Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 19069 times)

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4718
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #90 on: February 10, 2018, 01:50:24 PM »
1910: Mike, the Extraordinary Trolley-Riding Fire Dog of Engine Company 8

     

     Mike was the fire dog of Engine Company 8 from 1908 to 1914. Twice, he won the blue ribbon in the Dalmatian class at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden.  Mike was no ordinary fire dog. In fact, he was no ordinary Dalmatian. As the son of Oakie and Bess, two of the most famous mascot dogs in the history of the Fire Department of New York, he was destined for greatness.

    Oakie was raised in Newport, Rhode Island on Oakland Farm, the residence of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt. In March 1907, Vanderbilt shipped the dog by crate to Engine Company 39 at Fire Headquarters after he heard that their fire dog, Pinkie, was killed trying to slide down the pole at the firehouse. Oakie was placed in charge of Foreman Edward J. Levy.  Mike’s father, Oakie, was raised on Oakland Farm, the country residence of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt in Newport, Rhode Island.

    Bess also came from a litter of aristocratic dogs, but her master is not known. As the story goes, he very much admired the work of the firemen who responded to a fire at his house, so he decided to give them a Dalmatian.
One day he drove up to the firehouse of Engine Company No. 8 in his touring car and gave them a puppy. He didn’t say who he was, but told them that the dog’s name was Bess and that he wanted her to be a real dog working with firemen.

     Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, Sr. was the third son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Claypoole Gwynne. He was among the 1,198 passengers who died on the RMS Lusitania when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat on May 7, 1915, off the coast of Ireland. He was called a hero for helping others into lifeboats – he even offered his own life jacket to a woman with an infant even though he couldn’t swim. Vanderbilt’s body was never recovered.

     Boisterous, beefy Michael Creegman, aka, Mickey the Breeze, clicked with little pup right off the bat, and took her uptown every night for dinner. Perhaps he had connections, or perhaps it was his dominating presence, but somehow Mickey got her a special pass to ride the Third Avenue Railroad trolley cars with him.

     In March 1908, Bess gave birth to several noble pups. From the litter, a puppy the firemen named Mike was selected and turned over to driver David M. Lynx of Engine Company 8.  Shortly after Mike starting training for the position of fire dog with Engine Company 8, Bess was transferred to a quieter station house in Queens to recover from injuries sustained from running into burning buildings.

     Since she would no longer need her surface rail pass, Fireman David Lynx escorted Mike to the office of Receiver Frederick Wallington Whitridge to see if it could be transferred to Bess’ son.

     Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 8 was organized on September 11, 1865. The company spent the first four years at 128 E. 50th Street, and then moved to its current location at 165 East 51st Street in 1869. Today the company shares headquarters with Ladder Company 2 and Battalion 8.

     Now, Mike was not one for acknowledging anyone not wearing a fireman’s uniform. But according to David Lynx, he jumped right up on Whitridge’s lap “just like a politician asking for a favor.” Whitridge gave the fireman permission to transfer the pass to Mike, saying, “It’s the only pass of the kind ever issued by the road, and if Mike is willing to take all the risks and not sue the company in case of accident I guess we’ll transfer the pass to him.”

     Frederick Whitridge of 16 East 11th Street was appointed Receiver of the Third Avenue Railroad on January 6, 1908, following its foreclosure under the collapse of the Metropolitan Street Railway, which then controlled the rail company. In 1910, the Third Avenue Railway was chartered, acquiring all the properties of the former Third Avenue Railroad. Whitridge was named president of the new company around 1915.

     The special pass was engraved on a silver plate attached to his collar, which also held a tiny brass fire helmet. The inscription read: “To conductors: permission is hereby granted to carry a fire dog on the cars of this company.

     All the conductors were instructed to honor this pass, which let him ride back and forth on the front platform of all the Third Avenue lines. Mike used the pass often to go home with the firemen for dinner and to visit his fire dog pals in uptown fire houses.

     The Third Avenue Railroad Company formed in 1852 and began operating its horse-drawn cars on July 3, 1853. By 1859, using the 125th Street Railroad and tracks along 10th Avenue (Amsterdam Avenue), the line ran from the Astor House (Broadway and Park Row) north along Park Row, the Bowery, and Third Avenue to 130th Street near the Harlem River, a distance of about 8 miles.

     One of Mike’s best canine friends was Jerry, an ordinary mongrel attached to what was then the 29th Precinct at 163 E. 51st Street. Jerry was brought to the police station on March 4, 1909, by a woman who had found him outside starving and shivering. Captain John J. Lantry accepted the dog and the men named him Jerry in honor of the station’s doorman (they were originally going to call him Bill Taft in honor of President William Taft’s inauguration that year but the vote went to Jerry).

     One of the dogs’ favorite activity was taking the ferry-boat from East 53rd Street to Blackwell’s Island. If it was a warm day, they’d go swimming to cool off. Sometimes they would stay there for two or three days, but they always returned to their respective stations.

     By the mid-1880s, the Third Avenue Railroad Company began operating cable cars on the Tenth Avenue cable line and 125th Street line. The surface railway used cable cars as well as horse-drawn streetcars until 1899 when the company switched over to electric-powered trolleys.

When it came to the job, though, Mike and Jerry were all business. Jerry would accompany the policeman on patrol or ride along with the patrol wagon that picked up the prisoners for night court, and Mike would ride along with the fire engines. The two never switched jobs or mixed pleasure with business.

     Mike did his job very well, and the firemen say he saved many lives. He’d jump up and down in excitement as the horses, Jerry, Pat, and Miguel got into their harnesses, and would run ahead to bark and snap at pedestrians in cross streets to let them know the horses were coming. On the scene of the fire, Mike would always run into the buildings with the firemen, just like he mother once did. His reward on hot nights was getting hosed down with the horses when their work was done.

     Mike’s friend Jerry was attached to the 29th Precinct – originally the 19th – which was established at 163 East 51st Street on September 7, 1877. Today it’s known as the 17th Precinct.

     Mike’s two other good four-legged friends at the firehouse were a big grey horse named Jerry who also arrived in 1908 and a large black cat named Tom. The three animals loved being together, and always slept in Jerry’s stall – Mike would put his head on Jerry’s neck and Tom would sleep on Jerry’s back. Jerry fussed over his small friends in the stall, and would always lie down carefully so as not to crush them.

     When an alarm came in at night, Tom would jump out of the way and walk to the street to watch the engines pull away. Then he’d go back inside to sleep until his friends came home (who said cats were not as smart as dogs?) Actually, one time Tom tried to ride on Jerry’s back as he raced to a fire. He held on for a few seconds and then jumped, landing on his end and injuring himself (so maybe he wasn’t that smart).

     Although Mike usually went inside the buildings with the men, he must have sensed that his friend Jerry was about to lose his job when he noticed the horse was falling asleep on the scene. According to Captain Joseph Donovan, no sooner would Dave Lynx place a blanket over his team, Jerry would drop down in the gutter and take a nap.
Dave and the engine men Dennis McNamara and Frank Leonard didn’t know what to do – but Mike had an idea.
For the next few nights, Mike remained outside with the horses and began nipping Jerry on the knees as soon as he started to kneel down. Sometimes he’d nip him 10 times in a half hour, but eventually the trick worked and Jerry stopped falling asleep on the job.

     On December 5, 1914, Jerry stumbled and fell while racing to a fire. The large horse landed on top of Mike, crushing his hind legs. The firemen carried Mike back to the station and placed him in Jerry’s stall to quiet the horse – she seemed to know that the end was near for her dear canine friend.

     Although Mike had a short life, it was a very rewarding one. Not only did he help save lives, he also took first place in the Dalmatian class at the 34th annual Westminster Kennel Club show at Madison Square Garden in 1910 and 1911. The class was specifically dedicated to firemen’s dogs. In 1910, second place went to two-year-old Smoke II of Engine Company 68 on Jay Street in Brooklyn.

     This story is dedicated to the families and friends of the firefighters from Engine 8, Ladder 2, and Battalion 8 who made the supreme sacrifice on September 11th, 2001.


     http://hatchingcatnyc.com/2015/02/21/mike-trolley-riding-fire-dog-engine-8/


Engine 8 firehouse/17th Precinct:
 
     
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 01:54:33 PM by mack »

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #90 on: February 10, 2018, 01:50:24 PM »

Offline CVILLE 7111

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 375
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #91 on: February 10, 2018, 09:47:51 PM »
Slid my first pole with my Dad there!

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4718
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #92 on: February 11, 2018, 08:10:19 PM »
FDNY Responds to Great Baltimore Fire - February 1904

FDNY Companies - Engines 5, 7, 12, 13, 16, 26, 27, 31, 33  H&L 5  - 85 members

     

Chief - John Howe, Battalion 8

     

FDNY Surgeon - Dr Harry M. Archer 


LODD - Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly, Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and died - RIP.


"Great Baltimore Fire"

It was at 1:40 A.M. on Feb. 8, 1904, when the telephone next to Howe’s bed rang. The call was from the acting chief of department, Charles Kruger.
“Is that you, Howe?” Kruger asked.
“Yes,” Howe replied.
“Howe, you are ordered to proceed at once with the companies and apparatus that I designate to Baltimore.”
“What’s that? Baltimore? Where?” Howe rubbed the sleep from his eyes.
“Listen to me,” Kruger continued. “There is a big fire raging in Baltimore and the mayor of that city has appealed to Mayor McClellan for help from our department…”
With that, Howe was dressed and out the door heading toward a special ferry boat waiting at Liberty Street that would carry the companies to New Jersey, where a special train waited to take them directly to Baltimore. Nine flat cars carried seven gleaming steam fire engines, several hose tenders and a hook-and-ladder truck, all lashed down securely. Two cars were filled with 35 horses. Two coaches were for Howe and his 85 men and 10 New York City newspaper reporters. Several other companies followed later on another train.
The following telegram was sent to the mayor of Baltimore:
 
Robert M. McLane, Mayor, Baltimore, Md.

Nine fire engines and one hook and ladder company shipped to you on 6:34 o’clock train this morning in charge of battalion chief. The city of New York extends heartfelt sympathy and puts itself at your service. I shall be grateful if you call on me for any assistance New York can lend.
George B. McClellan, Mayor

After some delays, the expeditionary force of New York firemen reached Baltimore. With the winds blowing hard from the northwest, they were sent to the southeast fringe of the fire line to try to stop the fire from spreading to a neighborhood of tenements, lumber yards, factories and icehouses.
Their position was on West Falls Avenue alongside Jones Falls and Dock Street. They moved the seven six-ton engines into position and fired the pumps to their full 1,200-gpm capacity. Numerous lines were stretched and the New Yorkers made a stand. With wind-driven smoke and heat pounding their position, they held their ground and drove back some of the fire. Working in conjunction with the Baltimore fireboat Cataract, the FDNY firemen held their position through the night. With little visibility, they worked continually, taking breaks company by company only to have a sandwich and a cup of warming coffee before returning to the lines.
Howe led members of Engines 5 and 27 in a dangerous attempt to keep the spreading flames from igniting a huge malt warehouse. With the help of reinforcements the line held and the flames were stopped. For hours, they flowed water across the smoldering ruins, helping to ensure the fire was extinguished. Finally, dirty, cold and exhausted, the New Yorkers were ready to go home. The fire was out – their duty was done.
 
After meeting with Baltimore City Chief August Emrich and accepting his personal thanks and praise, Howe told him, “This is the worst fire I have ever seen. There seemed to be no stopping it when we got here. It was in so many places at once. I don’t believe our men have ever had a harder fight.” Regarding the Baltimore firemen, he told reporters, “The men themselves in this city are plucky fighters and good firemen. The way they have stuck to this fight against awful odds proves that.”
Howe and the New York City firemen had won the admiration and respect of not only the citizens and politicians, but also the Baltimore firefighters and the other cities that responded and operated in Baltimore including Philadelphia, Annapolis, Chester, York and Washington, DC.

The exhausted New Yorkers, who had been awake and operating for more than 48 hours, finally boarded a train for the trip home. Sadly, one FDNY member, Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly of Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and later died. Howe also became very ill after the Baltimore fire, but refused to go sick. He was finally taken to the hospital on July 10, 1904, suffering from acute inflammatory rheumatism. One notable visitor to the chief was William Aiken, who had been rescued from a fire by Howe three years earlier. After a brief stay, Howe’s condition improved and he returned to work.

     - from "Firehouse"  http://www.firehouse.com/article/11213191/rekindles-hall-of-flame


"Longest Run on Record" - WNYF 4th Issue 1966

     

     

     

     Notes:

     - most responding companies were double FDNY companies
     - responding members did not know they were going to Baltimore (had no money or winter clothing)
     - no provisions were made for feeding members
     - Dr Archer paid for meal for all 85 members







« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 08:43:50 PM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4718
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #93 on: February 11, 2018, 08:22:32 PM »
Dr Harry M. Archer, Honorary FDNY Battalion Chief/2nd Deputy Commissioner, 60 years service to FDNY members


     


     -1924 awarded James Gordon Bennett Medal - only civilian to ever be awarded this medal

     -Harry M Archer medal for heroism awarded in his honor

     -Fireboat "Harry M. Archer", Engine 78/Marine 6, named in his honor


Dr. Archer was born to a prominent New York family. He attended Columbia University and received an M.D. degree from Bellevue Medical College in 1894. Since his childhood he loved the FDNY, not unlike many youngsters in the City. But after becoming a physician, Dr. Archer dedicated himself to New York's Bravest. Perhaps to the disappointment of his family, rather than becoming a private physician to New York's high society, he accepted a salaried position with Aetna Life Affiliated Companies with the proviso that he could, and would, leave his office to attend greater alarm fires. On March 7, 1907, Dr. Archer was appointed to the Department with the rank of honorary Battalion Chief and was designated a Medical Officer. Though never receiving compensation for his medical services to the FDNY, there is no doubt that this was his full-time job.

Whether by horse, bicycle, his Locomobile outfitted with bell and Maltese cross, or by "bus" - the 1914 FDNY Ambulance he designed - Dr. Archer's appearance at second and greater alarms was a matter of routine. But once at the scene, he was not satisfied with merely tending to the wounds, major or minor, of the firefighters. On multiple occasions, Dr. Archer entered burning or collapsed buildings to treat firefighters and civilians alike. At the Equitable Building fire in 1912, he made his way into the basement vaults of the building to administer aid to trapped firemen. For this action, he received his first medal of valor. He was cited a total of four times during his career including the Department's highest award, the James Gordon Bennett Medal, for his participation in the rescue of two workmen trapped in a building collapse at 39 to 41 Eldridge Street in Manhattan. Dr. Archer himself became trapped briefly when a second collapse shook the building as he was making his exit. Twenty-four years later, at the age of 78, Dr. Archer was still at it, this time crawling through the rubble and debris to spend over ten hours on a freezing New Year's Eve to try to keep two firefighters, Battalion Chief William Hogan and Fireman Winfield Walsh, alive. They were trapped in the collapse of a loft building at 749 Broadway. Dr. Archer administered plasma to them, perhaps the first time this was done outside of a hospital in other than a combat setting, as well as broth through feeding tubes. Unfortunately, both men succumbed to their injuries but not until several days after their ordeal.

In 1939, Mayor LaGuardia asked him to serve as Second Deputy Commissioner which he did until 1940. To do so, he had to resign his honorary position and rank.

Dr. Archer's activities earned him the respect of his professional colleagues as well as the firefighters he treated. Perhaps the first Fire Surgeon to truly embody that title, he became nationally known for his expertise in treating toxic gas poisoning, having developed ground-breaking treatment modalities. Some times his methods were "low-tech." He was known to stock woolen Navy watch caps in his ambulance that he would make injured men wear on cold, wet nights.

Though the firefighters who benefited from Dr. Archer's intense concern and caring are of a generation long since passed, his memory lives on. In 1947, a medal was endowed in his name. It is awarded every third year to one of the three previous Bennett Medal recipients. In 1956, Commissioner Cavanaugh unveiled a plaque in Headquarters honoring Dr. Archer's sixty years of devotion and service to the members of the Department. In 1958, a fireboat was commissioned in his name. It was retired in 1994.

Dr. Archer was given a full Departmental funeral at St. Patrick's Cathedral. He is buried in the family crypt at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Tarrytown, New York.

     - https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86601573/harry-mortimer-archer


Fireboat "Harry M. Archer", Engine 78/Marine Company 6

     
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 08:40:47 PM by mack »

Offline guitarman314

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5444
    • Photobucket
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #94 on: February 12, 2018, 12:40:18 AM »
FDNY Responds to Great Baltimore Fire - February 1904

FDNY Companies - Engines 5, 7, 12, 13, 16, 26, 27, 31, 33  H&L 5  - 85 members

     

Chief - John Howe, Battalion 8

     

FDNY Surgeon - Dr Harry M. Archer 


LODD - Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly, Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and died - RIP.


"Great Baltimore Fire"

It was at 1:40 A.M. on Feb. 8, 1904, when the telephone next to Howe’s bed rang. The call was from the acting chief of department, Charles Kruger.
“Is that you, Howe?” Kruger asked.
“Yes,” Howe replied.
“Howe, you are ordered to proceed at once with the companies and apparatus that I designate to Baltimore.”
“What’s that? Baltimore? Where?” Howe rubbed the sleep from his eyes.
“Listen to me,” Kruger continued. “There is a big fire raging in Baltimore and the mayor of that city has appealed to Mayor McClellan for help from our department…”
With that, Howe was dressed and out the door heading toward a special ferry boat waiting at Liberty Street that would carry the companies to New Jersey, where a special train waited to take them directly to Baltimore. Nine flat cars carried seven gleaming steam fire engines, several hose tenders and a hook-and-ladder truck, all lashed down securely. Two cars were filled with 35 horses. Two coaches were for Howe and his 85 men and 10 New York City newspaper reporters. Several other companies followed later on another train.
The following telegram was sent to the mayor of Baltimore:
 
Robert M. McLane, Mayor, Baltimore, Md.

Nine fire engines and one hook and ladder company shipped to you on 6:34 o’clock train this morning in charge of battalion chief. The city of New York extends heartfelt sympathy and puts itself at your service. I shall be grateful if you call on me for any assistance New York can lend.
George B. McClellan, Mayor

After some delays, the expeditionary force of New York firemen reached Baltimore. With the winds blowing hard from the northwest, they were sent to the southeast fringe of the fire line to try to stop the fire from spreading to a neighborhood of tenements, lumber yards, factories and icehouses.
Their position was on West Falls Avenue alongside Jones Falls and Dock Street. They moved the seven six-ton engines into position and fired the pumps to their full 1,200-gpm capacity. Numerous lines were stretched and the New Yorkers made a stand. With wind-driven smoke and heat pounding their position, they held their ground and drove back some of the fire. Working in conjunction with the Baltimore fireboat Cataract, the FDNY firemen held their position through the night. With little visibility, they worked continually, taking breaks company by company only to have a sandwich and a cup of warming coffee before returning to the lines.
Howe led members of Engines 5 and 27 in a dangerous attempt to keep the spreading flames from igniting a huge malt warehouse. With the help of reinforcements the line held and the flames were stopped. For hours, they flowed water across the smoldering ruins, helping to ensure the fire was extinguished. Finally, dirty, cold and exhausted, the New Yorkers were ready to go home. The fire was out – their duty was done.
 
After meeting with Baltimore City Chief August Emrich and accepting his personal thanks and praise, Howe told him, “This is the worst fire I have ever seen. There seemed to be no stopping it when we got here. It was in so many places at once. I don’t believe our men have ever had a harder fight.” Regarding the Baltimore firemen, he told reporters, “The men themselves in this city are plucky fighters and good firemen. The way they have stuck to this fight against awful odds proves that.”
Howe and the New York City firemen had won the admiration and respect of not only the citizens and politicians, but also the Baltimore firefighters and the other cities that responded and operated in Baltimore including Philadelphia, Annapolis, Chester, York and Washington, DC.

The exhausted New Yorkers, who had been awake and operating for more than 48 hours, finally boarded a train for the trip home. Sadly, one FDNY member, Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly of Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and later died. Howe also became very ill after the Baltimore fire, but refused to go sick. He was finally taken to the hospital on July 10, 1904, suffering from acute inflammatory rheumatism. One notable visitor to the chief was William Aiken, who had been rescued from a fire by Howe three years earlier. After a brief stay, Howe’s condition improved and he returned to work.

     - from "Firehouse"  http://www.firehouse.com/article/11213191/rekindles-hall-of-flame


"Longest Run on Record" - WNYF 4th Issue 1966

     

     

     

     Notes:

     - most responding companies were double FDNY companies
     - responding members did not know they were going to Baltimore (had no money or winter clothing)
     - no provisions were made for feeding members
     - Dr Archer paid for meal for all 85 members





  Except for Eng. 7 (located at 49 Beekman), every company that responded including H&L 5 was a double company that day so there was no need for relocators to cover them during their long run. ;)

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1290
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #95 on: February 12, 2018, 12:42:56 AM »
How far back in history does the concept of "relocators" go?

Offline guitarman314

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5444
    • Photobucket
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #96 on: February 12, 2018, 01:34:48 AM »
How far back in history does the concept of "relocators" go?
  From the Book: "FDNY Tales"    http://www.fire-police-ems.com/misc/fdny-tales-stories-assign2.shtml

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1972
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #97 on: February 12, 2018, 06:03:26 AM »
Very interesting and thanks for posting Gman.

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4718
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #98 on: February 12, 2018, 07:55:02 AM »
How far back in history does the concept of "relocators" go?
  From the Book: "FDNY Tales"    http://www.fire-police-ems.com/misc/fdny-tales-stories-assign2.shtml

Thanks Gman.  The 1909 assignment card shows a lot of changes:

     - Disbanded Engines 13, 30, 20, 31, 27, 17, 29, 12, 25, 32, 11, 19
     - Disbanded Water Tower 1
     - Relocation - Engine 72 to the Bronx
     - Transition - Engine 18 to Squad 18
     - Disbanded Division 2
     - Disbanded Battalion 3, 5
 
Different operations:

     - No rescue companies, squads, special units - except water towers
     - Number of chiefs - only 1 Deputy and 5 BCs at 5th alarm (at a time they did not have radios)
     - Few relocations - due to 2-section companies
     - No relocations from other boros
     - 5 fuel wagons required
     - Horses

FDNY would be able to handle a 5th alarm in lower Manhattan with only 5 engines and 1 truck relocated.  For Box 220, 13 of the assigned engines and 3 of the assigned trucks were double companies. 
 

Engine 13 - 1st due Box 220 - former firehouse 99 Wooster Street:

     http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2016/01/engine-company-no-13-no-99-wooster.html

Engine 31/Water Tower 1 - former firehouse 87 Lafayette Street:

     http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2010/05/napoleon-le-bruns-fantastic-french.html

Engine 27 - former firehouse 173 Franklin Street:

     http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2016/09/engine-company-27-no-173-franklin-street.html
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 08:31:05 AM by mack »

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1290
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #99 on: February 12, 2018, 10:48:41 AM »
Thanks, Gman and Mack.  Lots of great information.

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4718
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #100 on: February 12, 2018, 10:41:20 PM »
Engine 240/Battalion 48  Firehouse  1309 Prospect Avenue, Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn  11th Division, 48th Battalion  “The Road Runners” 

     Engine 40 BFD organized w/Ladder 21 BFD 1309 Prospect Avenue                                               1896
     Engine 40 BFD became Engine 40 FDNY                                                                                     1898
     Engine 40 became Combined Engine Company 40                                                                       1898
     Combined Engine Company 40 became Combined Engine Company 140                                       1899
     Combined Engine Company 140 became Combined Engine Company 240                                     1913
     Combined Engine Company 240 became Engine 240                                                                   1914       
 
     Ladder 21 BFD organized w/Engine 40 BFD 1309 Prospect Avenue w/Engine 40 BFD                     1896
     Ladder 21 BFD became Ladder 21 FDNY                                                                                    1898
     Ladder 21 disbanded                                                                                                                1898

     Battalion 38 organized 395 4th Avenue at Engine 139                                                                1906
     Battalion 38 became Battalion 48                                                                                             1906
     Battalion 48 moved 530 11th Street at Engine 220                                                                    1930
     Battalion 48 moved 1309 Prospect Avenue at Engine 240                                                           1978
     
     Hydrant Service 12 organized 126 Foster Avenue at Engine 250                                                 1934
     Hydrant Service 12 moved 1309 Prospect Avenue at Engine 240                                                1948
     Hydrant Service 12 moved 126 Foster Avenue at Engine 250                                                     1951
     Hydrant Service 12 disbanded                                                                                                 1957


Pre-BFD:

     Windsor Terrace Hose Company No. 3 was formed in January 1888 to protect the growing community of Windsor Terrace.  It was consolidated with the Washington Engine Company and the Melrose and Woodbine fire companies of Parkville to form the Flatbush Fire Department.  The firehouse was located at 1286 Prospect Avenue.  Windsor Terrace Hose Company No 3 had about 40 members.   The Windsor Hose Company was mustered out of duty when the new firehouse for Brooklyn Fire Department Engine Company 40 was completed and City of Brooklyn assumed responsibility for paid fire-fighting companies in the area.

     


Brooklyn Fire Department 1309 Prospect Avenue firehouse - Engine 40/Ladder 21:

     

     

     The firehouse for Engine Company 40/ Hook & Ladder Company 21 was put into service in January 20, 1896.  It was manned with experienced officers from several different Brooklyn fire companies; several of the firefighters were from former Flatbush volunteer companies.  Engine 40 was equipped with a new 1895 Lafrance steamer and an 1896 P.J. Barrett hose wagon; the ladder company was equipped with an 1896 Holloway 50 foot City Service ladder truck with a 40 gallon chemical tank.  The Engine Company fought its first fire at 53rd Street and Third Avenue on January 29, 1896.  In February 1896, both Engine Company 40 and Ladder Company 21 were called to a fire in a three story frame building on Seeley Street, in Windsor Terrace. 

     - Landmarks Preservation Commission February 12, 2013   http://www.neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org/db/bb_files/2013-FirehouseEngineCompany40Company21.pdf


FDNY 1308 Prospect Avenue firehouse - Engine 240/Battalion 48:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 240:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

Battalion 48:

     


Engine 240 responding:

   


Engine 240/Battalion 48 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER EDWARD D. LAHEY ENGINE 240 September 25, 1907

         

          FF Lahey fell from Engine 240's tender while responding to a fire.

     BATTALION CHIEF JOHN J. DOOLEY BATTALION 48 June 6, 1931

         

          Battalion Chief John J. Dooley of the 48th Battalion was sliding the pole from the third floor to the second floor when he lost his grip and fell. He fractured his skull in the fall. After a time in the hospital he returned home and then back to the hospital suffering from pneumonia. A member of the old Brooklyn Fire Department since October 15, 1887, he was promoted to Captain on July 1, 1889. A Battalion Chief since 1922 he had been in command of Battalion 48 for the last five years. The fifty-year veteran was married and had one son and was seventy-one years old at the time of his death. - "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz & Melahn
     
     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS J. OSBORN ENGINE 240 March 3, 1941

         

          Fireman Thomas J. Osborn died on March 3, 1941. He was performing house watch in quarters on the night tour. He complained of being ill to his officer and was ordered to bed. Shortly later, Box 2514 was received and Fireman Osborn responded to the apparatus floor. Not being assigned to the box, he went back to bed. At 9:45, he was found not breathing in his bed. He had died from a heart attack. He left a wife and two children. (From "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz & Melahn, 2007

     FIREFIGHTER EUGENE F. KELLY ENGINE 240 March 22, 1943

         

          FF Eugene Kelly was killed when a trolley struck Engine 240 while responding to a fire.

     LIEUTENANT JOHN A. LYDEN ENGINE 240 December 24, 1949

         
         
         

         

          LT John Lyden was overcome by smoke fighting a fire at 324 Church Avenue.

     FIREFIGHTER JOSEPH J. TUCKER ENGINE 240 December 19, 1957

          FF Joseph J. Tucker was injured fighting a fire. He retired on disability on July 4, 1956 and died from his injury on Dec. 19, 1957.

     FIREFIGHTER MICHAEL BOCCHINO BATTALION 48 September 11, 2001

         

         

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/michael-l-bocchino/

     BATTALION CHIEF JOSEPH GRZELAK BATTALION 48 September 11, 2001

         

         

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/joseph_grzelak_52_fdny_battali.html

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=146335

   
     


     RIP.  Never forget.



Engine 240 history: "WINDSOR TERRACE AND ENGINE 240"  - Mike Boucher   

     Engine 240 was placed in service on January 20, 1896. At that time it was not part of the F.D.N.Y. and the fire truck was not painted white over red or diesel powered. One hundred years ago the apparatus was pulled buy a team of horses and was painted a two tone green. Engine 240 was called Engine 40 back then and was part of the City of Brooklyn, the fourth largest city in the country.  The village of Windsor Terrace  was a farm that belong to John Vanderbilt. He sold the farm to developers in 1849 and the village was formed in 1851. Between 1851 and 1888 there was no fire protection in the village. On January 11 of that year, a fire company was placed in service at 1288 Prospect Avenue and it  was called Windsor Terrace Hose 3. They affiliated with the Flatbush Fire Department which was located to the south of Windsor Terrace.  The town of Flatbush was annexed by the City of  Brooklyn on April 24, 1894 along with Windsor Terrace. The Brooklyn Fire Department kept the volunteers active until the City could build fire stations, buy equipment and hire manpower. For their services, each of the volunteer fire companies were paid $1,000.00 a year. The Flatbush Department had one engine, five hose companies and three ladder companies.

     The Brooklyn Fire Department had to hire members from the Flatbush Department to man the new companies. Over three hundred members belong to the Flatbush Department, but only forty four could be pick. Of the forty four picked, thirty two were Republicans. The reason thirty two Republicans were picked is because that is all that was on the department.  Flatbush was a Democratic strong, while the City of Brooklyn was Republican. One member of the Hose Company 3 was assigned to Engine 40.

     The first members of the company were; Foreman James Cummings and Assistant Foreman George H. Fletcher came from other Brooklyn companies. The members from the Flatbush companies were; Thomas F. Regin, William Gremeler, Douglas Murray, John Levanion, Walter T. Tibball, Henry Dorsch, Thomas Gorman, Anton Newman, Enos Pierson, John A. Boddy, Peter J. Velia, J. J. Mctigue and Frederick Meyer. Fireman Walter T. Tibball belonged to Hose Company 3.

     Engine 40 and Ladder 21 were organized on the same day along with Engine 48 and Ladder 22 in Flatbush, Engine 49 and Ladder 23 in Midwood, and Engine 50 and Ladder 20 in Parkville. A lot was purchased from Anna M. Ferris on April 1, 1895 for a cost of $1,600.00. The lot measured 40 feet in the front and 100 feet deep. Engine 40 and Ladder 21 moved into the newly built firehouse on Prospect Avenue near the corner of Greenwood Avenue. New apparatus was assigned to the company, Engine 40 received a 1895 Lafrance 4th size (300 to 500 gpm) steamer, 1896 P. J. Barrett hose wagon and a 1896 Holloway 50 foot City Service Ladder truck with a 40 gallon chemical tank.

     The two bay, two story house was built by J. T. Lauretzen for a cost of $15,600.00. The front of the building which measures 32 feet across has a Romanesque style, using Wyoming blue stone, Indiana limestone and gray pressed brick. On the left side is a circular tower supported on a richly carved cobble of limestone. The cornice is made of brick in an ornamental pattern. The two apparatus doors are rich in details with the frame work highly ornamental. The first floor has room for a steam fire engine, hose wagon and ladder truck. In the rear six stalls were provided for the horses and behind the stalls was a one story room for the feed and supplies for the horses, now the kitchen. The on left side in the front is the raised platform for the house watch and on the right side are hose racks, which can hold 700 feet of hose. The second floor has a sitting room, and an engineer room in the front, a dormitory with twelve beds,  the foreman and assistant foreman's room in the back, and a general toilet room.

     Prior to 1896, the fire department always boasted of the latest and most modern convinces and comforts for the men. With these new houses a new feature was added for the comfort of the men, a water heater for hot water. Now the men could take a hot bath after a fire. In the 1896 Annual Report it was reported "... to have the convenience of taking a refreshing bath, without the risk or danger of taking cold, which was the case in former years, when only cold water was obtainable."

     A fireman did not have worry about finding a mutual partner or  wonder "do I go to work today". The work schedule was very simple, 24 hours a day, 6 days on and the seventh day off. Each fireman could go home twice a day for two hours for meals. The assistant foreman and the engineer could also be detailed to a neighboring company to cover meals at that house.  A fireman could also be detail to another firehouse for a 24 hour period to cover vacancies. The paid was a little over $1,000.00 a year, or thirteen and half cents an hour for a 144 hour week.
The Cities of New York (including the Bronx), Brooklyn, Long Island City, parts of Western Queens, and Staten Island merged into the five Boroughs of New York City on January 1, 1898. Engine 40 and Ladder 21 officially became part of the F.D.N.Y. on January 28th. On April 15, 1898 Ladder 21 was disbanded as a separate fire company and the ladder truck assigned to Engine 40 to make it a combination company of an engine, hose wagon, and ladder truck.

     On October 1, 1899 Engine 40 was renumber to Engine 140 to avoid confusion with Engine 40 in Manhattan. Engine 140 would last only to January 1, 1913 and after this date it would be called Engine 240.  Combination Engine 240 status was changed on May 15, 1914 when it lost the ladder truck. Ladder 147 and Ladder 148 were placed in service in neighboring firehouse. The two motorized rigs replaced the three horse drawn ladder trucks at Engines 240, 248 and 250.

     The fire horse would be given a high place in fire service history. They were treated better than the men and were well taken care of. The department had an ambulance to take the horses to hospital when hurt or sick, before the fire department had an ambulance for the men. The also received vacations before the men. The old timers would say that the horses were smart, some of the horses could count the box numbers when the bells sounded and knew which box they responded on. After a fire on a cold snowy winters night, the horses would come back to the firehouse and the firemen would dry the horses, feed them and brush them down, then the men could take a hot bath, change clothes and warm up. The up keep on the horse for one year was around $800.00 a year, a new motor operated apparatus cost $64.00 for fuel. The pasting of the horses in most companies spelled the end of the fire department.

     Engine 240 lost its horses on October 21, 1921 when they received a new American LaFrance 700 gpm pumper. The 1896 hose wagon was replaced in 1909 with a new Seagrave hose wagon. When the new LaFrance pumper arrived the hose wagon was not replaced until  December 12, 1925 with a used 1914 Mack/Boyd hose wagon from Engine 255. The 1921 American LaFrance was replaced on June 26, 1936 with new LaFrance, 1923 model from Engine 11. This rig also could pump 700 gpm. On November 2, 1946 a new Ward LaFrance 750 gpm pumper replaced the 1923 model. The '46 LaFrance cost $9,700.00 new. The company received another new Ward LaFrance 750 gpm pumper on January 22, 1954. The price had increased to $14,405.00.  In 1970 the company was assigned two different Mack pumpers, the first was a used 1965 Mack that came from Engine 225 on January 1, 1970 and was kept until June 12, 1970. The second rig was a new 1970 Mack pumper that could pump 1000 gallons of water per minute. Another 1970 Mack was delivered on Feb. 21, 1980 and used until August 8, 1980 at which time a new 1979 Mack was received. The current rig is a 1989 Mack that replaced the 1979 model on December 13, 1989.

     By the mid 1920's the firehouse was starting to show it age. The new rigs were getting wider than the horse drawn apparatus and the doors were narrow. On November 20, 1925, $10,000.00 allocated for the repairs of quarters, new apparatus doors, removing the roof of the tower and other general repairs. Before the work could be started some emergency work to one of the fireboats postponed the work for a lack of funds. In March of 1926 new bids were received for the work. The bids ranged from $13,210.00 to $24,184.00. The $13,210.00 bid won the contract and the work was completed during 1926.

     Beside Engine 240, the firehouse on Prospect Avenue has housed several other pieces of apparatus. Division 12 relocated on November 1, 1948 and Hydrant Service Unit 4 moved in on December 12, 1948. Both of these moves were temporary for some work being done in from Engine 250's quarters, While at Engine 240 the Hydrant Service 4 was renumber to #12 on April 18, 1949. Both units moved back to Engine 250's quarters on February 6, 1951 for the Division and February 9th for the Hydrant Service 12.

     Today Engine 240 shares it quarters with the 48th Battalion. The Battalion moved into quarters on October 19, 1978. Battalion 38 was organized on April 1, 1906 at Engine 139 (now E-239) quarters on 4th Avenue and 6th Street. On April 15, 1906 the 38 Battalion was renumber to the 48 Battalion. The 10th Division was reorganized on January 1, 1930, in Engine 239's quarters and  the 48th Battalion moved to Engine 220's quarters on 11th Avenue between 8th  & 7th Avenues. In 1978 to Engine 240.
 
     The fireman performs his job  in the most hazardous of conditions, Most jobs a person knows he'll be home at the end of his shift but, not a fireman, he could have been hurt and in the hospital. Even worst he could lose his life. In the history of the New York City Fire Department 776 members have lost their lives.  Five members of Engine 240 have paid that supreme price with their life.

     Engine 140 was responding to fire on 56th Street and 12th Avenue in Borough Park on September 20, 1907. Fireman Edward D. Lahey was reaching for his boots when the hose wagon made a sharp turn from E. 3rd Street on to Ft. Hamliton Parkway throwing him off of the rig. He landed on his head, fracturing his skull and he lost consciousness. He died on September 25, never regaining consciousness. He was single and 27years old.
 
     Fireman Thomas J. Osborn died on March 3, 1941. He was performing house watch in quarters on the night watch. He complained of be ill to his officer and was ordered to bed. Shortly Signal Station 2514 was received and Fireman Osborn responded to the apparatus floor, not being assigned to the box he went back to bed. At 9:45 he was found not breathing in his bed. He had died from a heart attack. He left a wife and two children.

     Fireman Eugene F. Kelly and Fireman Robert W. Lane of Ladder 105, who were detailed to the company for the day, were injured on March 20, 1943. The company was responding to a automobile fire at Bedford Avenue and Hawthrone Street. Traveling north on Flatbush Avenue, a southbound trolley car sideswiped the apparatus throwing the six fireman to the street. Firemen Kelly and Lane received severe brain injuries in the accident. Fireman Kelly died two days later of his injury, and Fireman Lane died on April 9.

     Lieutenant John A. Lyden was overcome by smoke while fighting a fire in a row of taxpayers on December 23, 1949 . The fire at 324 through 328 Church Avenue was confined to the first floors of the three buildings and was label arson. He died shortly after reaching the hospital. He was 49 years old and left a wife.
The last member to died was Fireman Joseph J. Tucker. He was hurt at fire. He retired on disability on July 4, 1956 and died from his injury on Dec. 19, 1957.

     Engine 240 is ready for any type of emergency, fire, water leak, EMS or just to pump air in a kid's bicycle tire. Engine 240 has been serving the citizens of Windsor Terrace and the rest of New York for 100 years and will continue serving the public no matter what part of the City it is, Brooklyn, Manhattan Queens, The Bronx or Staten Island, Engine 240 will be there.



THE APPARATUS OF ENGINE 240

     1895 HORSE DRAWN LAFRANCE 4TH SIZE STEAMER #334 JAN. 20, 1896-OCT. 21, 1921
     1896 P. J. BARRETT HOSE WAGON JAN, 20, 1896-1909
     1896 HOLLOWAY COMBINATION C.S.T. 50' #8B JAN, 20, 1896-APR. 15, 1914
     1909 SEAGRAVE HOSE WAGON #129B  1909-OCT. 21, 1921
     1921 MOTORIZED APPARATUS 1921 AMERICAN LAFRANCE  700 GPM #3580 OCT. 21, 1921-JUN.  6, 1936
     1923 AMERICAN LAFRANCE 700 GPM #4273 JUN.  6, 1936-NOV. 22, 1946
     1946 WARD LAFRANCE 750 GPM #2199 NOV. 22, 1946-JAN. 22, 1954
     1953 WARD LAFRANCE  750 GPM #3301 JAN. 22, 1954-JAN.  9, 1970
     1965 MACK 1000 GPM #1318 JAN. 9, 1970-JUN. 12, 1970
     1970 MACK 1000 GPM #MP7073 JUN. 12, 1970-FEB. 21, 1980
     1970 MACK 1000 GPM #MP7045 FEB. 21, 1970-AUG. 8, 1980
     1979 MACK 1000 GPM #MP7954 AUG. 8, 1980-DEC. 13, 1989
     1989 MACK 1000 GPM #MP8908 DEC. 13, 1989-PRESENT


Engine 240 -Department Orders:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK BOROUGHS OF BROOKLYN & QUEENS
_____________
SPECIAL ORDER No 114                                                                                      New York September 25, 1907
___________________________________________
        1    With feelings of the of the deepest regret the death of Fireman 1st grade Edward D. Leahey of Engine Co. 140, who died from injuries received while responding with his company to a fire at 56th Street & 12th Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn on September 20th, 1907, Station 2-463 is hereby announced to the Department.                             The Department mourns the loss of this brave fireman from its ranks and extends its most heartfelt sympathy to the relatives and friends of the deceased in the sad loss which has so suddenly befallen them.
                The funeral escort will consist of one company of the men composed of two fireman each from the 31st, 32nd, 33rd and 38th Battalions under the command of Asst. Foreman Dennis McAuly, Engine 136.                            The members of Engine Co. 140 will act as pallbearers and mourners. The funeral will take place from his late residence No. 455 5th Street, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9:30 A. M. sharp on the 28th instant, thence to the Church of St. Saviour, Cor. 6th St. and 8th Avenue. Interment in Calvary Cemetery. 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK
_____________ SPECIAL ORDER                                                                                                        New York, March 5, 1941      No. 44
___________________________________________
1       With regret, the death of Fireman 1st grade Thomas J. Osborn, Engine Co. 240, which occurred at 11.40 P. M., March 3, 1941, is hereby announced to the department.
           Funeral will take place from the Duffy Funeral pallor, 237 Ninth Street, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9.30 A. M., Thursday, March 6, 1941. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery, Brooklyn.
           The Deputy Chief of the 10th Division shall detail one Lieutenant and twelve Fireman, who, together with six Members from the off platoon of Engine Co. 240 (who shall act as pallbearers), shall report, in full uniform, at the quarters of Engine Co. 239, at  9.15 A. M. on the 6th inst., proceed to the above-mentioned funeral parlor, thence to the Church of St. Thomas Aquinas, 9th Street and 4th Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn, and after the service, shall accompany the remains a reasonable distance, when detail shall be dismissed.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK _____________ SPECIAL ORDER                                                                                                      New York,  March 24, 1943      No. 65 ___________________________________________
1       With regret, the death of Fireman 1st grade Eugene F. Kelly, of Engine Co. 240, which occurred at 6.55 P. M., March 22, 1943, from Fracture of the skull and Lacerations of the brain, caused by and introduced in the performance of duty, while responding to Signal Station 1091, at 7.50 P. M., March 20, 1943, is hereby announced to the Department.
        The heartfelt sympathy of the entire Department goes out to the family, relatives and friends of the deceased in the midst of the great loss which they and the Department have sustained.
        Funeral will take place from the Funeral Home of Walter B. Cooke, Inc., 1218 Flatbush Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9.30 A. M., Friday, March 26, 1943. Interment Calvary Cemetery.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK _____________ SPECIAL ORDER                                                                                                New York,  December 27, 1949      No. 217 ___________________________________________
 1       With regrets, the death of Lieutenant John A. Lyden, of Engine Co. 240, which occurred at 12.20 A. M., December 24, 1949, from injuries sustained in the performance of duty while operating at Signal Station 3775, Brooklyn, received at 11.54 P. M., December 23, 1949, is hereby announced to the Department.
         The heartfelt sympathy of the entire Department goes out to the family, relatives and friends of the deceased in the midst of the great loss which they and the Department have sustained.
         The funeral will take place from Walter B. Cooke Funeral Home, 20 Snyder Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9.30 A. M., Tuesday, December 27, 1949. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. -

 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK UNIFORMED FORCE   
DEPARTMENT                                                                                                   New York,  December 20, 1957             ORDER No. 232 ___________________________________________
1.1        With regret, the death of retired Fireman Joseph J. Tucker, formerly of Engine 240, residing at 1485 East 52nd Street, Brooklyn, N.Y., which occurred on December 19, 1957, is hereby announced to the Department.
             Funeral will take place from the Michael J. Smith Funeral Home, 248 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, N.Y., on December 21, 1957, followed by a 9>30 A. M. Requiem Mass at Holy Name R. C. Church, 245 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, N.Y. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery.

     - http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_240/engine_240.pdf


Windsor Terrace:

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2007/03/windsor-terrace-brooklyn/
 
     

     







« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 11:48:10 PM by mack »

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4442
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #101 on: February 13, 2018, 02:48:06 PM »
 As I view this "FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section", it is amazing the amount of work that this site member Joe M., aka "mack" puts into the research and telling of each fire company and fire house listed. In less than two months, already this thread has seen over 5,000 views. There is a huge interest in these stories, videos, links, photos, history, members, awards, LODDs, apparatus, etc. I'm sure from the senior man to the newest probie, there is a special interest in the firehouse and the company history they are assigned to.

 Add to that the retired members who spent several years of their lives there as well as the buff who considers them a special group of the FDNY members.

 This thread came about because of the inability to continue posting information to the Original FDNY and NYC Firehouse thread. Which continues today to be very popular with over 800,000 views. When "mack" was unable to post anymore firehouse histories on that thread, it was necessary to begin this second section. This is merely a continuation of that original thread.

 I guess therefore if anybody would like to add any information or ask a question about any firehouse/company already posted in that original thread, it can be posted here. We can all follow it through with the company listed and maybe the page number can also be posted to make it easier.

 I hope somehow this information can be saved and never lost, because I don't think there will ever be another one like it.   

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9234
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #102 on: February 13, 2018, 05:59:18 PM »
^^^^^Well said Willy.... amazing job done by mack on these history posts.

Offline 1261Truckie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #103 on: February 14, 2018, 12:30:44 PM »
Indeed, an amazing job by Mack. THANK YOU, Mack !!!!

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4718
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #104 on: February 19, 2018, 06:20:16 PM »
Engine 266  Firehouse  92-20 Rockaway Beach Boulevard  Rockaway Beach, Queens  13th Division, 47th Battalion  "Holland House"
                                                                                                                                                                       
     Engine 166 organized 211 Beach 86th Street former volunteer firehouse                            1905
     Engine 166 became Engine 266                                                                                      1913
     Engine 266 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 267                        1922
     Engine 266 moved 58-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 265                                  2000
     Engine 266 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Battalion 47                              2000

     Engine 167 organized 102-10 Rockaway Beach Boulevard former volunteer firehouse         1905
     Engine 167 became Engine 267                                                                                     1913
     Engine 267 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                       1922
     Engine 267 disbanded                                                                                                   1972

     Ladder 71 organized 88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard former volunteer firehouse            1905 
     Ladder 71 became Ladder 121                                                                                       1913
     Ladder 121 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                       1922
     Ladder 121 moved 58-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                                 1954
     Ladder 121 new firehouse 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                       2004

     Battalion 47 organized 88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Ladder 71                             1905
     Battalion 37 became Battalion 47                                                                                  1906
     Battalion 47 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                     1922
     Battalion 47 moved 259 Beach 116th Street at Engine 268                                              2000
     Battalion 47 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                             2000
     Battalion 47 new firehouse 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                     2004

     Brush Fire Unit 7 organized 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 266                    1997
     Brush Fire Unit 7 moved 58-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 265                        2000
     Brush Fire Unit 7 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                     2000

     Thawing Unit 5 organized 97-28 43rd Avenue at Engine 289                                           1957
     Thawing Unit 5 moved 103-17 98th Street at Engine 285                                               1973
     Thawing Unit 5 moved 89-40 87th Street at Engine 293                                                 1984
     Thawing Unit 5 moved 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 266                          2005
     Thawing Unit 5 became Thawing Unit 266
     Thawing Unit 266 moved 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 265                      2005
     Thawing Unit 266 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 266                   2006

          - Note: thanks fdhistorian

 Pre-FDNY volunteer history - Rockaway Beach Fire Department - 1886-1905:

     https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/50422400/?terms=seaside%2Bengine%2B1

     Rockaway Beach was protected by 2 engine companies, 4 hose companies, 1 chemical hose company, 1 rescue company and 2 hook and ladder companies with approximately 400 members.  New paid FDNY companies were organized in 1905 in former volunteer firehouses:

     FDNY Engine 166 - Atlantic Engine 1/Atlantic Hose 1 211 Beach 86th Street
           
         

     FDNY Engine 167 - Seaside Engine 1/Seaside Hose 1 102-10 Rockaway Beach Boulevard 

         

     Ladder 71 - Oceanus Hook & Ladder 1  88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard                           

         

         
 
     Battalion 47 - Arverne Engine 2/Hose 2 64th Street/Rockaway Beach Boulevard

         


FDNY replaces Rockaway Beach Fire Department - September 1, 1905:

     


Engine 166 1st fire - September 20, 1905:

     


92-20 Rockaway Beach Boulevard firehouse:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 266:

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 267: DISBANDED

     

     


Brush Fire Unit 7:

     


Famous fires - September 22, 1892:

     ROCKAWAY BEACH, THE FAMOUS RESORT, ALMOST WIPED OUT. FIRE DESTROYS TWENTY-ONE BLOCKS OF BUILDINGS -- A LADY BURNED TO DEATH -- LOSS, $500,000.  Hotels And Cottages Burned.   Rockaway Beach, the popular summer resort situated on the south shore of Long Island, 20 miles from New York, was almost destroyed by fire Tuesday afternoon. Twenty-one blocks, covering an area of 10 acres, were swept clean of their hotels and cottages. The loss is estimated roughly at $500,000 with less than a third as much insurance. One life was lost.

Famous fires - June 15, 1922 Arverne Conflagration - Engine 266 1st due:

     Queens Box 4962 - Engine 266 Ladder 121 - 1st due companies
     13.5 acres and 141 structures destroyed

     https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/60022191

     

     

     


Famous fires - July 4, 1937 - Rockaway Beach Explosion and Fire:

     Explosion and fire destroyed amusement park, concessions, bungalows, boardwalk.

     

     


Famous fires - Hurricane Sandy - October 29-30, 1912:

     https://iafss.org/2013/04/29/fires-during-the-2012-hurricane-sandy-in-queens-new-york-a-first-report/

FDNY medals:

     ENG. 267 MEMBERS NOV. 11, 1914 FIRE COLLEGE MEDAL

     DAVID J. QUINN, JR. FF. ENG. 267 JAN. 24, 1945 BROOKMAN MEDAL

          FF Quinn and FF Carey rescued two US Navy fliers from a half-submerged military aircraft that had crashed into Jamaica Bay vicinity of Broad Channel Bridge.  FF Quinn and FF Carey had heard the crash and immediately left quarters and used an old row boat without oars using their hands to move their boat. The rescue was made in the hours of darkness at great personal risk. 

     JAMES F. CAREY, JR. FF. ENG. 267 JAN. 24, 1945 TREVOR-WARREN MEDAL


Engine 266 LODD:

     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS MCNAMARA ENGINE 266 January 23, 1907

         

         

     RIP.  Never forget.


Rockaway Beach:

     

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockaway_Beach,_Queens

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2006/09/rockaway-beach-queens/






« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 02:59:22 PM by mack »

 

anything