Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 157080 times)

Offline scoobyd

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2018, 08:43:24 PM »
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2018, 08:43:24 PM »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2018, 09:00:09 PM »
 Engine 83/Ladder 29  - from "1st Responder Broadcast Network"

"'83 Engine and 29 Truck'

     By Larry Woodcock Correspondent   1st Responder Newspaper     Story Number 032615109

     Disclaimer: This article is a direct street report from our correspondent and has not been edited by the 1st Responder newsroom.


     The South Bronx has always been synonymous with mean streets and urban decay. Mention the South Bronx and right away people remember buildings and blocks on fire and crime on such a grand scale that police officers didnít even want to work there.

     Thankfully, times have changed and places have improved. So too has the area known as Mott Haven.
Originally owned by the Morris family, it is also known as Port Morris with a population of over 50,000 within a square mile today. It is dominated by tenements and large public housing projects.
From the end of the 1800ís through the 1940ís, the neighborhood was quickly developed and at the same time became an upper middle class residential area marked by elaborate brownstones and became known as Doctors Row and the Irish Fifth Avenue.
     
     With its large German and Irish population made possible by public transportation, it supported the construction of tenement buildings. One of the cityís largest parades took place here every year on Easter Sunday in the 1940ís and 1950ís, marching down Willis Avenue to 138th Street. Saint Annís church, which was built in 1840, is the oldest church in the Bronx and is located on Saint Annís Avenue. It was added to the Register of Historic Places in 1980 and includes a graveyard that dates back to the early 1700ís.

     Mott Haven is also home to DaíBums on DaíHill, 83 and 29. The nickname goes back to the 1930ís, when surrounding companies would refer to them as such. Rivalries were much bigger then as competition was fierce.

     This firehouse was built in 1905 and opened in 1906 to incorporate two new companies. On January 31, 1906, 83 Engine was organized and on February 1, 1906 so too was 29 Truck.
At the time, Mott Haven had become a major shopping district for the Bronx (along 138th Street) and the need for more adequate fire protection was becoming apparent. The early days of firemen back in those days were typical of the times, ten days on followed by one day off and four hours a day for meals.

     As the neighborhood grew, so did the call volume and in the mid to late 1960ís as in so many urban areas, it changed overnight-first with civil unrest then in the 1970ís it was stricken by social and physical decline.  That was followed by drugs, crime, and the neglect by the city during its fiscal crisis. Building abandonment and arson swept through like a plague. Both companyís runs jumped from less then 300 runs per year in 1966 to over 5,000 in 1968. It even topped 6,000 in 1973. The trend continued until the early 1980ís.  Combined, the companies received over thirty unit citations and fourteen individual medals of valor.

     Two members were killed in the line of duty.

     Fighting fires one after the other and multiple fires burning simultaneously became the norm until virtually nothing was left to burn.  Some neighborhoods lost as many as 90 percent of their buildings and with 83 and 29, theirs was no different.

     With so many notable fires in the cityís history, one very memorable fire occurred with 83 and 29 first due.  On December 29, 1989 at 1:10 p.m., a backhoe accidentally ruptured a high-pressure gas main at 132nd Street and Locust.  The enormous explosion was felt in quarters as well as ten miles away. Ensuing was a fireball, 100 feet in the air and visible for blocks.  First responding 83 and 29 did all they could to evacuate nearby buildings, as five alarms were transmitted.  One worker was killed immediately and a civilian was blown into the East River, dieing later that night. The blast created a 25-foot deep crater and the heat from the fire melted cars and buses right down to their frames.  No structures were lost due to the quick and decisive actions of the firefighters and just plain luck.

     Along with 83 and 29, Satellite 2 responded out of this house when it was organized on October 1, 1965.  Members of the engine would take it on second alarms or greater, until the satellite relocated to 72 Engine in July of 1975."

     - http://www.1strespondernews.com/webpages/news/displaynews.aspx?PT=columns&cat=FDNY%20Houses&ID=f0c02455-35e6-44c4-950b-2c72104c6331
« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 06:37:56 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2018, 09:09:07 PM »
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.

Scoobyd - Thanks alot for TL 29 info.  What years did they have a tower ladder assigned?  I will make appropriate notes in company details. 

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2018, 09:13:15 PM »
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.

Obituary - Eli V. Giaquinto

     

Feb 13, 1936 - May 1, 2017

Passed away unexpectedly at CPMC in San Francisco. Born and raised in Harlem, NYC to Babette and Peride Giaquinto. Eli was a navy veteran and decorated NYC fireman. He drove the ladder truck at Engine 83, Ladder 29 "Da Bums On Da Hill" So. Bronx and retired after 25 yrs. He moved to SF after meeting Susan, who became the love of his life. Eli started two successful business in SF, Giaquinto Janitorial and Great Escape Fire Escape Service. Eli had a warm and generous heart that showed by spoiling any animals. He would cook special meals for Truckie, Maggie, Rocky, Rita and Kook-A-La.

He loved playing softball, starting in NYC as a teenager until age 58 in the SF bar leagues. Eli also spent his years having fun as a bartender at Zhivago's and "The Bell" and being a patron to many others. He frequented the Abbey Tavern with everyone laughing from his stories complete with NY accent while drinking his favorite, a Makers Mark Manhattan on the rocks.
Eli was into gaming and had the magic touch in choosing many winning horses at Bay Meadows OTB, picking yearly football pool winners; even just winning the 2017 Masters Golf pool by picking the long shot. His infamous AA "Attitude Adjustment" party he hosted with Susan for 12 years and monthly poker nights with "the guys" allowed him to express his love for entertaining friends.

Everyone has a favorite "Eli" story to smile upon; The Big "E" will be missed by all.

He leaves behind his wife, Susan Stanich Giaquinto; daughter Kim Giaquinto Hart, granddaughters Toni Marie Wright (Benny), Sammi Jo Jean; and Kayla Rae Powell, daughter of the late Lori Giaquinto-Powell; sister and brother-in-law Francine Stanich Bailey and Jim Bailey; nephew Michael Bailey; half-brother and sisters Bill, Carol, Marian and Nancy.
A Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, August 26th at the Irish Cultural Center of San Francisco at Noon.

     - Published in San Francisco Chronicle on May 14, 2017

RIP.


Great Escape Fire Escape Company

     http://greatescapeinc.com/about-us/

« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 09:17:23 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2018, 09:36:18 PM »
Ladder 29 - 1986 Seagrave rearmount:

     

     - thanks Willie D

Offline scoobyd

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2018, 10:01:22 PM »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2018, 10:10:20 PM »

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2018, 10:14:41 PM »
     That firehouse was one of my favorites to visit back around 1960-64 because they kept three pumpers there. E83's pumper was a 1959 Mack C-95 1000gpm (#1024), their hosewagon was a 1947 American LaFrance (#9025 ex-E220) 750gpm "bathtub" that we kids used to sit in, and a 1954 Ward LaFrance Civil Defense pumper C.D. 46 that was used as a 2nd pc. wagon more often than the '47 ALF. In 1963, they got a 1954 Mack L 1000gpm (#1099 ex-E10) that would be there until 1965 when Satellite 2 came along. Two years later, from 1967-69, I would get to see that '54 Mack almost every day when I worked at a Camera store next to Engine 65 on W. 43rd St. BTW, Ladder 29's 1960 American LaFrance was the first 100ft. aerial assigned to the Bronx. The next Bronx 100ft. aerials in came in 1962 with L19 & L27 getting 1962 Seagraves and L31 & L41 getting 1962 ALF's.

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2018, 10:22:15 PM »
Engine 83's 1947 ALF (front/left) and 1959 Mack (rear/right) operating at the 1961 "Ice House fire" at 137th St. & Rider Ave. Ladder 29's aerial with two ladderpipes is seen on the right side of the 2nd photo. The aerial on the left was a 1959-60 Mack/Maxim, either L14 or L30.




« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 10:28:13 PM by guitarman314 »

Offline mac8146

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2018, 10:26:44 PM »
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80ís early 90ís but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95í tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75í tower again.

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2018, 10:30:03 PM »
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80ís early 90ís but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95í tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75í tower again.
There was an issue regarding tower ladder responses onto bridge from Randalls to Wards Island.
 

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2018, 02:33:41 AM »
Yes the weight of the TL over the Bridge to Randalls Island was the problem.






















 

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2018, 02:50:13 AM »
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.
I remember LAD*29 before TL's were in fashion & Charlie Bohan was the Chauf  of 29 when we 108 while interchanged with 106 (by request) Relocated to 29. 

Offline nfd2004

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2018, 07:17:48 AM »
 I too had also heard it was the weight of the Tower Ladder (TL 29) being the reason for the change to a rear mount. A friend and member here, BFD151, had been an auxiliary firefighter with 83/29/14 back in the early 70s before the FDNY closed about 50 companies and laid off about 300 firefighters.

 With those lay offs, it was the first time that anybody had heard of such an event. Even during the Great Depression of the 1930s, no firefighters were ever laid off. Job security was given to firefighters for the protection of it's citizens. And this happened during the busiest time in history for the FDNY.

 How that city (NYC) didn't burn down with nothing left still amazes me. Of course the neighborhood of 83/29 certainly showed the scares of one such neighborhood that came pretty close.

Offline 811

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2018, 03:15:18 PM »
Wasn't the bridge that restricted Towers just beyond, and south of, the entrance to the Rock?  At one time the roadway spanned Little Hell Gate a waterway that separated Randalls and Wards Islands. It was ultimately filled, but the remaining bridge may still not have allowed the weight.  I think the bridge or its ramp was used in a roadblock scene toward the end of "The French Connection" or some similar cop movie.