Author Topic: GLORY DAYS  (Read 26121 times)

Offline ladder197

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 190
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #210 on: August 13, 2019, 07:18:53 PM »
Chief that made me laugh. Thanks for sharing

Nycfire.net

Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #210 on: August 13, 2019, 07:18:53 PM »

Offline CFDMarshal

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #211 on: August 14, 2019, 08:10:51 AM »
I guess we now know the real Count of Monte Cristo!

Online JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #212 on: August 14, 2019, 09:23:29 AM »
....and there it is...


Offline raybrag

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #213 on: August 14, 2019, 12:23:45 PM »
There are actually 2 versions of the Monte Cristo, Dan.  The one you pictured is the one I'm most familiar with . . . basically a ham & cheese sandwich that is dipped in batter and then deep fried.  Served with powdered sugar and raspberry preserves.  The one Chief JK described is the other version (pictured below).  Maybe a little bit easier to put together, but probably just as good (especially if you add the raspberry jelly), and just as deadly on the digestive system.  As for you, Chief . . . payback's a bitch, ain't it?



And Willy, stop drooling.  It puts a Big Mac to shame any day.
Ray Braguglia
Newport News VA


Offline fdce54

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 879
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #214 on: August 14, 2019, 02:53:26 PM »
Willy would eat us all under the table without blinking an eye.

Online JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #215 on: August 14, 2019, 03:35:31 PM »
My top three favorite sandwiches while OTJ;

3: During 9/11 recovery stage days at the WTC there was a "volunteer" walking around the pile with a satchel of P&Js that a scout organization put together with the jelly weeping through the white bread just like my school days. The P&J was perfect and delicious and not a moment too soon!
2: Jimmy Amato (RIP 9/11) covered a day tour in L 112. We broke down sausages from their casings, pressed them together to make patties. He had a home made type mayo slathered on a seeded bun, fresh romain lettuce, lightly squeezed lemon and raw onion. Outrageous.
1: Early 90's the city and FD brass was making radical changes to the FDNY including closing down fire companies...in protest thousands of off duty firefighters wearing turnout coat and helmet walked across the Brooklyn Bridge from Brooklyn to Manhattan in protest. When we arrived on the other side the protest disbursed and we headed straight to the local gin mill. One guy ordered liverwurst on rye with bacon, raw onion touch of mustard...soon there were twelve more orders. Good buddies, cold draft and that glorious sandwich... as close to a little slice of heaven I would ever know!


« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 03:55:37 PM by JohnnyGage »

Online JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #216 on: August 14, 2019, 04:12:18 PM »
Here, a young Proby Willy at the range attempting his first batch of Monte Cristos...



Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2375
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #217 on: August 14, 2019, 05:35:54 PM »
That liverwurst concoction sounds good!

Offline raybrag

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #218 on: August 14, 2019, 07:28:04 PM »
That liverwurst concoction sounds good!

Sure does!
Ray Braguglia
Newport News VA


Online JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #219 on: August 15, 2019, 09:11:57 PM »
Gory Days; Part 3
DOA’s

I usually like to start my tour by cleaning out the back of the bus providing the Brooklyn Communications Office (CO) is not holding any calls at the time. The MVO would check the fluids in the vehicle and I would get a bucket full of ammonia and water and make the concoction strong enough that teardrops formed while mopping out the back of the bus. First task would be to remove the stretcher and wipe down the three leather benches. One bench was against the driver side wall with a small sliding window above it, the second bench would be up against the front of the rig with a small opened window to talk with the driver and the third bench was the long bench that sat alongside the stretcher with storage below it. After the seats, the walls inside would get a thorough wipe with a damp cloth plus the stair chair and finally the floor would get a good soaking with a final rinse with the mop... Many times we were unable to even get that far as the CO would be calling us as soon as we went into service. It was not uncommon that many times CO would be holding calls for hours, especially on weekends you would hear over the radio minor sick or OBS calls being “held” for two hours. In fact, I recall there was a time that the CO advised us that he was holding “calls” for almost three hours!...It was no picnic either when we eventually “caught up” with the calls being held as there were quite a few angry citizens that were more than a little angry with us when we did finally show up to there emergency.

The back of the bus held a stretcher with a small spinal backboard and the stair chair. Almost everyone went in the stairchair that was hooked onto the side door of the bus for convenience. Unless you were unconscious or seriously injured, you were transported in a stair chair. If you could walk to the bus, you walked, if you had difficulty walking you went into the stair chair.  Over the stretcher was four compartments that were filled with who-knows what for first aid supplies. The compartments were haphazardly stocked and jammed with short splints, gauze and 4x4’s in no special order, and every bus was different. The compartments were so disorganized that nobody really used the supplies that were held behind a clear plastic door that had no handles, the doors were closed by the use of adhesive tape. Manytimes, rounding a corner the adhesive tape would become unglued and the contents of the storage would spill out into the back of the bus. After mopping the floor, I would reinforce the adhesive tape holding the compartment doors closed. I never counted on the contents of those storage compartments for anything.

Concerning patients, my rule of thumb was that any patient sick or with a survivable injury would be transported to Brookdale Hospital, those more critical and less likely to survive I shot for Kings County Hospital a little further away, unless if the patient was in full arrest or not likely to survive the additional mileage. The “Sick” persons were seated on the small bench under the window next to my kit where I kept a supply of plastic leaf bags... anyone experiencing a sickness and likely to spew I pulled out a leaf bag, made a small hole in it and slipped the bag over their head... if they got “sick” I’d hold up the front end of the bag for the delivery...Drunks and overdoses were transported to a small hospital called Lutheran, now long closed, where the staff usually had to wake up the attending physician. Calls for a mentally disturbed person were taken to Kings County usually accompanied by a police officer where there was a facility called “G Building” that could house them. We brought DOAs to Kings County Morgue.

                                                              ****************

Tonight is extremely cold, polar bear frigid cold, it is early into the tour when we receive a job that PD is on the scene of a DOA and we are assigned to go to pronounce the DOA. The address is  3143 Atlantic Avenue, a block or so away from the only fast food joint in the neighborhood, a White Castle. I am working with Hall, the MVO for this tour, he has no EMT experience and drives me to the location in a non emergency mode. Upon our arrival there is a police car from the 75 and inside are two police officers, I leave the heated bus and walk over to the passenger side of the patrol car feeling the cold go through the layers of my clothing... the police officer slightly cracks his window slightly and states the DOA is on the other side of this car that is parked next to us in this small darken garage parking lot. With that the police officer closes his window and remains inside his car...Shining my flashlight beam and illuminating the ground I walk around the parked car, mist coming out of my mouth every time I exhale...In between the two parked cars is a civilian and he is on his knees with his ass arched high towards me, he is resting on his elbows and looking under the parked car. “I got it partner, slide over”, I announce, thinking the DOA is under the car and I’m going to wind up dragging him out…”Hello”, I said “I got it buddy” and with that I nudge the civilian with my foot...it felt like I was nudging a marble statue, the subject I was talking to and trying to nudge is frozen solid...I shined my flashlight into a  bluish face that is frozen in a small pool of frozen vomit with his head twisted facing the parked car... He was my DOA, died right there on the spot.

DOA’s were not uncommon, especially during my shift. The PD would get to a scene with an obvious DOA, then EMS would pronounce the DOA and sometimes come back later to retrieve the body after the PD investigation to remove to Kings County Morgue. There were times that a body was discovered days after it’s death, and of course we would have to pronounce it DOA...I remember walking down the hall and you would begin to encounter the foul odor of decay, the smell of death...with the first onslaught of this odor, I would reach into my tackle box where I kept a small jar of “Vicks, Vaporub”... with its medicated vapors I’d place a small dab under both nostrils to overcome the stench...One time I had to walk about a half mile or so with Transit police into a tunnel to confirm a DOA, another time up on the elevated platform...Then there were the early wake up morning calls for “an unconscious” that quite often turned out to be DOA’s as people were waking up to discover their loved ones who passed away during the night ...There were more than a few times we received the dreaded early morning assignment of “Unconscious Baby” that often resulted from SIDS; Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. I had my fair share of telling young parents that their “sleeping” baby had passed on, a disturbing and uncomfortable distressing moment.

                                                                   ****************



EMS Log: 6/18/1979;  2909 FULTON STREET;  2 VICTIMS SHOT

We are 53 minutes into a clear and cool Monday morning. I am working with a new partner, he came over from Kings County Hospital EMS and is a highly respected veteran of EMS,  I will introduce him later, but his name is Lawrence... But right now, our assignment is to pronounce two store owners DOA who have been brutally gunned down at close range by shotguns. Apparently the two store owners got into a beef with a couple of local gang members who awaited outside the store until closing then ambushed them with three blasts at close range inches away as the two store owners opened the back door of their building establishment. After the PD investigation it was my job to go inside this horrific vestibule and pronounce them, obviously dead, and removed to Kings County Hospital.


This is the address today, the vestibule where double homicide took place is the rear door under the "tax" awning.
 
                                                              ***********

EMS Log: 9/11/1978; 1671 E 17th STREET, CONEY ISLAND; CARDIAC

I am detailed to cover a midnight to eight tour in Coney Island, aka “Cardiac City”. I was working with another Corpsman from Coney Island, his name is Martino who knows Coney Island area very well. It did not take long before we received our first cardiac assignment; it was a little after 2 a.m. when we were assigned to a cardiac job at East 17th Street. The building is a typical “H” shaped apartment house, and the call is coming from a top floor apartment. As my partner and I arrive at the apartment door we both stand to one side and knock, you never want to stand directly in front of a door for obvious reasons. I knock again. On the other side I can hear a faint elderly lady, she is telling me she is having trouble breathing, she is gasping. OK I say, “let us in, we're here to help you”. There are a couple of deadbolt cylinder locks on her door that I can see from the hallway side. I can hear her as she flips one of the locks,  again she tells me that she can not breathe…”get the other lock” I plead with her to open the door. The lock sounds like it is trying to open from her side, then just silence. I call her again while knocking on the door, there is no response... “Hello!, Hello! How we making out in there?”...but there is no answer. With my portable radio I request the NYPD and FDNY to respond for entry. My partner and I try to force the door, but unable to...a few minutes later, two police officers are on the hallway floor with us, I advise them of the situation.  The one officer starts to mule kick the wooden apartment door open and just as a crew from the FDNY arrives the police officer successfully forces open the apartment door. There on the sofa, next to the door, with her arm stretch out toward the interior lock is an elderly woman, dressed in a nightgown and slippers, peacefully DOA. Inches away from help.

Thanks for reading and allowing me to share, I don't think I have ever told anyone about these stories. 

Next; Slicing and Dicing.        KMG-365
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 09:20:52 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline 69 METS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 710
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #220 on: August 15, 2019, 10:24:50 PM »
Great stuff Johnnie G. Working for EMS back then certainly provided me with an education in life on the street. I spent 1978-1981 counting the days until my appointment to "The Greatest Job on Earth"!

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2375
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #221 on: August 16, 2019, 07:10:30 AM »
"Johnny" was that Coney MVO, Mike Martino?

Online nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5115
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #222 on: August 16, 2019, 08:34:23 AM »
 Thanks Dan for all these stories.

 Your latest story you told in "GORY DAYs" Part 3 tells us what just one single tour of working with the NYC Health and Hospitals EMS was like. Not only yourself, but so many other Life Savors like "memory master", "69 METS", and the thousands of other NYC Health and Hospitals EMS people who were out there, every day, doing the same kind of life saving work. Yet, it was such a THANKLESS JOB, as I saw during my buffing days. Few civilians seemed to appreciate the work you guys did and there was very seldom a "pat on the back" for a job well done.

 I wasn't chasing the NYC EMS like the FDNY. Yet many times I would see them operating at a totally separate incident, just down the street. Maybe a drug overdose, a car accident, or carrying a civilian out on a stair chair from one of the apartments in those large multi family buildings.

 During those days, ALL of the necessary emergency services, the FDNY, the NYPD, the NYC EMS, were beyond the breaking point. There were huge areas of the city that were completely out of control. I remember somebody telling me it reminded them of the Days of the Wild West.

 "69 METS" says here; "Working EMS back then certainly provided me with an education in life on the street". How TRUE that must be. I didn't work those streets but just watched, and only on a part time basis. But what that taught me - there is NO Classroom that can ever replace it.

 I must admit that I enjoyed watching you, "Johnny Gage", on your TV show "Emergency" back in those 70s. BUT it sure WASN'T like watching you guys work in parts of NYC during those years. I'm just glad that you have taken the time to tell us your stories of just what it was like then during those "GLORY DAYS" or as they are now called; "GORY DAYS".

Online JohnnyGage

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #223 on: August 16, 2019, 09:31:47 AM »
Thanks Willy, it sure was a crazy, unbelievable wild time with sights and experiences us young guns like Garrett and myself who were in our early 20's were smack in the middle of! And I'll bet MemoryMaster has a slew of stories, too...More crazy stuff coming, stay tuned!

                                                                                                   ☆☆☆☆☆

Note to MM; Charlie I'm not sure of Martinos first name, in my log he was actually a Corpsman (I made the correction above from MVO) badge #1581 if that helps.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 09:34:00 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline memory master

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2375
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #224 on: August 16, 2019, 10:23:35 AM »
"Johnny", it probably Mike. He was a Lt. in Coney Island when I worked with him during my short stay there before going over to Staten Island.

 

anything