Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 67666 times)

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #270 on: July 07, 2018, 10:06:37 AM »
From NYFD.com:


100 YEARS OF THE JOLLY ROGERS IN FLATBUSH ENGINE 255 & LADDER 157

One hundred years ago in a section of Brooklyn known as Vanderveer Park, two new fire companies were placed in service. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 were organized in a new house on December 15, 1897. These two companies, along with Engines 51 and 57 were also placed in service on the same day, Engine 51 in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Engine 57 in Canarsie. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 would serve only seventeen days with the City of Brooklyn before being taken over by the City of New York. In the past century many things have changed besides the annexation of Brooklyn, horse drawn, two tone green colored apparatus, and name changes.

Vanderveer Park was the northern most part of the Town of Flatlands, which was annexed along with the Towns of Flatbush, New Utrecht and Gravesend in 1894. Today Vanderveer Park lives only in name at the Vanderveer Park Houses on Foster, to Newkirk Avenues between Nostrand and Brooklyn Avenues. Other than the housing projects the name is lost in history and the area is now the junction of Flatbush, Farragut and Midwood.

The fire protection in these four towns were provided by volunteer companies. These companies would continue to provide the protection until the City of Brooklyn could replace the volunteers with paid companies. Each of the volunteer departments would receive $1000 a year for the upkeep and maintenance of the department. The Town of Flatlands was the last department to have its volunteers replaced. Before Engine 55 and Ladder 25 were established, Brooklyn’s Engines 48 (248), 49 (249), 50 (250) and Ladders 22 (at Engine 48), 23 (now Ladder 113), & 20 (at Engine 50) would cover this area.

Located at 1367 Rogers Avenue, the new firehouse is near Farragut Road and the center of Vanderveer Park. It was built on a lot purchased from the Germania Real Estate & Improvement Company for $800 on January 20, 1887. The lot is 40 feet x 102 feet deep. The two story firehouse was built by the Leonard Brothers who had been building firehouses in Brooklyn for the past several years. The front of the building consists of limestone and Harvard brick, while the foundation is of granite. Above the three apparatus doors are three large rounded windows with an iron balcony across the center window. The first floor has room for a steam engine, hose wagon, and a ladder truck along with stables for six horses. In the rear of the apparatus floor was a circular staircase to the second floor. On one of the walls were racks that could dry up to 500 feet of wet hose. The second floor had room for the officer in the front along with a room for lounging between alarms which included a library room. In the center was a dormitory that contained sixteen beds and wood lockers. In the rear was room for the assistant foreman, and a large, well-lighted bathroom. All the wood through the building was of North Carolina pine that was highly polished.

At 8 AM on December 15, 1897, three officers and fourteen firemen placed Engine 55 and Ladder 25 in service. The officers assigned from other Brooklyn companies were; Foreman Charles E. Rikel (Engine 26), Asst. Foremen, Charles Heath (Engine 31) & Alexander Johnston (Engine 35). The rest of the first crew were; Joseph J. Mahoney, Daniel W. Warner, John H. Kraft, Henry Van Houten, Charles F. Tederiman, Henry J. Foster. Arthur Morrall, William Thomas, Samuel Collins, George Miller, Charles Merk, Julius H. Bokenkamp, Peter L. Bullwinkel, and John Kraft. The fourteen man crew were picked from the former members of the Flatlands Volunteer Fire Department. Only sixty of the 200 members applied for these positions.

The working conditions of the fire department 100 years ago was hard compared to todays standard, but back then it was a good job. The work week was six, 24 hour days in a row with one day off. Each fireman went home for meals twice a day for 2 hours at a time. A fireman could be detailed to another fire house for a day to cover somebody’s day off. A salary of $900 a year was considered excellent for that time. Most other jobs were working five and half days a week, 12 to 14 hours a day, for less money.

The first run for the companies was on December 18 at 9:10 in the evening. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 responded to Box 617, Vernon Avenue and Prospect Street (now Tilden Avenue & Veronia Place). The fire was in the rear of 120 Vernon Avenue in a 2 story frame building occupied as a stable and owned by James Hackett. Engine 55 was third due and ordered returned to quarters by the Chief. Total time out of quarters was 30 minutes. Ladder 25 responded with four men and removed hay and straw from the barn. Ladder 25 was placed back in service at 10:11 that night.

The second and last run for 1897 was the next afternoon. It was back to Box 617, Vernon Avenue and Prospect Street for a one story tool shed in the rear of a new building on the corner. The cause of the fire was an overheated stove. Like the first run, the engine was returned without doing any work and the ladder overhauled the shed. The total time out of quarters 38 minutes. Ladder 25 responded with only an assistant foremen and two men, the engine responded with the foreman and five members.

The first real working fire for both companies was on January 4, 1898 and it was the first run of the new year. The Box was 798, Flatbush Avenue near Kings Highway and took both companies 4 minutes to hitch the horses and arrive at the location. The fire was in a barn and wagon house, a 1 story frame building the cause was unknown and the building was destroyed. The 35 gallon chemical tank of the ladder was used and it was recharged twelve times to extinguish the fire. The engine operated five hours and nine minutes while the truck operated five hours and forty minutes.

Some other runs included Ladder 25 being special call back to Box 798 the next night to put water on some of the smoldering remains of the barn fire. On January 8th both companies responded to Ryder Lane and Kings Highway for four barns burning. It took the companies ten minutes to arrive at the fire. The next run was on January 17 to E. 72nd Street and Avenue U, taking twenty minutes to arrive. Both companies were ordered to return to quarters without doing any work. It was also on this run that the first member was injured. Fireman Kraft had his foot step on by one of the truck horses, smashing the big toe and tearing the nail off. He was tended to and when back at quarters was placed on sick leave.

The first multiple alarm fire was on January 19, 1898. The company responded to East Broadway near Neefus Lane (Church Avenue & E. 40th St.reet). The engine took seven minutes to arrive at the hydrant at East Broadway and E. 40th Street, standing fast. The truck was having some problems with one of the horses. It took eight minutes to get the horses out the door and responding. The ladder truck went only as far as Clove Road and East Broadway (now Nostrand Avenue & Church Avenue) and stopped, the horses refusing to go any further. They never made it to the fire and when the horses decided to move the company was ordered to return back to quarters.

On January 1, 1898, New York City, which included the Bronx, and the Cities of Brooklyn, Long Island City, parts of western Queens county and Staten Island would merge into the Greater City of New York. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 along with the rest of the Brooklyn Fire Department, would merge with the F.D.N.Y. on January 28, 1898. On October 1, 1899, Engine 55 became Engine 155 to avoid confusion with Engine 55 in Manhattan. Engine 155 would be renumbered again on January 1, 1913, to Engine 255.

Ladder 25 lost its identity on April 15, 1898, when along with eleven other truck companies were taken out of service. These truck companies were located in the newly annexed areas of Brooklyn. The truck was kept and assigned to Engine 55 making it a combination company. Both apparatus responded together or the ladder truck could respond by itself and it would be known as Ladder 55 on the assignment cards only. The members could be assigned to either rig on any given day.

On February 1, 1927, Engine 255 was reorganized as a single company and the ladder truck was reorganized as Ladder 157. The first members of Ladder 157 were mostly from Engine 255. The first officers were Captain Maurice Foley #1 of Engine 209, and Lieutenant James F. Rice Ladder 153. The chauffeurs were Firemen Chas. Kratochvil, Robert E. Cook, William J. Gallagher #2, Thomas E. Hurley all of Engine 255. The other firemen were Patrick Falvey, Timothy F. Kelly, Benjamin J. Barling, Hugh Gallen, Alfred E. Johnson (Engine 240), Joseph Friel (Ladder 131), and Frank Gehlbach (Ladder 147). The first apparatus was a used 1913 American LaFrance 65 foot aerial truck.

As the apparatus kept getting wider and larger, the apparatus doors of many fire houses had to be remodeled. Engine 255 and Ladder 157 had two of the three doors replaced with a single door in 1925. The contract was awarded during the year of 1925 for a cost of $4,090.00 to replace the doors. Along with Engine 255’s quarters alterations were contracted for Engine 242, 244, and 248. For some unknown reason the four contracts were not completed and were rebid for in 1926. It cost another $2,313.00 to complete the remodeling of the front of quarters.

In one hundred years, Engine 255 and Ladder 157 has been serving the public of the Vanderveer Park section of Brooklyn faithfully regardless of what the company has been called, Engine 55, Ladder 25, Combination Company 255 or Ladder 157. As the community changed from being rural to densely packed the dedication of the members in the fire house on Rogers Avenue has never changed. No matter what the need is, air in a biycle, a safe haven for child, a cut finger or a battle with "Red Devil" Engine 255 and Ladder 157 can be and will be counted on to serve with pride and dedication.

Engine 55 first apparatus was an 1897 LaFrance 4th size steamer which Brooklyn had purchased for the company. The hose wagon was a used 1886 Woodhouse that came from Engine 5, now 205. Ladder 25 received a new 1897 Gleason & Bailey city service ladder truck with a 50 gallon chemical tank. Combination Engine 155 kept this rig until 1904 at which time it was turned over to the Woodhaven Volunteers in Queens. Engine 155 then received a used 1897 Holloway combination chemical, 50’ city service ladder truck. The next two rigs the company received were two used hose wagons. The first was in 1909 and it was an 1893 Marlbourgh hose wagon from Engine 251. The other was in 1912 from Engine 237 and a 1896 P.J. Barrett hose wagon.

Motorization came to Rogers Avenue on April 6, 1915, when Engine 255 received a new 1915 Mack/Boyd hose wagon. Its not known when Engine 255 lost it’s steamer or when they received a motorized pumper. The first motor driven apparatus was again used an 1898 American with a 1915 tractor added to it. This time it came from Engine 257 on December 12, 1923. Since the Department was totally motorized in December of 1922, the horses had to have been replaced earlier. The first modern pumper was 1925 American LaFrance 700 gpm pumper that they received on December 12, 1925.

The rest of Engine 255’s fleet consisted of a 1946 Ward LaFrance and a 1959 Mack. Both of these unites were new and could pump 750 gallons per minutes each. The next four rigs were all Macks which pump 1000 gallons per minute. They were an 1970, 1978, 1979 and 1984 models. The 1984 Mack had its body built by Ward 79 instead of Mack. The current rig is a 1994 Seagrave 1000 gallons per minute pumper. They received it on July 13, 1894.

Engine 255 was a Combination Engine from April of 1898 until February 1, 1927. After that time the truck was taken away from the engine and replaced with Ladder 157. The 1897 Holloway city service ladder truck was replaced on October 14, 1921 with a used 1918 Van Blerk/Combination Ladder city service ladder that came from Engine 5 in Manhattan. November 14, 1924, the Van Blerk was replaced with another used truck. Its not known where it came from but it was a 1921 White/Pirsch city service truck. Once Engine 255 was done with it went to City Island and Ladder 53 on October 30, 1926.

Replacing this unit was a spare 1913 American LaFrance 65 foot aerial. All the other trucks up until this time carried only ground ladders and no aerials. It was with this truck that Ladder 157 was placed in service with on February 1, 1927. Knowing this was a spare apparatus Ladder 157 received a new 1927 FWD tractor pulling an used 1914 American LaFrance 75 foot aerial on November 1, 1927. The first all new apparatus was a 1938 FWD 85 foot aerial on October 12, 1938 which they kept until August 29, 1963. On that date the company received it first metal aerial in a 1956 American LaFrance 85 foot aerial from Ladder 107. On April 16, 1973 Ladder 153 received its first 75 foot tower ladder, 1973 Mack. The next two rigs were both 1981 Mack 75 foot tower ladders The first one was new and assigned to the company on June 18, 1982. The second rig was received used on March 5, 1992 and came from Ladder 85. Today Ladder 157 responds with a 1994 FWD/Baker 75 foot tower ladder they received on August 16, 1994.
ENGINE 255 APPARATUS:

1897 LaFrance 4th size #390 12-15-1897
1886 Woodhouse 2nd size hose wagon #5B 12-15-1897
1897 Holloway Combination chemical, 50’ city service aerial # 11B 12-15-1897
1890 Hayes/LaFrance 75’ aerial #103 8-12-1903?
1893 Marlbourgh hose wagon #17B 1909-1912
1896 P.J. Barrett hose wagon #47B 1912-1915
1915 Mack/Boyd hose wagon #76 4-6-1915
1898 American/1915 tractor (9-3-1915) #2617 12-1915
1918 Van Blerk/Combination Ladder city service ladder 10-14-1921 to 11-14-1924
1921 White/Pirsch city service ladder #195 10-30-26?
1925 Alfco 700 gpm #5291 12-12-25
1946 WLF 750 gpm #2191 9-6-46
1959 Mack 750 gpm #1094 7-3-59
1970 Mack 1000 gpm #MP7055 5-8-1970
1978 Mack 1000 gpm #MP7809 4-13-1979
1979 Mack 1000 gpm #MP7979 11-26-1980
1984 Mack/Ward 1000 gpm #MP8414 12-18-85
1994 Seagrave 1000 gpm #SP9409 7-13-94


LADDER 155 APPARATUS:

1913 Alfco 65’ #121 before 12-8-21
1914 Alfco/1927 FWD tractor 75’ #140 11-1-1927
1938 FWD 85’ #340 10-12-1938
1956 Alfco 85’ metal aerial #412 8-29-1963
1973 Mack 75’ TL MP7303 4-16-1973
1981 Mack 75’ TL MP8103 6-18-1982
1981 Mack 75’ TL MP8107 3-5-1992
1994 FWD/Baker 75’ TL SP9401 8-16-1994

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #270 on: July 07, 2018, 10:06:37 AM »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #271 on: July 08, 2018, 01:56:35 AM »
Early FDNY Hook and Ladder companies:

1895:

     

1903:

     

1905:

     

     

     

1910:

     

     

H&L 2:

     

H&L 3:

     

H&L 5:

     

H&L 7:

   

H&L 8:

     

H&L 10:

     

H&L 11:

     

H&L 26:

     

H&L 27:

     

H&L 31:

     

H&L 35:

     

H&L 43:

     

H&L 67 (117):

     

H&L 101 (76):

     

BFD H&L 8 (108):

     

« Last Edit: July 08, 2018, 02:03:55 AM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #272 on: July 08, 2018, 11:26:06 AM »
Engine 291/Ladder 140  firehouse  56-07 Metropolitan Avenue  Ridgewood, Queens  14th Division, 45th Battalion  "Ridgewood Border Patrol"


     Engine 291 organized 56-07 Metropolitan Avenue w/Ladder 140                      1915

     Ladder 140 organized 56-07 Metropolitan Avenue w/Engine 291                      1915


Pre-FDNY:

     Ridgewood was protected by Metropolitan Engine Company 12 located on Metropolitan Avenue.  Engine 12 was part of the Newtown Fire Department.   

         

         

          http://www.newtownhistorical.org/maspeth-history/the-legacy-of-herman-ringe


56-07 Metropolitan Avenue:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 291:

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 140:

     

     

     

     

     



Engine 291/Ladder 140:

     

     


Engine 291/Ladder 140 Centennial:

     http://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/news/2015/09/29/ridgewood-fire-house-celebrates-100-years-of-service.html

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 291 LODD:

     LIEUTENANT JOHN MAYER ENGINE 291 May 24, 1929

     Lieutenant John Mayer suffered a fractured skull when he plunged down a flight of stairs in the quarters of Engine 291. He died the following morning at his home. A physician was summoned to his home when he failed to respond to calls. When he fell down the stairs in the engine house, other members of Engine 291 found him unconscious. He regained consciousness quickly and said he received no injuries. He went home and was found dead in his bed the next morning.

     RIP.  Never forget.


FF Albert E. Guinness Ladder 140 - Founder FDNY Uniformed Firemen's Association:

     

     Albert E. Guinness is the epitome of the expression, "one man can make a difference." Born in 1875 and joining the FDNY in September 1905, Guinness was the driving force behind the formation of the Uniformed Firemen's Association and its affiliation with the powerful American Federation of Labor. And while lauded by the rank and file, he was not only vilified, he was targeted by the administration.

     Guinness was a firefighter in Ladder Company 140 near his home in Long Island City. In 1918, one year after establishment of the UFA, he was given an un-requested transfer to Ladder 24 in Manhattan in retaliation – according to newspaper reports – for leading firefighters in the Labor Day Parade on Fifth Avenue. In 1922 he was again transferred, this time to Engine Company 70 on City Island, virtually an impossible three-hour commute for someone then living in Brooklyn. This later transfer occurred after his lobbying for back pay due to veterans of the First World War as required under legislation passed the previous year. Three years later he received a transfer to Engine Company 235 that finally brought him closer to his home.

     Some of his accomplishments to improve the lives of his brother firefighters included a twenty-seven percent salary increase in 1920 bringing annual pay up to $1,900 per year. In 1922 the two-platoon system was initiated bringing working hours down from 151 per week to 84. One of Guinness' major goals was to bring about legislative action making death of a firefighter from heart disease a job-related event. That finally happened in 1969.

     Not long after his retirement the same year, Albert E. Guinness died on March 12, 1927 from appendicitis at Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn. He is interred in an unmarked grave Greenwood Cemetery. Annual memorial services were held for him by the UFA for many years after his death. A window to the memory of Albert Guinness was donated by the UFA at the Central Methodist Church in Flatbush, Brooklyn.

     The UFA (now the Uniformed Firefighters Association) continues to represent the uniformed force as its bargaining unit.

     
         
          - "Fire Protection Service" Volume 83  1925

         


Ridgewood History:

     https://ny.curbed.com/2016/5/24/11755562/how-bushwick-and-ridgewood-once-entwined-became-distinct-neighborhoods

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2005/07/ridgewood-queens/


     

     

     

     


   
« Last Edit: July 08, 2018, 11:31:41 AM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #273 on: July 08, 2018, 11:54:32 PM »
Engine 25 firehouse 342 E 5th Street East Village, Manhattan     DISBANDED

     Engine 25 organized  342 E 5th Street former volunteer firehouse                   1865
     Engine 25 disbanded                                                                                   1947

     Ladder 11 located at 342 E 5th Street at Engine 25                                        1883 


Pre-FDNY:

     Jefferson Engine 26 organized                                               1803
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved Henry & Rutgers Streets               1813
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved Madison & Rutgers Streets            1832
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved Rutgers Street                             1836
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved 205 Madison Street                      1836
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved 6 3rd Street                                 1851
     Jefferson Engine 26 new firehouse 342 E 5th Street                 1852


Jefferson Engine 26:                       

     


Engine 25 Metropolitan Fire Department 1865:

     Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 25, (with horses) -- JOHN ALLEN, foreman, No. 342 East Fifth-street.

     Note - Foreman (Captain) pay $800 per year; Asst Foreman (Lieutenant) pay $750 per year; firemen pay $700 per year


Engine 25 FDNY:

     


Engine 25 Roll of Merit:

     Foreman Peter Weir, on August 17, 1871, went through smoke and flames to the 6th floor at 15 Forsyth Street, to rescue a woman and child.

     
 

Engine 25 disbanded January 1, 1947:

     On the evening of December 31, 1946, Engine 25 was 3rd due at a multiple alarm fire, Box 396, in a 7 story, 25x100, non-fire proof loft building at 749 Broadway.  All Engine 25 members narrowly escaped a collapse which took the lives of two firefighters, BC William Hogan Battalion 5 and FF Winfield Walsh Ladder 9.  Engine 25  continued to work at the multiple alarm after midnight when the company had been disbanded.           


Volunteer history:

     Our Firemen, The History of the NY Fire Departments
     Chapter 35, Part I

     No. 26. - -Jefferson.--("Blue Boys"). -- The company was organized in 1803. The first record of its location is when she lay in Henry Street near the Presbyterian Church, in Rutgers Street in 1813. During the year 1832 No. 26 moved to Madison Street, near Rutgers, in a frame building on the side of the brick building afterwards used by the company, and after 1845 by Oceana Hose Company No. 36. When the brick house at 205 Madison Street was finished, the company commenced to run the Blue Box Engine, calling themselves the "Blue Boys," with the rallying cry of "True Blue Never Fades." This engine was one of the handsomest, and at the same time the best geared, the lightest running and fastest engine of its day. Joseph Perkins, Elijah King (who afterwards kept the St. mark's Place Hotel, and, later on, the Fire island House) and Ethan L. Blanck were the foremen in those days, and in their little disputes with the "skivers" crowd (No. 39 Engine Company) Dave Phillips, and Jim or Puss Adams, were among the foremost in delivering striking arguments to their opponents. Jamieson Cox, chief engineer of the Department in 1824-28, was appointed an assistant engineer from this company. At the time of the Lorillard fire in Chatham Street, about where Leggett's Hotel now stands, Cox, then a member of 26 Engine, was on a three story ladder that was resting on the front of the building having 26's pipe. Some of the members noticed that the wall was shaking and called to Cox to come down. He had himself recognized the danger of his situation, and by a sudden and powerful effort jumped the ladder from the front of the building over to the front of the next on just as the wall fell in with a crash. Had he not moved the ladder over as he did, nothing could have saved him.

     About May, 1836, the men were having some repairs done to their house in Madison Street, and ran from a little wooden shanty on the north side of Rutgers Street, one door from Madison Street. While in this temporary location the building was discovered to be on fire one day, and on Mr. Charles J. Harris, one of the members, and Thomas Coger, a volunteer, arriving at the house and opening the doors, they were unable to draw the engine from the house, the machine having either been fastened to the floor, or the wheels so chocked that the engine could not be moved. The engine, which was a very handsome one with polished iron work, and a great deal of elaborate carving on it, was partially destroyed. It was a comparatively new machine, having been in use but about three years. this did not prevent the company from continuing their fire duty. They immediately applied for and obtained the engine that had been turned in by Hudson Engine Company No. 1, and commenced to run from their house in Madison Street.
At the fire in the Tribune building which occurred February 5, 1845, during a heavy snow storm which had lasted twenty-four hours, the streets being impassable for their engine, the members of 26 Engine Company put their hose on a wood sled belonging to Hecker, the flour merchant, and drew it to the fire, Zophar Mills and Charles Forrester being on the rope going down. The members then went and helped Engine Company No. 23 across the City Hall Park, they not having yet reached the fire from Anthony Street.

     On the occasion of the obsequies of ex-President Andrew Jackson in New York, June 24, 1845, a great many of the New York fire companies turned out without their apparatus, and among others were Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 26. They had just reached the City Hall, where they were to be dismissed, then the Hall bell struck for the fifth district. Both companies started after their engines, and on reaching Chatham Square No. 26 Engine could be seen coming down East Broadway, and No. 2 Engine coming down Division Street. After a little parley about "going out first," No. 2 engine started over toward Oliver Street, and John Harden, foreman of No. 26 Engine, headed his company over to Mott Street. This "skinned" No. 2 engine's rope, and the fun began. Both companies were halted at Chatham and Chambers Streets, where some lively hitting out was indulged in until stopped by Chief Anderson, and both companies sent home. They went back side by side, stopping a few moments before the Chatham Theater to exchange compliments, and as No. 2 engine men hooted at No. 26. As they separated at Chatham Square, they were obliged to continue hostilities in front of old Johnny Pease's candy store in Division Street, which ended in No. 2 engine being tied up to a lamp post, corner of Rutgers and Henry Streets.

     On the night of July 16, 1845, there were several alarms struck and one of them was for the fire in the old Dispensary, corner of White and Centre Streets. On their way home, when in Walker Street near Eldridge Street, and about opposite the old Sawdust House, kept by "Yankee" Sullivan, No. 2 Engine ran into No. 26 Engine and they struck out right and left. The companies were ordered out run in "tongue first," and the next night their houses were locked up, neither company being present at the great fire which took place down town shortly afterwards. The Blue Engine which No. 26 ran was taken away, but is said to still be in existence. It had a plate on the back of it of Jefferson writing the Declaration of Independence. The company was disbanded on September 22, 1845. A company bearing the same number and name, organized on December 2, 1851, by the company formerly known as Hose Company No. 32, was stationed at No. 6 third Street, and later in Fifth Street near First Avenue. It went out of service in 1865.


« Last Edit: July 09, 2018, 01:00:01 AM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
« Last Edit: July 10, 2018, 12:01:09 AM by mack »

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1497
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #275 on: July 10, 2018, 01:04:09 AM »
Mack,

You're an absolute wonder!

Hope you don't mind a suggestion, but keep an eye out so these gems won't be lost to the "ethernet" like "Section 1" was.

History as recorded by you, guitarman314, memorymaster and so many other site members (down to the up-to-the-minute box alarm assignments from so many dedicated people) is absolutely critical not only for FDNY but for the City itself, for future generations of Firefighters, schoolchildren, doctoral candidates, potential recruits and historians. Do you think there is there any way the Fire Museum or some other FDNY or City component might want to archive your work?  In fact, might the Museum, FDNY, WNYF or City be interested in archiving the extraordinary history, training hints and other issues presented on NYCFIRE.NET?  And would our members from Eire, the UK and other EU nations, South America (and Uncle Willy's northern suburbs, of course) and other areas be interested in formally inviting aboard their Professional and Volunteer Departments?

These things are much too important to be left to hope. There's too much precious history on this site to be left to luck.

Thanks for all your extraordinary work.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2018, 01:09:13 AM by manhattan »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9975
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #276 on: July 10, 2018, 01:39:10 AM »
^^^ This was a question i had posed on here awhile back ....what is archived ?....i know on another FDNY site much (especially pictures that were time consuming to post) suddenly were lost ?.....how can this loss of History be avoided ?

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1497
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #277 on: July 10, 2018, 01:45:13 AM »
Sorry, Chief,

I'm embarassed - I should have mentioned you, Bill D. and numerous other members as Most Valuable Contributors.

Please forgive the oversight.

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9975
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #278 on: July 10, 2018, 02:35:59 AM »
Sorry, Chief,

I'm embarassed - I should have mentioned you, Bill D. and numerous other members as Most Valuable Contributors.

Please forgive the oversight.
You do not need to be embarrassed about anything on here ...you do more behind the scenes than most know especially for Veterans....Thank YOU !

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #279 on: July 11, 2018, 05:31:53 PM »
Engine 203 - 1912 Mack high pressure hose wagon:

     

     

High pressure engine companies were established in Manhattan and Brooklyn to use the new high pressure water pumping systems.  The plan was to take lines off high pressure hydrants without the use of steamers.  High pressure companies initially were viewed as successful holding greater alarms at lower alarm assignments and eliminating the requirement of multiple section engine companies.  The limitations, however, were that high pressure companies without steamers could not respond outside their limited high pressure pumping system response area and relocations into high pressure areas was also limited.  High pressure engine companies were phased out but the high pressure pumping systems remained in operation in parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn into the 1970s.

 
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 09:21:20 PM by mack »


Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #281 on: July 11, 2018, 09:03:35 PM »
High pressure hydrant in use - Coney Island Dreamland fire - 1911:

     

     https://www.westland.net/coneyisland/articles/dreamlandfire.htm

     http://www.gendisasters.com/new-york/8052/coney-island-ny-disastrous-fire-may-1911

     
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 09:09:21 PM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #282 on: July 11, 2018, 11:18:14 PM »
Chief John Kenlon  -  Chief of Department  -  1911-1931

     

John Kenlon was born in County Louth, Ireland on August 25, 1861, near the seaport village of Annagassan. One day while working the field of a local estate, he abandoned his mule and plough, headed for boat races and never turned back. At the age of thirteen he signed on as a hand on the topsail schooner Margaret and Peggy and spent the next fourteen years at sea. He chronicled his experiences in his autobiography, Fourteen Years A Sailor, published in 1923.

During a visit to New York City in 1884 he attended a Broadway show. Toward the end of the third act someone in the crowd yelled, "Fire!" and pandemonium ensued as they all clamored toward the main entrance. Kenlon realized that nobody was using the numerous side exits from the theater, so he went that route. Before escaping, he witnessed the arrival of the firefighters who quickly extinguished the growing blaze on the raised curtain. In his account of this incident, he said that the combination of realizing the safety and ease with which the theater could have been evacuated and his intent interest of watching the firefighters work, made up his mind to leave his life at sea and become a New York City firefighter, which he did on April 2, 1887.

His original assignment was with Engine 24. He formed and became first Battalion Chief in charge of the Marine Division in 1905. An examination for promotion to the rank of Deputy Chief of the Marine Division was ordered, a requirement of which was for applicants to hold Pilot's and Master's licenses. Chief Kenlon was the only Chief of Battalion who could qualify and, after passing the examination, he was promoted to this specific title by Special Order No. 45, of April 12, 1909, being the only officer ever promoted to be Deputy Chief of the Marine Division. Two years later, although the junior among the Deputy Chiefs, he was first on the list for Chief of Department and became head of the uniformed force on August 1, 1911. Under his command the FDNY fought one of the most difficult structure fires of the time, the Equitable Building fire in 1912. In 1913, Chief Kenlon penned an authoritative book on firefighting entitled, Fires and Firefighting.

Upon his retirement from the FDNY on March 4, 1931, Chief Kenlon moved to Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

     - from "Find-A-Grave"


     Deputy Chief Marine Division:

         


     Chief of Department:

         
         
         


     Equitable Building Fire 1912:

         

         


         


         
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 11:23:55 PM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #283 on: July 14, 2018, 05:22:04 PM »
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

     Brush Fire Patrol 38 organized 3446 Eastchester Road at Engine 38                                                         1963
 
Notes:

     Ladder 15 located at 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38                                                            1874-1881

     Battalion 10 located at 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38                                                         1903-1904

     Battalion 13 located at 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38                                       1898-1903, 1904-1916


Engine 38/Ladder 15 1907 Amsterdam Avenue:

     

     


Engine 38/Ladder 51 3446 Eastchester Road:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 38:

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 51:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 38/Ladder 51:

     

     

     

     


FDNY Medals:

     CRAIG S. MC LOUGHLIN FF. ENG. 38 SEP. 29, 1995 1996 WYLIE

     LAWRENCE V. ROMANO LT. LAD. 51 FEB. 27, 1966 1967 COLUMBIA

     ANTHONY R. MAZZA FF. LAD. 51 SEP. 10, 1973 1974 HISPANIC


Engine 38/Ladder 51 LODDs:

     CAPTAIN MICHAEL SNYDER ENGINE 38 APRIL 16, 1868

          Captain Michael Snyder died as a result of injuries he sustained March 18th, when he was trampled by the horses in quarters while responding to an alarm in Westchester County. The horses were not entirely hitched to the steamer when the front doors of the firehouse were opened. Foreman Snyder attempted to stop the horses when he was trampled. The run ended up being a false alarm.

     FIREFIGHTER SAMUEL LILLY ENGINE 38 March 30, 1905 Box 874 – W 167 St & Broadway

          FF Lilly was washing down a fire that was burning for days in the subway tunnel.  The members were lowered into the tunnel and started flowing water in the line when bricks and cement began to fall in large quantities. Lilly was struck in the abdomen. As other members tried to rescue members, the top of the tunnel continued to collapse. All members except Lilly were rescued. The IRT Section boss got a rescue crew together and after hard work, located Lilly’s lifeless body. Lilly left behind 3 children.

         

     FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY P. LONGA ENGINE 38 March 31, 1957  Limited Service Squad

          He died as a result of injuries he sustained in the line of duty.


WTC Death:

     FF Terence Lorino Ladder 51 May 14, 2018

         

          FF Terence Michael Lorino was a longtime member of FDNY Engine 38 Ladder 51, "Da Dawg House" in Bronx, NY. He also was a U.S. Navy Veteran.


     RIP.  Never forget.


Williamsbridge, Bronx:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williamsbridge,_Bronx







« Last Edit: July 14, 2018, 06:02:24 PM by mack »

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5284
  • Gender: Male
Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #284 on: July 14, 2018, 06:15:05 PM »
Engine 38 1969 Mack R model 1000GPM: