Author Topic: GLORY DAYS  (Read 19667 times)

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #60 on: April 17, 2019, 04:34:27 PM »
COUPLE OF ODD COUPLES:  Part 1
The Blues Brothers

Summertime 1993, Ladder 112 is celebrating their 100 years of community service to the residents of Bushwick. The company is going to “march” three blocks north on Knickerbocker Avenue then turn west on Menahan Street two blocks west to Central Avenue and St. Barbara's Church for a Christian Mass. Both Engine 277 and Ladder 112 will be “out of service” for the day tour.

Back up a few months. Ladder 112 members are conducting a “Company Meeting” in the firehouse. Almost every member is in attendance as the topic is the upcoming “Centennial” and “what are we going to do?”.

The greater majority of members thought  a Mass and formal celebration is a little bit much. After all, we are “No Frills”, the name was appropriate. We discussed in length about donating to “a worthy cause” in L 112’s name. Most rejected the celebration and party aspect. How about just a nice lunch...toast the members before us, and those who are no longer with us...that was the direction the centennial would take the majority decided. Meeting adjourned...

Enter the “six who care”, these were five members and one officer who decided among themselves that we should have pageantry, a spectacle, a parade with all it’s trimmings, bells and whistles!...And so a parade through the streets of beautiful downtown Bushwick to the Church was planned by the “six who care”.

It is the day of the centennial, it is a beautiful warm but comfortable morning, everyone is dressed sharply in their Class A uniform, a solid turnout by the members...soon we will be stepping off from in front of the firehouse and head north on Knickerbocker Avenue lead by Captain H. Officers with their white hats are ahead and lead the forty or so members that make up both companies in a double column. Ladder 112’s apparatus is right behind us,  two of the “six who care” members; LCC John “Elwood” C and Lt. Tony “Jake” C man the front seat of the otherwise empty apparatus. (Empty being key word here). I’m pretty sure there was a police car protecting our rear.

Our small squadron of firefighters...dare I say... “march”...actually it is more like a “sashay” up Knickerbocker Avenue... first passing Gates Avenue, then Linden Street, passing the curious onlookers who sip from their brown bag. Some wave, most don’t even pay attention as we strut by. We make small talk amongst ourselves...Then…

From behind us the apparatus is blowing the horn. OK, a little noise to create a little drama and excitement...but the apparatus is closing in on the members, inch by inch, who are now becoming alarmed as the rig comes even closer now with siren and air horn blasting away. We all are looking back, and move closer to the west side of Knickerbocker Avenue up against the parked cars as the apparatus does an “end run” around our scrunched-up contingent, the rig heads further up the Avenue and makes a left onto Myrtle Avenue, out of sight, the siren now heard in the distance. Our gang is left abandoned on Knickerbocker Avenue looking at each other in disbelief, the bosses now scratching their heads, what the #$%^  just happened here? The old timer sitting on the garbage can swigging from the brown bag takes another swig...

In about ten minutes or so, the rig silently creeps back up behind us...The two front seat knuckleheads; Elwood and Jake seem forlorn and woeful. The dynamic duo heard over the rig radio a box come in about four blocks away and decided to “voluntarily take in” the alarm on their own!...Crashing through a parade!.. you would think that only happens in the movies...

The remainder of the day was uneventful, don’t remember too many details, except, however I remember an embarrassed Captain being po’ed, big time! You could fry and egg of his forehead... In another 100 years I will never see that mad, wild craziness again...unless I rerun a Blues Brothers episode.

Hope you enjoyed!  KMG-365




« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 04:53:19 PM by JohnnyGage »

Nycfire.net

Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #60 on: April 17, 2019, 04:34:27 PM »

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #61 on: April 17, 2019, 04:37:38 PM »
COUPLE OF ODD COUPLES: Part 2
Al Di La meets Norton

Both companies, E277 and L112 are backing into quarters from a taking up at a job, wasn’t a big job so we are not taking any time for R&R. The relocators that occupied our firehouse have left to return to their firehouse. As we clean our equipment and ready our turnout gear we notice all over the firehouse white copy paper with “Hi AL!”...The “Hi” on top,”AL” on bottom with exclamation point. These notes are taped every where the eye can see on the apparatus floor, the apparatus floor bathroom, the kitchen, the dining room...everywhere. They are all the same; “Hi AL!”.

Later we call the Ladder Company who had relocated to our joint and asked about the signs to find out what’s up with the notes... We were told that a recently promoted Lieutenant, who just happens to be a newcomer to E277 named Al is the beneficiary of the prank.

Story goes: Once upon a time, Al and a “study group” of the Brothers from the same Ladder Company were studying for the upcoming Lieutenants exam. Al did well and was recently promoted. He covered vacancy spots and shortly thereafter assigned to E277.  Prior to his promotion, the story goes, Al experienced some dark days, the same “study group” of Brothers stayed alongside him day after day until the days got brighter.

After his promotion, Al returned to his previous firehouse and spoke with the remaining members who were still waiting for promotion. When one of his previous “study group” members called him Al, he was immediately corrected; “Don’t call me Al, it is Lou, or Lieutenant...but not Al”.

Quicker than a speeding bullet, word shot out all over the Knickerbocker Avenue firehouse of this outlandish story...We left the signs up. It became the hot topic of discussion in the kitchen...our Lieutenant TK, a bit of an instigator, started to sing the first line of a 1963 Connie Francis/Jerry Vale hit; “Al di la…”. And the gag caught on...Whenever Lt. Al would come out of his office someone would break into song “AL (pause, hold the AL note...then, just as Lt. Al gave you the evil eye...continue) di la”...” da da da da-da….Al di la”...What? I’m just singing….

Of course there were other songs that worked too. Especially if you were behind Lt. Al, you might break into song, always pausing after the first note; Michael Jackson’s;  “I’LL (AL)...be there, I’LL (AL) be there…”. And of course the Christmas classic “I’LL (AL)...be home for Christmas.

One particular night tour we have a detail from L111 coming to L112. The detail is Firefighter TB. TB is a distinguished, very well respected, aggressive firefighter, one of the best I have every work alongside with. TB calls everyone “Norton”, and everyone calls him Norton, right back. It is an honor of sort, when TB is in full schtick and calls you Norton, a privilege...Coming from the “Nut House” nobody could touch the outrageous and entertaining TB, he was a good natured, card carrying “Nut!” and right now he was the jester holding court in our small dining room, everyone working the night tour was in attendance watching this spectacular performance. TB is bare chested and flexing his muscles to our amusement. He is on a roll!...Only one missing is Lt Al who has himself barricaded in the Engine office.

A short time later, Lt Al emerged from his confinement and came downstairs for a cup of coffee...we think. Lt Al takes a peek from the kitchen into the dining room and sees the floorshow...quicker than the groundhog who sees his shadow Lt Al disappears back upstairs and closes his office door. TB takes notice of this peculiar “non-conformity”...we “fill him in” about our special “shy” Lt.

In the middle of TBs artistic performance, he’s enlightened!...and takes off up the stairs in flight, bare chested and carrying a halligan tool. We can hear the office door kicked open, TB explodes into the office and breaks into song... “AL Di LA, DA DA DA DA-DA...”.

Like I’ve said before, on Knickerbocker Avenue you didn’t just need thick skin, you needed a shell. Lt. Al moved on shortly thereafter. “I’LL (AL) be seeing you……”

Thanks for reading, hope you enjoyed!  KMG-365






« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 04:45:35 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5076
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #62 on: April 17, 2019, 08:43:59 PM »
 JohnnyGage, we appreciate your stories.

 So we hope you like this gift - FROM US TO YOU. As we take you back to those Glory Days of the Past.


 


 


 


 

Offline 8060rock

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #63 on: April 17, 2019, 10:39:18 PM »
Willy, you're always spot on with these videos! Love the Ed Norton clip, he really was a "blast from the past".

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #64 on: April 19, 2019, 03:19:05 PM »
KNOW WHEN TO SAY WHEN

Since the early age of the first American colonies, fire companies have shared friendly and sometimes not so friendly banter when running to alarms together. Pride, tradition and custom...this behavior  will always be a fire company culture and heritage. And sometimes untraditional results will occur.

And so it is no surprise to this day, L112 has had a few runs this day tour with our colleagues from the west, L 111 and wise cracking back and forth has everyone in good spirits. L111 is an elite Truck Company from the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, they are proud to be called the “Nut House”. The Nut House has many colorful and dynamic firefighters on their roster. They are one of the very best truck companies that serve the FDNY, and their nickname suits them well.

This summer day tour, we shoot each other good jestered remarks, and then it's over....one of our members , FF Kayce,  seems to have developed testicular fortitude as he continues to shoot snide remarks at the members of 111 relentlessly. He thinks he is being funny...The recipients of the wise cracks are no longer laughing anymore and the smirk has been replaced with the stink eye... “Hey, uh, Kayce, you might want to tone the bull$%^& down a bit, little overkill, take it down a notch”.

Late afternoon, news from the truck office to the housewatch is tonight’s night tour one man from L112 detailed to, you guessed it, the “Nut House”....wait for it….and FF Kayce just happens to have the detail slot...A collision of instant karma awaits just around the bend!

My next tour in, I am told the following, follow-up story... it is the hot story in the kitchen and guy’s are tripping over themselves trying to tell it...

The next morning of Kayce’s detail... two woman approach the L 112 firehouse door and knocks on it, the house watchman cracks open the door. The woman states that there is a firefighter across the street in the firehouse parking lot and he says “he needs help”.

Across the street, dropped off and leaning helplessly against the eight foot chain link fence is FF Kayce... he has been duct taped every inch from head to toe with his arms against his sides. He looks like a cross between a lumpy HVAC duct and a silver mummy...For good measure an old trophy cup has also been duct taped to his a$$... Revenge is a dish best served cold.

Moral of the story;...“Know when to say when, pick your battles wisely and certainly don’t mess with any company that calls themselves “The Nut House!”.

Hope you enjoyed!  KMG-365







« Last Edit: April 19, 2019, 04:42:27 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline jkal

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #65 on: April 19, 2019, 06:11:13 PM »
Dan,  your TB/ Norton story was a Classic.  The LT must have been beside himself.  Tommy is the Only Fireman I know to be assigned to Ladders 111, 112 & 113.  Finishing his career in Squad 252.  We (when I was a Fireman in 111) used to say, if we were trapped, we want Norton to come and get us. I don’t recall the story of your detail to our place But both Companies had the Highest respect for each other. I look back to my Brooklyn time as a Fireman in TL -111 and the Captain of TL -120 (for 10 years) and think about the GREAT Trucks we ran in with and all the Trucks I covered in throughout the Boro, listed in order, Ladders: 102, 103, 105, 107, 108, 112, 113, 123, 124, 132, 147, 157, 159, 170, 174, 175, 176.  That is Some collection of Truck Companies. I hope I didn’t leave anyone in the “Hood” out. The level of Firemen was the highest and the quality of these individuals were even better. Told someone down in Florida yesterday, the ultimate compliment from the Brothers is,” He’s a Good Fireman”

As a side note,  I spent my first 11 years on the Job on the Mainland, the BX. Another day and another story...
« Last Edit: April 19, 2019, 07:35:32 PM by jkal »

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #66 on: April 19, 2019, 10:02:07 PM »
^^^^^^Hi John, thanks for jumping in! I know with your background and history you must have a cache full of great stories and memories, you worked in great shops and always very well respected.... TB was certainly one of a kind, if you met him one time, you could never forget him... even as I type I'm smiling thinking of him, it's very true, I thought the same thing typing about TB, if I was in a jam, I would hope TB was nearby! (Saw TB at a L112 old timers reunion a couple weeks ago, hasn't missed a beat!)...You and I were very lucky to be on the job during a special time and work with great truck companies and learn from the "Masters"...that is the perfect discription of those war year vets. You too John, a gentleman and one of the fine "Masters" of our time.

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #67 on: April 20, 2019, 02:28:43 PM »
FLASHBACK; 37 Years Ago

April 20, 1982, just four months before I am to be hired for the FDNY I was a firefighter for the Washington D.C. Fire Department. In a couple of hours of my night tour I would be half of a team to participate in a very extraordinary rescue, probably the last of its kind.

I was hired on August 6, 1979 an assigned to Engine Company 21, a single, two piece company in the Northwest neighborhood of Adams Morgan. Ambulance 2 is quartered there also. We are considered a busy, active fire company. The year before Engine Company 21 was the “Fire Company of the Year”, an annual award by the City administrators for all around performance and administrative duties besting 31 other engine companies, 19 truck companies and 4 rescue squads.

The firehouse is very old, has two green bay apparatus doors (now painted red), a architect designed the firehouse with a spanish style, specifically to look like the “Alamo”. Two blocks behind us was the National Washington DC Zoo. The firehouse was situated on a side street in the bedroom community. The two piece engine company concept was two pumpers, an old concept that has now been abandoned. Both rigs were set up exactly the same with pumps, hose lays, and hand tools...the first piece was called the “wagon”, the second piece, which was an older piece of fire apparatus was called a “pumper”. As I mentioned above, there are thirty-two “two-piece” engine companies in DC. The wagon was where the MPO, Engine Officer, Lineman and Layout man rode. The pumper followed close behind with just a MPO by himself. His mission was to locate the hydrant and supply the wagon from his apparatus. Washington DC streetscape was unique in that every block was dissected  with “alleys”. On a “Box Alarm” assignment, 4 engines (double pieces), 2 trucks, rescue and Battalion Chief would respond. (what a parade of equipment!). Alarm assignment went as follows, the first and third due companies responded to the buildings address in front. The second and fourth due were to respond to the rear, via alleyway. (The two piece system gave the companies the versatility in different types of hose lays, furthermore in the event of civil unrest, with a call back, the engine companies could break into single engines, affording the department sixty-four engines very quickly). Regardless of conditions showing, the first and second due companies “laid out” a supply line from nearest hydrant.

Washington had also experienced their “war years” and riots...I was working with many knowledgeable war year veterans during a special time. Our “first due” area was interesting, if we turned out to the left of quarters we ran into real rough neighborhoods, where we would catch good fire duty. If we turned out to the right and crossed the Calvert Street Bridge towards Woodley Park we responded to hotels and elite neighborhoods with big mansions where Congress representatives and Senators lived. During my three years (I would resign my position of firefighter for the FDNY on August 6, 1982, three years to-the-day I was sworn in for DCFD!) I witnessed President Carter going out, newly elected President Reagan coming in. Newswise the Iran hostage crisis for 444 days was daily headlines, then followed by a parade when they came home. I Was working the day tour when  President Reagan's attempted assassination on T Street, Sheraton Hotel (our Ambulance 2 transported the injured DC Police Officer, we stood fast in quarters). The Iran Embassy was to be closed down permanently and the Ayatollah evicted, we stationed deck guns around the embassy perimeter...word was the Ayatollah was going to blow the place to smithereens. And the Air Florida flight that crashed into the 14th Street Bridge. A very remarkable three years of action!

My proby class was packed with 24 Probationary firefighters! Full class. Class number 273. I was hired along with my very close friend and brother-from-another-mother Phil. We grew up together from little league baseball, Explorer Scouts and then joined our Long Island volunteer fire department. We started taking fire department entrance exams together in various cities, and amazingly we were hired simultaneously for the DCFD! Our class was very tight, we all formed a close bond quickly and many of us still stay in touch to this day!...I recall on our first day we were told to “brown bag” your lunch as there was no facilities nearby and you could not leave the training facility grounds. The next day, I showed up with my lunchbox which I liberated from younger sibling from home earlier, it was an “Emergency!” tin lunch box and thermos with the profiles of Johnny Gage and his partner Roy DeSoto standing next to their Dodge rig. It was a hit with my fellow classmates and training staff...(Fact; after graduation, the staff requested if I would consider donating the lunch box to the training facility museum collection of tools and artifacts...I did).

Our training was as expected, tough and grueling. Part of the early training curriculum you had to be proficient in the “scaling ladder” evolution. Instead of the ladders being stationary like in FDNY probationary school;  you had to climb to the neck, dismount into the window, pull the neck up, rotate ladder 90 degrees, heave twice hand over hand to extend to next window, turn ladder 90 degrees, mount, climb and repeat. This continued until you reached the roof of the six story double windowed tower. There was a net below. Another evolution was to climb an extended 100 foot unsupported aerial to the top rung, clip in your life saving belt buckle, and lean back totally supported by your belt with arms extended outwards away from your body. Both evolutions were confidence builders. (For graduation we had a competition on both evolutions that would be a portion of your final mark; Out of the twenty-four students I came in third doing the scaling ladder evolution, and second climbing the aerial...completed in 19 seconds...whew)

The DCFD works three day tours, 0900-1800 hrs. But due to heavy traffic in the city, the general rule of thumb had members report for work at 0700 and 1600 hrs. After three day tours you were off a day, reported for three night tours, three days off. DCFD did not employ a “roll call”. When you reported for “duty” you relieved the on-duty member...at whatever his/her position was, you assumed that position. So naturally, if you are not a wagon or pumper driver, you would  “Sign in” the company journal that you relieved the “lineman” (nozzleman), the choice position and that would be your assignment for that tour until you were relieved. The second position was “Lay-out”, essentially the back-up position. Chow was early. A man would be sent by himself to the local market, procure the meal and we would eat breakfast by 0900 on day tours (no lunch) and  dinner at 1830 hrs. After dinner, everyone (including the boss) who ate rolled the dice to see who would wash the pots, pans and dishes...hi/lo rollers, you were both in the sink. Sometimes the two finalist would roll off between themselves and loser got stuck with the whole works. That was common practice in all the DCFD firehouses.

It’s a little after 2100 hours, the city wide tone system pulses out two tones indicating a higher level alarm is about to be transmitted, “BOX ALARM” all ears throughout the 32 firehouses in DC perk up, “BOX ALARM: ENGINE 9, 21, 23 and 1, TRUCKS 6,3, RESCUE SQUAD 1 BC?, 1514 17th STREET FOR FIRE REPORTED ON 4th FLOOR.” The member on house watch starts banging on the house alert gong, we all hear the box coming in and start a rush to the apparatus...donning my three-quarter boots, yellow turnout coat with reflective DCFD lettering on the back, and yellow leather New Yorker helmet, the two piece engine company turns out of the firehouse within a minute of the alarm...the history of DCFD turnouts are very aggressive. (one time a boss lined us up and admonished certain members that they were not turning out “fast enough!”). The apparatus door was set on a timer and came down two minutes after the “door open” button was pressed from the housewatch, another button was on a coiled wire hanging down from the ceiling where only the MPO could press the button and activate the door to open during winter weather. The apparatus door was on a two minute timer and came down on its own. The Hahn “Wagon” roars out to the right on Lanier Place, the Ford “Pumper” following right behind. Left on 18th Street to the alley that dissects P and Q Street towards 17th Street.

21 Engine is second due, which means we will take an alley behind the address, drop a supply line and hand stretch a line from the rear if ordered. Engine 1 and Truck 3 will be in the alley, too. Radio reports have a confirmed fire in an apartment on the fourth floor of this large 7 story “E” shaped, ordinary construction, brick apartment house. There is a report of a woman trapped on the fire floor, smoke is showing in the rear as the first due company Engine 9 starts the handstrech to the fire location assisted by the third engine from the front of the building. A woman appears above us in the alleyway at a fourth floor window screaming that she is trapped, the fire is next door and the front of her apartment is on fire. A thirty five foot ladder has been placed at a third floor window, below where the woman is screaming, obviously a little short. Engine 21 teams up with third due Engine 1 in the rear to start stretching a handline... just then, scurrying around the corner, part carrying a scaling ladder hooked over his shoulder and dragging the rest of the ladder is firefighter Joe N from Truck 3. He is having trouble with the cumbersome ladder in the tight alley by himself. My boss, is a covering officer,  notices his struggles, nods to me...“give him a hand with that”...I pass off my folds, dump my scba and grab the bottom of the scaling ladder. And up-we-go! Joe N has the hook in his right hand, I have the lower half of the single rail in my right hand as we climb in tandem to the third floor. I assist Joe raising the ladder like we were taught in proby school, he hooks the neck into the fourth floor window and starts his climb, I follow right behind. This climb is a little more difficult with three quarter boots and turnout coat compared to proby school in sneakers and gym shorts!...Joe climbs into the window, as I move up and take a position level to the window with my knees banging away against each other from the adrenaline rush... lo and behold, this stocky, older woman is climbing over the window ledge without hesitation, I place her foot on a lower rung and firmly I embrace her as we slowly, rung by rung, hand over hand, descend to the third floor window...that is fully intact. My immediate thought as we get lower to the third floor window, should we go in there, or do I make the dangerous and awkward transfer of her to the thirty five foot portable ladder. I decided this was far enough, I kick through the screen and glass, able to remove the glass and without hurting ourselves I guide her into the apartment below for safe shelter. Joe N made his way down, all three of us in the apartment below, Joe N escorted the woman to the street as I climbed down the portable ladder and resumed my engine duties.

The following morning Joe N is on all the local morning television networks in dress uniform telling his rescue story in detail. Joe N received the highest DCFD award that year, the “Gold Bar”, he rightfully deserved . I received a “Chief’s Commendation Certificate” and a lasting memory of being a part of a rescue team to effect a scaling ladder rescue in the DCFD...for a few minutes there, I got to be JohnnyGage.

Hope you enjoyed and thanks for reading...I think I will pour me-self a nip of JWB, today!   KMG-365

Next: More TT!














« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 03:26:17 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline fdce54

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 874
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #68 on: April 20, 2019, 04:00:08 PM »
Great story. Well done on the rescue Mr. Gage.

Offline raybrag

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2094
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #69 on: April 20, 2019, 06:09:23 PM »
I agree with Frank.  Great story!  Keep 'em comin!   Where on Long Island are you from?
Ray Braguglia
Newport News VA


Offline JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #70 on: April 20, 2019, 10:03:32 PM »
I agree with Frank.  Great story!  Keep 'em comin!   Where on Long Island are you from?

Thanks fdce and Ray for your comments, more stories on the way.
To Ray; Born in Brooklyn, grew up on LI in Brentwood, Suffolk County.

Offline manhattan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1681
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #71 on: April 20, 2019, 10:07:27 PM »
I know where Brentwood is, but I'm not sure about Brooklyn.   Isn't it located someplace east of First Avenue in Manhattan??

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5076
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #72 on: April 21, 2019, 09:21:33 AM »
I know where Brentwood is, but I'm not sure about Brooklyn.   Isn't it located someplace east of First Avenue in Manhattan??

 "manhattan" you fit right in.

 Are you sure you NEVER worked in a firehouse before ? Because it sure sounds to me like you did.

 Those guys that have spent any time in one of those neighborhood firehouses are usually the Best when it comes to figuring out the answers to the Worlds BIGGEST Problems. "Only" because they know how to ask the Right Questions. Then putting it all together such as you did "manhattan", they can clearly come up with the correct answer.

 Thank you JohnnyGage and all the guys who have contributed to this. My next question. Could a MOVIE be in the Making called: "GLORY DAYS".

Offline jkal

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #73 on: April 22, 2019, 05:59:13 PM »
A quick BX story,  I am a young (27 y/o) Fireman in Ladder Company 48 in the Hunts Point section of the South Bronx. The locals used to say, “the Point is where it’s at”. So much for where it’s at, the Firehouse became the only occupied building on the block, losing the rest to fire. It’s probably 1979. We are in a tenement overhauling after a Job with 31 Truck. I have the Can position, as I did for probably one year straight when I transferred across the floor, since 48 was one of the Most Senior Trucks on the Job (lucky me). For some reason, we and 31 are in the same apartment and 31 Legend, Jerry Albert looks over to me and says, “hey Kid, give me your Hook”. I am with Eddie Scott, one of 48’s legends and I recoil in horror. I clutch the hook to my body and would Never think of parting with it, imagine. Jerry looks at Eddie, chuckles and says to Ed, “you taught him well “.  As Johnny Gage presented and I have alluded to, They were the Masters.  Several years ago we buried another South BX Legend, Gene Hessler and I saw Eddie for the first time in almost 20 years at the funeral. Glad I had the opportunity to speak with him. Eddie Scott died 6 months later...
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 08:07:15 AM by jkal »

Offline enginecap

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 418
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #74 on: April 22, 2019, 07:23:59 PM »
Eddie Tegjian ( spelling) was the FF from Ladder 48 that I remember in that capacity.  I was a Johnny LT assigned to the 6th division and working the R group (94/48 and 71/55)  Eddie always treated me with respect as he did with every officer.  He took the irons almost every tour and he took “ the kid” with him on the can.  “The kid” may have had 15 years on the job.  Eddie may have carried the Rabbit tool, but there’s no way he was going to use it.  He was a fireman’s fireman.  RIP Eddie
I just want one more good fire