Author Topic: GLORY DAYS  (Read 183935 times)

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 558
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #285 on: November 19, 2019, 02:27:41 PM »
Dan, THANK YOU VERY MUCH for telling us your DCFD stories. I remember some of the incidents that you talked about. Particularly the plane that crashed striking the 14th St Bridge.

 All of the pictures you posted are amazing. As well as telling us the history of your time with the DCFD. And earlier of course your "GORY DAYS", with the very busy NYC-EMS. Now known as the FDNY/EMS.

 Thank You Johnny, aka Mr Gage. 

 I guess (??????) your next series begins with your FDNY Probie Days. I'm sure that I am not the only one looking forward to that. When that time comes and you tell us about your days with Ladder Co 5, don't forget, "you know who", while you were at the Rock. And how you got to meet up with that FDNY buff again many years later.


Dear Willy, CanadianBrother and those who have PMd me, thank you for your kind thoughts and words, it has been fun shaking out the ol' cobwebs in my coconut reminiscing about those Glory Days...and, you bet Willy, we will get to L5 soon and of course the magical Photo op!
« Last Edit: November 19, 2019, 02:35:04 PM by JohnnyGage »

Nycfire.net

Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #285 on: November 19, 2019, 02:27:41 PM »

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 558
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #286 on: November 24, 2019, 06:55:56 PM »
THE “MAGICAL” DAY

It’s a Magical Day...August 6, 1982 has finally arrived and it is a cool early Friday morning. I did not sleep well and so I am up extra early enjoying an English muffin and a cup of coffee, I glance over to my faithful recliner chair where I laid out a freshly ironed white dress shirt, black slacks, gray sport jacket, conservative tie, and shined black shoes on the floor. The sun is beginning to break, it’s days like this I’m reminded of a comic strip called “Ziggy”, in this one panel cartoon Ziggy is clapping his hands and cheering; “GO GOD!”...it is that type of day...I slide into my car for the hour drive towards Brooklyn Boro Hall on Joralemon Street to meet Lieutenant Francesse from the FDNY Candidate Investigation Unit for further details.



So, finally, today’s the day,  back to my birthplace; Brooklyn, to be sworn in as a Probationary Firefighter for the FDNY. It has been almost five years since I took the entrance exam for the position of FDNY Firefighter and it seems so long ago I thought this day may never come. Recently the hiring process has started again after a hiatus that occurred because an injunction was brought on by a women's group concerning the unfair testing practice given by NYC, and all hiring was suspended, but now the case has been resolved and the hiring commences...time to get down to business.

Leaving my apartment early the traffic is very light while heading towards Brooklyn on the Long Island Expressway, during my travel I have a chance to reminisce and reflect on all the other exams I took over the past few years to get on board with a career fire department. Taking the perceptive advice from my Dad when I told him I was interested in becoming a New York City fireman during my early teens, he advised me to “not” put all my eggs into one basket. I heeded his wisdom and as soon as I graduated High School began a writing campaign to local fire departments that had career firefighter positions inquiring about future entrance exams, I kept a meticulous log with responses from the recipient city. By the time I was twenty I was on a few lists, namely; The Anne Arundel County Fire Department, I was standing by for a year, my list number was five, but that list only hired four then expired. In  New Haven I was fingerprinted and all set to go into the next class except the City Mayor only wanted women to be hired and nobody from “out of town” as explained to me by a wonderful and friendly New Haven Fire Chief (Who went on to write reference letters to other departments I had applied to)... In Cleveland, Annapolis and Philadelphia I was still on their list to be hired, and, of course I was fortunate to be hired by the DCFD. Great advice Dad, thanks.

When the FDNY entrance exam was announced by the local civil service newspaper “The Chief” (the paper Uncle Jack suggested I subscribe to) my buddies, Big Mac, Mike and Philly from our local volly house took the Long Island Railroad into Penn Station, from there we then hopped into a cab for a ride to 49 Thomas Street, the home of NYC Civil Service Office. This was the location that the paper stated in the announcement you could pick up your application, or you could have an application mailed to you. However, it was rumoured that in the event of a tie, the tie would be broken and favor would go to the person with a lower application number.


CHIEF CIVIL SERVICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Nobody had any idea that there would be close to fifty thousand applicants, but non the less, we wanted whatever the best edge was for us. So we four amigos arrived at Thomas Street arriving just before midnight, prepared to sleep on the sidewalk and be the first to file when the doors opened in the morning. Upon our arrival we realized we were not the only ones to have the idea of submitting an early application as there was a small group of guys who had already arrived ahead of us, with more who began to show up as the night progressed into the wee hours. Everyone hunkered down against the wall of the building reserving your spot. By midnight there were about sixty or so guys lining up along Thomas Street waiting for the office to open in the morning for the golden ticket, an application. I remember it was a comfortable night, but long, many of the guys were from different volunteer fire departments, so conversation was lively until everyone started to crash from exhaustion and begin nodding off along the wall. In the morning we heard the doors being unlocked, we all rose from our contorted positions along the sidewalk while a surprised and gleeful employee began to hand out the application, I remember I was number thirteen... Later on we found out, the tie breaker would not be your application number, but some other method none of us were privy of.


YOUNG JOHNNY GAGE ON 49 THOMAS STREET, 3rd ON RIGHT FROM LIGHT POLE.

With the application now filed, us four amigos enrolled into the “Delehanty FDNY Prep Course” that was given once a week at night in a Hempstead commercial building that was designed like a classroom. I think it cost us fifty dollars per month to enroll.

At Delehantys we were learning how to take and prepare for the highly competitive exam. We reviewed mathematics, local city history, general history, current events, spelling, pulley ratios, identifying abstract diagrams and memory recall among the popular topics.

I also bought myself the “ARCO FIREMAN FD” book that was supposed to give you an edge on civil service exams with previous questions and exams from other fire department exams that I immersed myself into.



Eventually when the open competitive exam was given the questions were remarkably simple and not what we expected. As an example, one question showed you the head of a screw with a cross-shaped slot for turning...you then had to select that corresponding screwdriver from three other tool options, the other questions were very similar and not complicated as well. Since the test was very elementary, a couple of points off the exam made a real difference. The part that many of the test takers had trouble with was the memory recollection. Here I was very thankful that I attended the Delehanty prep course...with just a few years out of High School I did not have many opportunities taking civil service exams yet, just a couple perhaps and I did well. Fortunately none of the previous exams I took had a memory recollection part, but the FDNY exam was a possibility, so Delehantys coached us with a very helpful strategy; the strategy was to focus on the image, take the five minutes allocated to review every nuance and detail then burn a memory into your coconut. When the proctor collected the paperwork and allowed you to begin the exam, the very first thing you did was to redraw the image on the scratch paper provided before you did anything else...not even look over the questions or write your name! Solid Gold advice!...Lo and behold, the FDNY entrance exam did in fact have a memory recall part (which was a semi-intricate floor plan with windows, rooms, hallways, doorways, furniture, and victims), and I aced all ten questions pertaining to the floorplan...Later on I heard many students talking after the exam that they “blew” that portion of the exam and did not do well, as simple as it was.

After the exam us four amigos were relieved and now it was time to celebrate, the stress now behind us we pulled into a White Castle parking lot and loaded up on belly-bombs! Later we would all go home and be glued to a local NYC radio station that divulged the answers for the written test later that night.

After the written exam us four amigos would go to the physical agility practices that were set up at various places and designed to make sure you are training properly in anticipation of the upcoming agility exam.

So, 49 Thomas Street was where it all began for me, the first act of applying for the job I coveted for years as a young man from my shared experiences with Ladder 31, and Uncle Jack during the War Years...ironically a few blocks south is where my career came to an abrupt halt after the attack of September 11.

Among us four amigos, I was the only amigo fortunate to pass both written and physical agility exams. And now here I am, back in the Big Apple and driving down the Long Island Expressway to be sworn in at Brooklyn Boro Hall by Mayor Ed Koch. Monday I will report to Randall's Island at the FDNY Training School. That's next.

Thanks for reading! Hope you enjoyed... Happy Thanksgiving to all!     KMG-365
« Last Edit: November 25, 2019, 07:52:53 AM by JohnnyGage »

Offline t123ken

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 170
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #287 on: November 25, 2019, 06:14:54 PM »
As I recall, there were over 7,000 men on that list. 
Do you know if they went through the entire list and when the last from that list were hired, or when the first from the next list were hired?

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 558
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #288 on: November 27, 2019, 07:53:05 AM »
As I recall, there were over 7,000 men on that list. 
Do you know if they went through the entire list and when the last from that list were hired, or when the first from the next list were hired?

Hello t123ken, not sure what the final list number hired from exam 3040, next exam 1162 final physical agility was given Spring of 1984, hiring started after that. The womens organization held up hiring on 3040 for almost two years. Hope that helps.
Best, JG

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11822
  • Gender: Male


Offline fltpara16

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 253
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #291 on: November 28, 2019, 03:01:55 PM »
Johnny Gage,

Thank you so much for the great stories of your time with the DCFD.  I grew up 50 miles south of DC in Fredericksburg, VA.  My close encounter with DCFD came in the spring of 1982.  I was picking a girlfriend up from a relatives apartment that was on Columbia Rd. in Adams Morgan.  As I approached the area, I noticed a large column of smoke in this area and heard the sirens heading in on the box.  There was a fire in an OMD located behind the building I was heading too.  I got to the building just as an Engine Company was laying out with their wagon and a pumper was hooking up to the hydrant to supply the wagons 3" line.  The two piece engine company was something new to me and held my interest watching them get set up.  I soon realized I needed to get out of the way so I headed further up Columbia Rd.  As I approached an intersection, and Engine Co, Truck (a Hahn Tiller) and RS 4 with the Ford Bruco rescue wagon turned onto Columbia Rd. in the opposite lane of traffic and heading directly at me.  I knew that in this situation I was on the losing end, so I quickly found a parking place on the sidewalk for my little Chevy.  These units proceeded in and took their positions for work.  I picked up my girlfriend from the apartment, and headed around the block for a little buffing but could not get close to the scene.  I did note E21's Ford pumper hooked to a hydrant suppling the wagon down the block. I wanted to park again and get a little closer to observe the action, but this girlfriend wanted nothing to do with my interest in the fire service.  She was not my girlfriend for long!  It was great to see how DCFD operated and how quickly they went to their positions and controlled the fire.  I wish now I had made a few more trips to the Big City (other than to the Georgetown Bars) during this time.  It would have been great to capture some of the action of this aggressive fire department.  I did return a few years later to attend some training with DCFD, but at this point the crack wars had taken hold of many neighborhoods and there were places you did not venture out into, especially Southeast where we were.  Looking forward to the next installment of your early FDNY days, and thanks for bringing back good memories!

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 558
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #292 on: November 28, 2019, 10:10:47 PM »
Thanks Brother Fltpara16 for your kind thoughts, yes, DCFD was a wonderful experience and I am grateful to have been a small part of it from 1979-1982. With two piece engine companies, and four engine companies assigned to a Box that was eight pieces of apparatus, NOT including the two trucks, Rescue and Chief assigned too! If you stood on the right corner it would be like watching a fire parade as the apparatus whizzed by...with all that apparatus on one Box the surounding area got congested very quickly. DC Engines first and second due dropped a supply line whether there was any indication of fire or not. Since the DCFD did not have a real problem with false alarms, almost every call generated by telephone, therefor, lines were dropped, and picked up just as quick if not needed. It was an awesome experience working in the Nations Capital, some super firefighters too!

E 21's neighborhood was Adams Morgan and Columbia Rd was the main drag, the firehouse was one block north of Columbia Rd. Adams Morgan (no hyphen) was two local schools that combined their resources in the 50's to enhance the neighborhood childrens education and racial differences.

Thanks for checking in! Best, JG

Online lucky

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #293 on: November 29, 2019, 12:23:13 AM »
Downtown and midtown Manhattan used to have a 4 engine response but not every unit had a hose wagon. The Fire Patrol also responded with a unit in those areas so there was almost as much apparatus responding to initial alarms.

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 558
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #294 on: December 01, 2019, 10:27:59 PM »
PROBY SCHOOL

After last Friday’s swearing in at Brooklyn Boro Hall and now with the weekend behind me, this Monday morning our class is to report to the Training Facility on Randall’s Island, the “Rock” we have been told to park on the gravel section of the parking lot and not on the blacktop, my first order as a NYC Fireman!...Arriving in the designated parking area I notice a hundred and fifty new clean shaven faces, all with that confused and apprehensive look...everyone is scanning the unfamiliar grounds, looking around, eager to meet new friends and share an exciting unknown journey ahead. Some guys seem a bit edgy, but all seem enthusiastic about getting the “show on the road”. Immediately a Lieutenant approaches the group and introduces himself, he is soft spoken and kind manners as he welcomes us...He informs us; when he calls your name you are to line up on the yellow lines painted on the blacktop in front of the first training structure and begin forming the first of two platoons of seventy five guys, each platoon has three squads of twenty five men...when your name came up, you fell in place next to the previous named recruit. One by one guys were falling in, there were only a few of us still standing on the gravel stone as the last squad was forming in the second platoon, finally my name was called, I was in the third squad, second platoon. My partner immediately to my right  was Joe Leavey (RIP 9/11), we became friends right away. The Lieutenant (I cannot remember his name, but I remember him telling us stories about 17 Truck) asked for anyone with a military background, those who had raised their hands and volunteered to become our squad and platoon leaders. I remember our squad leader was Sidney, a very cool and calm vet, quick to laugh and with a warm genuine smile.


Our squad, why is it in every group photo someone has to "give the bird?"


JohnnyGage next to Joe Leavey (RIP 9/11)

The first day was a whirlwind, the exciting notion that you were now at the training school and  being bombarded with orders, greeting new faces, absorbing new sights, navigating confusing criss-crossing hallways and classrooms, made the day go by quickly. But the instructors knew how to turn the chaos into order before we even left the tarmac to head inside and begin filling out paperwork and receiving lectures. Different squads would head off to have your head measured for a leather helmet, (a machine that formed around your head and then translated the data to a helmet mold specifically for you (we would not receive our helmets until we graduated). After that you tried on for size a turnout coat and given the option of either a duck canvas material coat that seemed very popular or a rubber coat. I had the duck canvas style in DCFD, it held water and was cold during the winter and not so crazy about it, so I decided to select the rubber coat...and I’m glad I did! (I do not recall getting very wet inside as the rubber repelled the water instantly). Everyone was issued a black round hard plastic/ fiberglass type helmet, three quarter rubber boots, a used yellow slicker and heavy light blue fire resistant shirt to be worn underneath the slicker for the smoke house. Our class was the first to wear the new dungaree pants and blue tee shirt. The white silk screened “Florian Cross” (The Florian Cross is the actual Firefighter Cross, often mistakenly called the “Maltese”) was stenciled in the wrong location on many shirts, instead of the cross being over your left breast, it was stenciled too low and almost under your arm, in the middle of your chest, or left part of your upper stomach. On your helmet you had to run masking tape along the side just above the brim and then write our last name for identification on front and back. On our boots we had to mark them as per department orders, there would be three lines, the top line you wrote NYFD, the middle line your name and the bottom line your Badge number. When I received my badge, there were two “used” Florian style badges in a small yellow envelope. I received Badge number 10617, I liked the fact that it was a five digit number, same as Uncle Jacks whose badge number was 10324. Of the two badges, one was a hat badge and the other you could wear (but nobody did) on your dress uniform. (My dress uniform badge rounded arch that displayed the hydrant was partially snapped off, but I did not intend to wear it on my uniform anyway and so it sat in my jewelry box until I retired).


Notice location of Florian Cross stenciled incorrectly on work duty tee shirt

Within a day or so, everyone fell into the daily routine and becoming more comfortable, we were becoming a solid paramilitary organization. As we got to know one another most of us were able to hook up into carpools quickly. On my first day I recognized one of the recruits as a former High School colleague and volly fireman from another nearby local fire department, his name was Stevie. Stevie was an electrician by trade, and coincidentally used to “carpool” with my younger brother to their Union affiliated Electrical night school, now Stevie and I would start car pooling. Stevie and I then met another fellow who lived nearby, Santo, who preferred to be called “Chicky”, he had one of those long four syllable Italian last names that were easily mispronounced that began with “Cicc”... Santo had just bought a new compact sedan and offered to do all the driving. During our first week riding back and forth we picked up a fourth rider, Paul, a former transit cop who was switching over from Transit Police to the FD. Paul, is a real nice guy, but a little aloof...he never made eye contact with you when he spoke to you, he kind of glanced over your shoulders and rocked up, down, back and forth on his heels... At the end of our Proby training I still don’t think Paul knew our names (But he did retire as a Captain, Stevie retired as a respected Engine Chauffeur after twenty years and Santo retired with a disability five years on the job after he was hit by a car in front of his assigned quarters).

The first few weeks of proby school seemed to go by fast, we were scheduled to graduate in October but that still seemed so far off. It was only a short time ago that I completed the DCFD Training School...With that experience behind me I was not overly apprehensive about the scaling ladder or aerial ladder climb confidence courses, and I sought of knew what to expect of the smoke house...the days seemed to blur by, we had a good squad and new friendships were forming, the officer instructors were getting to know us little by little and started to lighten up on the drill sergeant schtick... And we were getting to learn who the instructors were too, the ones you could have a little fun yukking it up with, which were most, but a few of the others you avoided. Some of the more colorful instructors we mimicked  behind their backs for a quick laugh...However,  everyone, and I mean everyone, feared the Captain who ran the proby school!... Captain Saccomanno... to be called up to his office or singled out by him was to be avoided at all costs. Captain Saccomanno was gruff, stern, hardened and intimidating...and he let it be known that he set the standard; exemplary. Of which he, in turn,  demanded the highest standards from us recruits, no excuses. Captain Saccomanno  had a lean wiry build, not very tall, but he stood ten feet tall in his impeccable uniform, he walked with a purpose when we observed him walking around the training facility, all eyes following him. (Little did I know he could have came from the same mold that Tough Timmy came from!).


Outdoor Training Stations


Another Lieutenant , we’ll call him Lt. Snarl; which actually rhymes with his real name, was a relentless pain in the ass and bad tempered, always with a scowl on his face...he was ruthlessly unkind bashing and insulting recruits and he never let up, unyielding even to the last day, he seemed miserable...So now, when your squad went from one outdoor training session to the other you did so in formation and belted out a cadence. One ingenious member of our squad began incorporating Lt. Snarl’s name in vain into our favorite cadence, other squads loved it and they too picked up on the unflattering ditty and began using it too..I forget how the song went, but I remember distinctly the last line as we accentuated it loud and clear jubilantly;  “...you grumpy fat f*&% !”...(He had a large beer belly).


Even todays Proby's employ a cadence between training sessions

During proby school the name of the game was of course not to be highlighted or bring attention to yourself. I had a few turns in the barrel as well as everyone else. But we were somewhat fortunate, among our twenty five squad members we had one recruit that was always screwing things up and not getting it right, despite all of us trying to pitch in to help him, ‘til the very end he was hopeless. It bode poorly for our squad as we acquired extra cleaning details, but the good thing he was like a lightning rod for the instructors, taking the heat... and that let the rest of us slide under the radar.

However, eventually you get nabbed, and I did a few times. My first was toward the end of a warm summer August day… Since all recruits had to assemble in the auditorium for the daily lecture towards the end of the day, it was tough to keep your eyes open and you could see many recruits start to nod off, bleary-eyed trying to remain awake. Lieutenant instructors were along the sidelines looking for the culprits, and as soon as one saw your head drop or roll, they would come down the aisle, tap you on the shoulder, do the “come with me finger thing” and make you stand in the rear of the auditorium for the remainder of the lecture...which could be almost an hour. Many times there were more than a dozen recruits standing in the rear, many repeat offenders. I was doing my best, I was exhausted and I was doing so well hanging in there...when suddenly a tap on my shoulder I opened my eyes to see Lt. Larklin looking me in the face, “let’s go son”, he whispered kindly. I was embarrassed and mortified, not only because I was caught  with my head rolling, but I noticed on his left collar brass was an E 45. “Holy $&*#”, I said to myself!  This intolerable infraction (drama added) is surely going to get back to “Uncle Jack!” who was assigned to E 45 at the time, furthermore this was the company I presumed I was heading for after graduation. I stood in the back, all wired up thinking how am I going to explain this to Unk Jack when he calls me after he finds out from Larklin on my impromptu siesta during training school lecture?... Of course nothing ever happened, soon enough there were a bunch of us standing in the rear. But that was the only time I was nabbed for that offense, as a preventative measure I made sure I had a couple of swigs of hot coffee in the cafeteria before we assembled for the lecture.


End of Day lecture

During two other outside training sessions I became the unintended focus recruit of our squad, the “lucky one”. At one training event we were practicing how to slide down the pole that was mounted on the outside of one of the training buildings by itself, here we climbed up the stairs in single file and when it was your turn you “slid” the pole. I’ve slid the pole hundreds of times in DCFD, and there was nothing to it. When it was my time, I simply slid the pole with no fanfare and proceeded to walk toward the end of the line of our squad to repeat, until I heard “Just a minute there Mr. Gage, where do you think you are? Back in the DC Fire Department?”... I had no idea how the instructor knew of my previous history, but he wanted to have a little fun with me and he insisted I slide the pole again and again while he had my squad stand by to watch. I must have gone up the steps and slid down the pole five consecutive times while he stood to the side smirking.

At another session not to far from the sliding pole we had to handle a deuce and a half with another Instructor. Everyone would have a chance on the nob, the line was charged with high pressure that required all your strength and grit to maintain control with a backup firefighter. To make it more difficult we were kneeling on loose gravel and it was a struggle to maintain solid footing to support the line advancement. Now, It was my turn on the nob, and I had a good back up firefighter (Joe Leavey), we duck crawled as instructed, then advanced on our knees, the Lieutenant instructor standing next to me we used to call him (Unbeknown to him, of course) Yogi, as in Yogi Bear, ( and we noticed that he hung around another instructor that was rather short, so we called him “BooBoo”...Yogi and BooBoo, the tag fit for both). Yogi was tall, large and beefy, he had thick curly hair and was a bit goofy, but usually a calm demeanor. Today, though, uncharacteristically he was being a hard ass toward the squad. I took my place on the nob and got a firm grip, carefully pulling the nozzle bale towards me the line comes alive... Yogi is yelling into my ear over the loud water gushing from the nozzle ...”MOVE IN, MOVE IN !”...I continue methodically duck walking forward, whipping the nozzle clockwise with a straight solid stream. Yogi is yelling louder at me: “IT’S OVER MY HEAD, THE FIRE IS OVER MY HEAD, OVER MY HEAD, I SAID !”...With all my strength I pull the arms length of hose with the nozzle straight up into the air, above us, the water cascading down onto the squad...but that’s not enough, he continues to bark into my left ear,  “OVER MY HEAD, OVER MY HEAD…!”...with that, I leaned back even further and with all my ability and vigor I swirl the nob further backwards, still in the circulating motion..when all of a sudden it happened...to this day I can still hear the slapping sound of solid stream smacking a solid object, that would be Yogi’s forehead and propelling his helmet high into the afternoon sky, landing some distance away..Oh, Man! Did he explode!...I shut down the line...Yogi, now red-faced, wet and flustered threatened to keep me for the next three proby schools; “YOU AIN’T GOIN’ NOWHERE, GAGE!” he kept berating me over and over loudly...Our squad had a great time remembering that instance for the remainder of our training, it afforded us a lot of laughs.


Notice gravel rock off of sidewalk and surrounding building.

Anyway, our day of reckoning came and our class of one hundred fifty probationary fireMEN graduated, the last class of all males, the next class will have the first twenty-five female recruits in attendance.


First Official Mugshot for ID Card and "Newspaper" if......

 ************

A couple of years ago the Retiree Group I belong to was organized, lo and behold Captain Saccomanno and Lt. Larklin eventually joined our group...To this day I see Captain Saccamanno and Lieutenant Larklin at my monthly retirees group meeting, in fact I sit with them both at the round table sharing coffee and chatting with them...I did not know that Captain Saccamanno was a former member of E 88 before he was promoted and we have a fun time exchanging stories!... One time I reminded Larklin how we met back in proby school and my concern of him ratting me out to Unk Jack when I nodded off during lecture and was handpicked by him to stand in the rear of the auditorium... We laugh, and he says…”He should have called Jack!” Both guys are sweethearts, mellow, cool and real fine Gentlemen..

But, WOW, they were both HOLY TERRORS back in ‘82!


Thanks for reading....  Hope you enjoyed!                 KMG-365

Offline nfd2004

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5461
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #295 on: December 01, 2019, 11:37:57 PM »
 Dan, during your Probie Days at the Rock, I probably had you and the other Probies under surveillance once or twice a week back then. I would usually make a visit to the Rock before I hung out in the streets chasing the FDNY rigs.

 Actually, I enjoyed going over to the Fire Academy watching the guys train and I would often pick up a few "tricks of the trade" that I couldn't wait to show off to my local Connecticut Brother Firefighters. But I really owe it all to you guys and those GREAT FDNY Fire Instructors.

 I remember seeing the guys with those helmets having their last names written on that masking tape. I remember the gravel lot and the sign that said: "No Probie Parking Beyond Here".

 But Johnny, there's more. One day when walking around, taking pictures, I asked a boss some questions regarding the Probie Training. That boss turned out to be Captain Saccomanno. He invited me into his office and he explained to me about the FDNY Probie Training and how it is set up. But he also gave me a copy of an FDNY Probie Manuel, which I believe, I still have today. I think it was his copy because his name is written on it in pencil.

 That Probie manual opened the door for me to understand the tactics of the FDNY. I added the updates every three months to it which I would get at the FDNY Fire Academy. Later I would add all of the FDNY Manuals like Ladders Vol 1-6 (?), Engine Co ops etc. What Capt Saccomanno gave me that day was a tremendous help to me in doing the job and in helping other guys I worked with to do the job.

 So Dan, I hope you will pass this on to him. 

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11822
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #296 on: December 02, 2019, 12:54:29 AM »
Thanks Dan for your recollections of a Great Time in an FDNY FFs early life.... i have never personally met Richie Saccamanno  but i remember a WNYF picture of an impending  BX collapse that DC Vinny Dunn later had said to us that it was Richie as a FF holding the Nozzle in 88 maybe a cover photo ?  ....maybe someone can post it ?

Offline turk132

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 535
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #297 on: December 02, 2019, 08:31:10 AM »
Thanks Dan for your recollections of a Great Time in an FDNY FFs early life.... i have never personally met Richie Saccamanno  but i remember a WNYF picture of an impending  BX collapse that DC Vinny Dunn later had said to us that it was Richie as a FF holding the Nozzle in 88 maybe a cover photo ?  ....maybe someone can post it ?


Maybe this cover?

Offline JohnnyGage

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 558
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #298 on: December 02, 2019, 09:20:00 AM »
You got it Turk, thanks!...Richie with the nob, notice 88 frontpiece on Brother at multi- versal.

Offline 68jk09

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11822
  • Gender: Male
Re: GLORY DAYS
« Reply #299 on: December 02, 2019, 04:25:59 PM »
^^^^ Thanks Turk that's the photo...Vinny Dunn also pointed out that the LT Danny Maher was running to get the guys on the Multiversal who were in danger & may not have been aware......he also said if i remember correctly that the wall collapse was caused by sloping hip rafters at the end of a bow string heavy timber truss roof.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 04:41:12 PM by 68jk09 »