Author Topic: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section  (Read 48090 times)

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #510 on: September 10, 2018, 07:03:05 PM »
Bronx 2-2-2851 0413 Hrs. October 28, 2013:

Uniformed Firefighters Association

"Amid High Heat and Low Visibility, Reacting Coolly and With Clarity
Chief Leader - June 10, 2014
by RICHARD STEIER

"In recounting the deeds that led firefighters of various ranks to capture 51 of the 65 medals presented June 4 on FDNY Medal Day, there was a recurring theme: battling through poor visibility as flames and smoke intensified to pull people trapped in their homes to safety.

None did it better than Lieut. Robert E. Lee.

‘There Were Gonna Be People’

Normally assigned to Battalion 16 in The Bronx, he was detailed to Ladder Co. 47 on Oct. 28 last year when shortly after 4 a.m. a report came in of six people trapped inside a private home. As the company’s rig left its Castle Hill Ave. quarters, Lieutenant Lee was already figuring some of those people would not find their way to safety by the time their truck arrived because of the hour of the blaze.

“We knew at the time, private dwelling, there were gonna be people in there,” he told reporters at the 69th Regiment Armory on Lexington Ave.

By the time they arrived, they learned that two children had been passed out of the building to neighbors. When Lieutenant Lee led his forcible-entry team into the building, they were confronted by heavy smoke and high heat from the open basement stairwell.

“Even without the protection of a hose line, he led his firefighters forward, undaunted, unwavering,” Mayor de Blasio told the large crowd of award-winners, family members and members of their companies inside the armory.
The Lieutenant dispatched two of his firefighters to conduct a search inside the front of the building while moving toward the back himself. A hallway led him to a rear bedroom where the door was closed while a fire burned in the basement, making it impossible to move a hose line in there to get water on the blaze from below.

Furniture Blocked Entry

Mr. Lee, who is 43, tried the door and found it partly blocked by furniture inside the bedroom, forcing him to squeeze his way in and, while unable to see anything, found an adult woman lying on the floor, unresponsive. He pulled some debris off her and then maneuvered her towards the doorway and through the narrow opening, then dragged her down the hallway and onto the sidewalk where she could receive medical attention.

He was exhausted, but it didn’t matter: he re-entered the building, passing one of his firefighters and others from Rescue 3; in both cases they were bringing other trapped people to safety. He made his way back to the rear bedroom, and during a search underneath a bed found a child lying there who he later learned was 13.

Asked what had been going through his mind when he decided to return to the bedroom rather than deferring to less-weary colleagues, Lieutenant Lee said, “To be honest with you, I thought about my wife and daughter,” who was about the same age as the girl he then pulled to safety. “I knew where the room was. I just wanted to make sure we could get someone out.”

He seemed to feel he was being given too much credit, insisting he did what any firefighter would do if placed in the same circumstances, and made a point of asking that a Firefighter from Rescue 3, Dave Donatelli, be mentioned for his efforts inside the building.

Got FDNY’s Top Honor

The Fire Department wasn’t as inclined to shrug off the feat as just one of those things anyone might do in his place: it gave Lieutenant Lee the James Gordon Bennett Medal, the FDNY’s highest award, and he also received the New York State Fire Chiefs Association Medal.

The 19-year veteran, who prior to joining the department spent four years in the Navy and served in Operation Desert Storm, said he had yet to meet face to face the woman and her daughter whose lives he had saved, explaining that they had come to the company on days when he wasn’t working and met other firefighters who had been involved. But the chance to meet those you’ve rescued, he said, is “probably the most rewarding part of the whole thing. This’’—meaning the awards ceremony—“is nice, but seeing the person face to face is the most rewarding.”"


     
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 07:06:56 PM by mack »

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #510 on: September 10, 2018, 07:03:05 PM »

Offline ladder197

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #511 on: September 10, 2018, 07:20:51 PM »
Whatever happened to that E-One?

Offline Signal73

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #512 on: September 10, 2018, 09:34:10 PM »
See one of my pics made the 47 Truck post

Here are a couple more














« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 09:37:37 PM by Signal73 »
Remember to take it coming in

Offline FDNYSTATENISLAND

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #513 on: September 10, 2018, 10:52:22 PM »
Wow, 47 Truck has a huge response area, 1st-3rd Due. Love love seeing the response area maps posted in the firehouses. Any more out there for companies??

Offline guitarman314

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #514 on: September 10, 2018, 11:42:41 PM »
Wow, 47 Truck has a huge response area, 1st-3rd Due. Love love seeing the response area maps posted in the firehouses. Any more out there for companies??
  You should've seen their response area before Ladders 54, 58 & 61 came on.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #515 on: September 11, 2018, 08:25:37 AM »
Whatever happened to that E-One?

According to the July-August 1996 issue of Fire Apparatus Journal (Volume 13, Number 4), in the F.D.N.Y. Updates column by Jack Lerch, this pumper was loaned to the F.D.N.Y. by E-One for evaluation.  It is a 1995 E-One Hush (EP9601) equipped with a Hale two-stage 1000gpm pump, 500 gallon booster tank, a Mack E-7 electronic diesel engine, and an Allison HD World transmission.  It was assigned for short periods of time to E275, E8, E64, and E290 before being returned to E-One.  - per downtownmedic earlier post

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #516 on: September 11, 2018, 07:12:12 PM »
Stumptown Opens Third New York Cafe in Historic Brooklyn Firehouse

Stumptown’s new coffee bar in the Cobble Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Portland, Oregon-based Stumptown Coffee Roasters today opened its third cafe in the New York area, inside an historic firehouse building in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.

     https://dailycoffeenews.com/2018/07/30/stumptown-opens-third-new-york-cafe-in-historic-brooklyn-firehouse/

     


Former firehouse of pre-Brooklyn Fire Department Engine 19 "Empire" - 212 Pacific Street

     

Offline JOR176

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #517 on: September 11, 2018, 09:27:19 PM »
Wow, 47 Truck has a huge response area, 1st-3rd Due. Love love seeing the response area maps posted in the firehouses. Any more out there for companies??
  You should've seen their response area before Ladders 54, 58 & 61 came on.

Tom you are on the money.My aunt lived in Parkchester in the 50's and I used to walk to L47 (separate house from 64).I counted the Boxes on the running board which was in the Housewatch area and they had 654 first alarm boxes.I don't remember how may boxes L47 ran in with L31 but they did have some.

Offline scoobyd

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #518 on: September 12, 2018, 11:36:25 AM »
Thus the "Gypsies"

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #519 on: September 14, 2018, 01:04:30 PM »
Engine 282/Ladder 148  firehouse 4210 12th Avenue  Borough Park, Brooklyn  Division 11, Battalion 48  "It Ain't Easy"

     Engine 282 organized new firehouse 4210 12th Avenue                               1913
     Engine 282 moved 126 Foster Avenue at Engine 250                                   2002
     Engine 282 moved 5011 7th Avenue at Battalion 40                                    2003
     Engine 282 returned 4210 12th Avenue w/Ladder 148                                 2004

     Ladder 148 organized 4210 12th Avenue at Engine 282                               1914
     Ladder 148 moved 1336 60th Street at Engine 247                                     2002
     Ladder 148 returned 4210 12th Avenue w/Engine 282                                 2004


4210 12th Avenue:

     

     

     

     

     

   

     

     

     

     


Engine 282:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 148:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 282/Ladder 148:

     

     

     

     


Centennial:

     Brooklyn firehouse celebrates 100-year anniversary - from Brooklyn Downtown Star
          by Jess Berry
          May 23, 2014

Hundreds of uniformed firefighters filled the quarters of Engine 282 and Ladder 148 last Thursday to celebrate 100 years of service to the community. Firefighters past and present of EC 282 and Ladder 148 joined together with family and friends to celebrate the firehouse's centennial. The mood of the ceremony was at times silly, as past and present firefighters joked about shared memories, and at times somber, such as when current captain of Ladder 148 Michael Doda remembered those who have lost their lives in service.
 
“I often reflect on friends we’ve lost,” Doda said. “However, there’s no greater tribute to their memories than to assemble here and reflect on our history. Our hearts swell with pride to see friends, retired and former members, all gathered here with our current firefighters.”

Doda gave a brief history of Engine 282 and Ladder 148. Hook and Ladder 148 was organized on May 15, 1914, under the command of Captain David O’Keefe. Engine 282 was then added, and two lieutenants and 100 firefighters were assembled from neighboring companies.

He reflected on the similarities that have persisted throughout 100 years of the firehouse's history. “There’s an old proverb: ‘The more things change, the more things stay the same,’” Doda said. “This will always ring true for the New York City Fire Department. If Captain O’Keefe walked through those doors today, the changes to the neighborhood, the fire service, the world may be unimaginable to him. But the one constant is the perpetual brotherhood. “Today, much like Captain O’Keefe in 1914, I find myself surrounded by hardworking firefighters dedicated to making this house the best we have to offer,” he added.

Retired members who played a large role in that history enjoyed the celebration as well, such as John LeVine, a former captain of Engine 282 who retired in 1977. “It’s great to be with the guys again,” LeVine said. “A couple of these guys really helped me with my transition from lieutenant to captain. And it wasn’t easy, but it worked out good. I mean, I enjoyed it very much. It was a pleasure.” When asked how it felt to put his uniform back on, 89-year-old LeVine said it was “a little loose!” “It’s great,” he said. “It’s like being reborn.”

     
This letter was read during the celebration in 2014.

     A Letter from the Captain:

     On May 15th, 1914 Hook & Ladder Company 148 was under the command of Captain David O’Keefe. A new motorized ladder truck was placed in quarters with Engine Company 282. Ladder 148 was needed to provide protection to the neighborhoods between Engine 247 and Engine 250. The two Lieutenants and eleven firefighters that formed the company were assembled primarily for neighboring companies. As when any new company is formed firefighters, and officers are selected for being hard working and dedicated professionals.

     I marvel at what Captain O’Keefe was faced with. He had a new unit in a bourgeoning area of Brooklyn. Once called Blythebourne (Scottish for happy home) the area began to be populated in 1887 with small cottages, but soon the streets began to bustle with people, and large fancy Queen Anne style private homes were added to the landscape. The area between the Bath Beach Railroad and the West End Line, now called Boro Park, was becoming sought after and the population was exploding. By the time Ladder 148 was formed, Brooklyn Rapid Transit had begun to elevate both lines of the train and consolidate some of the smaller lines. By the 1920's single family homes were giving way to large multifamily apartment buildings, each with a uniformed doorman, in response to the growing demand for housing.

     Ladder 148 was established shortly after the second major reorganization of the FDNY on January 1, 1913. Many older Brooklyn Fire Companies were renumbered as in 1898 and four 'Combination' Engine Companies surrounding New Utrecht had their horse drawn ladder disbanded. The 9th New York City Fire Commissioner - Robert Adamson worked during his tenure to have the entire department motorized. Ladder 148 was an early part of that movement.

     Thank you for attending this celebration and honoring 100 years of devoted service to this community. I often reflect on the friends we have lost, however there is no greater tribute to their memories, than assemble here today and reflect on our history. My heart swells with pride to witness friends, retired and former members, as well as our current firefighters, gather together, to insure this Centennial Celebration was an enormous success. It was your perseverance and attention to detail that accomplished this enormous task, and for this I am forever grateful.

     There is an old proverb “The more things change the more they stay the same” This will always ring true for the NYC Fire Department. If Captain O'Keefe walked thru the doors of the firehouse today, the changes to the neighborhood, the fire service, and the world, may be unimaginable, but the one constant is the perpetual brotherhood. He would feel right at home. Today, much like Captain O’Keefe in 1914, I find myself surrounded by hardworking firefighters dedicated to making Ladder Company 148 the best in the FDNY. It is my honor to be part of that future.
                                                                                    Respectfully,

                                                                                    Captain Michael  Doda
                                                                                    Hook & Ladder Co. 148


Engine 282/Ladder 148 medals:

     MICHAEL P. CASHMAN FF. ENG. 282 AUG. 31, 1920 1921 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

         

         

     JAMES P. MC CHRONE LT. LAD. 148 JAN. 29, 1922 1923 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

         

     THOMAS J. MULGANNON FF. LAD. 148 JUL. 12, 1948 1949 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

         

     PAUL DI GEORGIO FF. LAD. 148 AUG. 6, 1993 1994 HOLY NAME

     MICHAEL T. QUILTY FF. LAD. 148 JAN. 17, 1996 1997 FIRE MARSHALS

         


Engine 282/Ladder 148 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER GERALD T. HANLEY ENGINE 282 December 13, 1939

          Fireman Gerald T. Hanley died of smoke poisoning while fighting a small blaze at 1179 51st Street. He was the second Probationary Fireman killed in Brooklyn in less than a month. Hanley and two other members of Engine 282 rushed into the smoke filled apartment at 1179 51st Street and all three were overcome by the smoke. Rescue 2 worked over Hanley for more than three hours before he was pronounced dead. Fireman Dunn, one of the other members overcome, was a classmate of Hanley, but he recovered.

         

         

     FIREFIGHTER JAMES A. DINGEE ENGINE 282 August 23, 1943

         

          James Dingee, Engine 282, was inducted into the US Navy during World War II.  His armed service number was  8087463. He was killed in action.  He was assigned as a Navy firefighter to the USS Narragansett (AT-88), a Navajo-class fleet tug constructed for the United States Navy during World War II. Her purpose was to aid ships, usually by towing, on the high seas or in combat or post-combat areas, plus "other duties as assigned." She served in the Atlantic Ocean and, at war’s end, returned home proudly with three battle stars to her credit. At 0430 on 23 August, the Luftwaffe raided Palermo, with bombs scoring on nearby service craft and a near miss wounding two of AT-88's crew. Narragansett's remaining crew immediately set to work to aid the damaged vessels despite explosions which exacted a heavy toll among the fire fighters and damage control sections. Six were dead and 12 seriously wounded before it was over.

     CAPTAIN THOMAS F. KEARNS LADDER 148 April 12, 1917

          Captain Thomas Kearns died at a working fire at 187 Pearl Street from smoke inhalation advancing a hose line while working at Engine 207.

         

         

     CAPTAIN THOMAS P. MULVANEY LADDER 148 January 16, 1959

          He died as a result of injuries sustained in the performance of his duties.

          Prior 1930 rescue and award:

               

     LIEUTENANT PHILIP PETTI LADDER 148 September 11, 2001

          LT Philip Petti died at the World Trade Center September 11, 2001.

         

         

          https://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/philip_petti_43_lieutenant_ama.html

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/philip-s-petti/

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=151807

     RIP. Never forget.


Borough Park:

     

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2011/10/borough-park/

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borough_Park,_Brooklyn







« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 04:40:33 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #520 on: September 14, 2018, 02:47:52 PM »
Engine 282:

FIREFIGHTER JAMES A. DINGEE ENGINE 282 August 23, 1943

     

     James Dingee, Engine 282, enlisted in the US Navy during World War II.  His armed service number was  8087463. He was killed in action as a firefighter in combat when his ship was attacked by enemy aircraft. FF Dingee was assigned to the USS Narragansett (AT-88), a Navajo-class fleet tug constructed for the United States Navy during World War II. Her purpose was to aid ships, usually by towing, on the high seas or in combat or post-combat areas, plus "other duties as assigned." She served in the Atlantic Ocean and, at war’s end, returned home proudly with three battle stars to her credit.  At 0430 hours on 23 August, the Luftwaffe raided Palermo, with bombs scoring on nearby service craft and a near miss wounding two of AT-88's crew. Narragansett's remaining crew immediately set to work to aid the damaged vessels despite explosions which exacted a heavy toll among the firefighters and damage control sections. Six were dead and 12 seriously wounded before it was over. FF Dingee was one of the firefighters KIA.


     

     

     

     

     


     RIP. Never forget.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 05:33:29 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #521 on: September 14, 2018, 04:41:09 PM »
2002: E 282 moved to E 250 on Foster Avenue.

Thanks John - corrected.

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #522 on: September 19, 2018, 01:30:23 PM »
Engine 68/Ladder 49 firehouse  1160 Ogden Avenue Highbridge, Bronx  Division 6, Battalion 17  "The House on the Hill"

     Combination Engine 68 organized 1080 Ogden Avenue                                    1898
     Combination Engine 68 became Engine 68                                                      1908
     Engine 68 new firehouse 1160 Ogden Avenue w/Ladder 49                              1979

     Ladder 49 organized 1079 Nelson Avenue                                                       1913
     Ladder 49 moved 1080 Ogden Avenue at  Engine 68                                        1947
     Ladder 49 new firehouse 1160 Ogden Avenue w/Engine 68                              1979


First Highbridge FDNY unit:

     Ladder 19 organized 1187 Ogden Avenue                                                        1880
     Ladder 19 disbanded                                                                                     1898


Pre-FDNY Highbridge volunteer company:

     Cataract Engine 3


1080 Ogden Avenue - Engine 68/Ladder 79 previous quarters - EMS 17 current quarters:

     

     

     

     


1079 Nelson Avenue - Ladder 49 previous quarters:

     

     


1160 Ogden Avenue:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
 

Engine 68:
 
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Ladder 49:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


Engine 68/Ladder 49:

     

     

     


Engine 68/Ladder 49:

     

     


Engine 68/Ladder 49 history:

     ENGINE 68 & LADDER 49  from GovServ

     Engine 68 & Ladder 49 100 Years of Service to High Bridge Prior to being settled in the late 1800's, much of the Bronx was very rural and was governed by Westchester County. In the 1800's, residents of Manhattan would utilize ferries to cross the Harlem River to "vacation" or get away from the bustling city-life in the rocky, open areas of The Bronx. One of the small villages located in the southwest Bronx became known as High Bridge. The name was derived from the water bridge (aqueduct) that carried water as part of the Croton Aqueduct, crossing the Harlem River supplying Manhattan with fresh water. Construction of The High Bridge was started in 1837 and was completed in 1848. It spanned over 1,200 feet, and had the appearance of a Roman aqueduct with multiple stone arches spanning the entire length. Two of the original High Bridge engineers later participated in designing Manhattan's St. Patrick's Cathedral. In 1928, in order to facilitate river navigation many of the masonry arches were demolished. They were replaced with a single steel arch that spanned the river. Eleven of the original masonry arches still remain today. The aqueduct supplied water to Manhattan until the 1950's. The walkway was closed permanently in the 1970's when residents of the rapidly deteriorating neighborhood were dropping rocks and debris onto the Major Deegan Expressway and on boats in the Harlem River. Currently a multi-million dollar restoration project is underway to re-open the bicycle and pedestrian path that connects High Bridge to Washington Heights. Work is slated to be complete in 2014. Until 1874, various volunteer fire companies provided fire protection to many areas of the Bronx. On January 1st 1874 the land west of the Bronx River to the Harlem River including the towns of Morrisania, West Farms and Kingsbridge were annexed into New York City from Westchester County. Prior to the annexation fire protection of High Bridge was the responsibility of Cataract Engine 3. After annexation, New York City placed in service two steam fire engines, four chemical engines and two ladder companies to cover the newly annexed area. In April 1879, Mr. S. G. Courtney and other High Bridge citizens petitioned City Hall for a fire company to be located at Ogden Avenue and Wolf Street (present day 169th Street). On March 17th, 1960, the FDNY placed Ladder 19 in service with a ladder truck, and a double-tank chemical engine company. Both units were located at 1187 Ogden Avenue in a lease building (currently the new three story apartment building located adjacent to the gas station diagonal from present-day quarters). The owner of this building, the estate of William B. Ogden, set the rent for this building at $700 per year. After several years, the owner allowed the building to fall into disrepair and the city pursued a new location to house FDNY companies. On March 3rd, 1894, New York City purchased property located on Ogden Avenue between 165th Street and 166th Street for $3,250, and started construction of the firehouse. On August 23rd, 1898 Combination Engine 68 was placed into service at 1080 Ogden Avenue. On the same day Ladder Company 19 was disbanded (until being reorganized as present day Ladder 19 on November 12th, 1898), and the eleven man crew of Ladder 19 were transferred to Combination

     Combination Engine 68. The company was assigned all new apparatus: An American LaFrance 4th size steamer, a Gleason & Bailey 40' roller frame ladder truck, and a Sebastian hose wagon. One captain commanded the Combination Companies and a lieutenant rode on the ladder truck. Engine 68 was painted on each rig, and could be manned by any member assigned to the company. A response could consist of all three units or the ladder truck only. On February 15th, 1908, Ladder Company 36 was placed in service at Engine Company 43, covering Morris Heights and High Bridge. Combination Engine 68's Gleason & Bailey ladder company was removed from front-line service. The early 1900's saw rapid growth in High Bridge, and the over-worked members of Engine 68 were feeling the need for a full-time ladder company. On December 23rd, 1913, Ladder Company 49 was placed in service in a new firehouse at 1079 Nelson Avenue located directly behind Engine 68's quarters. Engine 68 and Ladder 49 remained in this configuration, in different firehouses and responding onto different streets for over 30 years. After World War II, New York City conducted a study aimed at closing and combining firehouses. Shortly thereafter, Ladder 49's firehouse on Nelson Avenue was closed, and they were moved into Engine 68's quarters on Ogden Avenue and piggybacked. Engine 68 was parked in front of Ladder 49 in a single-door firehouse in a single-file configuration. Ladder 49's quarters at 1079 Nelson Avenue is privately owned, and still stands today. The 1898 firehouse located at 1080 Ogden Avenue was of English Tudor design, and was the only firehouse in New York City to have this look and design. The building had a single door for the apparatus to exit, and a housewatch located in the front. The second floor front housed the officer's room and sleeping quarters. Directly behind the officer's quarters was one large sitting room for leisure time between alarms. The firemen's bunk-room and bathroom were located in the rear of the second floor. The third floor had another large sitting room and lockers for the firemen. Due to the age of the building, the firehouse was remodeled in the 1960's. As a result of the remodel, the original English Tudor appearance was removed, as well as the original front dormer. On September 19th 1979 a newly built two-bay, two-story firehouse located at 1160 Ogden Avenue was placed in service and is the present day company quarters of Engine Company 68 and Ladder Company 49. The previous company quarters at 1080 Ogden Avenue is still in use by the city as EMS Battalion 17 today. Several members of Engine 68 and Ladder 49 have made the Supreme Sacrifice in performance of their duties to New York City and their country. On January 11th, 1946 Fireman George M. Williams (L-49), serving as a Corporal in the U.S. Army was Killed in Action while serving in World War II. His military records indicate his theater as "India", and that he was serving as a "Personnel Officer. He was 26 years old, and is buried in Long Island National Cemetary in Farmingdale, NY. On January 31st, 1965 Fireman James F. Hipple (L-49) was killed from injuries sustained while operating at Box 75-2575 located at Gerard Avenue and East 167th Street. Fireman Hipple was 39 years old and had 12 years on the job when he was killed.

     -https://www.govserv.org/US/Bronx/272278209535285/Engine-68-%26-Ladder-49


Ladder 49 medals:

     GUY R. SCARCELLA FF. LAD. 49 FEB. 15, 1972 1973 KENNY

     THOMAS R. BOYLE LT. LAD. 49 DEC. 23, 1981 1982 TREVOR-WARREN

         

     HARRY WANAMAKER, JR. LT. LAD. 49 SEP. 29, 1983 1984 COLUMBIA

         
 
     SANTO P. GOLANDO FF. LAD. 49 MAY 23, 1985 1986 CONRAN

         

     FRANK J. MIALE LT. LAD. 49 MAY 23, 1985 1986 BROOKMAN

         


Engine 68/Ladder 49 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER JAMES W. THOMPSON ENGINE 68 April 27, 1915

          FF James W Thompson died as a result of injuries April 27, 1915.  While responding to Box 433, Engine 68 collided into a trolly car.  FF Thompson and 2 horses lost their lives.

     FIREFIGHTER GEORGE M. WILLIAMS LADDER 49 January 11, 1946

         

          FF George M. Williams served as a Corporal in the US Army in World War II. His theater of war was India.

     FIREFIGHTER JAMES F. HIPPLE LADDER 49 January 31, 1965

         

          Fireman James F. Hipple responded to Bronx Box 7-5-2575, Gerard Avenue and East 167th Street, at 7:10 in the morning. The company returned to quarters and Fireman Hipple went home at 9:00 a.m. He was walking to his car and collapsed in the street. He was taken to the hospital were he died from a massive heart attack. He was appointed to the Fire Department and Ladder 49 on January 1, 1953. He was thirty-nine years old. (From "The Last Alarm"

     RIP.  Never forget.


WTC illness death:
 
     FIREFIGHTER Michael O'Hanlon Engine 68 August 27, 2017

         

         

         

          https://cortlandt.dailyvoice.com/obituaries/michael-ohanlon-59-cortlandt-manor-first-responder-at-ground-zero/720337/


Highbridge:

     

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highbridge,_Bronx

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2010/03/highbridge-heights-bronx/

     https://www.nycgovparks.org/park-features/highbridge-park/high-bridge-history



     

     

     
« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 06:55:17 PM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #523 on: September 19, 2018, 01:58:59 PM »
Battalion 17 Highbridge Station FDNY/EMS 1080 Ogden Avenue, Highbridge, Bronx

     Battalion 17 EMS Bronx was organized on March 17, 1996

     Battalion 17 was reorganized on 11/16/98 under the Command of Captain J.R. Rivera.


         

         

         

         

         

         



WTC illness death:

     EMT Felix Hernandez, Battalion 17 2004
         
         
       
         

          https://www.firehouse.com/lodds/news/10497845/fdny-emt-wtc-veteran-dies

     RIP. Never forget.


« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 02:29:38 PM by mack »

Offline memory master

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Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Reply #524 on: September 19, 2018, 05:50:04 PM »
I had the pleasure of working for and with Capt. Rivera when we were both in Queens. A great boss and nice guy!

 

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