Author Topic: GLORY DAYS  (Read 11165 times)

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2281
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #105 on: May 09, 2019, 06:48:07 PM »
How many of those tractor-trailers pulled into the market area with half or all of their goods gone. The trucks start coming into the area late at night and the wee hours of the morning from all parts of the Country. The unsuspecting driver stops at a red light and denziens of the neighborhood pop open the rear trailer door, if it was only secured by the seal, and as the truck meanders toward it's destination it's cargo is being flipped out to the rest of the miscreants on the street. That area kept the 41 precinct quite busy when their station house (Fort Apache) wasn't being attacked.

Nycfire.net

Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #105 on: May 09, 2019, 06:48:07 PM »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10676
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #106 on: May 10, 2019, 04:48:34 PM »
41 PCT 1973....

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10676
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #107 on: May 10, 2019, 08:19:08 PM »
Back in the '70s there was a group on bicycles (who morphed into a Motorcycle group) in Williamsburg .....they would stalk tractor trailers stopped at lights all along Union Ave from the BQE to Broadway they would open the back door & one would get onboard & throw boxes out i even saw them with one kid on the handlebars who would manage to ride behind & grab onto the back of a moving TT & open it...this was done in the daylight sometime within a block of the 90 PCT....many times the TT drivers realized it but not want to stop & possibly get jumped .

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10676
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #108 on: May 10, 2019, 08:49:20 PM »
In regard to car or ADV Fires when i was a LT in 332 we had more of our fair share of them....we had one of the first 1987 Macks without a red rubber Booster Line on a reel .....instead there was a regular length of 1 3/4" Polyester Hose on the extended front bumper that was hooked up to discharge outlet on the front of the Rig.... we were 1st Due to most of "The ENY Airport" ....after about a month of use the front length showed tremendous signs of wear from dragging it on glass & broken concrete areas repeatedly ......this never happened with the old red rubber Booster Hose ... i wrote a lengthy report explaining this & requesting a retro fit of a Booster Reel above the Hose Bed like what was on the earlier 1958 Mack's before the reel was moved under the hose Bed ...the reply to my request was "we are sending you 12 lengths of 1 3/4 use as much as you want" they went on to mention the Death of FF Tony Shands https://www.nytimes.com/1984/10/21/nyregion/firefighter-hit-and-killed-by-car-as-he-rolls-up-hose-after-blaze.html   ENG*297 which happened when a drunk driver crushed him into the back step as he was rewinding Booster Hose onto the reel below the rear of the
Hose Bed on 20th Ave by the now Target/BJs Complex....i wondered what the time difference was between re winding Booster Hose in the rear (especially with the later electric rewind) as opposed to the time taken to uncouple ..drain..reconnect & pack regular Hose in the front bumper tray (Booster Hose never had to be drained)  ....i felt the drunk driver could come from either direction....the correct thing was done by the Job after FF Shands Death by mandating a Truck to be assigned to "block" traffic for an ENG operating on a road incident whether Fire or an Accident....oddly enough awhile after this mandate Units were again operating on the same stretch of 20 Ave (no stores there back then & a lot of dumping of Vehicles) & a Woman hit the Truck blocking the ENG....prior to the 10-20-84 FF Shands incident.... on 1-20-76 there was also a FF named Kanavan in ENG*228 that was killed rewinding the Booster but nothing was addressed for quite awhile....CONTINUED REST IN PEACE TO BOTH.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 09:16:24 PM by 68jk09 »

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 153
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #109 on: May 12, 2019, 07:20:28 PM »
TOUGH TIMMY, Part 9
Epilogue

It’s a beautiful crisp afternoon, we have just had lunch and in the process of cleaning up the pots and pans when the tones alert the housewatchman of an incoming alarm, all pause as we wait to hear his command, (remember...this was before the computers “alerted you verbally”)... “ERS...ENGINE ONLY, GET OUT 88 ERS-NC 185 AND PROSPECT”.

(The ERS box has two round buttons on the face of the box with an overlapping hinged cover. You have to lift the cover and press the button to initiate a response from the dispatcher. One button is for the Police Department dispatcher, the other button goes to Bronx Communication Office on 180th Street. Press the button, wait, when the dispatcher acknowledges your call, you speak directly into the speaker that is also mounted on the face of the alarm box and state your emergency. Your “emergency” will dictate the level of response from the Bronx CO. If you press the button and walk away, it is deemed as “NC; no contact” and most likely a 10-92; false alarm...in this case the Bronx CO will send just the Engine to investigate).

Today is one of the last tours I drive Captain Tough Timmy Gallagher (A firefighter transfer order will be coming out shortly). As soon as the housewatchman yells out the box location we hustle to the rig. (Now, even though the NC will usually be false, TT responds 100% to all alarms aggressively, he does not ever take an alarm for granted). Today we have two of the three new probies recently assigned to 88 working due to manpower turnover...a couple of members were recently promoted and another member became a fire marshal leaving us a few vacancies on the roster. The three probies are affectionately tagged; “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”...(their new found names are interchangeable and substituted for the suitable condition at the time)... I fire up the 1980 American LaFrance pumper, right turn out of quarters onto Belmont Avenue against light traffic, left on 182, cross over Crotona Avenue and make the left onto Prospect. I slow the rig down after crossing 183 as we “eyeball” the surrounding landscape to see if there is any activity that would warrant our help. I approach 185, the ERS box is on the left of the sidewalk, I observe nobody standing there….Then... “Hel-lo!” I say...“On the left Cap, ground floor rear” of a partially occupied six story apartment building, we have two windows of flame lapping out. As I pull the rig to the hydrant on the corner, Captain TT transmits the 10-75, I transfer the driveshaft into pump while TT bounds out of the cab…(I notice) he turns, does a double-take and eyeballs  the two probies hopping out of the cab ready for action, eagerly awaiting for direction from their leader, out of his mouth...the Cap orders... “FIRST THING, GET RID OF THOSE MASKS”!

Ah yes, the more things change, the more they stay the same...

SIDENOTE: I met two lifelong buddies during my time in 88. Marty O and Ed K (who would go on to become B2 Commander). I am thankful and grateful to have two wonderful buddies like them. We have lunch regularly and speak passionately about our Glory Days, although Chief Ed was on the other side of TT friendliness during his tenure.

WTC GROUND ZERO

Long after TT retired, my other good buddy Marty O from 88 years ago and I  pulled TT out of retirement to assist with recovery at Ground Zero, TT’s wife had passed away and he was alone in his Riverdale apartment. He spent many days at the site working side by side raking and searching the broken down ruins of the WTC wearing brown Carhartt overalls, sometimes his 88 helmet or a white hard hat with Marine Corps emblem...Exhausted,  at the end of the day we would grab a quick bite at the Red Cross tent (aka The Taj Mahal). TT would sit with buffs and rescue workers from out of town and other states and chat away, little did they know the notorious TT they were dining with. Furthermore, he charmed the little ol’ Red Cross ladies, they plied him with “take out buffet... including extra desserts!”...

Timmy and I  were together on the final day of recovery operations May 2002 and stayed in touch thereafter, even going out to dinner on occasion, always the gentleman...my wife loved him!  I did too…

FINAL THOUGHTS

I remember my first days with the Captain reverently, he was spirited and old-schooled and I appreciated that. I recall watching from the front seat of Ladder 31 as a teen these “War Year Heroes” and yearned to be one of them. If part of that was learning to fight the red devil the old-school way down and dirty, I was all in. And what better opportunity than to be alongside with the “toughest!”... Since the first day I started to work with TT I learned first hand the valuable skills within an unimaginable work experience...I couldn’t help but think how fortunate I was being assigned to 88 and his groups. I am thankful that you were my boss. TT taught me to never take any part of the job for granted and is one of the reasons why I always tried my best, you were truly an inspiration. Thank you for guiding me professionally and personally, I learned a great deal from you. I would proudly carry what I have learned there on Belmont Avenue with you throughout my career, forever grateful.

I will forever appreciate everything deeply and will remember my time with Tough Timmy fondly. He was wild, he broke all the rules...Rest in eternal peace Boss, nobody was as lucky as I was to work alongside you... (November 13, 2015)


« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 07:33:47 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline jkal

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 31
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #110 on: May 12, 2019, 07:56:10 PM »
Danny,  Timmy was the True War Years Legend, among many.  Their respect for our Job gave us the guidance to respect it the same.  I loved Timmy (as I did all the South Bx guys who broke me in) and can see him down at the Pit, doing what he did best, being with the Brothers.  What you have written will become folklore to his life and will carry on forever.  I look back to the Senior Firemen that I have worked with in 48 Truck, 59 Truck and TL-111 and could go on forever about them.  One in particular, Kenny C, the Duke, from 111.  J. Gordon Bennet and Archer award winning Fireman. Since I cooked all the time in 111 and Kenny was in my groups, he didn't really like my Italian flair of cooking.  I asked him what he wanted, he said steak.  So when I went shopping for the meal on Long Island, since there was really no place to do so in Bed-Stuy and I would bring the meal in with me, I would get Kenny a steak. I would make that for him because I wanted him to eat with us.  The meal is Very important in the Firehouse.  One of the other (lesser) members of the Truck complained to me that I didn't bring him a steak too.  I told him you are Not the Duke. I would be turning the stove off and trying to get my gear on and would be running to the rig on Hancock St to not miss the run that just came in. As they used to say in the old TV show, Naked City.  There are 8 million people in NY and 8 million stories. 
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 07:59:20 PM by jkal »

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4997
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #111 on: May 12, 2019, 08:02:53 PM »
 Captain Gallagher, May You Rest in Peace. Thank you for your service to the City of New York during their toughest years. As told here, you were an inspiration to the members who worked with you. You were a "Firefighters - Firefighter". Captain Gallagher, you served your purpose well.

 Thank you to our friend Retired FDNY Dan Potter for telling us the story of working with you.

 I'm sure I saw you fighting fires in some of those Bronx neighborhoods many years ago. But I wish that I was able to meet you.

 Some people say that "we will meet again". Well Cap, if that's true, when my time comes, "I hope I get the chance to meet you then". 

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10676
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #112 on: May 13, 2019, 12:54:29 AM »
Well written Dan....CPT TIMMY was a MAN among Men...a True FDNY Legend....GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN. ....RESPECT DUE !

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5827
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #113 on: May 14, 2019, 04:16:51 PM »
... I look back to the Senior Firemen that I have worked with in 48 Truck, 59 Truck and TL-111 and could go on forever about them.  One in particular, Kenny C, the Duke, from 111.  J. Gordon Bennet and Archer award winning Fireman...

FF Kenny Connelly

     


     

     

     

Offline jkal

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 31
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #114 on: May 14, 2019, 05:50:34 PM »
Yes, that's the Duke along with Mr J.  Both of them went to Medal Day that year.  Thanks for posting because otherwise Nobody would know.  The current Captain of TL-58, a long time BX guy may have been working when Captain TT made his grab the same year.  It was toss up for the Medal Board that year for unbelievable Firemen making spectacular rescues and who would get the Highest Honor.   The Bennet went to Kenny and the Brooklyn guys probably thought it was deserved.  I was working in the BX at the time and didn't have a "horse" in the race".  I am sure the BX guys thought Captain Timothy Gallagher deserved the Bennet.  But at the end of the day, We, the Brothers, know who did what and if people lived, we have fulfilled our oath to save them.  The Highest compliment the Firemen, the Brothers, can bestow on each other is,  "He is a Good Fireman"...

Offline mack

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5827
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #115 on: May 14, 2019, 06:51:31 PM »
Yes, that's the Duke along with Mr J.  Both of them went to Medal Day that year.  Thanks for posting because otherwise Nobody would know.  The current Captain of TL-58, a long time BX guy may have been working when Captain TT made his grab the same year.  It was toss up for the Medal Board that year for unbelievable Firemen making spectacular rescues and who would get the Highest Honor.   The Bennet went to Kenny and the Brooklyn guys probably thought it was deserved.  I was working in the BX at the time and didn't have a "horse" in the race".  I am sure the BX guys thought Captain Timothy Gallagher deserved the Bennet.  But at the end of the day, We, the Brothers, know who did what and if people lived, we have fulfilled our oath to save them.  The Highest compliment the Firemen, the Brothers, can bestow on each other is,  "He is a Good Fireman"...




Offline JohnnyGage

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 153
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #116 on: May 14, 2019, 07:45:39 PM »
Great "Duke" story, thanks mack for posting... L 111 had some of the finest firefighters on our job...you could bet "The Nut House" would have one or two medal  winners celebrate Medal Day every year....

Da Prince was on the nob for TT's grab. (L38 meal prep...Da Prince, John Koller (Medal Recipient / RIP), JohnnyGage. There is a fun story coming soon about this meal).


« Last Edit: May 14, 2019, 08:13:30 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10676
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #117 on: May 14, 2019, 09:18:24 PM »
Third from the right is Bob Johnson's Son ...he is a Chauf. in LAD*167 i see him around the neighborhood often.....   https://www.facebook.com/FDNY/photos/a.316291185728/10156778898495729/?type=3&__tn__=-R

Offline scoobyd

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 291
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #118 on: May 14, 2019, 10:03:58 PM »
An old timey photo of Da Prince standing over his favorite meal.  Might be worth something.

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 153
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #119 on: May 15, 2019, 10:05:12 PM »
MONGOMAN & CHING-A-LINGS

In addition to the many ADV fires we responded to outside rubbish fires, mongo fires and burn barrels.

Some outside rubbish fires could be huge mountains of stinky, foul garbage and debris that would be tedious and tiresome work; wet garbage down, pull hot spots, wet garbage down, repeat for an hour or so. Other Bronx companies would blast the mountain of garbage with the deck gun, a little hydraulic overhauling.

Mongo fires were many, too. “Mongoman” we used to call them, years ago they would have been called the “Junkman”. Mongoman would find a vacant lot and burn the tires for their steel belts, plastic coating of wires, car seats, mattresses for the recyclable scrap metal and brought to a junkie weigh station for cash. The rubber tires and  wire coating material would create ominous billows of ugly black smoke which look threatening and smelled awful, local residents would tolerate the Mongoman just for-so-long... And then the fire department would be called. This little game would be played out almost daily in many parts of the City.

A  late hot summer afternoon we receive a phone alarm for a “barrel fire” on Arthur Avenue in the vicinity of 180 Street, we know this “barrel” well, the barrel fire is not the first. It sits across the street on Arthur Avenue in a vacant lot opposite the Puerto Rican motorcycle gang known as the “Ching-A- Ling’s”,  a bike gang that was formed in 1966 with their headquarters on Arthur Avenue in a vacant building that they “illegally” occupy. When the Engine pulls up two bike members wearing leather vests adorned with their motorcycle logo are standing on the front doorway stoop in front of their headquarters building. There is loud music playing from within the structure. The two “sentries” seem uninterested in our presence.

The boss in Engine 88 today is  Lt. Kevin L...Lt. L is laid back, always calm... never in a rush for anything, I don’t think I have ever seen him upset...he has a que sera, sera... la-de-da persona. Today the boss appears unusually agitated as we stretch the booster into the middle of the vacant lot over rubbish and debris and extinguish the barrel fire for the umpteenth time. It doesn’t take us two minutes and we crank the booster hose back up. Just before we mount the apparatus and take up, Lt. L approaches the two gang members on the steps, they hardly look up, they express no concern. Lt. L tells them: “the barrel fire needs to stop, we can’t keep running back and forth for this bull$hit everyday”....Still the two gang members hardly pay the boss much attention until the boss clearly states, “You see these motorcycles lined up here? The next time I come down the block for this barrel fire (Lt. L points to the rig) I am going to have this big red fire engine run over everyone of them”... With that the boss turns back to the apparatus and we return to quarters.

I don’t recall going back to the barrel for a couple of days, but it did not stop... anyway...who were we kidding?
Thanks for reading! Hope you enjoyed....  KMG-365



« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 02:42:11 PM by JohnnyGage »