Author Topic: GLORY DAYS  (Read 183931 times)

Offline 811

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #120 on: May 16, 2019, 06:33:38 PM »
Fr. Kenavan's E228 death (Reply 108) was a long open stretch beside Green-Wood Cemetery. HQ took no specific action on responses afterward, however Brooklyn Chief Dispatcher Ramsey did issue orders that any further responses to that area (Box 1488) would require a minimum of 1x1.  Interestingly E282 (L148) would have been first due at the location of the ADV, but E228 [normally second due] got it as a verbal and was already on the way
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 06:37:47 PM by 811 »

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #120 on: May 16, 2019, 06:33:38 PM »

Offline turk132

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #121 on: May 17, 2019, 10:50:43 AM »
Box 3310,  on the corner of Webster Ave and E 184th Street, was a chronic false alarm response. As you made your way to the Engine, you would hear a shout from someone in the Truck... “Send out the scouts”. It was one long block from the firehouse at 187 St and Webster Ave. to  Box 3310 and the Engine would make the trip, check the area, rewind and reset the Box and transmit the 10-92. If you sat on the Chauffeur's side, you would get off the rig, get the keys from the chauffeur and R&R the Box.  As you did this, you might see the truck coming down Webster Ave., or it would be on the firehouse apron or you wouldn't see it at all. As the weather got warmer and the running picked up, it was a good bet that the  first run of the 6x9 tour would be there. When the 10-92's at 3310 were in full swing , one very intense ECC would hop off the rig, grab the can of grease, and smear it all over the handle. (One time we got the Box for rubbish, as we were putting it out a guy came up to me and put his  hand out and said “ There's stuff all over the alarm box”... What could I say) Another time this same chauffeur got off the rig, gloves on, picked up a pile of dog crap and wiped it all over the face of the Box. The one block bound by 184 St and 183 St from Webster Ave to Park Ave had one vacant tenement on the corner of 184 and Park Ave, nothing else. It was 5 stories, with a store front on the Park Ave side and was wide open. Middle of the summer, it is sweltering, it's the start of the night tour and on queue our first run, Box 3310. I am sitting in the spot so when we get there I get off the Engine, grab the keys and R&R the Box.(the Truck made it to the Box also) As we reach the corner of Park Ave and 184 St, an unbelievable stench filled the cab of the Engine. A resounding “Holy Sh*t, what is that” was heard through the rig. A huge pile of boxes and crates covered  part of the street, the sidewalk and spilled into the vacant storefront. What was in them... rotting fruits and vegetables...putrid. It was not a few, had to be a tractor trailer load, at least. A half hour later, we are heading back there, this time as I R&R the Box, I see a guy waving to us up on Park Ave. His problem... the terrible smell and what are we going to do about it. Our third trip there, more people in the street and at the windows of the MD on the corner, all screaming about the unbearable smell. On the rig one member commented, “I wonder how many times we will be back here” ; another said “ Let's start a pool”. My gut told me this was going to end. The sun had set and Box 3310 was in again. The Engine made the left on 184 St from Webster Ave but didn't stop at the Box...ahead on Park Ave orange filled the street. The whole pile, every box and crate, was on fire and the flames were as high as the 2nd floor. We stretched and knocked it down, probably spent a good 45 minutes wetting it down and trudging through the slop. The fire, all the water we used, and the cooler night gave the people the wanted relief from the smell and kept us from Box 3310 for the remainder of the night tour. My next night tour working, Box 3310 was our first run, amazingly the huge mess had been cleaned up, just a 10-92. Good times.....

Offline mack

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #122 on: May 17, 2019, 02:18:32 PM »
Fr. Kenavan's E228 death (Reply 108) was a long open stretch beside Green-Wood Cemetery. HQ took no specific action on responses afterward, however Brooklyn Chief Dispatcher Ramsey did issue orders that any further responses to that area (Box 1488) would require a minimum of 1x1.  Interestingly E282 (L148) would have been first due at the location of the ADV, but E228 [normally second due] got it as a verbal and was already on the way

     FF Joseph Kenavan, Box 5-1488-228, January 25, 1976  FF Kenavan was killed by a drunk driver while extinguishing a car fire.  Driver also injured other members of Engine 228.

     


Online nfd2004

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #123 on: May 18, 2019, 08:56:01 AM »
 You guys, "Turk132", "*******", "jbendick", "68jk09", "8060Rock", "jkal", "JohnnyGage" along with the many others who took part in those Glory Days, "MUST" have seen me in the streets then. Sometimes I was down there by myself, park the car, and go charging up the street with scanner and camera in hand.

 The neighborhood citizens must have thought I was "nuts" for being there. Those streets were nasty and sometimes a dangerous place to be. Some of the people thought I was from the NEWS and would yell to me, "Hey newsman, take my picture". Maybe that's what kept me alive. Sometimes, I was alone, but for some reason, nobody bothered me or even touched my car. Maybe the fact that some felt I didn't have all my marbles in the right place, that gave me the right to be there without becoming a victim.

 As I mentioned many times on this web site, watching you guys work in places like the South Bronx, the West Bronx, Harlem, Washington Heights, Bushwick, Bed Sty, Brownsville, Williamsburg, not only taught me about the job but about life in general. Maybe it was also how to survive in a War Zone, right here in America. Only a few miles from the very rich and famous of Manhattan.

 I appreciate all of these stories. Even as a Buff, they really were the Glory Days. From what I saw, the moral was the "highest" I ever saw in any department. Whenever I was invited into the firehouse, the guys treated me great.

 To many of the guys here, I'm sure we met a long time ago. We just don't know it.

 I remember seeing guys ride the back step. I remember the smells. I remember those Glory Days that you guys talk about. Yes, they were the Glory Days. But they were the "GREAT Days" too.

 I just happened to go to the "School - of Glory Days". Best school around about life and fighting fires.

Offline turk132

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #124 on: May 18, 2019, 09:44:02 AM »
Drilling at 184 and Park......


Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #125 on: May 18, 2019, 05:10:20 PM »
Handi Talkie Radio Transmission...you can't make this up...
Scene; L 112 and L 135 sitting on wires down, beautiful spring Sunday morning, just before change of tours....L 135 is first due.

Someone from L 135 to Battalion; "Hey, Chief, I'm a electrician on the side, I can tape these wires up and we can all be out'er here..."
Battalion Chief to whoever; "Wha? who is this?...negative keep your fat a$$ away, we're awaiting Con-Ed."
« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 06:06:16 PM by JohnnyGage »

Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #126 on: May 18, 2019, 05:14:44 PM »
PROFILE; Gary T (L 112)

Firefighter Gary T, is a tough, lean firefighting machine. Give Gary a short handle mall and he would fight his way into the core of the earth. The small handle mall was Gary’s favorite tool...forget the back of an ax, or a sledge hammer...Gary could do more with less by rapid fire strikes of the tool. Gary is a hard working sandhog on his off time, he is of Polish descent (add favorite sandhog/Polish joke here). His hands are hard and calloused but he was super good natured and took every joke and prank in stride, Gary even laughed hard. When Gary partied, not often, but when he did, he partied hard, too.

There was a time when the FDNY gave up the group chart and we were working another chart that had a “mini vacation” implemented. Gary came into the firehouse from a shift from the water tunnel construction, he was beat tired and dusty... What he did not realize was he is to start the assigned “mini vacation” giving him five days or so off. Instead of leaving the firehouse, Gary poured himself a cup of coffee in a two stubbed broken handle mug and sat upright in the corner of the dining room on a blue plastic chair with one leg crossed over the other. Gary did not get a chance to sip his coffee, his head slumped forward and nodded off in the upright position, he remained in that position despite all the noise of a firehouse for twenty four hours. We knew he was exhausted, we were careful not to disturb him, we checked on him often...he did not move. His wife called a few times to check on his well being, we told her he was “safe and sound” and she was satisfied that he was secured and did not want us to bother him. The following morning, Gary woke from slumber, poured a fresh cup of coffee and went home.

Gary was also proud of his green thumb and his “square foot garden” that he had in the back of his Greenpoint home. Gary loved to talk gardening and was boasting about his tomatoes.

He brought in a sack of tomatoes one night tour. They were big, ripe and beautiful, the size of a softball, crimson red without a blemish...these should be on the cover of some gardening magazine!...you sure are a Mr. Green Jeans, the Farmer in the Dell!...We discussed a meal and decided to incorporate Gary's tomatoes into a nice tomato salad with onions, slightly tossed with balsamic vinegar...the works. But they were to juicy looking to pass up right now for a little nosh...we quartered two good looking ‘maters, a few of us popped those red ripe slices into our mouths....just then we all looked at each other, our faces twisted and contorted as if we bit into a duracell battery, and spit them into the trash can. “Gary, WTF, they are inedible”....We found out later that Gary fed his tomatoes twice a day with extra strength “miracle grow” increasing the acidity to a new meaning of toxic.

Thanks for reading, hope you enjoyed...10,000 views! WOW, thanks!    KMG-365



Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #127 on: May 18, 2019, 05:35:36 PM »
Drilling at 184 and Park......


Thanks Turk132, great photo!...Cutting sequence for a "Coffin Cut"*: first the top of a "7" (about 4'), then your second cut is the "knockout" (a small angle cut across the top of the 7 and across the next downward cut of the back of the 7, about 8' long) followed by making the 7 into a "9", then making the 9 into an "8"... pull accordingly!

* Coffin cut; as explained by Captain Farrell L 31 who helped create the Power Saw training bullitin. The cut was designed as a "coffin cut", 4x8', powers to be wanted him to change the name from coffin cut..but he couldn't...his LCC at the time the famous War Years Vet Jerry Albert, who smoked 4 packs of cigs a day would be coughing while he was making the cut, "Coughin' Cut"..the name stayed!
« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 07:45:09 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline 68jk09

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #128 on: May 18, 2019, 05:40:41 PM »
Johny G your reply 125 above regarding cutting wires reminded me of a long ago story involving a BROTHER who is no longer with us .....RET FF PHILLIP MAHANEY....   http://obits.silive.com/obituaries/siadvance/obituary.aspx?n=philip-mahaney&pid=186273410       REST IN PEACE BROTHER.....THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE BOTH MILITARY (US ARMY) & FDNY......PRAYERS FOR THE COMFORT OF THE FAMILIES..... As a Cov Lt in R*5 late '80s i had the pleasure of having Phil as the Rescue Chauf on several occasions....as said in his Obit he was a very capable man....i remember one night we were at a job in a Queen Anne.....the Fire was in several areas all starting in the walls due to an electrical issue....we tried shutting power in the basement in the normal manner but the lines remained charged & the Fire continued to extend & it seemed like we were going to lose the whole bldg & there was no ETA for the Utility Company.....i thought about cutting the service where it entered the box in the basement since it was raining outside.....i went outside to tell the Chief & get electrical cutters as i was telling the Chief (with my back to the bldg) the Chief suddenly went WTF ? ...i turned to see what he was looking at & Phil (who unbeknown to me was a Licensed Electrician) was standing on the porch roof w/a small pair of cutters separating & cutting the service eliminating the problem......always a pleasure to work with....his Twin Brother Pat was also OTJ.

Offline turk132

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #129 on: May 19, 2019, 07:30:25 PM »
Drilling at 184 and Park......


Thanks Turk132, great photo!...Cutting sequence for a "Coffin Cut"*: first the top of a "7" (about 3'), then your second cut is the "knockout" (a small angle cut across the top of the 7 and across the next downward cut of the back of the 7, about 6' long) followed by making the 7 into a "9", then making the 9 into an "8"... pull accordingly!

* Coffin cut; as explained by Captain Farrell L 31 who helped create the Power Saw training bullitin. The cut was designed as a "coffin cut", 3x6', powers to be wanted him to change the name from coffin cut..but he couldn't...his LCC at the time the famous War Years Vet Jerry Albert would be coughing while he was making the cut....the name stayed!

The finished product......



Offline 68jk09

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #130 on: May 21, 2019, 04:37:12 AM »
SOME INTERESTING PHOTOS FROM YESTERYEAR INCLUDING SOME VERY RARE RIG SHOTS.... some have been previously posted as individual photos on some sites & some were not.... i will flag a few ...0.20 min 2nd from left nycfire.net Site Admin RET CPT John Bendick as a
FF in ENG*75..... 0.35 LAD*120 & SQ*4 behind them in the forefront of the shot on a Brownsville St. early 1970's ......1:20 our old 1981 Mack that we were forced to re use due to demands by the community to make everything the same as when ENG*41 was closed before the Unit was closed .... the shot is shown IFO of Qtrs along w/every box that we could bolt on to carry all our equipment instead of an available Compartmented 1987 Mack .... 1:22 SQ*41 in our opening days July 1990 left to right FF Tony LaMagna ..FF Bill Flynn..FF Ken Kassman... ME ...FF John Halpin ..FF Kevin Donovan..... 1:29 ENG*310 w/one of the two Squirts..the other was originally assigned to ENG*71 (then to ENG*43 ?).....2:11 one of the only two Mack RMs the other was LAD*132 (i had worked my first day tour as a Covering LT in 290 then my first night tour as a Covering LT in 132 w/FF Lenny Johnson driving the Mack RM)......2:32 R*2 with the last "walk thru" Mack Rescue Rig a 1967 pulling out of Qtrs W/210 at 160 Carlton Ave bet Myrtle & Willoughby Aves when the block was still mostly occupied.... 2.55 Mack High Ladder w/ the original 144 ft Magirus Aerial (later retrofitted w/100 ft Grove Aerials & assigned to TCU 712 & 731..... 3:04 the only FDNY American La France RM it was a 1969 & originally a Demo offered for trial to the FDNY & Maroon in color & assigned to TCU*732 when they responded from ENG*277 on Knickerbocker Ave then later after an FDNY purchase was repainted traditional FDNY Red by our Shops & later after the TCUs were disbanded it was assigned to LAD*176 when they were organized in The BKLYN Tin House w/ENG*232 on Rockaway Ave & Bergen St...(i had a mid tour detail to drive it one night due to the Chauf. being injured ...very powerful w/ 4 on the floor & a very loud Jake Brake plus one of the first real Federal Q Sirens in the FDNY ).....PS the 1969 ALF was the first FDNY RM.... the next was a Seagrave & went to LAD*27-2 & also had only two covered jump seats...the Job never bought anymore ALF RMs but after the original Seagrave for 27-2 which was later assigned to LAD*10 all the following Seagrave RMs starting in 1970 had fully enclosed riding positions but when the adaptive response started there was no inside riding position for the extra FF so our Shops cut out a Compartment midway on the Officers side & made a "phone booth" w/a rear facing seat on the original 1970 RMs & awhile after that Seagrave then incorporated the design into all their future Rigs for many years until the Staffing was again cut back negating the need for an extra enclosed riding position... .3:24 a shot of LAD*102 with the old Phone Booth riding position which some LADs used for the Can Man & some for the Roof Man ..... 0:32 a shot of SQ*1's ALF with the first experimental "roof painted white" to make a Rig cooler inside w/out A/C.. = BS..... 3:36 a shot of the BX Tin House Boston Road & 169 St formerly War Years ENG*85 RIP & LAD*59.. now an EMS Station as is the BKLYN Tin House..... 3:53 a shot of the disbanded ENG*278 RIP....4:12 ENG*70 equipped w/a retrofitted short Aerial Ladder ( a former Squirt Rig ?)..this Rig was used on City Island as a hair brained idea during the period LAD*53 had been disbanded.....   https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=BCtRC7EfaRI

« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 04:40:38 AM by 68jk09 »

Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #131 on: May 22, 2019, 08:09:46 PM »
PARTNER SAWS

As you can see from the photo that turk132 posted, the firefighter cutting with saw is a southpaw! Starting a K-12 could be awkward for lefties because the “pull start” cord was on the left side of the saw. For safety reasons the saw was laid flat on a solid surface, flip up red cut off button and blue choke button, pull up the finger throttle trigger and lock it in place with palm of your hand. Insert LEFT foot into the trigger handle (back in the Glory Days before bunker gear, most Roofmen would wear black work boots, I certainly did. Wearing bunker styled boots makes this a little tricky), right foot back to stabilize, left hand firmly grasp crossbar with a straight forearm. Reach over and pull the “T Handle” start cord. That position was also the way you would cut, you did not straddle the cut.  Of course many of us “Roofmen” would just “drop start” the saw, although this practice was not condone by the higher ups. THe starting of the saw sequence is designed for right handed firefighters, I guess those who prepared this evolution never considered southpaws!

(That reminds me, my friend told his wife...should he die, she should date other men and go on with her life, in fact he could even have his golf clubs!....She said, forget about it, he’s a lefty.)


The saws were checked at the beginning of every  tour, usually by the junior man who would take the saw in front of quarters and fire it up, let it run for a minute or two then put it away. Gunning the saw was frowned upon, an unnecessary and unsafe action. Whenever I had the roof, and especially as a LCC I would join the junior member preparing to inspect the saw. I might pepper him with a question or two about the saw, see how quickly he could change a blade and maybe quiz him on saw cuts. I would also help him “tension” the belt that drove the saw blade.

According to Retired Captain Bob Farrell of L 31 “Fires in the Bronx on Facebook” collection the K-12 saw was originally designed for street work. The saw was manufactured in Sweden, the “K” represented “Kutter” and the 12 was the blade size dimension. Hence K-12. Kutter later became Husqvarna. The K-12 saw beat out other saws that were tested by Ladder 31 in the Bronx. The concept was to use them for ventilation purposes on “H” styled apartment houses, where they were plentiful. The K-12 was the only saw that would operate in a smoke environment. Originally only Rescue Companies had saws, then shortly 200 were ordered for truck companies.

Truck companies had three types of blades for the saw. The carbide tip was for cutting wood and mainly used for roof cutting operations. The blade was inspected daily to make sure all the tips were attached, if (I recall correctly) 6 tips were missing the blade was taken out of service.

The aluminum oxide was for cutting metal. The difference between the wood saw and metal saw, the wood saw you would rev to full throttle before cut. Whereas the aluminum oxide blade you started the cut slow, then revved up to full throttle after you got a bite. These blades worked great on roll down gates and padlocks.

And the third was seldom used, called Silicon Oxide, used for masonry and concrete cuts. We painted this blade yellow as to differentiate from the aluminum oxide blade.

Basically the Roofman made two types of cuts. First was the “Coffin Cut”. These cuts were made on flat roofs. The cuts were made during the growth stage of fire to alleviate smoke buildup and heat on the top floor and inside the fire building. The cuts were 4 feet by 8 feet (originally Capt Farrell suggested the 3’x8’ cut...theoretically a chief stated that a 24 square foot  opening was necessary to prevent a smoke explosion in a cockloft), cut in a 7-9-8 pattern as depicted above in turk132’s photos. Before cutting, the Roofman would take a quick look as to where the fire apartment was, he would guesstimate that his cut would cover two rooms below when the roof material was pulled. Once the coffin cut was completed and the knockout pulled, the rest of the cut would be pulled in one 4x4’ piece. Many times this would create a heavy fire condition emanating from the hole. If just smoke came out, we would use the cut roof planks to push down the ceiling below...it was easier and more productive than using the hook. If I had a dime for the many times I did this operation I could have bought Willy his own White Castle.

The other cut, much seldom used, but very helpful when warranted was the “Trench Cut”. The trench cut was a defensive maneuver to prevent the fire in the cockloft from extending from one wing of a building to another, or to localize the fire in one wing of a “H” type non-fireproof building. A cut, 3 feet wide would traverse the roof from one point to the other, usually where the roof has the least width. After completing the trench which was not pulled, observation holes were made ahead of the trench toward the fire. Observation holes were made by just dropping the blade into the roof surface, making a small triangle hole...When fire arrived at the observation holes, the trench was pulled, the ceiling below completely opened, windows on the top floor opened to prevent the fire from jumping through the trench to the unexposed side. Different from a ventilation hole, a handline with a bent tip could be deployed into the opening as a stop gap measure of the advancing fire. Hopefully containing the fire and preventing the fire from communicating to the other wing.

I remember a cutting operation assigned to L 112. We were operating at a fire near the “Nut House”, L 111, it had to be one of the coldest, blustery days I have ever worked, cold just went right through you. I had done some extensive overhauling roof cuts along with a member of 111. The fire was out, the Chief told the Boss of L 112 to “take up, good job”. Boss called me on the handi talkie that we were taking up, “10-4, be right there”... just then a member of L 111 inside the bucket says, “Hey Johnny, come in the bucket, we’ll take you down”. Cool I thought, I would not have to carry the saw and my tools six flights down an icy staircase. “Thanks, Bro, much appreciated” as I climbed into the basket with my tools. The basket pulled from the building, started to rotate clear of the building when the chief ordered; “L 111, finish washing down the building from the top down, make sure you catch all the hot spots...here comes your water”. “Fudge” I said to me-self (actually not fudge). I was stuck in the freezing cold bucket for another half hour delaying our company’s return to a warm comfy firehouse. When I got back to 112”s rig, there were some unhappy campers that gave me the “stink eye”...

Thanks for reading! Hope you enjoyed!"   KMG-365

Photos by Mike Dick (hope you don't mind me using these outstanding clips, Mike...Thank you)







« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 09:41:42 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline Signal73

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #132 on: May 22, 2019, 08:31:58 PM »
Willy D asked me to post these







Remember to take it coming in

Offline 8060rock

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #133 on: May 23, 2019, 02:23:21 PM »
Just reading today's Dept. Orders - coverage for Officer medical leave - brings to mind the first and maybe only time I can recall working out of title - early in the night tour Lt. goes on ML after a job - no surplus Lts. and I end up as act. Lt. - much later that tour we catch a 1st due job, in spite of my "leadership", as always the guys do a good job - that morning the kitchen discussion is of course about the job with the act. Lt. in E80 - I'm strutting around telling all that will listen about what can be done at a job when there is great leadership - for those who have ever been in a firehouse kitchen, as expected, I was shouted down in mere seconds - mind you, the 5th Div. was still in quarters with us at the time and the DC who worked that night tour came into the kitchen - he joined in the cascade of "accolades" being thrown my way - if I remember, he said that he was thinking of transmitting a 2nd alarm due to the act. Lt. in the 1st due engine - all said in humor, "I think"! We didn't know him that well - Chief Harry W. had recently been "sent" from the Bronx 6th Div. to the 5th Div. in Harlem - for those who remember - shortly after his run-in with E42/L56, when both companies were on Monroe Ave. - I don't want to get into that story - but he wasn't a bad guy when he came to Harlem (DC Harry W. RIP). 
« Last Edit: May 23, 2019, 02:26:01 PM by 8060rock »

Offline JohnnyGage

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Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #134 on: May 25, 2019, 06:52:05 PM »
ROOFMAN; Part 1

“Johnny, you got the roof today”. That simple statement comes with a lot of responsibility not to be taken for granted. It comes with decisive decisions that you have to make quickly on your own, it comes with a personal responsibility and resolve that nothing will deter your achievement of making it to the roof, begin ventilation for the sake of the ground troops and trapped civilians unable to escape. The job requires experience, stamina, focus, determination and smarts. It is a very responsible position. It also conveys trust, faith and respect from your company officer knowing the mission assigned to the Roofman will be fulfilled. 

Other than Ladder Company Chauffeur (LCC) there are four positions in the truck company. The inside team; which consists of a “Can Man” and “Irons Man”, this team, along with the truck boss is responsible for locating the fire, force entry, primary search and remove any incapacitated victims and contain the fire until a hoseline gets in place. Each carry prescribed tools for their positions. The inside team rides on the officer side of the truck, usually with the “Can Man” riding backwards. The "Can Man" is usually the junior member working this tour, or sometimes a detail from another company. The outside team is the “Outside Vent Man” or OVM (or OV) and the “Roofman”. Both generally operate independently with assigned portable radios, unless, the fire is on the top floor. Theoretically the OVM and Roofman will team up with the second due ladder truck members who are assigned the same positions. The OVM is usually the tillerman on tractor trailer ladder trucks.

Basically the OVM operates from a fire escape opposite the fire location, mostly in the rear ( NOTE: The OVM position is far more complicated to just reduce into simple sentences), he forces the window of any obstructions and attempts to enter the apartment on fire to, vent and search... removing any victim that may be trapped between the hoseline and outside refuge. The OVM is a very demanding and laborious position, just trying to get to the rear of a building could be extremely challenging... the OVM may have to hop over fences, climb over garbage, deal with dogs...get to the rear fire escape drop ladder and hopefully get the rusted ladder to drop...climb the upright ladder, overcome obstructions on the fire escape and force open window gates... for starters!

The Roofmans job is to get to the roof as quickly as possible, especially on flat roof buildings where smoke, heat and lethal gases will begin to collect on the top floor and make its way down, suffocating anyone above the fire. Each truck position requires the firefighter to carry a certain tool and to be in a specific location. The first due company operates on the fire floor and the second due company generally operates on the floors above. Different type of buildings or emergencies dictate how truck positions may differentiate... buildings such as taxpayers, Queen Annes, row frames, private dwellings, high rise fireproof, and emergencies involving the subway will require different truck tasks and responsibilities from the typical ubiquitous Bronx apartment house tasks. The outside team rode behind the LCC with the “Roofman” on the door...riding this way the Roofman could do a quick size-up of the building upon entering the street.

In proby school, rudimentary truck work was touched on, as to educate and acquaint students in the full essence of truck work would take years of experience to understand all the unique possibilities and circumstances that affect truck work. One tenet implied at proby school and drilled into us about the Roofman position was that “nothing shall deter the Roofman of attaining his position”, meaning that no matter what is happening at the scene, the Roofman should not get involved or be distracted with another task, no matter the reason...but to achieve his mission of getting to the roof, and perform his assigned duties.

We are fortunate on this network, I am aware of  two very highly respected and distinguished truck bosses that have had remarkable Truck Company careers. I had the privilege of working with both. Captain “Jkal”...John C, the longest tenure Captain of the very prestigious L 120 for many years; Watkins Street... “Where the tradition continues”. The other was my boss, Lieutenant “TK” of L 112. Tom K,  was very well respected by the troops in a tough “No Frills” truck company. Both officers have been recipients of Department wide recognition on Medal Day. I am sure there are other well respected truck officers on this site, and I would invite them to share their thoughts and background concerning truck work. Jkal will tell you that truck work is a very special skill that takes time (years in fact) and experience before you fully understand and appreciate the nuances involved becoming a successful truckie. Jkal is absolutely correct.

Thanks for reading, hope you enjoyed!   KMG-365

Part 2: “ROOFMAN”...“Roof-FLOP-man”.

« Last Edit: May 25, 2019, 07:04:02 PM by JohnnyGage »