Author Topic: Remembrance  (Read 3476 times)

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
Re: Remembrance
« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2019, 04:27:29 PM »
Nice photos Mack, thank you. I a couple of them, Battalion Chief Marty Kehayas (Spelling may be incorrect) who was in charge of the Proby school during that time. Lt. Frank Screder was in charge of the chauffeur training.

Nycfire.net

Re: Remembrance
« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2019, 04:27:29 PM »

Offline *******

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 155
Re: Remembrance
« Reply #31 on: January 05, 2019, 06:48:54 PM »
Bill you bring up the opening of the tin house, sadly I remember the day well. Was working the 9x6 that day in 50. L19 had building inspection that day. Wanting to insure trucks available during those days when the truck in qtrs had building inspection (1000-1300) they would use the engine in qtrs for the inspections with the engine officer and men manning the truck for the period. There was a big ceremony at the tin house for the opening. The Mayor, Fire Commissioner, Chief of Department, brass etc, were in attendance. 85 and 59 were OOS for the ceremony. Was around 1030 or so we get a first due box, we (L19) respond. We pull up to the building and we have a heavy smoke condition from a 3rd floor apartment. The only person on the street was a young woman screaming at us that her baby was in the apartment. I gave an "urgent" over the apparatus radio if not 3 times at least twice with no dispatcher response back. Can't wait, into the building to the apartment. We force the door and the fire blows out into the public hallway. We (myself, irons and can man) go in low (nose rubbing on the apartment floor) but we could only make about 10 feet in for a fast search. 19 arrives on the floor with the line. We swap and give the truck guys their tools and we (50) take the line in and put out the fire. In the last room we find the baby, one years old the day before. His body looked like the ash on the end of a cigarette with 4 bumps where his arms and legs were. The best of times, this was the worst of times. 85 and 59 would have been first due.


Offline *******

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 155
Re: Remembrance
« Reply #32 on: January 21, 2019, 11:39:30 AM »
At hi-rise operations the FDNY has three command positions. The Operation Command on the floor below the fire floor, Staging Command two floor below the fire floor and the Lobby Command. Next month will be the 26th anniversary of the first World Trade Center attack 2/93. My assignment that day was Lobby Command South Tower. There was no Operations or Staging floor that day as there was no fire on the upper floors. The only floor we designated for assignment was a floor around the 60th floor for Triage. With no power/lights in the tower this floor was under renovation with the floor empty of partitions etc. and the windows gave us some light for treatment. This floor was used to treat people in need above the 60th floor and the lobby for triage for people below the 60th. The main concern in the South tower was to find and rescue people trapped in their offices and those in the stopped elevators. The office search was fairly easy and routine. We obtained master keys from building management. Truck companies were sent up to the top and middle floors to begin the search and evacuation. I can write it was easy as I didn't have to climb 100+ floors in stairwells without lights. I remember L111 reporting to me right after I had received word that a woman had fallen on the stairs on the 80th floor and broke her leg, she needed to be carried down to the lobby for hospital evacuation. The Lt. from 111 reported in and asked me if I had an assignment for him. I said "yeah, a woman just fell and broke her leg on the 80th floor. Go up there and carry her down to one of the ambulances outside." He just said "yes sir," and started up. Had to be well over an hour later that they carried her out of the stairwell and to the  ambulance. The main problem was the elevators. Each tower North and South had 99 elevators with pretty much all stuck between floors packed in with no lights. One elevator had over 60 school children and teachers. It took over 6 hours to free the children and teachers. Walls were breached for removal and many heroic acts were performed by the members breaching elevator doors and climbing down to the top of the stopped elevators to remove the people through the roof hatch. I left the scene around 9PM after the last elevator was found searched and the trapped removed.  I was told that day that the truck bomb was meant to bring the towers down. I thought that if they had they would have killed thousands. I retired in 1997. Like millions of others I watched the 9/11 attack unfold on the television. With me watching was my son who was a Nassau County Police Officer. When the South Tower fell I turned to him and said "you just saw 100 firefighters die." God bless them and may the 343 and those after that day continue to Rest in Peace.   

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4770
  • Gender: Male
Re: Remembrance
« Reply #33 on: January 21, 2019, 07:12:15 PM »
 Chief - Thank You once again for telling us your story. A few of us on this site have discussed how valuable your stories, as well as other stories from members of the department are so very important and should always remain in the history of the FDNY. Who many consider; "The Greatest Fire Department in the United States and perhaps the World".

 As I relate to the history of the FDNY, I realize how many changes and operating policies actually began within the FDNY. If there was ever a place in this country that the rest of the fire service could learn from, it is the New York City Fire Department. Within the boundaries of that city is every type of fire incident or emergency that any city must deal with.

 Chief, for our younger members of this site who may not remember the WTC Bombing of 1993, this is how it was.

    

 

anything