Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 118145 times)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #795 on: January 09, 2019, 09:06:41 PM »
Engine 52/Ladder 52 members:

     

     

     

     

     
 
     


Engine 52/Ladder 52 medals:

     JOHN J. CAVANAGH FF. ENG. 52 JAN. 1, 1940 1941 HUGH BONNER

     JAMES P. SHANLEY FF. LAD. 52 MAR-6 MAY 8, 1988 1989 DE FRANCO

         


Engine 52/Ladder 52 LODDs:

     LIEUTENANT THOMAS O'HAGAN ENGINE 52 September 11, 2001

          Lieutenant Thomas O'Hagan lost his life in the line of duty at the World Trade Center.

         

         

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=151766

     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS CASEY LADDER 52 October 8, 1958

         

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN F. O'NEAL LADDER 52 February 14, 2011

          Firefighter John F. O'Neal died from World Trade Center-related illness.

         

          http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/Charleston/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=148800177

     RIP.  Never forget.

     



Riverdale:

     

     

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riverdale,_Bronx


















« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 08:35:05 AM by mack »

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #795 on: January 09, 2019, 09:06:41 PM »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #796 on: January 09, 2019, 10:33:03 PM »
12/1/13 Bronx 2nd Alarm 10-60 Train Derailment Box 4972 - Engine 52/Ladder 52 1st due

Location: Independence Ave & Palisade Ave

TL-46 confirming 5 cars derailed, 2 over turned major train wreck, numerous victims.

B-27 we have multiple people trapped

First Alarm/10-60
E-52,81,95,92,48
L-52,46,56 Fast,45,37
B-27,19
B-18(Safty)
B-17(Resource)
E-46(Comm. Unit)
R-3,1,4
L-116 w/C.R4
L-25 w/ C.R1
L-27 w/ C.R3
L-14,42(Soc Supports)
Sq-61,41
Car-6,1a,11,1d,4d,12,23,1,3,16d,12a,4t
RB,SB
FC
Tac-1
Rac-3
Marine-1,6
Marine Battalion
Command Tac

2nd Alarm
E-42,88,62,
L-36
B-13,26s/c (staging)
E-97 w/ Sat. 2
E-262 w/ IMT
B-?s/c (Planning)

Hazmat response
E-75,93
HM-1
HMB

Relief
E-45,67
L-59,33
B-3,11
MCC-1
Sq-252 act. Sq-41
Sq-18

Relief @13:15
E-48,71
L-29,54
Sq-270
R-6(not a type-o )

B-27 we have 1 car at the waters edge. 1 10-45 No Code give me a marine unit if you can @ 07:52
D-7 give me 2 addtional rescue companies @ 08:05
C-11 have them bring there collapse rescues with them @8:08
D-7 give me a 2nd Alarm @08:14
D-7 2 10-45 Code 1s
D-7 s/c 2 addtional engines and hazmat 1 for a decon station @08:24
R-2 to Queens relocating to R-4 @08:29
R-5 to Manhattan relocating to R-1 @08:30
D-7 per EMS as off now there is 4 Black Tag, 8 Red tag, 5 Yellow Tag,30 Green Tag @08:39
FC-Car4D reports all victims removed setting operations to check under the trains @08:49
FC-Car 3 reports all searches complete @09:25
FC- s/c the IMT Vehicle with a planning chief @09:43
FC-s/c 2 Engines 2 Trucks & 2 BCs for relief and have them report to B-26 @09:56
FC-s/c squad 252 to relieve Sq61 & Sq41 @10:56
Sq-252 need a squad to replace us where broken down @10:58
Squad 288 was told to go 10-8
Squad 18 responding @11:06
MCC1 s/c 2 Engines 2 Trucks for relief @13:15
Sq-270 relief for Sq-61 @13:15
R-6 replacing R1 @13:15

Relocation:
Engine 35 Act. Engine 75
Rescue 2 Act. Rescue 4
Rescue 5 Act. Rescue 1
Engine 316 Act. Engine 88
Engine 303 Act. Engine 38
Battalion 49 Act. Battalion 26
Battalion 10 Act. Battalion 19
Ladder 51 Act. Ladder 33
Squad 252 Act. Squad 41
Battalion 14 Act. Battalion 27






Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #797 on: January 12, 2019, 12:47:27 PM »
Engine 275/Engine 298/Engine 299/Ladder 127/Ambulance 3/Battalion 50 - firehouse - 89-56 162nd Street Jamaica, Queens  "The Big House"  1925-1965


     

     

     

     

     
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 03:14:33 PM by mack »

Offline memory master

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #798 on: January 12, 2019, 03:05:36 PM »
Mack, L127 & Bn. 50. As a side note, there were two housewatch desks in those quarters. One on the north end and another on the south end of the apparatus floor.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 03:53:54 PM by memory master »

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #799 on: January 12, 2019, 03:58:21 PM »
     Battalion 10 organized 2801 3rd Avenue w/Engine 41                   1874
     Battalion 10 new firehouse 491 E. 166th Street w/Ladder 18          1882
     Battalion 10 moved 159 E. 85th Street at Engine 22                      1898
     Battalion 10 moved 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38            1903
     Battalion 10 moved 159 E. 85th Street at Engine 22                      1904
     Battalion 10 moved 159 E. 87th Street at Ladder 13                      1960
     Battalion 10 new firehouse 159 E. 85th Street at Engine 22            1961

In 1898, Battalion 10 in the Bronx was renumbered to 14 in order to allow a new Manhattan battalion to be numbered 10.
The original intent was to keep the Manhattan battalions numbered consecutively, and for the Bronx battalions to be numbered from 14.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2019, 03:14:56 PM by fdhistorian »

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #800 on: January 12, 2019, 09:55:47 PM »
Engine 52/Ladder 52 firehouse  4550 Riverdale Avenue   Riverdale, Bronx Division 7, Battalion 27 "Riverdale"

     Combined Engine Co 52 organized 4550 Riverdale Avenue former vol firehouse  1884
     Combined Engine Co 52 became Engine 52                                                      1928
     Engine 52 new firehouse 4550 Riverdale Avenue w/Ladder 52                           1939

     Ladder 52 organized 4550 Riverdale Avenue at Engine 52                                 1928
     Ladder 52 new firehouse 4550 Riverdale Avenue w/Engine 52                           1939

      Engine 52-2  1955 - 1956

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #801 on: January 13, 2019, 01:17:57 AM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50  firehouse  153-11 Hillside Avenue  Jamaica, Queens Division 13, Battalion 50  "Hillside Hurricanes"

     Hose 5 organized 90-22 Grace Court former volunteer firehouse                                  1907
     Hose 5 became Engine 298                                                                                       1918
     Engine 298 new firehouse 89-56 162nd Street w/Engine 275, Engine 299, Ladder 127  1925
     Engine 298 new firehouse 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/Ladder 127                                  1965
     Engine 298 moved 159-06 Union Turnpike at Engine 315                                             2003
     Engine 298 returned 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/ Ladder 127                                         2003

     Ladder 77 organized 89-48 162nd Street former volunteer firehouse                            1907
     Ladder 77 became Ladder 127                                                                                  1913
     Ladder 127 new firehouse 89-56 162nd Street w/Engines 275, 298, 299                      1925
     Ladder 127 new firehouse 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/Engine 298                                 1965
     Ladder 127 moved 91-45 121st Street at Squad 270                                                  2003
     Ladder 127 returned 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/Engine 298                                         2003

     Battalion 50 organized 196 Greenwood Avenue w/Hose 2                                           1907
     Battalion 50 moved  89-58 162nd Street                                                                  1909
     Battalion 50 new firehouse 89-56 162nd Street w/Engines 275, 298, 299                    1925
     Battalion 50 new firehouse 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/Engine 298                                1965
     Battalion 50 moved 111-36 Merrick Boulevard at Engine 275                                      2003
     Battalion 50 returned 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/Engine 298                                        2003

     Ambulance 3 moved 89-56 162nd Street at Engine 298                                              1963
     Ambulance 3 new firehouse 153-11 Hillside Avenue w/Engine 298                               1965


Pre-FDNY:

     Jamaica was protected by the volunteer Jamaica Fire Department

         

         

         


FDNY replaces Jamaica Fire Department - 1907:

     


Former firehouse 90-22 Grace Court - Hose 5, Engine 298:

     

     

     


Former firehouse 89-56 162nd Street - Engine 275, Engine 298, Engine 299, Ladder 127, Battalion 50:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


153-11 Hillside Avenue firehouse:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 02:56:05 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #802 on: January 13, 2019, 01:20:02 AM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 (continued)


Engine 298:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 127:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 298/Ladder 127:

     

     


Battalion 50:

     

     

     


Ambulance 3:

     


Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50:

     

     

     

     

     

« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 01:27:52 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #803 on: January 13, 2019, 01:20:55 AM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 (continued)

Jamaica Gas Leak and Explosion 1967:

     https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/video/early-morning-gas-main-explosion-in-queens-houses-and-news-footage/454006694


     FIRE ENGINEERING New York's 13-Alarm Night of Flame  04/01/1967  By DICK SYLVIA

          Master streams used to combat radiant heat in

               

               

          A gas main leak that sent a 20-footwide column of flame 150 feet above the street resulted in a 13-alarm fire that destroyed five buildings and damaged 15 others in the Jamaica section of New York City.
         
          The first task of rousing hundreds of sleeping residents and removing them from their homes saw the margin between life and death narrowed to a fragile line when the escaping gas burst into flame. This produced the second problem—radiant heat.

          The beginning of what the fire department was to call “a major disaster” became evident when Mrs. Rose Padimha of 139-19 101st Avenue awoke in her second-story bedroom at 5:10 a.m. last January 13—a Friday. She dialed the telephone operator, who relayed her report of smelling gas to the police. The two policemen in the patrol car that was sent to investigate transmitted a fire alarm—box 4758—upon their arrival and began to get occupants out of their homes.

          Record for alarms

          Within 48 minutes after the first alarm at 5:19 a.m., the 10th alarm was struck for box 4758. And 50 minutes later, at 6:57 a.m., the 13th alarm was transmitted—the largest number of alarms in the history of the New York Fire Department.

          “The last three alarms were merely precautionary to insure an adequate water supply,” Chief of Department John T. O’Hagan explained.

          The first apparatus arriving on the first alarm. Engine 298 and Ladder 127, stalled on 101st Avenue as they reached Brisbin Street.

          It is believed that so much gas was escaping from a drip pot on a natural gas main 10 feet west of Brisbin Street that there was not enough oxygen in the atmosphere for the apparatus engines. Engine 298 stopped within a few feet of the drip pot, and Ladder 127 halted about 60 feet farther back.

          The officers of the two units ordered their men to clear the nearby homes of occupants.

          At this time, Battalion Chief Robert E. Fay arrived. After being informed of the situation by the company officers, lie ordered them to continue evacuating the area, and he immediately asked the dispatcher for a second-alarm assignment to hasten the evacuation. He also asked for more police and a repeat request for a Brooklyn Union Gas Company emergency crew. The second alarm was transmitted at 5:31 a.m.

          Tower of flame

          Slightly less than five minutes later, the escaping gas became “a vertical column of flame about 150 feet high and 20 feet wide,” as Fay described the ignition. Men in the second-a'arm companies approaching the area saw the torch erupt in the blackness of the night. So did Deputy Chief Joseph Weinhofer, Jr., of the 13th Division, who transmitted a third alarm at 5:36 a.m. while still en route.

          The source of ignition “was problematical,” according to O’Hagan. A commercial truck went through the area, and while a vehicle ignition system might have lighted off the gas, it could have been a number of other things, the chief explained.

          The 24-inch natural gas distribution main under 101st Avenue bad a drip pot just west of Brisbin Street that was designed to trap moisture in the years when the main was used for manufactured gas. Atop the drip pot was a 26-inch-diameter iron cover weighing 285 pounds. This cover was caulked and sealed with lead. Over it was 10⅝ inches of earth. The gas in the main, at 11½ psi, exerted a tremendous force on the cover. Somehow, the cover was unseated so that it was at a 30-degree angle and a third of it was off the top of the drip pot, allowing the gas to break through the street, O’Hagan explained.

          This was the situation as the gas was ignited while the first-alarm assignment of three engine and two ladder companies were getting people out of homes on 101st Avenue, Brisbin and Allendale Streets, and Cresskill Place.

           Radiation Trouble

          As the gas torched skyward, radiant heat on exposures became the dominant problem as building after building caught fire. The homes were mostly detached, two-story, wood frame construction, generally 20 to 25 feet wide and from 25 to 80 feet deep— mostly 45 feet deep. The lone three story, wood frame house had a neighborhood grocery store on the ground floor. It was only lightly damaged. A masonry, one-story, 100 X 100-foot paint factory at the northeast corner of 101st Avenue and Brisbin Street collapsed in flaming ruins. Ladder 127 burned in front of this building.

          With a 4-7 mph wind behind it, the fire moved eastward on 101st Avenue. O'Hagan credited the brick veneer construction of a few homes with helping to contain the fire. Some of these houses, the chief commented, were remarkably well constructed. He cited a row of brick veneer homes with common walls separating them. The home nearest the fire was burned out, but the home adjoining it remained livable because the masonry party wall remained intact.

          Some of the brick veneer homes became involved when exterior wood trim or wood window frames caught fire. A brick, four-story apartment house, 50 X 100 feet, on the west side of Allendale Street near 101st Avenue, was lightly damaged after fire entered through the rear windows in the top two stories.

               

               

               

          The gas problem

          As the fire spread and apparatus kept rolling in, the gas flame continued to burn. Firemen dared not try to extinguish the flame for fear that unburned gas would be let loose in the area. They had to wait for the gas flow to be shut off by gas company crews, who also had the problem of limiting the shutdown of service to as small an area as possible. This was because difficulties arise when service is resumed. Then it is necessary to make certain that appliances that had been operating at the time of the shutdown are turned off and pilot lights are relighted. The wider the area, the more difficult the job and the more chances for a mishap.

          As pressure in the main was reduced by utility crews, the radiation problem created by the flame began to shrink.
“Until they reduced the pressure and flame on the main, we still had that exposure problem,” O’Hagan explained. “We weren’t sure of containing the fire until we saw that reduction taking place.”

          The main was finally bagged by introducing an inflatable bag into the main some distance from each side of the drip pot and then pressurizing the bags to form barriers to further passage of gas at those points. After this was done, an excavation was made around the drip pot, and the cover was replaced.

          As Chief O’Hagan was responding, he drew a diagram of the fire area on a map, using information from progress reports received by radio. Then he drew a defense perimeter: 97th Avenue on the north, Liberty Avenue on the south, Allendale Street on the east and Brisbin Street on the west.
 
               

          He put assistant chiefs in charge of three sides of this area and took charge of the southern line himself. The chief also ordered all companies that had not yet arrived to report to perimeter command posts.

          “Unless you set up a perimeter for fire defense and put a chief in charge,” O’Hagan said, “everybody gets confused.”

          The first objective, the chief declared, was to keep the fire from jumping Allendale Street on the east. This was done by positioning two multiversals (deluge sets) on the roof of Public School 50, just east of Allendale Street on 101st Avenue. Another master stream was set up on the fourth floor of the school. Still another deluge set was placed on the roof of a brick building across the avenue from the school.

          These tactics were successful. The fire did not cross Allendale Street.

          Water curtains used

          Meanwhile, other companies had put numerous deck pipes and deluge sets into service. Many of these were used to provide water curtains to contain the fearful production of radiant heat. Other master streams were directed on blazing buildings. In some cases, hand lines were shifted to service master stream equipment.

          “The tendency in large-scale fires,” O’Hagan stated, “is to use too many hand lines. We had to shut some down and put them into master stream equipment.”

          A total of 76 lines were laid, most of them for master streams, by some 400 firemen with 70 pieces of apparatus. Ladder pipes were not used because of the speed with which the fire spread. As O’Hagan explained, it takes too long to move an aerial with a pipe working, and it was feared that more apparatus might be trapped in flame.

          With the use of a multitude of master streams, water supply was a problem. The actual fire area, supplied by a private water company, had mains that were overtaxed. Therefore, many of the engines were assigned to relay pumping. A 48-inch city main at Sutphin Avenue and 101st Avenue, a long three blocks to the east, provided a large supply of water.

          Big hose used

          Although the Super Pumper itself was out of service at the time, the rest of the Super Pumper system—the large tractor-trailer tender and three satellites—was used to advantage with the 4&-inch hose these units carry. This hose, because of lower friction losses and big capacity, simplified the problem of getting large amounts of water to the fire.
Satellites 1 and 3 operated deck guns with 700-gpm adjustable fog nozzles, and Satellite 2 used a 2-inch tip on its deck gun for two hours on 102nd Avenue, between Brisbin and Allendale Streets. Satellite 1 was positioned on 101st Avenue, between Brisbin and Cresskill Streets, and Satellite 3 was on Brisbin Street, between 101st and 102nd Avenues.
As conditions improved, hand lines were used to extinguish fires darkened down by master streams. All structural fires were under control by 9 a.m., about three and a half hours after the first alarm. By 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the fireground complement was down to a second-alarm assignment. At this time, the signal that the overall situation was under control was transmitted.

          Gas company employees then went into every house they could enter to check for leaks and unlit pilot lights. All appliances had to be checked before gas service could be restored to unburned homes affected by the cutoff of gas service.

          After 6 p.m., only a reserve engine with a detail of men manning one hose line was left on the fireground. This piece remained there for four days to guard against any flareup.

          Although news reports at first told of as many as 12 blocks aflame in Jamaica, the fire was contained mostly within two blocks on 101st Street, where five buildings were destroyed by flames and nine others damaged. In addition to the lightly damaged apartment house on Allendale Street, light damage also was done to two woodframe, three-story homes on Brisbin Street and three wood-frame, 2-story homes on 102nd Avenue. The master stream attack won out over the radiant heat.

          Of the five fire fighters injured, two were treated for foreign bodies in their right eyes. Another fireman’s shoulder was fractured and his right hand was cut. Two others were burned on their faces. No civilians were injured despite the extent of the fire at a time when they had to be awakened.

          O’Hagan estimated the replacement cost of the two pieces of apparatus and their equipment at $100,000. Seven civilian autos and trucks were damaged or destroyed by flames.


The Jamaica Gas Leak and Fire - Division 7 - August 2017:

     https://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/August-2017-Jamaica-Gas-Leak-13-Alarms.pdf

     https://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/August-2017-Part-2-of-3.pdf

     https://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/August-2017-Part-3-of-3.pdf


Engine 298:

     


Ladder 127:

     

     

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #804 on: January 13, 2019, 01:21:41 AM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 (continued)


Engine 298 - 1933:

     


Engine 298/Ladder 127 medals:

     JAMES E. GRANEY, JR. LT. ENG. 298 JUL. 6, 1996 1997 HISPANIC

         

     FRANK W. ROSS FF. LAD. 127 APR. 30, 1922 1923 PRENTICE

         

     JOHN A. CALDERONE FF. LAD. 127 E-275 DEC. 18, 1977 1978 STEUBEN

         

          Note - BC Jack Calderone joined the FDNY September 1973, assigned to Eng. 290. He was laid off in 1975. Came back to Eng.303, Lad.127 and Rescue 4. Promoted to Lt of HazMat, Squad 1 and Rescue 5. Promoted to Captain of Rescue 3, and again promoted to Battalion Chief in the 22 Bn. Jack is a very respected, decorated member of the FDNY, a firefighter we strive to be. He worked through the 'war years' of the FDNY and he saw the best and worst of NYC, and lost many friends on 9/11. He is also a well known fire service author and has written extensive history on all types of FDNY apparatus makes and models. - from NYC Fire Wire

     ROBERT M. MYETTE FF. LAD. 127 DEC. 4, 1983 1984 EMERALD

         

     JAMES M. MC FARLAND FF. LAD. 127 APR. 6, 1995 1996 WILLIAMS

         

     CHARLES S. FRAME FF. LAD. 127 2003 PULASKI

         
 
     MICHAEL J. CULEN FF. LAD. 127 2003 THOMPSON

         

     DAVID C. BENGYAK LT. LAD127 JUL. 18, 2006 BELLA STIEFEL

         

     ENGINE 298 OCT. 3, 2016 2017 CURRAN /BURN CENTER

         

          Members of Engine Co. 298, Ladder Co. 127 and Ladder Co. 36 received the Lt. James Curran/New York Firefighters Burn Center Foundation Medal for their actions in Jamaica last Oct. 3. Engine 298 was dispatched to a report of police dealing with an emotionally disturbed person who was threatening to blow up an apartment building. Upon their arrival smoke and flames were visible in multiple windows of a third-floor apartment. Lt. Ralph Longo’s had to get nearby emergency vehicles moved to a safe distance and string hose lines before attacking a fire that had gasoline and natural gas as accelerants. Witnesses said the subsequent explosion blew out all the windows, and the fire advanced to the fourth and fifth floors before firefighters got the upper hand. Longo and firefighters James Branch, Howayne Delisser, Ross Dubner, Garret Langdon and Erich Smith were honored.


Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 LODDs:

     LIEUTENANT JOHN M. CLANCY BATTALION 50 December 31, 1995

         

          https://www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/2d-firefighter-killed-job-hit-fiery-gust-article-1.711930

     FIREFIGHTER GARRETT W. LANGDON ENGINE 298 December 6, 1953

         

          Fireman Garrett W. Langdon of Engine 298 died on December 6, 1953. He was injured on November 24, 1953 while operating at a fire at 139-42 Hillside Avenue. At the time it was not considered a line of duty death. On March 8, 1955 the Board of Trustees of the Fire Department Pension Fund reversed their earlier decision and said his death was in the performance of his duties. He was appointed to the Department on July 1, 1946 and served his whole career with Engine 298. He was forty years old. (From "The Last Alarm")

     FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY W. DeFALCO ENGINE 298 January 9, 1974

           

          Firefighter Anthony W. DeFalco - Engine 298 - 13-year veteran - suffered a fatal heart attack while operating at a dwelling fire

     FIREFIGHTER GEORGE J. MURPHY LADDER 127 July 21, 1956   

     FIREFIGHTER JAMES J. O'SHEA LADDER 127 September 27, 2003

         

          https://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/30/nyregion/city-firefighter-dies-after-queens-blaze.html

     LIEUTENANT ROBERT STEGMEIER LADDER 127 February 16, 2012

         

          Lieutenant Robert Stegmeier, Ladder 127, died February 16, 2012 from WTC-related illness.


     RIP.  Never forget.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 03:23:43 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #805 on: January 13, 2019, 01:22:25 AM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 (continued)


Jamaica:

     Name origin - Jamaica is an English distortion of an Algonquin tribe that inhabited this Long Island outpost — the Jameco Indians (also referred to as the Yamecah tribe). They were named after the Algonquin word for beaver.  (from http://www.boweryboyshistory.com/2008/09/name-that-neighborhood-why-is-jamaica.html)

     

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica,_Queens


     

     

     

     

     

     


« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 02:58:51 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #806 on: January 13, 2019, 01:29:18 AM »
3 ALARM FIRE HILLSIDE AVE AND 148 STREET QUEENS - 1990

     

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #807 on: January 13, 2019, 12:54:36 PM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 (continued)

Jamaica Gas Leak and Explosion 1967:
 

http://nycfire.net/forums/index.php/topic,13442.msg145139.html#msg145139

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #808 on: January 13, 2019, 01:21:01 PM »
Engine 298/Ladder 127/Battalion 50 (continued)

Jamaica Gas Leak and Explosion 1967:
 

http://nycfire.net/forums/index.php/topic,13442.msg145139.html#msg145139


January 13, 1967 Jamaica Gas Leak and Explosion - from fdhistorian link above:


Chief K's incident summary -

     "Another report on the 1967 Jamaica Gas Fire from the Bell Club Newsletter Thanks to JOR.... QUOTE...50 years ago this month, on Friday January 13, 1967 a major gas explosion occurred at 101 Avenue and Creskill Place in Queens. This incident resulted in the transmission of 13 alarms. The following is an edited and abbreviated version of the run-down that appeared in the January-February-March 1967 issue of the “Third Alarmer”. I have also taken the liberty of using some of the abbreviations I use in summaries of the current rundowns. See WNYF 1967 2nd issue for additional information regarding this incident.
5:19AM: Box 4758 - E270, E298, L127, BC51 (first due units E303, L126 & BC50 were on another run). 5:31AM: 22-4758 - B/O BC51 “for a massive gas rupture. Precautionary 2nd alarm transmitted to utilize companies to evacuate the neighborhood in conjunction with the NYPD. All units to report 1 block west of Cresskill Pl and 101 Ave and meet BC51. Citizens in immediate area are being evacuated. Brooklyn Union Gas urgently requested to respond immediately”. Response: E308, E302, E275, R4, L155, DC13, Searchlight 24, Safety Unit Car 500, Photo Unit, FC2, SAT3 and Car 956 (Satellite Officer). 5:36AM: Third alarm B/O DC13 (DC Winegar) - E315, E305, E301, L125, BC54...FD Ambulance 3, Superpumper System and Assistant Chief on duty – Francis J Love (Car ...DC13 reported gas leak had erupted into a flaming holocaust!!! ”Flaming fire now erupting from manholes”...DOUBTFUL... 5:39AM: Fourth Alarm B/O DC13...E293, E317, E299 & L142...”BC51 to Queens----Have all 4th alarm companies respond in to fire and use heavy caliber streams in any direction possible. Special call two additional BC’s (BC50, BC39) and have them assume control on east side of fire at Allendale. Also notify Con Edison....” 5:47AM: Via Radio – “DC13 to Queens --- All 4th alarm units to respond North and West and assume defensive positions...TRANSMIT A FIFTH ALARM and have units approach from the East...SEVERAL BUILDINGS NOW INVOLVED!!” FIFTH ALARM: E319, E236, E252, E232 & L151...5:50AM: Car 5 – Chief of Department JOHN T. O’HAGAN... ”Responding to Fifth alarm...notify gas utility companies to respond...emphasize this is a major incident...will require abnormal response of
(utilities)...everything available to be sent...Have high officials of such companies also respond 5:51AM: AC FRANCIS LOVE...”Have arrived at scene at 101 Avenue and Liverpool Street body of fire approximately 100’ in diameter...Car 8 located 100’ East of fire...approximately half a dozen buildings involved...practically impossible to enter the fire area...” 5:55AM: Car 8 – “Recommend to Car 5 (en-route) that a 3rd alarm Boro Call be transmitted”. Car 5 agreed and advised that instructions be given to units responding on Boro Call to have a chief in command of each sector and have them anticipate the arrival and control of companies responding...5:56AM: A 3rd alarm response of engines only normally assigned to Brooklyn Box 958 – Atlantic & Bedford Aves. responded to Queens Box 4758...5:58AM: Car 8...”Have (Boro Call) companies respond in on Liberty & approximately 100 Ave. Send 4 companies to 101 Ave and Allendale”...1st alarm E235, E219, E280...2nd alarm: E214, E234, E209...3rd alarm: E249, E256, E230, E210...6:04AM: Car 8 – “Recommend to Car 5 that Boro Call be increased to a FIFTH ALARM & have these units respond in to 101 Ave. and Brisbin St.” Car 5 approved recommendation & radioed dispatcher to transmit 5th alarm Boro Call and to stand-by to receive instructions to set up a defense...Requested radio be kept clear for urgent fire traffic from Car 5 – Chief of Dept. O’HAGAN. At 6:05AM the following report received from Car 5...”Center of fire incident is to be taken as 101 Ave & Brisbin St...East Front – Allendale St; West Front – Sanders Pl; North Front – Atlantic Ave; South Front – Liberty Av...Have one Staff Officer on each (of above) sectors or fronts... 6:06AM: 4th alarm: E211, E226, E217, E207; 5th alarm: E269, E222, E248, E220...6:14AM: TOWER LADDER #1 special called to scene by orders of Car 5...6:15AM: Satellite 1 to respond to 101 Ave & Brisbin; Satellite 2 to approach from North end of fire and stretch lines two blocks below fire area... 6:20AM: SUPERPUMPER responding to Sutphin Blvd & 103 Ave where a large 48” main was available for water supply...6:35AM: “Car 5 to CITY-WIDE ”Prepare to transmit an additional Boro Call...will give order when required...have all utility companies respond to 101 Ave & Brisbin St“. 6:37AM: “CITY-WIDE to Car 5”...CON ED and all
utilities notified and are responding...6:50AM: Car 5 advised all incoming Boro Call units & Tower Ladder to respond to Liverpool and 101 Aves. 6:56AM: “BY ORDERS OF CAR 5 – TRANSMIT AN ADDITIONAL 3RD ALARM BORO CALL”.6:57AM: A 3rd alarm response of engines only due to respond to Manhattan Box 174 Bowery and Canal St, were to respond instead to Queens Box 4758...1st alarm; E9, E55, E31...2nd alarm; E17, E15, E7, E32...3rd alarm; E27, E33, E13 and E10. 6:59AM: “CITY-WIDE TO FIELD COMM UNIT” ”The American Red Cross requests all evacuees to respond to St Pius Church, 106 Ave & Liverpool St”...Field Comm 2 complied with this request and presently hundreds of men women and children – in various stages of shock and fright – came to the Church seeking help and comfort which was quickly forthcoming....7:03AM: (Via Manhattan Radio)...”All 3rd alarm engine companies responding from Manhattan are to proceed to Sutphin Blvd and 103 Ave and prepare to relay water (from Superpumper)...”7:13AM: PROGRESS REPORT from Car 5: “Fire front on 97 Ave., Allendale St, Liberty Ave & Cresskill Pl. Center of fire is a large gas main break at Brisbin & 101 Ave. There are an undetermined number of private residential homes that have been involved in fire. Unable to extinguish main body of fire which is caused by a large column of illuminating gas which is burning at a height of approximately 50 to 75 feet...Defensive lines have been established to attempt to confine fire to present involvement. 8:11AM: BY ORDER OF CAR 5: All companies up to and including the (original) 5th alarm assigned on Box 4758 are to be relieved at the scene & their relief are to report to 101 Ave. and Allendale St. Relief of all Boro Call units are to remain in quarters unless receiving special instructions...9:51AM: PROGRESS REPORT #8 FROM CAR 5: “Structural fires under control...gas fires extinguished...gas leakage has not been controlled...overall control will not be given until gas leak is stopped.10:05AM: SOCONY GAS & OIL UNIT to respond...11:16AM: Satellite 1 in service... Satellites 2 & 3 still
operating...12:02PM: SUPERPUMPER SYSTEM leaving scene by orders of DAC Ratner...3:21PM: PROGRESS REPORT #9 FROM CAR 5: “Gas leakage stopped...overall problem under control. Car 5 leaving the scene...END OF REPORT.     UNQUOTE."



Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #809 on: January 15, 2019, 09:34:04 AM »
Engine 151 original firehouse 190 Butler Avenue  Tottenville, Staten Island

     

     

     


     - former firehouse of volunteer Eureka Engine 1  -  1888-1905
     - Engine 151 originally organized as FDNY Engine 201  -  1905
     - Engine 201 became Engine 151  -  1913
     - new firehouse 7219 Amboy Road  -  1930
« Last Edit: January 15, 2019, 09:38:16 AM by mack »