »
Engine 258/Ladder 115 firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue  Long Island City, Queens 14th Division, 45th Battalion

     Engine 1 LICFD organized 12-17 Jackson Avenue w/Ladder 1 LICFD                             1891
     Engine 1 LICFD became Engine 1 FDNY                                                                      1898
     Engine 1 FDNY became Engine 158                                                                            1899
     Engine 158 new firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue w/Ladder 65                                          1904
     Engine 158 became Engine 258                                                                                 1913
     Engine 258 moved 33-51 Greenpoint Avenue at Engine 259                                         1999
     Engine 258 returned 10-40 47th Avenue w/Ladder 115                                                2000

     Ladder 1 LICFD organized 12-16 47th Road former volunteer firehouse                         1891
     Ladder 1 LICFD became Ladder 1 FDNY                                                                      1898
     Ladder 1 became Ladder 65                                                                                       1899
     Ladder 65 new firehouse 10-42 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                          1904
     Ladder 65 became Ladder 115                                                                                   1913
     Ladder 115 moved 11-15 37th Avenue at Engine 260                                                  1999
     Ladder 115 returned 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 258                                                2000

     Search Light 4 Queens organized 10-42 47th Avenue at Engine 258                              1930
     Search Light 4 Queens moved 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                          1938
     Search Light 4 Queens moved 56-29 68th Street at Engine 288                                    1966
     Search Light 4 Queens disbanded                                                                               1968

     Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Ladder 115                     1942
     Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens disbanded                                                                      1945

     Battalion 15 organized 12-17 Jackson Avenue at Engine 1                                            1898
     Battalion 15 became Battalion 35                                                                               1898
     Battalion 35 new firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                       1904
     Battalion 35 disbanded (reorganized in Brooklyn at Engine 111)                                   1906

     Battalion 45 organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Engine 158                                            1906
     Battalion 45 moved 33-51 Greenpoint Avenue at Engine 259                                       1979


Long Island City History:

     Long Island City (LIC) was formerly a city, created in 1870, from the merger of the Long Island village of Astoria and the hamlets of Ravenswood, Hunters Point, Blissville, Sunnyside, Dutch Kills, Steinway, Bowery Bay and Middleton in Newtown Township. It was a separate city until it became part of New York City in 1898.   

     Long Island City 1873 map:
                                 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/1873_Beers_Map_of_Astoria_and_Long_Island_City,_Queens,_New_York_-_Geographicus_-_LongIslandCity-beers-1873.jpg

          - Note: Blackwells Island (became Welfare Island, then Roosevelt Island); separate Ward's Island and Randall's Island; and ferries to Manhattan.


Long Island City - Volunteer fire department history:

     There were over 20 volunteer fire companies that protected L.I. City, many of which were in service since the 1860s.  All were disbanded by January 1, 1891 when a professional fire department, Long Island City Fire Department (LICFD) was put in place, .
                               
     
 
     “Live Oak Truck No. 2”, a volunteer company of Hunter’s Point, was located at a wood-frame shed at Vernon & Borden Avenues.  This became the initial quarters of Ladder 1, LICFD.  In August 1893, Ladder Co. 1 occupied a leased 2-story brick firehouse at 178 7th Street (now 12-16 47th Rd) which was the rear of Engine Co. 1’s quarters that fronted on Jackson Avenue, which became Ladder 115.


Long Island City Fire Department (LICFD):
     
     LICFD was a paid fire department which protected Long Island City in the 1890s before it became part of New York City in 1898.  LICFD companies entered FDNY in 1989 and were renumbered in 1898 and later in 1913.
 
         

         

     LICFD companies 1898:

         
     

12-17 Jackson Avenue firehouse:

     

     


12-16 47th Road firehouse:

     

     


10-40 47th Avenue firehouse:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 258:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 115:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


CPC 115:

     


Engine 258/Ladder 115:

     

     

     

     


Engine 258/Ladder 115 FDNY Medals:

     VICTOR VAN ISEGHEM LT. ENG. 258 FEB. 24, 1947 1948 STIEFEL

     WILLIAM C. RINSDALE FF. ENG. 258 OCT. 2, 1957 1958 HUGH BONNER

           LODD BC William C. Rinsdale, August 1, 1971

         

     THOMAS J. LUCAS FF. LAD. 115 OCT. 13, 1913 1914 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          Rescued 2 y/o William O’Donnell at fire 97 Jackson Avenue, October 13, 1913.

         

     SASHA W. BURAK FF. LAD. 115 FEB. 24, 1947 1948 FDR
     
          Later a Deputy Chief.

     GREGORY PIROZZI FF. LAD. 115 OCT. 26, 1962 1963 KANE

          Firefighter Gregory Pirozzi, Ladder 115, received a medal for saving the life of Lt. Walter Pollack of his company. The officer was one of nearly 20 firefighters who were trapped and injured in a collapse while operating at the fire.  6 firefighters were killed at this Maspeth factory fire, the Sefu Soap and Fat Co.

          http://www.junipercivic.com/historyArticle.asp?nid=95


Engine 258/Ladder 115 LODDs:

     FIREMAN PATRICK LENNON (Detailed from Engine 160) Engine 158 (258) December 1, 1904 injured November 26, 1904 Box 99-44 Queens Co. Court House, Jackson Avenue

         

         

          Fireman Patrick Lennon was burned while working on the roof of the Queens Co. Court House. The fire started around noon in the third floor kitchen, and spread up through the mansard roof by a strong North wind. Working on the roof at the time of the fire there was twenty one workers who entered through a skylight and became trapped by the flames. An aerial ladder was raised and all twenty one workers came down without any injuries. Fireman Lennon who was detailed to Engine 158 was ordered up to the roof with other members. Lennon was up the ladder first and when he stepped onto the roof, flames enveloped him. Other firemen removed him from the roof and he was removed to a hospital. He had inhaled flames and was badly burnt. While in the hospital, his condition started to improve but took a turn for the worse and died on December 1st.

     FIREMAN EDWARD J. KNAPP Engine 258  July 7, 1927 Box 44-153  43-51 Purvis Street

          Fireman Edward Knapp of Engine 258 was overcome by gas and died on the way to St. John's Hospital. He had reported to duty for his day tour and went to the fire with the rest of the crew to relieve the night tour, who had been fighting the four-alarm fire for five hours. He was operating at the ruins of the Manhattan Steam Bakery Co. at 43-51 Purvis Street. He died from carbon monoxide gas, having been created by the action of water on the hot ovens and the debris strewn about. Dr. Archer declared that Fireman Knapp's death was very unusual.

         

     LIEUTENANT JAMES A. O'BRIEN (Detailed from L116) Engine 258 April 19, 1930 injured March 17, 1930 in the quarters of Engine 258

          Lieutenant James O'Brien of Hook & Ladder 116 died as the result of injuries he received at Engine 258's quarters. On March 17, while detailed to Engine 258, he suffered burns to the eyes and the face when he fell carrying a pail of water containing caustic soda. He died at his home from pneumonia resulting from his injuries.

         

LIEUTENANT JOHN W. SMITH Ladder 115 June 18, 1933  (Injured May 19, 1933) Box 7209  25-19 Borden Avenue

          Lieutenant John W. Smith was injured when he fell from the first floor to the basement after forcing a door to search for the fire.  Other members of Ladder 115 heard him cry for help and ran to his aid.  He suffered cuts about the head and possibly a fractured skull.  He stayed in the hospital until June 16th at which time he went home.  He had a relapse and returned to the hospital and died.  He was 57 years and a veteran of thirty years on the job.

         

         


     FIREMAN MICHAEL BERENZ Engine 258 October 22, 1957 (Injured January 26, 1957) Box 7369 38th Avenue & 10th Street

               At 11:20 pm after returning from a fire at 38-25 9th Street, Fireman Michael Berenz of Engine 258 complained of severe pains in the chest. Rescue 4 and a public ambulance were called to quarters and administered oxygen. Fireman Berenz was removed by ambulance to St. John's hospital. Doctor Hania in attendance diagnosis possible Coronary Thrombosis. He died 10 months later from a fatal heart attack.

     FIREMAN FRANCIS X. EGAN Ladder 115 October 26, 1962 Box 7027  56th Rd. & 48th Street

          Firemen Richard Andrews, James Marino, Captain William Russell of Engine 325, Firemen Richard Gifford, George Zahn of Engine 238, and Fireman Francis Egan of Ladder 115, were killed by a falling wall during a fourth-alarm.  At least seven other firemen were injured.  The dead and injured firemen were trapped on the first floor of the factory, the Sefu Soap and Fat Co. at 44-15 56th Road in Maspeth.  The men were buried In 6 feet of debris as the wall and ceiling of the two story brick building fell.

         

          On October 26, 1962 a building collapse took the lives of six firemen at 44-15 56th Street. The five-alarm fire started around 9:30 at night at the Sefu Soap & Fat Company. It was placed under control at 10:30 and five minutes later a twenty-foot section of metal roofing over the loading dock came crashing down. The collapse took out the brick wall of the two-story building and buried twenty men. Heavy equipment was rushed in to assist in the digging for the buried men. Fourteen men were quickly dug out with various injuries and taken to area hospitals. The six that were killed were buried under six feet of debris. A worker started the fire during the day, using an acetylene torch to cut up old machinery. He had started two fires and put them out himself without calling the fire department. Killed in the fire were Captain William F. Russell, Fireman James M. Marino and Probationary Fireman Richard Andrews of Engine 325, Firemen Richard P. Gifford and George J. Zahn of Engine 238 and Fireman Francis X. Egan of Ladder 115. Captain Russell was forty-three years old while the others were all in their twenties.

         

     FIREMAN GERARD T. GANLEY (Detailed to E297) Engine 258 July 13, 1978 Box 4553 20th Avenue & 120th Street

         
     
         Fireman Gerard T. Ganley of E258, was detailed to E297 pending transfer to that unit. E297 was special called to a brush fire at 20th Avenue. While assisting in the stretching of a line, Fireman Ganley was stricken with a heart attack. He was removed to Parsons Hospital but was dead on arrival. He had 18 years of service in the fire department.


L.I.C. Volunteer FIREMAN MICHAEL RIGNEY Jackson Hose No. 5 July 17, 1888 Vernon Boulevard, Ravenswood

     “The new factory of the New York Architectural Terra-Cotta Company was only in business since April before it was wiped out by fire.  On Saturday, the workers had left the building around four o’clock in the afternoon and the night watchman was making his rounds around 10:30 that night when he discovered a fire on the top floor near the flues for the kilns.  He tried to put the fire out but could not.  The delayed alarm was sent out and the volunteer fire department responded.  The three engines, six hose, and three ladder companies were soon hard at work.  The closest hydrant was 1,000 feet away and hose lines were stretched to the fire.  Somebody cut the hose line at the hydrant and it had to be replaced with a new line of hose.  Fireman Michael Rigney of Jackson Hose 5 was on the west side of the boiler house directing a hose line when the wall fell on him and another fireman.  Both men were quickly pulled from the rubble.  Fireman Rigney suffered a hole in his head from a brick and a broken collarbone.  The skin on his right hand was ripped off and the right side of his body was badly burned from the hip down.  He was taken home and treated.  He died from his injuries on July 31, 1888.  The second fireman was from Hunter Engine 4 and only received a burned hand and a cut on his head.”

     RIP.  Never forget.


10-40 47th Avenue firehouse history:

     Queenswalk: The Firehouse in Hunter’s Point: Engine Co. 258 and Ladder Co. 115

     Brooklyn and Manhattan had fire companies that were established long before Queens’ were. Long Island City, because it is so close to Manhattan and was the center of Queens’ government, was the first part of Queens to get a professional fire company. That was in 1891. By comparison, independent cities like Manhattan and Brooklyn had professional companies mandated by state charter in 1865.

     Before 1890, the separate towns that made up LIC had 12 volunteer fire departments. When the law authorizing paid departments in Queens was passed that year, all of the volunteer departments were disbanded, and five new houses were built for the new companies. When the city consolidated in 1898, these companies were brought under the control of a central New York City fire department.

     In 1899, the city announced that they were authorizing the building of new fire houses in Brooklyn and Queens. The fire house on Jackson Avenue that contained Engine 258 was considered one of the worst and most dangerous in the city, “a danger to life and limb,” according to the Brooklyn Eagle. The new fire house would be built on land purchased by the city at 10-40 47th Avenue, between Vernon Avenue and 11th Street.

     The building was begun in 1902 and completed in 1904. It was built to accommodate Engine Co. 258, Ladder Co. 115, and headquarters for the battalion chief. It was close to the old fire house, but more importantly, close to Borough Hall and two important factories: the Pratt & Lambert Varnish Factory and an oil refinery for Standard Oil. The rest of the immediate neighborhood held schools, small businesses and a sizable residential area full of attached wood framed houses.

     Over in Manhattan, the city had commissioned just one architect to design that city’s firehouses: Napoleon LeBrun. Between 1879 and 1894 he, and later with his sons, designed over 40 fire houses. Many still remain, and are gorgeous examples of civic architecture, and indeed worthy of Manhattan.

     In Brooklyn, prior to 1898, that city had hired several of the best residential and commercial architects in that city to design firehouses. Peter J. Lauritzen, who designed my old Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood’s firehouse on Madison Street was among them, as were the Parfitt Brothers, Frank Freeman, Frank J. Helmle and others. Their firehouses are also masterful and imaginative examples of fine civic architecture. Today, many of the fine fire houses of the LeBrun’s and the Brooklyn architects are protected by landmarking.

     By 1900, the expanded Greater City of New York began hiring some new architects, and the most prominent of those was Ernest Flagg and Bradford Lee Gilbert. The two only designed three firehouses, but they were all masterful. Flagg’s were in Manhattan, and the architect of Engine Co. 258 was Bradford Lee Gilbert. A graduate of Yale University, he trained in the offices of Josiah C. Cady, a major talent who was the architect of the southern wing of the Museum of Natural History, as well as the old Metropolitan Opera House and the New York Presbyterian Hospital. Cady also designed 15 buildings on Yale’s campus, including the Peabody Museum, so no doubt that Yale connection was a plus.

     In 1876, Gilbert was appointed architect for the New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad. He designed buildings for them that can still be found throughout the eastern half of North America, including Detroit, Chicago, Ottawa and Halifax. He based his practice in Manhattan, and is credited as the architect of the first New York City skyscraper, the Tower Building, completed in 1899. It was located at 50 Broadway, and at eleven stories, was one of the first steel framed buildings in Manhattan. Gilbert was quite proud of this one, and maintained his office on the top floor of the building until his death in 1911.

     Most of Gilbert’s designs were in the Romanesque Revival style, but for the new firehouse, he decided to reference New York City’s Dutch roots. The step gabled roofline is a classic feature of Dutch building, dating back as far as the late 14th century. This feature was especially popular on canal houses and row houses, where small lots necessitated multi-story buildings. The step gables used on Engine 258 are called “proto-Baroque” by experts on Dutch building styles.

     In any case, Gilbert was not the first to design Dutch Renaissance Revival firehouses. Napoleon LeBrun had designed one for the old Manhattan Engine Co. 15, now demolished. In Brooklyn, the Parfitt Brothers designed Engine Co. 253, which is in Bensonhurst, and landmarked. Both were before Gilberts’ Long Island City firehouse. Gilbert himself alter designed more than a few building in this style, suggesting he really liked it, as the buildings are as far flung as a train station in Mexico, a YMCA in Harlem, a hospital complex in Staten Island, and a group of row houses in Manhattan.

     Engine Co. 258 and Ladder Co. 115’s new building opened with great fanfare, in 1904. It’s a magnificent building, quite visually striking and a prominent part of the streetscape. The top part of the roof is five stories tall, putting it at least a story above the rest of the block. His use of materials creates a powerful contrast between the light colored quoins, the key surrounds on the windows and the ornament, and the darker burnt brick.

     The building is 50 feet wide, built to accommodate both the engine and ladder trucks. The size of the building, and the bays themselves, predated our large fire trucks of today, but the building was built large enough to make housing them possible.

     The tall structure could also accommodate hanging space for the hoses, which needed to be hung up lengthwise to dry properly when not in use. The firehouse also needed to have enough room to have a dormitory for the men, who at the time, worked 24-hour, six-day shifts before a day off. There were offices for the battalion commander, and the chief, as well as bathroom facilities, a day room and a kitchen/eating area.

     Today, the firehouse is still in use, and a prominent landmark in the community. It’s been mentioned in every edition of the AIA Guide to New York City, and was called a “gem” in Jeffrey Kroessler and Nina S. Rappaport’s book Historic Preservation in Queens. The building was also cited by the Queens Historical Society as a “Queensmark,” a building with architectural, historic or cultural significance.

     It may also be recognized as the firehouse serving as the headquarters for the firefighters and EMTs in the television series Third Watch, which aired from 1999-2005. The firehouse was landmarked in 2006.

         https://www.brownstoner.com/queens/long-island-city/queenswalk-the-firehouse-in-hunters-point-engine-co-258-and-ladder-co-115/


Engine 258/Ladder 115 neighborhood:

     

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2007/08/hunters-point-queens/



     

     
« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 11:06:26 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #259 on: July 05, 2018, 02:05:48 PM »
Fire Engine Company No. 258, Hook and Ladder Company No. 115



10-40 47th Avenue
Bradford Lee Gilbert  1902-04


Today considered to be one of the most dignified firehouses in New York City, this Dutch Renaissance Revival style structure commands a strong presence with its 4½ stories and 53-foot width along 47th Avenue. Its architect, Bradford Lee Gilbert, designed only this one firehouse over the course of his career. A pioneer in steel frame construction, Gilbert gained prominence across the country for the design of railroad structures and is known locally for his design of the Tower Building in Lower Manhattan, considered New York’s first skyscraper with a steel skeleton, constructed in 1887-89 (demolished in 1913). As an important political and industrial center, Long Island City was the first part of Queens to have a professional fire department, enabled by an act of the state legislature in 1890. In 1898, after the consolidation of the boroughs, the Long Island City and Brooklyn departments merged with the Fire Department of the City of New York. Upon consolidation, officials planned an expanded fire department to accommodate a growing population and improve working conditions for firefighters. This building was one of the more ambitious firehouse projects undertaken by the department due to its size and level of architectural detail, and was built for the same company that laid claim to being the borough’s first professional fire department. Although its numbering system changed over time, the company’s first name was Engine Company No. 1 and Hook & Ladder Company No. 1, which was established in 1891. The brick structure with granite and limestone trim is a rare example of the Dutch Renaissance Revival style, which was likely employed by Gilbert in homage to New York City’s Dutch roots

http://6tocelebrate.org/site/fire-engine-company-no-258-hook-and-ladder-company-no-115/

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #260 on: July 05, 2018, 04:04:24 PM »
Engine 258 (then 158) operating at fire - note individual in background working on telephone or electrical line:

     

     

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #261 on: July 05, 2018, 06:04:49 PM »
     Ladder 1 LICFD organized 12-16 47th Road former volunteer firehouse                         1891
     Ladder 1 LICFD became Ladder 1 FDNY                                                                      1898
     Ladder 1 became Ladder 65                                                                                       1899
     Ladder 65 new firehouse 10-42 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                          1904
     Ladder 65 became Ladder 115                                                                                   1913
     Ladder 115 moved 11-15 37th Avenue at Engine 260                                                  1999
     Ladder 115 returned 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 258                                                2000
Long Island City Ladder 1 initially became Ladder 15 FDNY for approximately 6 months in 1899, before being renumbered as Ladder 65 later in 1899, and then being renumbered as Ladder 115 in 1913.

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #262 on: July 05, 2018, 06:13:55 PM »
In mack's reply # 258 above mention is made of a "Relay Hose Wagon"...   ("Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Ladder 115 in 1942  &   Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens disbanded  in 1945")                                            ..... during WW2 Relay Hose Wagons were organized & equipped to carry large amounts of Hose in case water mains here in NYC were bombed ....i don't know about this particular Rig # 4 but i have seen a picture of one (#?) that was built on a Hook & Ladder chassis complete with a Tillerman....maybe someone can dig up a picture of one of these interesting Rigs......( not sure but i think i remember it being painted gray or white in the picture ?).
« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 06:16:19 PM by 68jk09 »

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #263 on: July 05, 2018, 06:21:51 PM »
     Battalion 15 organized 12-17 Jackson Avenue at Engine 1                                            1898
     Battalion 15 became Battalion 35                                                                               1898
     Battalion 35 new firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                       1904
     Battalion 35 disbanded (reorganized in Brooklyn at Engine 111)                                   1906

     Battalion 45 organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Engine 158                                            1906
     Battalion 45 moved 33-51 Greenpoint Avenue at Engine 259                                       1979

Long Island City FD Battalion 1 became Battalion 15 FDNY in 1898, then was renumbered as Battalion 35 later in 1898, then renumbered as Battalion 45 in 1906.

Brooklyn FD District Engineer 5 became Battalion 25 FDNY in 1898, then was renumbered as Battalion 35 in 1906.

Both the Brooklyn and the Long Island City battalions pre existed the merger with FDNY, thus Queens BC35 gave up their number to become BC45, while Brooklyn BC25 gave up their number to become BC35, and BC25 was used again in Manhattan in 1907.

Queens and Brooklyn both had a BC35, but their timelines are simultaneous and separate.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 06:45:09 PM by fdhistorian »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #264 on: July 05, 2018, 09:28:47 PM »
In mack's reply # 258 above mention is made of a "Relay Hose Wagon"...   ("Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Ladder 115 in 1942  &   Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens disbanded  in 1945")                                            ..... during WW2 Relay Hose Wagons were organized & equipped to carry large amounts of Hose in case water mains here in NYC were bombed ....i don't know about this particular Rig # 4 but i have seen a picture of one (#?) that was built on a Hook & Ladder chassis complete with a Tillerman....maybe someone can dig up a picture of one of these interesting Rigs......( not sure but i think i remember it being painted gray or white in the picture ?).

Thanks Chief.  Rigs were painted gray and had blacked out headlights.

     

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #265 on: July 05, 2018, 09:34:57 PM »
Searchlight 4 located at Engine 258 1930-1938   
1929 Packard:


     

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #266 on: July 05, 2018, 11:03:44 PM »
Members of LICFD 1889:


     

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #267 on: July 06, 2018, 02:09:25 AM »
As far as reply # 264 above.....mack Thanks ...Yes that is the photo....i did not want to put you on the spot to find it but when i asked if somebody might i thought you would be the one to find & post it....some good History.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #268 on: July 07, 2018, 09:08:55 AM »
FDNY "24 hours in the FDNY firehouse that never sleeps"

     By NJ Burkett with exclusive access at one of New York City's busiest fire houses.

     Monday, February 12, 2018  FLATBUSH, Brooklyn (WABC) --


          http://abc7ny.com/24-hours-in-the-firehouse-that-never-sleeps/3072654/


"It's long past midnight in Flatbush, Brooklyn, and firefighter Mark Merrell of Engine 255 is explaining to me why medals aren't important and being called a hero doesn't matter all that much.

"What you try to achieve is for somebody to say, 'you're a good fireman.' That's probably the biggest compliment you can get," he says. "And that don't come easy."

The firehouse kitchen erupts in laughter. Mark smiles, because it's a tough crowd and he knows I know that. But I'm spending twenty-four hours with the firefighters of Engine Company 255 and Ladder Company 157 -- one of the busiest firehouses in New York - and I'm ready for pretty much anything.

The FDNY granted us total access and even provided a chase car with lights, siren and a driver.

Eyewitness News photographer Josh Hartmann and I followed them on virtually every run. There was just one restriction: Don't show the cooking. Why? "It's corny," they told me. (But the chicken marsala was excellent, I have to say.)

No, we didn't sleep at all. It's hard to do that when the alarms go off all night. And we learned pretty quickly that if you're not out the door in 52 seconds, tower ladder chauffeur Dean Montesani will leave you in the dust.

I don't think we ever had more than two hours between runs, and it was often much less than that. I've covered just about every major fire in New York City since Happy Land, and I was amazed at how much I had yet to learn.

Did you know the turnout gear can weigh as much as 100 pounds? (Which amounts to about two-thirds of my body weight.) And it's not like in the movies--when you're running into a fire you often can't see anything. You're groping your way through the smoke to find the fire and any victims who may have been unconscious or trapped.

These firefighters were among the first on the scene in Midwood in March of 2015, when seven children died in a raging house fire.

Pat Rooney of Ladder 157 stood at the scene with me, and tried to put it into words.

"The whole first floor was on fire," he told me. "To be honest, you get reports of people trapped all the time, and they're not there. One neighbor is like, 'There's seven kids in there.' And no way there's seven kids there. I put my ladder up to the bedroom window and went in and there's a kid laying on the floor. You don't think there's gonna be anybody, so when you find one it's a surprise. And when you find out there were seven, it's brutal. I thought about this fire for over a year. Every day, every single day."

"When it's successful," Mark Merrell told me, "there's nothing better. When it's tragedy, you have to deal with it and move on."

That's hard, of course, and they don't really like to talk about it.

Sitting around the kitchen, camera rolling, I ask a serious question. "What's the hardest part of this job?" The answer, almost in unison, "When a reporter wants to hang out in the firehouse." More laughter. Yes, it's a tough crowd.

But you won't find a more upbeat, dedicated group of firefighters anywhere in America. I hope they'll invite me back for dinner some night soon."


     

     
« Last Edit: July 07, 2018, 09:14:54 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #269 on: July 07, 2018, 09:29:39 AM »
Engine 255/Ladder 157  firehouse  1367 Rogers Avenue  Flatbush, Brooklyn 15th Division, 41st Battalion  "The Jolly Rogers"

     Engine 55 BFD organized 1367 Rogers Avenue w/Ladder 25 BFD                            1897
     Engine 55 BFD became Engine 55 FDNY                                                               1898
     Engine 55 became Combination Engine Company 55                                             1898
     CEC 55 became CEC 155                                                                                    1899
     CEC 155 became CEC 255                                                                                  1913
     CEC 255 became Engine 255                                                                              1927

     Ladder 25 BFD organized 1367 Rogers Avenue w/Engine 55 BFD                           1897
     Ladder 25 BFD became Ladder 25 FDNY                                                              1898
     Ladder 25 disbanded (Engine 55 became CEC 55)                                                1899

     Ladder 157 organized 1367 Rogers Avenue at Engine 255                                     1927


1367 Rogers Avenue 1897:

     

     


1367 Rogers Avenue 1980s:

     


1367 Rogers Avenue:

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 255/Ladder 157:

     


Engine 255:

     

     

     

     


Ladder 157:

     

     

     

     


Engine 255/Ladder 157:

     

     


Engine 255/Ladder 157 100 years:

     http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_255/engine_255_history.html


Flatbush Fire Department volunteer companies:

     


Engine 255/Ladder 157 Medals:

     CAPT. JOHN T. ROKEE DEC. 16, 1962 1963 PRENTICE ASSIGNED TO DIV. 12 AND DETAILED TO LAD. 157

     

     Captain John T. Rokee, Covering in Ladder 157, 12th Division, received the John H. Prentice Medal for assisting in rescuing the trapped occupants of 1391 Flatbush Avenue on December 16, 1962. Captain Rokee helped the remaining people that Fireman Fraker had brought down out of the hallway. He then went upstairs to the 2nd and 3rd floor and found another group of people trapped, and brought them down to safety. Between Fireman Fraker and Captain Rokee they rescued six adults and eight children.

     FF. LAWRENCE J. FRAKER DEC. 16, 1962 1963 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

     

     Fireman 1st grade Lawrence J. Fraker Ladder 157, received the Brooklyn Citizens Medal for rescuing the occupants of 1391 Flatbush Avenue on December 16, 1962. Fireman Fraker found twelve occupants on the 2nd floor landing refusing to move due to the heat coming up the stairwell. Pushing, carrying, he forced them down the stairs only to be blocked by fire coming from the store on the first floor. He placed himself between the fire and their escape and six managed to get out before his clothing caught fire. Seeing this, the members of Engine 255 put a charged hose line on Fireman Fraker. Before being taken to the hospital he notified his officer that there were more people trapped in the hallway

     FF. ROBERT L. TYRRELL APR. 24, 1968 1969 HISPANIC

     Fireman 1st grade Robert L. Tyrrell Ladder 157, received the Hispanic Society Memorial Medal for rescuing a woman and child from a third floor bedroom at 1094 New York Avenue on April 24, 1968. He made a search of the fire apartment and found Barbara Beckwick unconscious. He dragged the unconscious form to the window and handed the woman to other members of Ladder 157, Going back into the burning bedroom he found Dawn Grier, 10 months old in a burning crib. Scooping up the child he raced to the front door as other members of Ladder 157 were breaking down the door. He handed the child to Lieutenant Spitz before collapsing and had to be carried out of the building himself. Mrs. Beckwick was placed on the critical list but, the child died in the hospital. All this was done before any water was placed on the fire.

     FF. ROBERT L. TYRRELL APR. 24, 1971 1972 CONRAN

     

     Firefighter 1st grade Robert L. Tyrrell Ladder 157, received his second medal, the William F. Conran Medal for rescuing two children from a bedroom at 2525 Bedford Avenue on April 24, 1971. He entered the fire floor via the rear fire escape and found one child just inside the bedroom window. He handed the child to waiting members outside of the window and entered the room for a second search. Fireman Tyrrell was taking a terrible beating from the heat and smoke but found the second child between the bed and wall. He carried this child to the window and safety. He then entered a third time to search a crib in the bedroom but found no additional children. After the third search Fireman Tyrrell had to be assisted out of the fire building because of exhaustion. Both children recovered in the hospital.

     FF. ROBERT A. BRILL FEB. 25, 1975 1976 PULASKI

        

     Fireman 1st Grade Robert A. Brill Ladder 157, received the Pulaski Association Medal for rescuing a little girl from a smoke filled room at 2323 Newkirk Avenue on February 25, 1975. Fireman Brill entered the window of a first floor apartment upon hearing that a child was trapped in the building. The fire had taken possession of three rooms on the fire floor. He worked his way toward the rear bedrooms looking for this child. In the last room he found the girl, unconscious. He protected the little girl with his coat and found his way back to the window, giving the little girl new lease on life. All this was done without the use of a mask or a charged hose line.

     FF. ROBERT L. TYRRELL MAR. 12, 1976 1977 LANE

          Fireman 1st grade Robert L. Tyrrell Ladder 157, received the Captain Denis W. Lane Memorial Medal for rescuing two people from a third floor apartment at 800 E. 14th Street on March 12, 1976. Firemen Tyrrell drove the company’s tower ladder to the front of the building. As he was raising th bucket it stopped and froze in place and would not budge. He then went for a 35’ ladder and placed it at the third floor window. The flames were pushing out of the first and second floor windows as Fireman Tyrrell went up the ladder to rescue a man from the third floor. Shielding the man from the flames he brought him down to safety. The man said that a bedridden woman was still on the third floor. Going back up the ladder and passing the flames Fireman Tyrrell found the 78 year old woman and dragged her to the window. During this time the tower ladder had been fixed and moved to the window. Both Tyrrell and the woman enter the safety of the bucket.

     FF. LAWRENCE MURPHY SEP. 12, 1981 1982 DOLNEY

     
       
     Fireman 1st Grade Lawrence T. Murphy Ladder 157, received the Lt. Robert R. Dolney Medal for rescuing a woman from a burning apartment at 596 Argyle Road on September 12, 1981. Fireman Murphy entered the fire apartment on his hands and knees. Beside pushing through the heat of the fire Murphy had to fight his way through a "Collier mansion." He had to climb over, around and under the junk that blocked his way. He found Ermine Harkins collapsed behind the bathroom door, blocking it from opening. Murphy forced the door open and dragged the unconscious woman to a safe place. She was not breathing and burned over 20 percent of her body. Fireman Murphy along with other firemen brought her back to life. She recovered fully after a long hospital stay.

     CAPT. STANLEY FONER, JAN. 8, 1984 1985 UFOA

     

     Captain Stanley Foner Ladder 157, received the Uniformed Fire Officers Association Medal for rescuing a woman from 1921 Avenue "I" on January 8, 1984. Upon arriving at the fire building tenants told the Captain that a woman was trapped in the building. Captain Foner forced the door of the fire apartment and made a search while other members of Ladder 157 donned their mask. He entered the apartment and started his search only to be forced back by the heat. Hearing the woman was still missing, he entered the apartment once again and this time went deeper into the burning apartment. In the rear bedroom he found the woman unconscious and covered with a blanket. Completely covering her with the blanket he dragged her through two rooms of fire to the public hallway. Ann Feslowick survived the fire due to the determination of Captain Foner.

     FF. HARVEY L. HARRELL MAR. 12, 1986 1987 THIRD ALARM

          Fireman 1st grade Harvey L. Harrell Ladder 157, received the Third Alarm Association Medal for rescuing a man from a fire at 1400 E. 52nd Street on March 12, 1986. Fireman Harrell performed his duty as the outside ventilation man, then went to the rear of the fire building to survey conditions. He forced entry through the rear door into the kitchen and began his search with the living room being fully involved in fire. Entering the bedroom Harvey located a lifeless form partially under the bed. Knowing he could not return through the kitchen because of the fire he tried to get out a window only to be trapped by window bars. Knowing he had only a short time before the room flashed over he retraced his steps back through the kitchen. He dragged the victim under the roaring fire overhead to the outside. The 72 year old man had been burned so severely that he died several hours later.

     FF. GARETH S. NIESEN APR. 5, 1991 1992 THOMPSON

     

     Fireman 1st grade Gareth S. Nielsen Ladder 157, received the Commissioner Edward Thompson Medal for rescuing a woman from a burning second floor apartment in a private dwelling at 2421 Avenue "L" on April 5, 1991. Fireman Nielsen was told that people were trapped in the fire apartment. As he was placing a ladder in the rear a woman appeared on the porch yelling her mother was in the fire apartment. Notifying the chief that he was going into the apartment to rescue the woman. He went through the window and started his search. Halfway through he heard a moan to his left and went toward the sound giving up the safety of the wall. With the heat building up in the room and a flashover happening at any moment he found Rosalie Steiner, 80 years old in the hallway and bedroom. Kneeling he dragged, and half carried her to the bedroom window where he lifted her out and on to the porch. She was burnt over forty percent of her body but did surveyed.

     LT. JEREMIAH P. COLLINS SEP. 25, 1991 1992 FIRE CHIEFS

     

     Lieutenant Jeremiah P. Collins Ladder 157, received the Fire Chiefs Association Memorial Medal for attempting the rescuing of a man in a basement bedroom at 625 Westminster Road on September 25, 1991. Lt. Collins going down the basement stairs yelled out "Is anyone down here?" and heard someone say "Help me." Going deeper into the basement he found Bruce Donelon in the fire room. Crawling under the fire he tried to pull the 300 pound man out. Another firefighter joined in trying to get the man out. The room suddenly burst into flames and the three men were taking a terrible beating. The protective fire gear protected the two firemen somewhat but all three were burning. Just in time the engine put water on the fire and the three were pulled out. Unfortunately the heat and fire were to much for the 35 year old man and he died in the hospital.

     FF. DANIEL J. DEMPSEY APR. 16, 1992 1993 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          Fireman 1st grade Daniel J. Dempsey Ladder 157, received the Brooklyn Citizens Medal for rescuing a 4 year old child from 799 E. 8th Street on April 16, 1992. Ladder 157 arrived in front of a three story wood frame house with heavy black smoke pushing from the second floor windows and cockloft. The first due engine transmitted a 10-70, a delay in getting water on the fire. Fireman Dempsey was told that children were trapped on the fire floor. Without hesitation he placed a portable ladder to the second floor and entered the smoke filled hallway. He crawled on his belly to the front bedroom and found the door locked. Breaking the door down he located the limp form of young Yisroel Frank. Not breathing Fireman Dempsey took off his mask and placed it on the young child. Crawling back into the hallway he dragged the young child to the stairs and down to safety.

     LT. ROBERT BOLKER OCT. 24, 1992 1993 MC ELLIGOTT

          Lieutenant Robert Bolker Ladder 157, received the Chief John J. McElligott Medal for the attempted rescue of a little girl from a fire at 179 Linden Boulevard on October 24, 1992. Ladder 157 arrived first at six story apartment building with smoke pushing out the first floor apartment windows. A mother was screaming that her child was in the rear bedroom. Lieutenant Bolker did not hesitate, pass the fire in the living room knowing the hydrant was not working. Once in the bedroom he started his search and found little 2 year old Itye Whyte wedged between the wall and the bed. Protecting the child as best as he could, he crawled down the hall, passing the fire in the living room that was growing. Once outside Lieutenant Bolker started CPR on the little girl until relieved by Engine 249. Despite the heroic effort made by the members of Ladder 157, the child received burns over 50% of her body and died in the hospital.

     LT. JOHN J. PRITCHARD MAR. 27, 1992 1993 LA GUARDIA

     

     Lieutenant John J. Pritchard Ladder 157, received the Mayor LaGuardia Medal for the attempted rescue of a 70 year old man at 1188 E. 34th Street on March 27, 1992. Ladder 157 arrived several minutes after Engine 255 arrival and were told that a man was trapped in the fire. Lieutenant James Greco, was being carried out after trying to rescue the trapped man. Lieutenant Pritchard entered the fire building and encountered heavy smoke and high heat. He stay low as he made his way to the bedroom, which was burning along with the living room. Once in the living room Lieutenant Pritchard found Joseph O’Leary on the bed with his clothing on fire. He pulled him from the bed, extinguished the burning clothes. The fire intensified as he was dragging the victim to safety. All during this time Lieutenant Pritchard was receiving serious burns to his neck and face. Mr. O’Leary was removed to Coney Island Hospital and succumbed to his injuries. Lieutenant Pritchard spent over two months on medical leave recovering from his burns.

     LT. JAMES M. AMATO JAN. 29, 1993 1994 FIRE BELL CLUB ASSIGNED TO B-58 AND DETAILED TO LAD. 157

     
   
     Lieutenant James M. Amato, assigned to Battalion 58 and covering in Ladder 157, received the Fire Bell Club Medal for rescuing Maryann Shapiro, age 90 years old, from 5455 Kings Highway on January 29, 1993. Ladder 157 was assigned as an additional truck to the box. Information was relayed to Lieutenant Amato that a woman was trapped on the fourth floor. Lieutenant Amato and his forcible entry team went to the fire floor and saw two apartments on fire. The doors to the two apartment were left open and a 45 mile per hour wind was blowing the fire out the doors like a blow torch. Lieutenant Amato crawled down the hallway passed the fire to apartment 4J where the woman was found semi-conscious. Two engine companies had entered the hallway and drove the fire back into the two apartments and Lieutenant Amato removed the victim down the interior stairway. The fire would burn out that floor and two other floors. If it wasn’t for Lieutenant Amato bravery Maryann Shapiro would have perished in the fire.

     Captain James M. Amato, LODD, September 11, 2001, Squad 1 

     FF. THOMAS J. GARDNER NOV. 7, 1993 1994 GOLDMAN

     

     Fireman 1st grade Thomas J. Gardner Ladder 157, received the Edith B. Goldman Medal for rescuing a woman from a basement apartment at 729 E. 26th Street on November 7, 1993. When Ladder 157 arrived people were screaming that a woman was trapped in the basement apartment. Part of the forcible entry team, Tom entered the hallway that leads to the basement and 1st floor. The door blocked the basement stairs and prevented the placement of a hoseline into the basement. Knowing this Tom went down into the basement to look for the woman. The fire was in the small kitchen across the room. Because of the limited ventilation and low ceilings the heat was building up and conditions were becoming unbearable. Continuing passed the kitchen on his belly he found the bedroom and entered it looking for the victim. He found 45 year old Jacqueline Vital, unconscious on the bed. He dragged her through the bedroom and kitchen, up the stairs and to safety. She was admitted to the hospital and would recover.

     FF. THOMAS E. CLAIR III OCT. 14, 1994 1995 THIRD ALARM

          Fireman 1st grade Thomas E. Clair III, received the Third Alarm Association Medal for rescuing a 35 year old man from 734 E. 8th Street on October 13, 1994. While enroute the company was given reports that people were trapped in the building. Smelling the fire several blocks away, Ladder 157 could not believe what they saw when pulling up in front of the fire building. A two story wood frame private dwelling that had fire coming out every window on both floors. With little time left the forcible entry team went up the partially burnt staircase to the second floor. The fire had total control of the rear bedrooms moving down the hallway to the front bedrooms. Tom raced the fire to one of the front bedroom and started his search. He located a mattress on the floor and found Eric Penzola not responding lying on it. Knowing he could not retreat back through the hallway because of the advancing fire Tom called for a ladder to carry what seemed at the time a dead man. Before a ladder could be placed against the window an engine company was putting water on the fire in the hallway. Without a second thought Tom carried the man down the hallway and down the stairs to safety. Eric would spend a long time in the hospital before recovering and getting on with his life.

     LT. ROBERT J. BOLKER DEC. 13, 1994 1995 DOUGHERTY

     

     Lieutenant Robert J. Bolker Ladder 157, received the Thomas F. Dougherty Medal for rescuing five people from a fire at 371 E. 32nd Street on December 13, 1994. Lt. Bolker received over the radio that people were trapped in the fire building. Racing in with the forcible entry team they found the fire was in the basement even though the smoke only coming out of the second floor windows. The roofman radioed that he could see some people in the rear top bedroom. Lt. Bloker worked his way to the rear bedroom were he found a 3 month boy and a 13 day old boy along with three women in their thirty’s. One by one the five victims were handed out to the members of Ladder 147. All five were overcome by smoke and after a short stay in the hospital all recovered.

     FF. ANTHONY ROCCO, JR. OCT. 8, 1990 1991 LAUFER

          Fireman Anthony Rocco, Jr. Engine 255 detailed to Ladder 157, received the Arthur J. Laufer Memorial Medal for rescuing an 88 year old lady from a fire at 1006 E. 36th Street on October 8, 1990. The first run of the night found the company responding to a report of fire in a second floor apartment. Once on the scene it was learnd that two elderly sisters were still in the fire apartment. Anthony being the can man went to the fire apartment and used his extinguisher to keep the flames in check inside the fire apartment. He entered the apartment to look for the two ladies only to be blocked by their collection of newspapers and other treasures that the ladies collected. Once through the obstacle course he located 88 year old Mary Greenhill, unconscious in the rear bedroom. Anthony could see Engine 255 in position with the hose line to attack the fire when they backed out without putting water on the fire due to a burst hose line. Knowing he did not have much time left he looked for another way out and could not find one so he closed the bedroom door to buy some extra time. Only when he heard water hitting the fire did he open the door and carry the woman out of the building and to safety.

     FF. DOMINICK M. MUSCHELLO, NOVEMBER 19, 2014, BROOKLYN BOX 22-2446,  BKLYN CITIZENS/FF LOUIS VALENTINO AWARD

     

     FF. MICHAEL RYSETNYK, DECEMBEL 11, 2015, BROOKLYN BOX 75-2441, BKLYN CITIZENS/FF LOUIS VALENTINO AWARD

     





Ladder 157 LODD:

     FF Thomas F Shortell, US Marine Corps KIA, Iwo Jima, March 8, 1945

     

     

     Thomas Francis Shortell (known to friends and family as Tommy or Tom), was the son of a New York City Firefighter. He was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1914. He was appointed to the Fire Department of New York City on June 6, 1938 and was assigned to Engine 316. On January 1st 1941 he was transferred to Ladder Company 157, where he worked until his enlistment in U.S. Marine Corps on June 27th 1944. Tom served with the 3rd Marine Division in the South Pacific. He made the ultimate sacrifice for his country when he was killed on Iwo Jima on March 8th 1945. He was survived by his mother, Helen O'Mara Shortell, his brother John (Jack) Shortell, and four children: Thomas (Tom), Carol, Gerard (Jerry) and Hellen.


Flatbush:

     

     http://www.brooklynhistory.org/exhibitions/lefferts/historic-flatbush-maps/


     



     

     

     
« Last Edit: July 07, 2018, 04:51:32 PM by mack »

 

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