Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 38276 times)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #420 on: August 12, 2018, 03:32:30 PM »
Signal 8-8 Fire Buff Club - Richmond  (Staten Island):


Fire Engineering
Bells, Buffs and Blazes
01/01/1966
By Paul C. Ditzel

"When New York buffs get to reminiscing, they are likely to recall that most embarrassing of days when, fate of fates, the Third Alarm Association’s headquarters in the Bronx burned.
But it’s an ill wind that doesn’t blow someone some good, as the cliche goes, and this particular wind played a role in bringing a group of energetic young buffs on Staten Island to the fore.
 
When the TAA relocated in Manhattan, there was need for someone to provide canteen service on Staten Island. A group with a name as big as its ambition volunteered—the Richmond Association of Auxiliary Firemen-8-8 Fire Buff Club.

At that time, circa I960, the Staten Island buffs club was only two years old. And if it’s any source of pride to the many young buffs who write this column in search of encouragement, the Staten Island club was formed by a 15-year-old.

On January 24, 1961, the Staten Islanders entered into an agreement with the American Red Cross and the New York Fire Department. The pact called for the club to provide canteen service on Staten Island (or Richmond as the natives know it) 24 hours a day. The Staten Island Chapter of the Red Cross funded the operation and provided the equipment.

With a moniker as big as the one sported by the Richmondites, it wasn’t too long before they changed it. (The Super Pumper hadn’t yet been built and it would take a rig that big to carry all that hand lettering.)

In 1964, the club became The Signal 8-8 Fire Buff Club, Inc. But Staten Island wasn’t big enough to contain these enthusiasts and they have ranged fairly far in pursuit of the smoke spoor.
When a general alarm blaze struck a chemical plant in Garwood, N, J., the Signal 8-8 group turned out. The president of the chemical firm later wrote:
“The voluntary formation of the 8-8 Fire Buff Club for the purpose intended by private citizens is certainly strong evidence of the good citizenship and high public spirit of these men. Meeting this emergency was an outstanding example of intercommunity cooperation, for which all the people of our company are most grateful.”

After still another general alarmor - this one in Bayonne, N. J.—Fire Chief John T. Brennan wrote:
“The Islanders, who remained at the scene until the fire was brought under control early yesterday morning, are to he complimented for their work.”

When the worst fire in Staten Island’s history (April 20, 1963) destroyed more than 100 homes, 16 members and their wives worked with firemen, helped to evacuate citizens, and assisted at Red Cross shelters.

“In the five days that followed,” says Secretary John J. Kryger, “members worked at Red Cross disaster headquarters in all capacities until all the victims were assisted. We do this at every fire involving a family. We check on the condition of the family after the blaze is under control. If assistance is required, we notify the Red Cross.”

What started out as an enthusiastic group of buffs in their teens, has become a club whose members now wear the FDNY blue, or serve in other fire service capacities. President John Jansen is with the Fire Patrol of the New York Board of Fire Underwriters; Vice President Roy N. Johnson is a fire alarm dispatcher in Manhattan; and Kryger, the club’s founder, is secretary.

Membership totals 23 and the outfit runs out of Room 100, 36 Richmond Torrace, Staten Island, N. Y. 10301. Their phone number, in case you’re in New York is YU 1-8951."


     Note - The "YU" in phone number was for "Yukon"
« Last Edit: August 12, 2018, 03:39:49 PM by mack »

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #420 on: August 12, 2018, 03:32:30 PM »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #421 on: August 12, 2018, 03:36:44 PM »
There has also been a 6-6 Fire Buff Club mentioned in this site. I don't know if there has been any buff club associated with the Bronx. 
« Last Edit: August 12, 2018, 03:39:13 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #422 on: August 12, 2018, 07:54:15 PM »
Fire buff organizations history - 1960s:


Fire Engineering
BELLS BUFFS and BLAZES
05/01/1965
By Paul C. Ditzel

"TO BUFFS EVERYWHERE, New York City is without peer as the capital of buffdom. It’s a city of spectacularly big blazes and of disastrous fires: The Triangle Shirt Waist Co. fire; the famous Wooster Street blaze; and that fireman’s nightmare which regularly plagues the New York Fire Department—Hell’s Hundred Acres in lower Manhattan.

It’s a city of unusual fires: The recent Grand Central subway blaze; the highin-the-sky fire when an airplane crashed into the Empire State Building. It’s a city where some of the most rugged waterfront fire fighting is practiced: The SS Normandy blaze, the aircraft carrier Constellation disaster.

It’s a place where airliners collide over the city and come crashing down to set a five-alarm fire in a church and another multiple-alarm fire several blocks away.

It’s a city where one battalion chief gets so much action that a second battalion chief is moved into BC’s quarters to alternate with him on handling the alarms when the going gets rough.
It’s a city where buffs are as knowledgable about the complex procedure of fire alarm communications in that peculiar jargon of simultaneous borough calls and Signal 7-5 “holding all companies” and radioed reports from Car 5 (the fire chief) that he’s “doubtful will hold,” that many buffs concentrate on listening to the action on their radios and over alarm and telegraph registers. The fire isn’t nearly as interesting to them as the chess game that the dispatchers “on the platform” play in juggling equipment and manpower of the world’s largest fire department.

New York is a City where there are more buffs per square mile than any place on earth. It’s a city where the buffs get to fires faster (usually by subway) than almost any city anywhere. It’s a place where buffs cannot lay claim to the title until they have seen a simultaneous borough-call blaze before they go off to buff Valhalla and, hopefully, return reincarnated as a New York City fire buff.

Amid this plethora of firemanics, buffdom in New York City also lays claim to having more organized clubs than anywhere else—five of them in the various boroughs. And, if you count the environs where there is always plenty of fire fighting, too, three more of them. All of which makes a total of eight clubs in the Greater New York area.  In this and future columns, well visit, if only vicariously, these clubs and look at some ot the worthwhile community service performed by them as the New York Fire Department celebrates the centennial of its organization.

The city’s two best-known clubs are The Fire Bell Club of New York and the Third Alarm Association. Brooklyn, which can usually stand alone as an action-packed place for fire action, has the energetic 255 Fire Club, Inc. Staten Island has its eager-to-serve Signal 8-8. And, of course, there is the wellknown Association of Auxiliary Firemen of Manhattan, Inc.
Small wonder, then, that the International Fire Buff Associates decided to hold their 1965 midwinter board meeting in New York not long ago. The Third Alarm Association (TAA) was host club for the meeting and provided a program of scheduled events and some unscheduled events—but nonetheless predictable. In the latter category, the buffs turned out to a five-alarmer in a foam rubber factory in Flushing, Queens, on a Friday night.

And just to prove that the unusual can be counted upon to happen in New York, consider what happened to the city’s new fire chief, John T. O’Hagan. It’s something that will go down in his and the buffs’ record books.

The first multiple that Chief O’Hagan took in was a Saturday noontime blaze in a bowling alley near Broadway and 218th Street in Manhattan. They stopped it with second-alarm response. But not for long, because a firebug was not sated with a mere deuce.

The following evening, an alarm was again turned in for the bowling alley. Before Car 5 declared the fire under control, the affair had gone into a fourth alarm. Twenty-two TAA’ers responded with the American Red Cross canteen and operated at the scene for five hours.

When not counting the register taps, buffs are likely to be poring over the official FDNY magazine, “WNYF” which is one of the finest publications of its kind. With New York Firemen” is popular with buffs all across the nation who subscribe to it for $2.00 by the calendar year. Subscriptions should be sent to Samuel Black, Subscription Department, WNFY, Room 1104, Municipal Building, New York, N. Y. 10007. The magazine is celebrating the centennial itself with special commemorative issues.

Or, if you want a quick eyeball-to-eyeball rundown on what happened in the FDNY last year, send a big envelope—and we mean a big envelope— with about 15 cents postage affixed to it to Ira Hoffman, GPO Box 19, Brooklyn, N. Y. 11202. Ira tells me that he has a limited supply of the complete list of runs and workers for the FDNY during 1964.

Until the next simultaneous borough call, please send your anecdotes and club reports to me. There’s a new address— P. O. Box 66337, Los Angeles, Calif. 90066. Regretfully, letters cannot be answered other than in this column."

Offline 69 METS

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #423 on: August 12, 2018, 10:57:18 PM »
A picture of 255 Club members providing support to members at a fire:

     

My great uncle was very active in the 255 Club as well as the Auxiliary Fire Corps.

Offline JOR176

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #424 on: August 12, 2018, 11:44:05 PM »
There has also been a 6-6 Fire Buff Club mentioned in this site. I don't know if there has been any buff club associated with the Bronx.

The older guys on this site know that Manhattan and The Bronx boxes both the the prefix of 6-6  and that Brooklyn and Queens had the prefix of 7-7. The reason why is that all Manhattan boxes ended before Box 2000 and the Bronx boxes started at 2100. The Brooklyn and Queens prefix worked because the Brooklyn boxes ended at 3999 and the Queens Boxes started at 4000, This was during the time when that Bells were still in operation,this would not work today as you know there are 4000 boxes in both Queens and Bklyn.I hope you will understand what I'm trying to say here LOL. and old expression "you had to be there to see it or understand it"

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #425 on: August 13, 2018, 12:23:22 AM »
There has also been a 6-6 Fire Buff Club mentioned in this site. I don't know if there has been any buff club associated with the Bronx.

The older guys on this site know that Manhattan and The Bronx boxes both the the prefix of 6-6  and that Brooklyn and Queens had the prefix of 7-7. The reason why is that all Manhattan boxes ended before Box 2000 and the Bronx boxes started at 2100. The Brooklyn and Queens prefix worked because the Brooklyn boxes ended at 3999 and the Queens Boxes started at 4000, This was during the time when that Bells were still in operation,this would not work today as you know there are 4000 boxes in both Queens and Bklyn.I hope you will understand what I'm trying to say here LOL. and old expression "you had to be there to see it or understand it"


Richmond (Staten Island) boxes had the prefix 8-8.

Offline manhattan

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #426 on: August 13, 2018, 01:11:24 AM »
There has also been a 6-6 Fire Buff Club mentioned in this site. I don't know if there has been any buff club associated with the Bronx.

The older guys on this site know that Manhattan and The Bronx boxes both the the prefix of 6-6  and that Brooklyn and Queens had the prefix of 7-7. The reason why is that all Manhattan boxes ended before Box 2000 and the Bronx boxes started at 2100. The Brooklyn and Queens prefix worked because the Brooklyn boxes ended at 3999 and the Queens Boxes started at 4000, This was during the time when that Bells were still in operation,this would not work today as you know there are 4000 boxes in both Queens and Bklyn.I hope you will understand what I'm trying to say here LOL. and old expression "you had to be there to see it or understand it"

I'm not positive about this and if anyone cares to correct me please feel free to do so.  I believe that the highest box number in Manhattan (in the early 1960s, at least) was 1868 at Henry Hudson Parkway, 300 feet south of Dyckman Street Entrance.

There were unassigned box numbers from 1870 through 1899.

Online fdhistorian

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #427 on: August 13, 2018, 12:18:04 PM »
Engine 95/Ladder 36 firehouse 29 Vermilyea Avenue Inwood, Manhattan  Division 7, Battalion 13 "The End of the Line"

     Engine 95 organized 29 Vermilyea Avenue w/Ladder 36                        1915

     Ladder 36 organized 1901 Sedgwick Avenue at Engine 43                     1908
     Ladder 36 disbanded                                                                          1913
     Ladder 36 reorganized 29 Vermilyea Avenue at Engine 95                     1915 

As can be seen in the early photos, the firehouse was lettered for Engine 95 and Ladder 50.
Ladder 36 was originally organized with Engine 43.  In 1913 Engine 43 and Ladder 36 became a combination company numbered 43.  In 1915, Combination 43 reverted to Engine 43 only, so number 36 was available for reassignment when Ladder 50 came up.  Ladder 36 was organized while Ladder 50 was later used for a new Ladder Company at Engine 89 in 1926.

The land engine quarters of Engine 43 (which Mack has not profiled yet) has been home to three different Ladder companies.
Prior to that, Engine 43 was the first Fireboat (Marine Company), "William F Havermeyer"

Ladder 36 was organized there, then disbanded when Engine 43 became a Combination company.
TCU 712 was stored at Engine 43 when off duty.
Ladder 59 moved there in 1978.  (Technically, Ladder 59 was organized from TCU 712)

Engine 43, in 114 years of history (as a land engine), hosted three Ladder companies, but only for a total of 47 years  (Ladder 36 1908-1913, TCU 712 1969-1971, Ladder 59 1978 to present)

Offline JOR176

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #428 on: August 13, 2018, 08:24:05 PM »
In reply #426 Manhattan stated that the last Box# in Manhattan was 18something that is in the parameters of up to 2000. I'm quite sure Chief JK knows that I'm correct in the way I explained it.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #429 on: August 13, 2018, 10:54:19 PM »
Engine 43 (Marine)  - fireboat WILLIAM F. HAVE­MEYER - First FDNY Fireboat - Pike Street  Manhattan, East River

     

     In August of 1874, the Commission­ers contracted with Wood Dialogue & Company, Philadelphia, for the con­struction of a fireboat at contract price of $23,800. When placed in service on May 12, 1875, the boat, which had been named the WILLIAM F. HAVE­MEYER, was berthed at the foot of Pike Street. East River, and Engine Company 43 was organized to man her, with two officers, two engineers, pilot and five firemen. The HAVE­MEYER was a wood hull vessel and, like several of the early fireboats, had quarters aboard for the crew. In fact, these boats were moved from one lo­cation to another without any more preparation than running the fire alarm telegraph wires to provide a ship-to-shore connection. Until the time that John Kenlon became Chief of Department, the company number remained with a fireboat regardless of its location.

     - Marine 1 FDNY  http://marine1fdny.com/fireboat_history_new.php


WILLIAM F. HAVEMEYER (1875-1901)

     

     

     

     

     

     


Harper's Weekly  Nov 11, 1882

   

THE FIRE-BOAT OF NEW YORK HARBOR

    Not least important in the Fire Department of New York city is the harbor fire-boat William F. Havemeyer, or, as she is officially known, Engine No. 43, N.Y.F.D. This fire-boat is a powerful steam-tug of 110 tons burden, and was built in 1875 by Wood & Dialogue, of Camden, New Jersey, by order of Fire Commissioners Perley, Van Cott, and Hatch. She is propelled by a low-pressure engine of 300 horse-power, and is one of the swiftest tugs in the harbor. She has made the distance from her berth - Pier 1, North River, close beside Castle Garden-to the foot of West Twelfth Street in twelve minutes.

    For fire apparatus the Havemeyer is provided with two powerful Amoskeag pumps, capable of throwing 2000 gallons of water per minute. This immense volume of water can be thrown through ten separate lines of hose, or connected in one, from which it discharges with force sufficient to overthrow brick walls or tear down a substantial building.

    An amusing incident in the career of the fire-boat happened a few years ago, upon her return from a short excursion down the bay, with a party of Western chief engineers of fire departments on board. An elevator in Brooklyn was on fire, and several tub-boats were throwing streams of water upon it. As the Havemeyer approached, with a view of rendering assistance, and at the same time showing the Western visitors of what she was capable, the tugs directed the several streams against her for the purpose of driving her off. Instead, however, of leaving she turned two of her powerful streams upon them, and within five minutes had the field to herself having completely deluged her opponents. She then went to work and subdued the fire, to the great admiration of her guests.

    Her equipment includes nearly 5000 feet of the best rubber hose of which is three inches in diameter, the largest ever made, and a large assortment of nozzles, among which is a "Siamese," or double nozzle, and a "double Siamese," or quadruple nozzle. She is connected with the regular fire alarm of the city by a cable, which can be detached at an instant's notice, and with the several engine-houses by telephone.  Her fires are never allowed to go out, and a constant head of fifty pounds of steam is maintained in her boilers. She is always clear of her berth within a minute after receiving an alarm, ad has been cleared and got under way in thirty seconds.

    The crew of fourteen men is commanded by Captain R.R. Farrell, who ranks with the foreman of a land company, and Lieutenant W.C. Braisted, who ranks as assistant foreman. There are also two pilots, two engineers, three stokers, and five men who act as deck hands, or, at a fire, as firemen. The duty is arduous, for all hands must sleep on board, and though they may take their meals at their homes, no more than two men are allowed to leave the boat at a time, and at fires the work is incessant and more prolonged than that of land companies. The reasons of this prolonged duty is that the Havemeyer uses salt-water, she is employed to drench out fires that come within her reach, in order that Croton may not be wasted. Thus, during the holiday season last winter, she was stationed for ten days opposite the United States Storage Warehouse fire on South Street, during all of which time she kept a steady stream playing upon the smouldering ruins.

     The fire-boat is expected to answer all calls along the water-front of either river within the city limits, and upon her arrival at the scene of a fire her Captain reports to the Chief of Battalion in charge, and receives orders from him the same as a foreman of a land company. In addition to this duty, the fire-boat must be ready at all times to go to the assistance of any vessels getting on fire in the harbor, and, if necessary, must tow all vessels in dangerous proximity to the burning one to a place of safety, or tow away the burning vessel itself. On special occasions she has responded to calls beyond the city limits, once going as far as Tarrytown, and once, when Hoboken firemen were on a strike, rendering valuable assistance in subduing a fire that broke out on the Eagle-Steamship Company's pier, and saving much property.

     It is estimated that the Havemeyer has saved from destruction property worth more than her weight in gold, and realizing her importance, and also her inability to all calls made upon her along our constantly increasing line of water-front, the Fire Commissioners have ordered another fire-boat to be built. This new boat, now in the process of construction, will be considerably larger than the Havemeyer.

     The crew of the present fire-boat are an active, well-trained lot of men, who take great pride in their craft, and spend their spare time in burnishing her brass fittings, painting her wood-work, or in otherwise beautifying her. They have also on occasions exhibited great personal bravery, not only at fires, but while lying quietly at Pier 1. There is not one of them who is not ready to spring overboard in answer to a cry of distress, and several persons who have fallen or been thrown into the water in this vicinity owe their lives to the brave crew of the fire-boat Havemeyer.



Confrontation at the Sanitation Docks - 1895:

On May 18, 1895, the New York Times reported on a confrontation between the Havemeyer and the Restless, a tugboat chartered to the city's Sanitation Department. A fire had broken out at the Sanitation Department's "dumping wharf". The wharf, a large wooden wharf near 46th Street was used to load barges with the city's garbage. Tugboats, like the Restless, would then tow the barges out to sea, where it was dumped.

A colony of homeless men the New York Times called "wharf rats", lived in spaces within the wharf, where they supported themselves by salvaging bottles, rags, and other refuse that had resale value.The New York Times blamed the fire on cooking fires the homeless men used to cook their breakfasts.

When the Havemeyer arrived at the wharf it found that the Restless was already fighting the fire with its less powerful pumps. When the Restless refused to get out of the way the Havemeyer turned its pumps on it. The New York Times reported that the smaller vessel was at risk of being swamped. The conflict between the two vessels consumed fifteen minutes, only ending when a senior fire department official convinced a senior Sanitation Department official to order the Restless to get out of the way.

The fire was eventually extinguished when The New Yorker came to assist the Havemeyer.
 
     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Frederick_Havemeyer_(fireboat)



Engine 43 (Marine) LODD:

     ENGINEER JOHN BULGAR, E-43 (Fireboat Havemeyer) detailed to E-29  OCTOBER 28, 1890

          Thrown from tender while responding to a fire.

          Engineer of Steamer John Bulger was assigned to FDNY Engine Company 43, the fireboat William F. Havemeyer. No information on his death could be found except for a telephone message from Foreman Cooney of Engine 29 to Doctor Johnson in the dispatcher’s logbook. Engineer of Steamer Bulger was detailed to Engine 29 probably to relieve the Engineer of Engine 29 for a meal break. Engines 29 and 43 were located close to each other.

          The following is a transcript of a telephone message from Foreman Cooney to Dr. Johnson relayed through the dispatchers:

               “Fireman Bulger of Engine 43 detailed to Engine 29 was thrown from the tender while proceeding to a fire and was hurt about the head. Was taken to Chambers Street Hospital. He died at 3:20 p.m. in the hospital.”

          The fire was at 194 Broadway in a five-story brownstone measuring twenty-five feet by one hundred feet. Damage to building and contents was slight.    - from "Find a Grave"

     RIP.  Never forget.


« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 11:16:33 PM by mack »

 

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