Author Topic: GLORY DAYS  (Read 19668 times)

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10949
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2019, 04:00:14 PM »
I enjoy reading these stories too. The Great and Funny entertaining stories of the FDNY during those Glory Days.

 But as a buff, when I read the name "Ira", I also thought of Ira T., a guy who I first met at Engine 290. I believe he also worked Ladder 111 and retired as a Fire Marshall.

 Ira treated me great. He had invited me to his home in Brooklyn and one day we went around to get a few rig shots.

 I haven't seen Ira in years. I hope he's doing okay and enjoying his retirement. I never forgot how great he treated me.

I also had the privilege of working with Ira T. when I was assigned to St. John's East and he was assigned to The Eye of The Storm. Great guy as well.
That Ira T. was in 280...232..290...111...103 then Marshall...a nice  guy .....when he went to the Tinhouse they told him he was the junior man so he had to be the Tinman at the Annual Tin house Run to greet people showing up so they wrapped him in foil & put some silver cream on his face & finished it off with a funnel for his hat.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2019, 04:02:26 PM by 68jk09 »

Nycfire.net

Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2019, 04:00:14 PM »

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2019, 09:38:42 AM »
FIREHOUSE MANNERS 101: Covering lieutenant, and not a fan favorite of the troops... comes downstairs for his morning cup of joe. (In all firehouses, members coming in for day tours it is customary to bring in a choice of morning treats; english muffins, bagels, donuts, crumb cake, etc. Just don't come in empty handed). The kitchen is coming alive with fresh troops coming in and night tour guys heading for home.  This Lt notices a fresh bag of bagels placed on the table, he picks up one bagel, looks it over, nah, does it to another, and another, the guys are watching this incredulously! He must have manhandled a half dozen... until he found the one for him. One of the regular members walks over; "Got what your looking for, lou?" Then tosses the bag of bagels into the trash can.

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #32 on: March 31, 2019, 09:52:15 AM »
CAN'T MAKE THIS UP:  On Knickerbocker Ave you did not only need thick skin, you needed a shell.

One of the senior members has brought in a case of 12 new coffee mugs. We used to call them "toilet bowl mugs". They are the common thick white ceramic type mug usually served in resturants and can withstand daily abuse. Except for some reason at the "Ant Farm"... where none of them have a complete handle, only two stubs.  This trooper is happy to "present" a new case of mugs, because he is sick and tired of "drinking out of mugs with broken handles"...(you know where this is going, right?)...No sooner as he heads upstairs to change into work duty clothes one of the brothers is gleefully smacking off the handles, one by one, over the sink with the back of a heavy knife and placing them back in the case.

I am thankful that we could only work 24 hours. I don't think I could take another hour of my face hurting so much from laughing!

Hope you enjoyed...thanks for reading. KMG-365.



« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 09:55:27 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline STAjo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2895
  • Gender: Male
  • Former NY State EMT, NYC Security, Buff
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #33 on: March 31, 2019, 02:51:37 PM »
I enjoy reading these stories too. The Great and Funny entertaining stories of the FDNY during those Glory Days.

 But as a buff, when I read the name "Ira", I also thought of Ira T., a guy who I first met at Engine 290. I believe he also worked Ladder 111 and retired as a Fire Marshall.

 Ira treated me great. He had invited me to his home in Brooklyn and one day we went around to get a few rig shots.

 I haven't seen Ira in years. I hope he's doing okay and enjoying his retirement. I never forgot how great he treated me.

I also had the privilege of working with Ira T. when I was assigned to St. John's East and he was assigned to The Eye of The Storm. Great guy as well.
That Ira T. was in 280...232..290...111...103 then Marshall...a nice  guy .....when he went to the Tinhouse they told him he was the junior man so he had to be the Tinman at the Annual Tin house Run to greet people showing up so they wrapped him in foil & put some silver cream on his face & finished it off with a funnel for his hat.

 If it's the Ira T. I know - From Flatlands Brooklyn (?)... I worked w/him on ' The Yellow Chase Trucks' @ Chase Auto E.35 x. 'I' & Dead End. (Talk about your Glory Days!) He & I Chased as many Fires as MVA"s.
He Always wanted to be 'On The Job'.
Chief J.K. Probably knows this guy as Chief was a bit o' 'Chaser' his-self back in 'The Day'. That's how he & I first met.
Richie M., Sandy B., Tommy M. ('Reno') and bunch of others went to The Job from our Ranks. I didn't make it; (Long, Boring Story...).
Ira & Sandy usually worked together at Chase we/ me and most of the Talk and 'Action' was FDNY.
We'd have 'Occasional Cocktails' @ O'Halorhan's @ J & Nostrand. There was some FDNY talk there too; but most of the Attention & Energy at 'O's' was focused on Females & Drinkin'.
O's was a very Irish-Sounding Place but was owned by a Little Italian Guy named 'Sammy'.
Sammy Always put-on a Fantastic Spread & Feast w/ Irish Music all day on St. Paddy's.
Great People; Great Fun!
If anyone know's of Richie, Ira, Sandy, 'Reno'; I'd love to catch-up w/ their FDNY Careers Here...Thanks, Staj.  8)

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10949
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #34 on: March 31, 2019, 06:09:53 PM »
^^^ STAjo ...  Richie M. was originally a FF in ENG*205 back when he chased for "Alladin Auto Body" ....he later transferred to SQ*1 & is now Retired....  http://www.2040-cars.com/chevrolet/Silverado-2500/chase-truck-tow-truck-wrecker-scarp-cars-be-your-own-boss-859823/

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #35 on: March 31, 2019, 06:42:39 PM »
TOUGH TIMMY; Part 4
Driving the Boss

I have been working in Engine 88 for a couple of weeks now assigned from proby school,  the new guy, fresh meat...Proby... And, I am assigned to the “Captains groups”. When the Captain works, so do I. Tonight Captain Gallagher, nicknamed “Tough Timmy”,  a no nonsense, gritty war year veteran...whom I’ve never met is returning from his injuries sustained at 183 St job a little while ago. It will be his first tour back. All the horror stories told to me, all the “just you wait”, all the “He’s going to eat you up”... anticipation is going to come to a head any minute as soon as he walks through the door. Today is the day of reckoning.

Checking the masks on the rig, Captain “Tough” Timmy Gallagher (TT) walks in, we meet eye to eye as he starts climbing the stairs to his office. He is in a happy mood, glad to get back to work, get back to what he loves to do, put out fire. He sees me...“Hey, you must be the new proby...come up to my office” he says...still smiling.

I put the mask back on the rig, give him a minute or so to change, and head upstairs to his office. I knock on the open door, we exchange pleasantries and a hand shake... he is “really in a good mood” I think.... I aim to keep my good fortune going and tell him I was looking forward to meeting him and working alongside with him. We chatted for a minute or two...his next remark surprises me. He’s glad to have me aboard, “I understand you worked in the DCFD for three years, pretty busy department...Do what your supposed to do, but...I’m not going to treat you as a proby”. WHAT??... We immediately hit it off. Can I say, “it was love at first sight”. I immediately felt a bond and honor to work with this  gritty veteran. I felt accepted into the FDNY that night….That night, we talked about fires, the old days, families and much more... he was very interested in the Washington DC Fire Department. As we got to know each other better, I realized he was a “BUFF”! And he loved buffs!...I went home the next morning, I just made a new special friend...

(Side note: My Uncle Jack, that I have mentioned before, who used to take me into L 31 as a lad to ride, watch me grow from a kid to become a DC firefighter, then appointed to FDNY.  I believe he had a hook and got me a spot in E 88. Jack and TT were cut from the same cloth, both war year legends...both worked together during the war years, too. I think Uncle Jack put in a good word for me too to TT... Thanks Unk!)

I had many late night conversations with TT... I told him about the DCFD Proby School, in part of  the DCFD proby school, everyone graduates as a MPO. One of your immediate assignments in your company is to drive your company apparatus and be qualified within three months as a MPO. TT thought that was very interesting.

The regular MPO for the Cap is also our union rep, Joe. Joe is very involved with union business and often times has to run out. Back then, the Captain could designate any of his members as “Company Qualified Chauffeur” to serve as a backup chauffeur if they showed promise. This was usually for a short stint awaiting to go to Engine Chauffeur School. I was his choice. I began driving him more and more often as Joe took care of union stuff. I started to cover Joes vacation spot as the day to day MPO. In six months I was driving Engine 88, the 1980 American LaFrance, with TT very often. The other firefighters in our groups were all senior men that had no desire to drive. Sometimes I would look behind me and realize I am driving well over 100 years of experience!

One afternoon we get a box: Southern Blvd and 187 Street, near the Bronx Zoo, it’s a 92. We take up and immediately get assigned to another Box; Monterey and 180 St, we're first due, this is one of our notorious 10-92 Boxes. Never does a day go by that this box does not come in. It is in the backyard of the Monterey Projects on the northwest corner of 180 Street. TT made clear to me previously that he takes in all alarms as if we received the three rings, no exceptions... I start heading down Southern Blvd, picking up steam, (the American LaFrance Engine had a slow acceleration, like driving a bus)... as the rig gained speed, the Captain would lean further and further into the dashboard as if he was leading with the handset pressed to his ear. I turned the corner from Southern Blvd and began heading west on 180 St. Every couple of blocks is a red light, I’m going at a good clip, but being careful, weaving in and out of the cars. About six blocks from the box we can see the lights of Engine 46 turning onto 180 St from Third Ave heading toward us. They are one block away from the box. Monterey is a small dead end street...one block east from Third Avenue...TT sees this, and not happy…Without looking at me and straight ahead  he commands in a direct voice ”DON’T LET THEM BEAT YOU IN”, he repeats as he leans closer and inches from the windshield now with the handset pointing at Engine 46; “DON’T LET THEM BEAT YOU IN!”....I’m still four blocks away... I sense him looking directly at me; “RAM THEM, RAM THEM, RAM THEM…”. Now my head is about to explode, does he really mean it, how am I going to ram a fire engine? In proby school they drilled it into our heads if you don’t follow orders you could be killed, worse, he is going to eat me alive...all this is going through this “Proby’s” head like an ice cube in a blender... . “Engine 46 to da Bronx, 10-92 Box XXXX”...Whew, gasp, relieved... I was saved... TT saw my effort. Sat back in his seat, looked over at me and says with a smirk "You were going to ram them, weren’t you?”. With a smirk right back I said “Of course, wouldn’t you?”... I drove back to Belmont Ave with a grin and an occasional glance at the boss...I love this guy…

(Side note: On January 1, 1988 while assigned to L 38;  Monterey Ave and 180 St. Box would be struck for one of the most horrific alarms I have ever responded to... reinforcing TT belief of never taking the job for granted.)

Next; MONTEREY AND 180.

Thanks for reading...Hope you enjoyed. KMG-365




My Boss



Daily News: Capt G after being pulled out of a collapse at Tiffany and Fox, June 1969.



Engine 88; 1980 American LaFrance
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 10:16:05 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline 8060rock

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #36 on: March 31, 2019, 08:51:20 PM »
Great stuff JohnnyG - probably like lots of others, can't wait for the next edition!

This one of mine doesn't have "Ramming speed" in it (I thought that was a great conversation), but here goes,
Once again - early 80s - working an OT tour in E69 (Harlem Hilton) - they have a Proby who is finishing up his 1st year and is due to take his Proby physical - the guys in 69/28 have been telling him that a medical officer will be coming to quarters to perform the physical.

Short time after lunch - the housewatch yells out that Car 32 medical officer has pulled up - FF John L. to the apparatus floor. Having already been clued into what's about to happen, I am already smiling. 69's apparatus door opens and outside is the 5th division van (stored in 37/40 quarters, but the Proby has no idea that it isn't car 32). Out of the van comes the medical officer (FF Manny F. 37/40 senior man) dressed in a long white lab coat with a stethoscope hanging from his neck, carrying a small black, what seems to be, doctor's bag. What a sight to behold!

Everybody working has now made their way to the apparatus floor, including the 16th Battalion chief, who I believe was BC George B. (RIP), man with a great sense of humor and arguably the biggest ball breaker in the Harlem Hilton. "Dr." Manny tells Proby John L. that he is in a hurry and it will be a very quick physical, so quick that he will perform it right on the apparatus floor. I don't know how guys weren't falling on the floor by now, the look on the proby's face was beyond incredulous. "Dr." Manny goes through some quick prelims, tells him his blood pressure is fine, heartbeat sounds normal, tells him he will draw blood right after he checks for a hernia.

Whatttttt - checks for a hernia!!!! He tells the Proby to drop his pants - guys are hysterical now - John L. asks him if he means "right here on the apparatus floor in front of everyone"? The chief says something like "do as the "Dr." said". The poor red faced Proby does as he is told, down go his pants - "Dr." Manny puts on a pair of rubber gloves - c'mon, for real? He actually reaches down into the general vicinity, I can't swear that his hand actually made contact, buttttttt - tells him to cough - he says "hmmmm, cough again". He turns to the Chief and says we have a problem, this man has a hernia and I am putting him on light duty immediately. The poor Proby is totally upset and in disbelief, asks "Dr." Manny if he is sure about the hernia. At this point the Chief tells him to take his gear off the rig and come up to the BC's office.

Proby John L. barely has his gear off 69s rig and an alarm comes in - 69/28/16 - everybody goes. The Lt. in 69 sees the Proby standing there while everybody else is gearing up, tells him "let's go, get your gear and get on the rig". John L. tells him that he can't - the Lt. says "what do you mean you can't" - "get on the rig". Once again, John L. says that he can't - that he is on light duty - the Lt. says "get on the F...ing rig, it was all a practical joke". Eventually, he was practically dragged, screaming and kicking onto 69's rig. This would have rivaled Paul Newman/Robert Redford's "The Sting".

Proby John L. went on to become an upstanding member of the Harlem Hilton and upon promotion, a Lt. in E60 "Green Berets"

As JohnnyG says - you really can't make this stuff up - beyond funny and no harm intended, but I wonder how that scenario would play out in today's FDNY?

Looking forward to Monterrey & 180!!! 
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 08:59:44 PM by 8060rock »

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5076
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #37 on: March 31, 2019, 09:53:12 PM »
 These stories are GREAT. It's better than watching TV. We used to laugh at some of the greats like "The Three Stooges", "Abbott and Costello", "Laurel and Hardy". But these stories are real and not Hollywood.

 As a buff, sometimes I was invited into the firehouse back then and I got to enjoy a small part of the show. I would sometimes be included in the firehouse meal but the guys would not accept my cash for my share of the payment. I was told "You are our guest". The food was great but many times the show was great too.

 Thank you guys. And by the way some of the companies that you guys talk about, E46, E60, E69, L28, L38 were some of my favorite areas. I'm sure we all crossed paths back in those "Good Ole' - Glory Days".

 

 

 

Offline 69 METS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 708
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #38 on: March 31, 2019, 10:28:40 PM »
I enjoy reading these stories too. The Great and Funny entertaining stories of the FDNY during those Glory Days.

 But as a buff, when I read the name "Ira", I also thought of Ira T., a guy who I first met at Engine 290. I believe he also worked Ladder 111 and retired as a Fire Marshall.

 Ira treated me great. He had invited me to his home in Brooklyn and one day we went around to get a few rig shots.

 I haven't seen Ira in years. I hope he's doing okay and enjoying his retirement. I never forgot how great he treated me.

I also had the privilege of working with Ira T. when I was assigned to St. John's East and he was assigned to The Eye of The Storm. Great guy as well.
That Ira T. was in 280...232..290...111...103 then Marshall...a nice  guy .....when he went to the Tinhouse they told him he was the junior man so he had to be the Tinman at the Annual Tin house Run to greet people showing up so they wrapped him in foil & put some silver cream on his face & finished it off with a funnel for his hat.

 If it's the Ira T. I know - From Flatlands Brooklyn (?)... I worked w/him on ' The Yellow Chase Trucks' @ Chase Auto E.35 x. 'I' & Dead End. (Talk about your Glory Days!) He & I Chased as many Fires as MVA"s.
He Always wanted to be 'On The Job'.
Chief J.K. Probably knows this guy as Chief was a bit o' 'Chaser' his-self back in 'The Day'. That's how he & I first met.
Richie M., Sandy B., Tommy M. ('Reno') and bunch of others went to The Job from our Ranks. I didn't make it; (Long, Boring Story...).
Ira & Sandy usually worked together at Chase we/ me and most of the Talk and 'Action' was FDNY.
We'd have 'Occasional Cocktails' @ O'Halorhan's @ J & Nostrand. There was some FDNY talk there too; but most of the Attention & Energy at 'O's' was focused on Females & Drinkin'.
O's was a very Irish-Sounding Place but was owned by a Little Italian Guy named 'Sammy'.
Sammy Always put-on a Fantastic Spread & Feast w/ Irish Music all day on St. Paddy's.
Great People; Great Fun!
If anyone know's of Richie, Ira, Sandy, 'Reno'; I'd love to catch-up w/ their FDNY Careers Here...Thanks, Staj.  8)

I was good friends with Ira and Sandy growing up in Brooklyn. Sandy's father and my father worked together in L101. I dispatched at Vollaro's on weekends for a while. Ira and I were in the same proby class. Sandy came on the job about a year after us.

Offline STAjo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2895
  • Gender: Male
  • Former NY State EMT, NYC Security, Buff
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #39 on: March 31, 2019, 11:37:44 PM »

 Thanks, 'Mets' !  8)  (PM Sent. )

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10949
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #40 on: March 31, 2019, 11:43:33 PM »
In regard to Johhny Gage's post in reply # 35 ....  The Joe he mentions as the MPO who also was the Company UFA Delegate is a friend of mine Joe B. who also later became a LT back in his Company (88) ...Joe was also very Active in the UFOA & has 2 Sons OTJ who are Chiefs.... awhile back on EBAY i saw an odd old FDNY Badge it was the standard FDNY Maltese Cross but in the center where a Badge Number would be it had a double number & encircling it were the words "PROBATIONARY FIREMAN"...i had not seen one before & thought either it was a fake or maybe they had been used by probies while in school "way back when"...i posted the EBAY ad on a few FD related sites to see if anyone had some history on it....a poster Ret from LAD*6 who i had never met personally sent me a PM on The Rant & told me that he had no history on what they were but he did have one that someone gave him but it had a different number in the center than the one in the ad....he then told me he would give it to me for free....i did not really want to accept it.....but then i asked him what  number it was & he said the number was 88....(you know where this is going) .....i told him i knew a well respected BROTHER who had been a longtime FF & LT in ENG*88 & i could give it to him .....he mailed it to me...it turned out soon after i received it we were having a get together at Maggie Mays (well over a hundred people) for 1st Deputy Commissioner Bob Turner (my friend & best mutual partner) & i knew Joe & at least one of his Sons were coming so i brought it there ....Joe B. did not know ....after Bob gave a little Thank You speech i took the floor & explained (to those that could hear since the sound system had failed) about the existence of at least 2 of these proby badges that i knew of & that someone had given me one...Joe was sitting there listening but not knowing about it & then i said the one that had been given to me was now being given to Joe.... he did not get why until i said the number was 88.....needless to say he was very excited to have it. .....this is one with a different number.... https://www.google.com/search?q=PROBATIONARY+FIREFIGHTER+BADGE+ON+EBAY&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=wqXwpsUL3vgo8M%253A%252CB6ju6_UXvrKj5M%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRUyG1xLZwTWDg1ugaDdSSYCUyT7g&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiZnqCr_q3hAhWMg-AKHcHICJcQ9QEwA3oECAkQCg#imgrc=wqXwpsUL3vgo8M:
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 11:51:36 PM by 68jk09 »

Offline mac8146

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 676
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #41 on: April 01, 2019, 10:04:27 AM »
In regards to post 40 I too have a story of Joe B. I was a fireman in L-38 and was promoted in 1996 and had a friend at badge desk and was able to get badge #88 as a lieutenant, 38 was not available then. Year or two later Joe B. Gets promoted and while celebrating his promotion over a cocktail or two I mention my badge and offer to swap since he was in 88 his whole career and deserved it. So we make a lunch date and off we go to HQ and swap badges so Joe B now has #88. I get to look at some available badges and lo an behold #38 was in drawer, so I have had the pleasure of holding badges #88 & #38 as a lieutenant. FYI Joe B got me again a few years later when I had been covering back in the Bronx and was in 88 ufo when spot came up and I was informed it was going to Joe B so I took another assignment as Joe went back as Lt. In Engine 88.

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #42 on: April 02, 2019, 09:15:46 PM »
MONTEREY AND 180 STREET

It’s New Years Day, 1988...I’m now assigned to Ladder 38. It’s late morning, we just had a run of some sort in Ladder 27’s area, as we cruise back to Belmont Avenue we stop by the quarters of 46/27 to wish everyone a Happy New Year.

We are not there long. The LCC “Sidecar” Tom calls us over the handi-talkie. “38 has a run, Monterey and 180, first due”...a day does not go by that this Box does not come in. We hurry to the rig, the tones are going off in 46/27, they will be right behind us.

Up Third Avenue, we make a right turn, heading east on 180 Street. Whoa! People in the street waving us down. Somethings up. Tommy stops the rig at the intersection, Monterey is a short dead end street...I have the can, the boss; Lt. Artie and I jump off the rig and follow the very excited residents running ahead of us and towards the courtyard of this nine story project. They keep waving back for us to follow...were running too. I climb the short staircase, I’m first in the project courtyard... and immediately see what I assume to be outside rubbish smoldering. I say to myself, “all this excitement for outside rubbish?” Then...I come up to the “rubbish” and it moans. (I will hold further description)... “Holy effen #$%, it’s a somebody!”. Instantaneously my senses go into that slow motion heightened awareness...WTF is going on. I put my finger over the can nozzle, gently I extinguish the smoldering person on fire. People are throwing down blankets. I cover this person and wet down the blanket to cool the burning. Other companies have arrived and immediately start to assist. To my right I see another victim, he looks like a teenager. He is sitting up against a cement walkway. He too,  is burned from head to toe, the front top of his sneakers and shoe laces have been completely burned off. I’m the only EMT at this point I help with the assessment. The first victim is being treated now by EMS, the second victim can speak and tells us there is a third victim!... He is in the elevator. I relay this info to my boss. Our hands are full with these two victims. Other companies are on scene and head toward the elevators in the lobby.

 A resident tells us he saw the three teens bringing down a Christmas Tree in the elevator from the sixth floor, thought he heard an explosion and suspects one of the teens lit the tree on fire.

The elevator is not in the lobby, it proceeded back up to another floor. Rescue is on scene and identifies the elevator, the door is hot to the touch and severely buckled by the heat. The hurst tool is started, the door forced and the horrific remains of the third teen is discovered.

That was a tough one. I got relieved that day...a few of us headed to a local joint, had a couple of cold ones and just looked at each other. What was there to say?...The next days newspaper headlines would say it all.

Thanks for reading...KMG-365





Monterey and 180 St. "Monterey Project" courtyard...right rear




Two teenagers died. One in elevator at scene, the first victim I encountered, two days later.









JohnnyGage on right....Proby FF on left is George F. From E 48 (He would go on to be a super fine Lt in E 24 and Capt of L 29, now retired) Photo by Matty Daly
« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 09:29:10 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline 8060rock

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #43 on: April 03, 2019, 08:12:27 PM »
This 6th alarm fire in B'klyn, fire in the cockloft, brings to mind another short story.
E80/L23 are at a multiple in Harlem, people were pretty tough back in those days, sometimes you had problems trying to get them to leave the building. At this particular top floor fire in a "h type", the cockloft is going good, threatening to jump the throat, we're on the top floor with our handline - 23 has been pulling ceilings - we bring our line into this apt. where there is a little old lady, doesn't wanna leave - her apt. is immaculate, unlike most others on the top floor, probably in the b'ldg.. Makes you feel badly for what's about to happen here - we're telling her that she has to go and she's arguing, but finally she's convinced it's time to go, but before she leaves she comes out with a classic line - she says to the guys from E80, standing there with a charged line "you squirters ain't so bad" then looking over at L23, with their 6' hooks "but them sons a bitches with them wrecking sticks ain't no good at all". We almost fell over laughing, sorry to say that her immaculate apt. was indeed destroyed. Wondered back then, what ever happened to that poor little old lady, possessions/home gone. Same thing is happening today in B'klyn. Some things never change!
« Last Edit: April 03, 2019, 10:20:21 PM by 8060rock »

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1681
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #44 on: April 03, 2019, 09:50:31 PM »
This entire site has to be edited into book format.  Remember -  you heard it here first!

Outstanding professions, callings and story-telling, everybody!

And special recognition to the Bendicks and our two unflagging moderators who never waver in their duties for all the work they do - Bravo Zulu!!  (Willy - did I say that the way you wanted?  If so, you owe me a Big Mac, fries and shake.  Yeah, I know - I'm easy but I ain't free.  After all it's New York.)

Seriously, thank you to everybody..

 

anything