Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 155879 times)

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #285 on: July 14, 2018, 07:22:48 PM »
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

Engine 38 is one of the handful of companies that have served in two Boros - in Manhattan until 1918, and in the Bronx ten years later in 1928.

Technically, the same is true for Ladder 51 but in a different way.  Ladder 51 was in Brooklyn from 1899 to 1913 when they were renumbered as Ladder 101, and then Ladder 51 was a new company in the Bronx in 1928.

Nycfire.net

Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #285 on: July 14, 2018, 07:22:48 PM »

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #286 on: July 15, 2018, 01:19:50 AM »
  Manhattan Engine 38 was disbanded on Sept. 12, 1918, seven years after E84/L34 firehouse was placed in operation nearby on Aug. 1, 1907.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #287 on: July 15, 2018, 02:44:19 PM »
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

Engine 38 is one of the handful of companies that have served in two Boros - in Manhattan until 1918, and in the Bronx ten years later in 1928.

Technically, the same is true for Ladder 51 but in a different way.  Ladder 51 was in Brooklyn from 1899 to 1913 when they were renumbered as Ladder 101, and then Ladder 51 was a new company in the Bronx in 1928.


Engine 47 was organized in the Bronx in 1881, disbanded and reorganized in Manhattan in 1882.

Engine 72 was a Manhattan engine company until 1957 and later reorganized in the Bronx in 1972.

Engine 251 was a Brooklyn engine company, organized in 1897, disbanded in 1946, and reorganized in Queens in 1952

Squad 1 was in Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

Squad 5 was in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Satellite 1 was in Brooklyn and Manhatan.


Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #288 on: July 15, 2018, 03:11:24 PM »
Captain John Vigiano - Ladder 103, Rescue 2, Ladder 176

     

     

     

     

     

Awards (-posted by Chief K)

Thomas F. Dougherty Medal awarded to:

Fireman 1st Grade John T. Vigiano Ladder Co. 103
Fire at 468 Berriman Street, Brooklyn. Box 7-5-1918, 2251 hours
December 28, 1968. 2 story Brick, 20 x 40 Class 3 P.D. (Building 3 stories in Rear)

0n arrival of L103, the cellar was fully involved, with an extremely heavy smoke and heat condition throughout the remainder of the building. After the initial size up, the officer in command of L103 requested a full first alarm assignment. Civilians at the scene reported a woman was in the 2nd floor of the building.
Fr. Vigiano had gained access to the roof of the fire building via an adjacent building and had completed preliminary roof ventilation, and was proceeding to ventilate at the rear While carrying out this task he heard a moan from within the building. He immediately lowered himself to the fire escape balcony with a short piece of rope he had been carrying with him. He forced a door to a rear bedroom and made a search, being forced to his hands and knees by the extreme conditions. Approximately 10 feet into the room he found a 65 year old woman in a semi-conscious state lying on the floor near a bed. He removed her to the rear balcony an started mouth to mouth resuscitation. While rendering this aid. Fr. Vigiano collapsed. Subsequently, both he and the victim were removed to the hospital. After initial treatment Fr. Vigiano was released. After returning to quarters to rest, he experienced chest pains, nausea and severe headaches. He was returned to the hospital where he remained overnight for observation It was later disclosed that the victim had a history of tuberculosis and Fr. Vigiano is now being watched to protect him from any possibility of contracting the disease.
This rescue was made under heavy smoke and heat conditions, prior to the use of handlines, and without the protection of a mask. In addition the woman was very heavy, and great exertion was required to effect her rescue by Fr. Vigiano. He showed initiative and determination under arduous circumstances and his aggressiveness undoubtedly saved the life of this person. He acted in the finest traditions of this great department.

..........................................................................
1972 Medal Day Book:
Albert S. Johnston Medal awarded to:

Fireman 1st Grade John T. Vigiano Ladder Co. 103 (now Rescue 2)
Fire at 420 Williams Avenue, Brooklyn. Box 7-5-1720, 2115 hours,
April 9, 1971. 4 story N.F.P., Multiple Dwelling.

Upon arrival at the fire building, members of L103 set out performing their assigned duties. Fire had originated on the 2nd floor and had communicated to 3rd floor via ceiling and flooring. Flames were shooting out of 2nd floor windows and enveloping the fire escape on south side of building. Units attempting to gain access via interior were encountering difficulties due to intense heat and heavy volumes of smoke. No lines had been able-to penetrate and get above the fire. Members on roof were unable to descend fire escape due to flames, heat and smoke.
At this stage, Fireman Vigiano, the chauffeur of L103 and the last to leave the apparatus, noticed a woman at the 3rd floor window in an alley on the south side of the building. He immediately returned to the apparatus and removed a 35' portable ladder, and with the assistance of an auxiliary fireman raised it and placed it alongside the fire escape at the 3rd floor. By this time the woman had disappeared from the window. He quickly climbed the ladder to the 3rd floor balcony where he dashed aver the railing through the smoke and flame and entered the open window where he had seen the woman. Dropping on his stomach he began to crawl through the apartment searching for the woman. He located her in a hallway off the bathroom, in a highly emotional and disoriented state. Dragging and carrying her, he returned to the window. Using his body as a shield from the heat and flames, he got her on the ladder and guided her down to the street. There she told him that her brother was still in the apartment. Although near exhaustion from exertion and the effects of the heat and smoke, Vigianao again climbed to the 3rd floor and despite the worsened conditions, re-entered the apartment to search for the brother.
Crawling through the apartment he finally located the brother in a hallway leading to the interior of the building. He then dragged him through the intense heat and smoke, back to the window. There be carried him out the window to the ladder and then down to the street, again using his body and protective clothing to protect the boy from the heat.
As a result of his actions Fireman Vigiano was later hospitalized and treated for Carbon Monoxide poisoning. His unbelievable courage, in singlehandedly rescuing these two people who were trapped in their apartment, is deserving of the highest praise. His unselfish devotion to duty was of the highest order and in the best traditions of this department.
.........................................................................


1979 Medal Day Book:
Thomas A. Kenny Memorial Medal awarded to:

Lieutenant JOHN T. VlGlANO Rescue Company 2
Fire at 70 Clermont Avenue, Brooklyn
Box 75-385,0100 hours, October 27, 1978
Four story, 20'x40’, Frame Private Dwelling

Arriving at the fire scene, Lieutenant John T. Vigiano and members of R2 observed that fire had full possession of the front bedroom and hall of the 4th floor. Occupants of the dwelling yelled to Lieutenant Vigiano that an elderly woman was trapped upstairs at the attic floor level. R2 members were ordered by the lieutenant to assume the duties of the first arriving ladder company and ascended the stairs to the third floor. He also tried to determine in which room the victim was located. Informed there was no fire escape in the rear of the building, Lieutenant Vigiano requested, via. Handi-Talki, that a roof rope be taken to the roof for an attempted rescue from that point. Moving to the top of the attic stairs with the can man, they encountered severe heat. The door to the fire room had been burnt away. At this moment, Fireman Sullivan dragged a victim to the stairs. Assisting them down the stairs, Fireman Sullivan informed Lieutenant Vigiano that there was another victim in the room.
A second extinguisher was brought up to the fire floor. Lieutenant Vigiano crawled into the back room under the protection of the second extinguisher. Crawling on his stomach, he made his way across the bedroom to the window on the far side. There he discovered the unconscious victim, wedged between the bed and the wall. The room was crowded with furniture, therefore it was difficult to maneuver around the bed. Lieutenant Vigiano was forced to pull the lifeless body up onto the bed and drag her across it onto the floor. Fire had full possession of the front room, interior hall, and was burning across the ceiling of the rear bedroom. Burning paint was I dropping and igniting the mattress in the room.
Lieutenant Vigiano dragged the unconscious and non-breathing, severely burned victim to the stairs. Then other members assisted them down to the third floor. He immediately began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until a resuscitator was placed in operation.
Lieutenant Vigiano acted in a manner which is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Fire Department. If not for his courageous act, this victim would have perished

...
1981 Medal Day Book:
Thomas A. Kenny Memorial Medal awarded to:

Lieutenant JOHN T. VlGlANO Rescue Company 2

Brooklyn's R2 was returning to its quarters after operating at a fire when the dispatcher announced via the Department radio, that an alarm of fire was being transmitted for a 4 story brick apartment house at 713 Lafayette Avenue. The dispatcher finished his message advising that a full first alarm assignment (3 engines and 2 ladders) would be rolling in to the scene due to the numerous phone calls received at the Communications Center. As he signed off announcing the time at 2125 hrs., Lieutenant John T. Vigiano radioed his units availability since he was only two blocks from the fire scene. "Take it in" came the terse reply. As R2 rolled into the block, members observed a heavy fire condition on the third floor with possible extension to the fourth floor. Instructing his unit to function as the first arriving ladder company, Lieutenant Vigiano raced to the third floor, where a dazed resident informed the rescue officer that people were trapped on the fourth floor.
Fire was now showing at 4 front windows, the roof had not been vented, and without any engine company's at the scene affording the luxury of a hose line to back up his rescue efforts, Lieutenant Vigiano knew he had to act quickly to reach any victims. While donning the facepiece to his mask, he reached the fourth floor landing, where intense smoke and heat drove him to a crawling position. Upon entering the apartment, he crawled down a long hallway, stopping occasionally to listen for cries of help. Half way down the hall, he heard the anguished pleas for rescue. Temporary renovations to the apartment slowed the rescue attempt. After doubling back from the kitchen, he found the opening to the front bedroom just as the victim, Lincoln Dawkins, cried out one more time. Near exhaustion from searching four other rooms prior to locating the victim, Vigiano now had to remove the semi-conscious victim. While dragging him from the apartment, he stopped a few times to administer air from his own mask.
At one point, the victim, barely audible, informed the rescue officer that his mother was in the front of the bedroom. Vigiano took Dawkins to the hallway and headed back to the bedroom in search of the mother. Fire had gained complete control of the thud floor and blew in the windows of the bedroom on the fourth floor, cutting the lieutenant. Fire now was spreading in his locale and an urgent message from Chief James Duffy (B57) advised him that all residents had been accounted for, and ordered a hasty retreat. Fire was now gaining headway on the fourth floor and as Lieutenant Vigiano made his exit, members of Engine Companies 209 and 217 were moving a hoseline into position to extinguish the blaze.
For Mr. Dawkins and the residents on the fourth floor, it was fortunate indeed that R2 was in such close proximity to the building as the fire broke out.
R2 has a long and glorious history of heroism. Lieutenant Vigiano added another remarkable feat to its already outstanding record. It is interesting to note that Lieutenant Vigiano's son, Joseph, was recently awarded one of the Boy Scouts of America highest awards for heroism. The youngster saved three lives last summer in Clearwater, Florida. As young Joseph looks on today, he will watch his father honored for his valiant actions. Whoever first called New York's Firefighters-"The Bravest"-had to be thinking of men like Lieutenant John T. Vigiano of R2.
..................................................John had received the Thomas A. Kenny on two separate Medal Days.



     



CAPTAIN JOHN T. VIGIANO (NYFD site)

John T. Vigiano is a retired Captain of the New York City Fire Department, with over 38 years of service. 

His career started in 1962 with Ladder Company 103 in the East New York - Brownsville section of Brooklyn.
He transferred to Rescue Company 2 for a short period but returned to Ladder 103 until his promotion to Lieutenant in 1976.
After a 6-month period of covering in Far Rockaway, he returned to Brooklyn and to Ladder Company 132 where he stayed
until his transfer to Rescue Company 2 in 1977.  He remained in Rescue Company 2 until his promotion to Captain in 1988.
 Upon promotion, he was assigned to the Rescue Liaison Unit for nearly a year until his assignment to
 Ladder Company 176, "The Tin-House Truck" where is he retired as the Company Commander in May of 1998.

John is a graduate of John Jay College with a Bachelors Degree in Fire Science.

He is also a Certified New York State Instructor who was an Adjunct Instructor to the New York State First Line Supervisors Training Program.
He was also an adjunct instructor for the Captains Management - Training Program for the New York City Fire Department.

In addition to his full time fire career, John also worked for the Suffolk County Fire Training Academy for over 14 years.
Where he designed and wrote the Heavy Rescue Program. He retired from the County in 1998.

He has authored many articles for the various trade magazines such as Firehouse, Fire Engineering and Fire Command.
He has lectured at the Firehouse Conference in Baltimore in 1998 and FDIC in Indiana this year.

John has been lecturing to many departments for over twenty years.
 He is the director of Fire Mark Consultants; a company that specializes in fire related seminars.


Subject: Accountibility
By: Captain John Vigiano (Ret)

There is a riding list.  The officer on duty writes this up at the
start of each tour (shift).  It lists the following info:
a) Members riding position, eg. where he/she is seated on the apparatus.
b) Members assignment, eg. forcible entry, roor, chauffeur, etc.
c) Members group #. eg., the assigned group on the units roster
d) The SCBA assigned to that member for the tour.

This list is approx 3" x 4" and is made out in duplicate.  The original
is placed on the dash board of the apparatus and the duplicate is carried
by the officer.

In the event of a disaster (building collapse, flash over, etc) where members are lost
or unaccounted for the Inicident Commander will have each officer conduct a roll call to
account for his/her members, using his copy of the riding list.  This is important,
since there are times when the officer does not know the members he/she is
working with. It could be an officer just assigned for the tour.

If however, the officer is one of the missing, then the list is removed
from that members apparatus, and the roll call conducted....hence the two
copies.
Captain John Vigiano Ladder 176 (Ret.)


Subject: Rapid Intervention Crews ( F. A. S. T. TRUCK )
By: Captain John Vigiano (Ret)


I was asked to send you some info on Rapid Intervention Crews.  Here in NYC,
 we refer to them as F. A. S. T.  units.  (firefighter assist search team).
 Other areas of the New York, the term used is Rapid Intervention Teams.  They
 are all the same and have the same purpose; to aide fire units or fire
 personnel in trouble.

I have recently reitired (May 1998) from the New York City Fire Department. I
 spent the last 36 years doing what I loved....riding a fire truck and going to
 fires.

A few years ago, the FDNY, went through a tough time.  Too many members were
 injured and killed in a short periord of time.  The think tank went into
 overdrive and soem pretty smart people came up with ideas to curb this
 problem. 

Being a firefighter, you know, we can not change fate, but we can make
 adjustments to training and education to ensure our people have help when they
 need it.  Hence, the F.A.S.T. concept was initiated.

Here is a copy of my former units policy concerning the F.A.S.T. TRUCK
(Firefighter Assist and Search Team)

LADDER COMPANY 176 POLICY


This unit is an additional ladder company above the ladder companies assigned
 on the second alarm.

Upon arrival, the FAST truck will report to the Incident Commander at the
 Command Post;  advise the IC that "they are the FAST TRUCK", and follow his
 direction.

As per the AUC 273 addendum #155 and ABC 5-88, all members will be equipped as
 follows:

  SCBA WITH PASS ALARMS
  SEARCH ROPE
  LIFESAVING ROPE  / LIFE BELT
  RABBIT TOOL WITH FORCIBLE ENTRY TOOLS
  "NORMAL" TOOL ASSIGNMENT WITH ROOF SAW.

GENERAL DUTIES:

  Listen to HT (Hand held portable radio) transmissions while responding and
 walking to the CP.
  Look at the fire conditions, and discuss what you  see.
  Anticipate where we would go and how we would get there....ladders, fire-
  escapes, breaching a wall....if the situation turns to s_ _ t
  Take note of the units working ; their unit numbers; they may be re-located
  units.
 Check  out what apparatus we would place our equipment if call to work as a
 relief unit or if equipment is not necessary for operation.

ANTICIPATE PROBLEMS - HAVE A REACTION PLAN

SPECIFIC DUTIES: 
(Note: FDNY we have a minimum of an Officer and 5 members)

A.      INSIDE TEAM: ( Officer / Can / Forcible Entry)

FIRE ESCAPES:
  Are they overcrowded ?
  Will interior units be using them  ?
  Will that be the way to get into the building quickly ?

PORTABLE LADDERS:
  Are they in place ?
  Are additional ladders necessary ?

B       CHAUFFEUR:     

  Go to the Aerial / Tower ladder in front of  fire building  and check it
 out.
  Get familiar with the controls, and make sure it is ready to be used.
  Stay at the turntable if the assigned chauffeur is not there.
  If assigned chauffeur is there, stay at the pedestal in case the assigned
 chauffeur is called into the building by his officer.

C.      OUTSIDE TEAM  (OVM / ROOFMAN)

  Check out the perimeter of the building....
  Take note of any shafts, fences  or fire-escapes
  Note any obstacles or problems the unit may encounter.
  Report back to Unit Officer in front of building or at CP
  REMEMBER THIS IS A SIZE UP ONLY.

ANTICIPATE PROBLEMS  - HAVE A REACTION PLAN

THIS IS A UNIT OPERATION, NOT AN INDIVIDUAL ONE


     

     

     

     

     


     RIP.


      

« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 03:17:18 PM by mack »

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #289 on: July 15, 2018, 04:10:38 PM »
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

Engine 38 is one of the handful of companies that have served in two Boros - in Manhattan until 1918, and in the Bronx ten years later in 1928.

Technically, the same is true for Ladder 51 but in a different way.  Ladder 51 was in Brooklyn from 1899 to 1913 when they were renumbered as Ladder 101, and then Ladder 51 was a new company in the Bronx in 1928.


Engine 47 was organized in the Bronx in 1881, disbanded and reorganized in Manhattan in 1882.

Engine 72 was a Manhattan engine company until 1957 and later reorganized in the Bronx in 1972.

Engine 251 was a Brooklyn engine company, organized in 1897, disbanded in 1946, and reorganized in Queens in 1952

Squad 1 was in Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

Squad 5 was in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Satellite 1 was in Brooklyn and Manhatan.

A few more:

Engine 43 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1875-1903 and berthed in Bronx 1904
Engine 51 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1883-1908, berthed in Staten Island 1908-1916, berthed in Brooklyn 1916-1922, and back to Staten Island 1922-1959
Engine 66 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1898-1959, land engine in Bronx 1974
Engine 77 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1903-1904, berthed in Brooklyn 1904-1911, berthed in Manhattan again 1911-1922, finally berthed in Staten Island 1922
Engine 85 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1908-1959, land engine in Bronx 1967-1986
Engine 69 in Bronx 1899-1916, then in Manhattan 1917
Engine 89 in Manhattan 1909-1916, then in Bronx 1926
Engine 326 in Brooklyn 1939-1952, then in Queens 1984
Engine 332 in Queens 1938-1941, then in Brooklyn 1970
Engines 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157 were organized in Brooklyn, numbers assigned to Staten Island companies in 1913
Engines 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168 were organized in Queens, numbers assigned to Staten Island companies in 1913
Engines 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 were organized in Staten Island, numbers assigned to Brooklyn companies in 1913

Ladder 18 in Bronx 1874-1882, then in Manhattan in 1887
Ladder 36 in Bronx 1908-1913, then Manhattan in 1915
Ladder 39 in Manhattan 1909-1916, then in Bronx in 1916
Ladders 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 61 were organized in Brooklyn (1899-1913),  numbers assigned to Bronx companies in 1928 (51, 52, 53), 1966 (54), 1968 (55, 56), 1972 (58, 59), 1974 (61)
Ladders 76, 77, 78, 79, 80 were organized in Queens (1907-1913), numbers assigned to  Staten Island companies in 1913


Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #290 on: July 16, 2018, 01:43:00 AM »
  You left out L57 with E72 that actually had their rig numbered and in quarters but didn't get organized. ;)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #291 on: July 16, 2018, 02:08:55 AM »
"Signal 9-2" - 1950s FDNY film:

     
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 11:53:46 AM by mack »

Offline manhattan

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #292 on: July 16, 2018, 02:36:28 AM »
I can't be absolutely positive, but I think I remember seeing this video at the old Fire Museum on Duane Street one of the times  my Mom took me there back in the 1960's.

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #293 on: July 16, 2018, 12:46:08 PM »
  You left out L57 with E72 that actually had their rig numbered and in quarters but didn't get organized. ;)

That's an interesting story to be told.

A few other mystery moves:

 L58 instead of L60
 E290/L103 instead of E296/L145

E287-2 - the only second section organized in its own station (not with the first section)

Great history puzzles.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #294 on: July 16, 2018, 04:23:22 PM »
  You left out L57 with E72 that actually had their rig numbered and in quarters but didn't get organized. ;)

That's an interesting story to be told.

A few other mystery moves:

 L58 instead of L60
 E290/L103 instead of E296/L145

E287-2 - the only second section organized in its own station (not with the first section)

Great history puzzles.


Divisions have also crossed borough locations frequently:

DIVISION 1 MANHATTAN
 
DIVISION 2 MANHATTAN
 
DIVISION 3 MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN
 
DIVISION 4 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX   
 
DIVISION 5 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, QUEENS, MANHATTAN, QUEENS
 
DIVISION 6 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX
 
DIVISION 7 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX 

DIVISION 8 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND
 
DIVISION 9 BROOKLYN, BRONX
 
DIVISION 10 STATEN ISLAND, BROOKLYN 
 
DIVISION 11 BROOKLYN 
 
DIVISION 12 BROOKLYN
 
DIVISION 13 BROOKLYN, QUEENS
 
DIVISION 14 QUEENS
 
DIVISION 15 BROOKLYN
 
DIVISION 16 QUEENS 

DIVISION 17 BROOKLYN

MARINE DIVISION  MANHATTAN, BROOKLYN
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 04:26:31 PM by mack »

Offline 68jk09

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #295 on: July 16, 2018, 04:46:10 PM »
One bay of 206s old Qtrs was lettered for LAD*133 when the FH was built but it never existed there & in 1998 the number was used when 133 was organized at ENG*275.

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #296 on: July 16, 2018, 05:42:46 PM »
One bay of 206s old Qtrs was lettered for LAD*133 when the FH was built but it never existed there & in 1998 the number was used when 133 was organized at ENG*275.

No ladder was ever organized at E206 either.

One bay at E310 was lettered for L160 in 1927.  Never happened.  L174 wound up in that bay in 1966.  L160 organized later in 1984 at E326.

L138 was scheduled for E288's house and L139 scheduled for E289's house.  Instead L138 organized at E289 and L139 never happened.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2018, 08:30:13 AM by fdhistorian »

Offline fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #297 on: July 16, 2018, 06:33:24 PM »

Divisions have also crossed borough locations frequently:

DIVISION 1 MANHATTAN
DIVISION 2 MANHATTAN
DIVISION 3 MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN
DIVISION 4 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX   
DIVISION 5 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, QUEENS, MANHATTAN, QUEENS
DIVISION 6 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX
DIVISION 7 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX 
DIVISION 8 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND
DIVISION 9 BROOKLYN, BRONX
DIVISION 10 STATEN ISLAND, BROOKLYN 
DIVISION 11 BROOKLYN 
DIVISION 12 BROOKLYN
DIVISION 13 BROOKLYN, QUEENS
DIVISION 14 QUEENS
DIVISION 15 BROOKLYN
DIVISION 16 QUEENS 
DIVISION 17 BROOKLYN

MARINE DIVISION  MANHATTAN, BROOKLYN

Do to the usual historical moves and due to the renumbering of divisions, some houses have hosted multiple divisions.

185 Lafayette St, Manhattan             DC1, DC2
115 W 33rd St, Manhattan                DC2, DC3
155 Mercer St, Manhattan                 DC2, DC1
243 Lafayette St, Manhattan             DC2, DC1
205 W 77th St, Manhattan                DC3, DC4, DC2
221 E 75th St, Manhattan                 DC3, DC5, DC4
3134 Park Ave, Bronx                        DC4, DC5, DC6, DC7
503 E 139th St, Manhattan               DC5, DC6
720 Melrose Ave, Bronx                     DC6, DC3
2417 Webster Ave, Bronx                 DC7, DC4
2504 Webster Ave, Bronx                 DC7, DC9
617 Central Ave, Brooklyn                 DC9, DC13, DC15, DC17
1189 Castleton Ave, Staten Island   DC10, DC6, DC7, DC8
365 Jay St, Brooklyn                          DC10, DC6
127 N 1st St, Brooklyn                      DC11, DC7
172 Tillary St, Brooklyn                     DC11, DC6
530 11th St, Brooklyn                      DC12, DC8
108-01 Horace Harding Expwy, Queens   DC14, DC5
885 Howard Ave, Brooklyn               DC15, DC7
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 07:05:48 PM by fdhistorian »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #298 on: July 16, 2018, 11:43:24 PM »
Engine 17/Ladder 18/Squad 5/Engine 15/Battalion 4 - Broome Street and Ft Pitt firehouses:


     Old Broome St firehouse - designates E 17/L 18/4th Bn  (Squad 5 operated from here 1966-1969):

         


     New firehouse built for Engine 17/Ladder 18/Squad 5/Bn 4 1973:

         

          Firehouse built for 3 companies but Squad 5 operated at 55 E Broadway and then moved to the Bronx in 1974


     Squad 5 moved to Bronx 1974:

         


     Engine 18 disbanded 1998:

         


     Engine 15 relocated to Pitt Street 2001:

         



Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #299 on: July 16, 2018, 11:52:27 PM »
Engine 6  firehouse  49 Beckman Street Financial District, Manhattan Division 1, Battalion 1 “Tigers”

     Engine 6 organized 100 Cedar Street former volunteer firehouse           1865
     Engine 6 moved Battery Place & West Street                                       1882
     Engine 6 new firehouse 100 Cedar Street                                            1882
     Engine 6 new firehouse 113 Liberty Street                                           1905
     Engine 6 moved 49 Beekman Street                                                    1970
     Engine 6 moved 42 South Street at Engine 4                                        2004
     Engine 6 returned 49 Beekman Street                                                 2005

Notes:
 
     Ladder 15 located 113 Liberty Street at Engine 6                                 1961

     Battalion 1 located 113 Liberty Street at Engine 6    1907- 1912,  1936-1937, 1948-1949


 Pre-FDNY volunteer history:

    Washington Engine 20 located at 100 Cedar Street                           1861-1866

    Washington Engine 20 organized 1792.  FF James McNulty, Engine 20 LODD at Jennings fire. Engine 20 disbanded 1865.  Engine 6 FDNY organized in former quarters at 100 Cedar Street.


Engine 6 1880s located 100 Cedar Street:

     


Engine 6 1909 located 113 Liberty Street:

     


49 Beekman Street firehouse:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     Note:  Engine 7 located at 49 Beekman Street 1903-1905; Engine 32 located at 49 Beekman Street 1905-1972


Engine 6:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 6:

     

     

     

     


FDNY Medals:

     JOSEPH MC GOWAN FF. ENG. 6 APR. 14, 1876 1877 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

         

          FF Joseph McGowan on April 14, 1876 at a fire at 15 Thomas Street, assistwed by FF Thomas Keenan, learned on arrival that Mary Molony, Julia Roach and four children were trapped on the third floor.  FF McGowan entered the burning building and through an attic window, passed three children to Keenan, who was on the cornice of an adjoining building.  He then rescued the women and the remaining child by guiding them to the roof and then to safety.  All were exhausted with terror and inhaled smoke.   

     CHARLEY H. PERELEY CAPT. ENG. 6 1896 1897 STEPHENSON

          Awarded to the captain maintaining the most efficient and best disciplined company in the Department.

     PETER J. MCKENZIE FF. ENG. 6 MAY 8, 1911 1912 STRONG

          1911 Medal winners w/Mayor and Commissioner:

               

          FF Peter Strong attempted to rescue a child from the 5th floor of a building on 189 Greenwich Street on the morning of may 8, 1911.

     WALTER T. CLARKE CAPT. ENG. 6 1944 1945 STEPHENSON

         

          Awarded to the captain maintaining the most efficient and best disciplined company in the Department.

          LODD October 1944.

     ALFRED W. SANTASIRO LT. ENG. 6  OCT. 31, 1951 1952 DELEHANTY

     ANIELLO J. BOVINO FF. ENG. 6 OFF-DUTY OCT. 1, 1962 1963 LA GUARDIA

         

     JAMES J. GUNNING LT. ENG. 6 AUG. 23, 1996 1997 LANE

         


Engine 6 LODDs:

     CAPTAIN JAMES WHALEN ENGINE 6 OCTOBER 6, 1869

          Foreman James Whalen, Engine 6, was responding to a fire 11:32 PM at 278 Pearl Street.  Engine 6 was responding on Cedar Street, east of Broadway, when the team of horses struck a piece of timber planted in the street for derrick purposes for the Equitable Building.  Foreman Whalen was bounced from his seat.  He fell under the engine and was dragged a considerable distance.  He was dead when found.

     FIREFIGHTER CHARLES J. CONNOLLY ENGINE 6 MARCH 14, 1878

          Discovered at 1:20 in the morning, the fire spread throughout the building in no time due to its contents of paints and varnishes. While placing a hose line in operation on the roof of 176 Fulton Street, Fireman Charles J. Connolly fell through the skylight on the roof of the fire building. The fall was caused by heavy smoke that obscured the roof making it impossible to see the leeward side of the fire. Fireman Connolly fell 15 feet, striking his head and fracturing the base of his skull. When Connolly’s body struck the floor, the members of Ladder 8 who were working on the floor below heard the crash. They went to the floor above to discover Connolly lying in a pool of blood and in an unconscious condition. He was carried out of the building and taken to Bellevue Hospital were he died. He was married and twenty-five years old. He was appointed to the Department on May 1, 1875.

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN O'ROURKE ENGINE 6  JANUARY 25, 1880

          While backing the hose line of Engine 6 off the roof of 220 Pearl Street, Fireman (Private) John J. O’Rourke fell from the hayloft to the fifth floor. The fall was only nine feet but Fireman O’Rourke suffered a concussion of the brain and contusion of the left side of the face. He was taken to Chambers Street Hospital by ambulance where he died.

     FIREFIGHTER TIMOTHY COTTER ENGINE 6 June 6, 1910

         

          Over a dozen firemen who went up ladders to the top floor of the fire building were caught in a backdraft, injuring many. The trapped men were rendered unconscious by the heavy smoke and had to be rescued by other firemen. Fireman Timothy Cotter along with other members of Engine 6 went up to rescue the trapped men. One by one, the downed firemen were brought to safety. Once the two-alarm fire was under control, the men entered the fourth floor to find Cotter lying face down and dead. The smoke overcame him. Fireman William F. Healy lost his life while working under orders on the same floor as Cotter. Healey had been sent to relieve the nozzleman. He was the last to obey the order to retreat and became confused in the dense smoke, apparently mistaking his direction. He was also overcome by smoke. Healey thirty-five years old, was married and left five children behind. Cotter was thirty years old. He lived with his aunt, Mrs.Nora Willman, who died upon learning of her nephew’s death. A joint requiem mass and burial were held for them

     CAPTAIN WALTER T. CLARKE ENGINE 6 October 25, 1944

         
     
          Captain Walter T. Clarke, white-haired after forty-three years with the Fire Department, died as he often expressed he wanted. He wished to die fighting a fire. Captain Clarke, sixty-five years old, had been in action for nearly five hours when he staggered from the structure at 9:30 a.m. and collapsed in the street. He died an hour later from carbon monoxide poisoning. The four-alarm blaze was fed by drums of olive oil and destroyed the six-story building. He left two sons; one was the Captain of Ladder 7, while the second one was serving in the military

     FIREFIGHTER PAUL BEYER ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

         

         

         

          FF Paul Beyer was killed at the World Trade Center.

          https://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/paul_beyer_37_fdny_worked_on_c.html

     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS HOLOHAN ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

         

         

          FF Thomas Holoran was killed at the World Trade Center.

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=99725
 
     FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM JOHNSTON ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

         

         

          FF William Johnston was killed at the World Trade Center.

          http://heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=116

     LIEUTENANT THOMAS O’HAGEN ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

         

         

          Lieutenant Thomas O’Hagen was killed at the World Trade Center.

          https://nypost.com/2001/10/15/goodbye-to-a-man-of-taste-pals-remember-firefighter-who-loved-to-cook/


          Engine 6 World Trade Center September 11, 2001:

               https://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=90282&page=1


Engine 6 World Trade Center Illness-Related Death:

     Lieutenant Steven Sorger, Engine Company 6 March 11, 2017

         

          https://www.newsday.com/long-island/nassau/former-fdny-lieutenant-from-north-bellmore-honored-posthumously-1.14569898


     RIP.  Never forget.


Financial District (FiDi):

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_District,_Manhattan

     

     




« Last Edit: July 17, 2018, 12:53:45 AM by mack »