Author Topic: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC  (Read 12574 times)

Online manhattan

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #90 on: January 23, 2018, 01:27:01 AM »
I think that was in the spring or summer of 1977 and there were fatalities on the ground a couple of blocks from the building.  My mother and I came out of the subway at Grand Central a few minutes after the incident and there was absolute pandemonium on 42nd Street and also on Madison Avenue.  There was a restaurant/lounge on the top of the Pan Am building for First Class passengers waiting to get on the helicopter to their PAA flights at JFK.

Good call on that, Gman!

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #90 on: January 23, 2018, 01:27:01 AM »

Offline 68jk09

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #91 on: January 23, 2018, 01:54:44 AM »
^^^ The Helo crash on the roof of the Pan Am Bldg was the end of the Helo Pad up there.

Offline nfd2004

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #92 on: January 23, 2018, 07:55:21 AM »
 The gasoline lines and rationing in 1973. The lines to buy gasoline went for blocks. All waiting for your chance to fill up.

 Gasoline could only be bought every other day based on the last number or letter of your license plate. For so many who had to use their personnel cars, life suddenly became very difficult. That was a NIGHTMARE - not a Great MEMORY of how it used to be.

 An unrelated very significant anniversary will be coming up soon. That is February 5th, 40 years ago, when the Blizzard of 1978 hit the northeast. We didn't know it was coming. We already had a significant amount of snow on the ground. As the snow fell, weather reports kept increasing the amount of snow to arrive. Some places reported winds as high as 80 mph. For three days the northeast part of the U.S. came to a complete halt. Major highways were closed down with cars and occupants stranded in them. Most police officers, firefighters, dispatchers, utility workers, nurses, etc were ordered to stay and couldn't get home even if they wanted to. Some places lost power during that time and there would be no oil deliveries for those who needed it. Even days later it was still impossible to drive into some side streets

 There was no mail delivery. Banks (before online banking), schools, and stores would remain closed for 2-3 days. In some places the National Guard was activated using heavy equipment and manpower to clear the roads.

 Another memory was when the FDNY was one of the first to go from all fire apparatus using standard shift transmission, to a few equipped with a new idea of an automatic transmission. As time went on, many other cities followed that idea. Just put the rig in drive and off you go. No more double clutching or down shifting.

 Police and fire scanner radios were coming out. You could now listen as the action was happening. First came tunable radios, then came crystal controlled scanners, then came programmable scanners needing no crystals. People from all walks of life began to listen. A new kind of hobby was being formed.

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #93 on: January 23, 2018, 10:47:03 AM »
Remember when only toll collectors used to collect coins in NYC and Port Authority bridges and tunnels.  Used to be 35 cents or 50 cents - now you can pay $12 or more and wait in line to pay.  Then they installed coin machines that people learned how to cheat with slugs and Canadian coins.

   


And the cops who had to patrol the tunnels - used to be by walking and sitting in booths.  Also with catwalk cars.  Duty was monotonous and unhealthy.

   

   



Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #94 on: January 23, 2018, 11:17:43 AM »
NYC subway used to have well-known BMT, IRT and IND divisions and stations:

     https://www.nycsubway.org/perl/caption.pl?/img/maps/system_1964map.jpg


People today may not know that BMT, IRT and IND stand for something and have independent histories.

     https://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/The_Dual_Contracts

    https://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/The_Independent_Subway



     

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #95 on: January 23, 2018, 11:49:36 AM »
Gone - religious schools in NYC taught by nuns:
 
 

 

 

 

     (bad memories for Willy D)

Gone - many religious churches, synagogues, temples, schools and buildings.  Many burned:

 

 

 

 

 

 



Many just closed:

Churches in Staten Island:
 Old Church of St. Joachim and St. Anne (Staten Island, New York), Hylan Boulevard, between Sharrott and Richmond Aves
 St. Benedicta, West Brighton - Established 1922, merged with Our Lady of Mt. Carmel 1957.
 St. Mary of the Assumption, Port Richmond - Established in 1877, merged with Our Lady of Mt. Carmel August 2015.[1] Our Lady of the Assumption deconsecrated November 2017.

Churches in Manhattan:
 Chapel of SS. Faith, Hope & Charity (Park Ave. at 58th St.) - Established in 1958 and closed in 1986; formerly located at Park Ave. at 59th St. (19581978).
 Chapel of St. Teresa of Jesus (187th St. at Broadway) - Established in 1932 and closed in 1935; formerly a mission of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal.
 Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe (14th Street and Seventh Avenue)- Established in 1913 as the first parish to serve the Spanish-Speaking; formerly staffed by the Augustinians of the Assumption.
 Church of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal (114th St. at Seventh Ave.) - Established in 1927 to serve the Spanish-speaking; formerly staffed by the Vincentian Fathers of Spain.
 Church of Our Lady of the Scapular (28th St. at First Ave.) - Established in 1889; previously staffed by the Carmelite Friars. Merged with St. Stephen the Martyr parish.
 Church of Our Lady Queen of Angels (113th St.) - Established in 1886 and closed in 2007; formerly staffed by the Capuchin Friars.
 Church of Our Lady of Vilnius (Broome St.) - Founded in 1917 as a Lithuanian National Parish; closed in 2007. Records housed at St. Anthony Shrine Church.
 Mary Help of Christians, East 12th St
 Church of St. Albert (429-433 W. 47th St.) - Belgian National Parish[3]
 Church of St. Alphonsus Ligouri (308 W. Broadway) - Established in 1866; mission of Most Holy Redeemer (18471866). Formerly staffed by the Redemptorist Fathers. Closed in 1980.
 Church of St. Ambrose (539 W. 54th St.) - Established in 1897; closed in 1938.
 Church of St. Ann (110 E. 12th St.) - Established in 1852 and closed in 2003; served as the Cathedral for Armenian-Rite Catholics from the 1980s.
 Church of St. Bernard (328 W. 14th St.) - Established in 1868; merged in 2003 with Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish under which title it now serves as the parish church.
 Church of St. Boniface (47th St. at Second Ave.) - Established in 1868 and closed in 1950. Records are now housed at the Church of the Holy Family.
 Church of St. Clare (W. 36th St.) - Established in 1903, formerly staffed by the Franciscan Friars.
 Church of St. Clement Mary Hofbauer (W. 44th St. and 10th Avenue) - Established in 1909 as a Polish National Parish; closed in the 1960s.
 Church of St. Gabriel (310 W. 37th St.) - Established in 1859 and closed in 1939.
 Church of St. Joachim (26 Roosevelt St.) - Established 1888; parish merged with St. Joseph Church, Chinatown (Manhattan) in 1967 due to city urban renewal project, building demolished.
 Manhattan State Hospital Chapel of St. Joseph (Manhattan State Hospital Chapel/Ward's Island) - Established in 1872
 Church of St. Leo (E. 28th St., between Fifth & Madison Aves.) - Established in 1880 and suppressed in 1908; became a mission of St. Stephen Church. Eventually given to the Sisters
 Church of St. Mark (Stuyvesant Ave. at Second Ave.)
 Church of St. Mary Magdalen (Avenue D, between 12th & 13th St.) - Previously located at 529 E. 17th St. (??-1945)
 Church of St. Mary, 69th Street (202 E. 69th St.) - Established 1895 and closed in 1999.
 Church of St. Matthew (215 W. 67th St.) - Established in 1902 and closed in 1959.
 Church of St. Nicholas (125 E. 2nd St.) - Established in 1833 and closed in 1960.
 Church of St. Raphael (552 W. 50th St.)- Transferred from the Italian Friars Minor to the Croatian Custody of the same Order and was renamed Sts. Cyril and Methodius.
 (The Old) Church of St. Rose of Lima (Cannon St., between Broome & Delaney St.) - Established in 1868 and closed in the 1960s.
 Church of St. Sebastian (312 E. 24th St.) - Staffed by the Franciscan Friars; opened in 1921 and closed in 1971.
 Church of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus & Mary (307 E. 33rd St.) - Established in 1915 as an Italian National parish. Closed 2008 and merged with Our Lady of the Scapular-St. Stephen. Demolished
 Church of St. Teresa of Avila (184th St. at Broadway) - Established in 1933; staffed by the Vincentian Fathers.
 Church of St. Thomas the Apostle (262 W. 118th St.) - Established in 1889; staffed by the Salesians of Don Bosco from 1979 to 2003; closed in 2003.
 Church of St. Vincent de Paul (123 W. 23rd St.) - Established in 1841 and closed in 2013.
 Church of the Assumption (427 W. 49th St.)
 Church of the Most Holy Crucifix (378 Broome St.) - Established in 1925 and closed in 2005.
 Church of the Holy Agony (New York City) - Established 1930, merged with St. Cecilia's 2015; Holy Agony deconsecrated 2017.
 Holy Rosary Church (Manhattan) - Established 1884, merged with St. Paul Church (New York City) 2015; Holy Rosary deconsecrated 2017.
 Church of Our Lady of Peace - Merged with St. John the Evangelist Church (Manhattan) 2015; OLP building sold to the Egyptian Coptic Orthodox Christian community 2017.

Churches in The Bronx
 Church of St. Adelbert (Polish) - Located at 150th St. & Robbins Ave. (18971899); East 156 St. near Elton Ave. (1899-?)
 Church of St. Eugene (Ogden Ave. at 163rd St.)
 Church of St. Mary (White Plains Ave. at 215th St.) - Established in 1866; closed in 2007.
 Church of St. Jerome (Alexander Ave. at 137th St.)
 Church of St. Simon Stock - St. Joseph (Bronx, New York) - St. Joseph's Church (Bronx, New York) - Established 1873, merged with Church of St. Simon Stock (Bronx, New York) 2015
 Our Lady of Pity - Established 1908, closed 2007, demolished.
 St. Pius V Church (Bronx, New York) (420 E. 145th St.) Established in 1906, merged with St. Rita of Cascia 2015, St. Pius church building deconsecrated 2017.
 Church of St. Roch - Personal (National) parish established 1899, merged with St. Anselm's 2015, building relegated to "profane but not sordid use" November 2017.
 Church of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Bronx) (Bronx, New York) (160 Van Cortlandt Park South) Established in 1928; merged with St. John's Church (Bronx) 2015.
 Shrine Church of St. Ann (Bronx) - Established 1927, merged with St. Brendan's Church (Bronx, New York) 2015; St. Ann's deconsecrated 2017.

Synagogues: http://www.cjvoices.org/article/lost-synagogues-of-new-york/

Closed NYC churches:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Closed_churches_in_New_York_City

Closed Catholic schools:  http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/09/education/catholic-church-closing-22-schools-in-brooklyn-and-queens.html?mtrref=www.google.com&gwh=DF26A5911FBAF16F21242E926A307924&gwt=pay


Many, many more churches, temples, convents, rectories, schools, chapels in Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Manhattan and SI.  And many difficult multiple alarm fires.


« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 11:52:51 AM by mack »

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #96 on: January 23, 2018, 12:05:30 PM »
Remember the things that were free that we now pay for?

     - water - no one paid for water anywhere
     - TV - no cable, no pay-for-view, no satellite
     - air for tires
     - luggage, meals on planes
     - telephone call operator assistance
     - banking services
     - food deliveries

Remember when there was not a tip jar and expected tip when you bought donuts, coffee and fast food?

Remember when there were banks with people - no ATMs?

Remember when people spoke to you and even knew your name when you went to your neighborhood market, store or restaurant?
 

Online manhattan

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #97 on: January 23, 2018, 12:24:45 PM »
Wow, mack - that list of churches required some investment of time doing research.  Great work.

You list St. Vincent de Paul on 23rd Street in Manhattan.  Just as an aside, the Archdiocese said they got $50million for the property which extends through the block to 24th Street where the rectory is located. The developer has said that he'll put up a hotel/residential with commercial space on the site and, considering what co-op and condo prices have been in the neighborhood, he'll probably make back that $50million investment with the sale of no more than five or six apartments.  The Archdiocese seems to have a habit of selling off properties at bargain rates.

Offline memory master

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #98 on: January 23, 2018, 03:01:11 PM »
Speaking of cable tv, when it was first being introduced they heralded that it would be entirely commercial free. Now it seems it's all commercials and 20 minutes of show. And they have the gall to charge astronomical prices to boot. >:(

Offline guitarman314

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #99 on: January 23, 2018, 03:16:30 PM »
  What about just plain "NON-DIGITAL" broadcast TV? ???

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #100 on: January 23, 2018, 09:00:01 PM »
Gone - transistor radios of the 1960s - you could listen to your music and your ball games:

     

     You listened to AM radio stations


Gone - boom boxes of the 1980s:

     

     

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #101 on: January 23, 2018, 09:12:26 PM »
Gone - CB radios 1970s - every trucker had one - many people bought them for their homes, cars or trucks - used them to communicate on trips, warn about police speed traps, get directions

     Engine 166 on SI used to have one at housewatch desk - they picked up many verbal alarms for responses on SI Expressway and other highways and bridges - always beat other companies in

 
     

     

     

     


        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens_band_radio

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #102 on: January 23, 2018, 09:19:06 PM »

Offline mack

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #103 on: January 23, 2018, 09:40:58 PM »
Gone - Studio 54 and NYC discotheques - 1970s and 1980s




Offline raybrag

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Re: Remember When These Used to Be Here in NYC
« Reply #104 on: January 24, 2018, 11:59:21 AM »
Not at all exclusive to NYC, but who remembers these?





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