Author Topic: station 43 site  (Read 2324 times)

Offline mercurygrandmarquis1

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station 43 site
« on: July 07, 2010, 06:55:52 AM »
i found it very interesting with alot of history
http://coneyislandems.com/default.aspx

Nycfire.net

station 43 site
« on: July 07, 2010, 06:55:52 AM »

Offline rdm258

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Re: station 43 site
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2010, 07:30:14 AM »
Great Find, very interesting and lots of history, thanks.

Offline 69 METS

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Re: station 43 site
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2010, 11:49:33 AM »
Check out the description of F.D.N.Y. by this retired medic:


http://coneyislandems.com/OtherEmergencyServices.aspx

This particular medic always had a negative attitude toward Firefighters (I know this from first hand experience). From this link it's evident that all these years later he still has little or no respect for the excellent service that F.D.N.Y. Firefighters have ALWAYS provided at non - fire emergencies. Contrary to his statement that the only Firefighters that were EMT certified prior to the merger were the guys in the Rescue Companies and some guys who were vollies, the fact is that in the 1970's well over 2,000 F.D.N.Y. Firemen became certified on their own time as N.Y.S. EMT's via a job sanctioned training program. Auto extrication's and various other types of rescue incidents were frequently handled by F.D.N.Y.. Often, the only response from a city agency to a life threatening emergency back in the late 1960's and throughout the 1970's came in the form of an Engine Company and a Battalion Chief with an Emerson Resuscitator. Many times, seriously injured patients were transported in a stokes basket on top of the hose bed of a pumper or in the back of a Rescue Company's rig due to the common EMS response of 'no bus available'. Often, upon arrival at the E.R., the Firefighters would find multiple buses hanging out, while not making themselves available for one of the many calls on hold. Much of the anti F.D.N.Y. attitude of some EMS personnel came as a result of their jealousy of the respect that the public had for the Firemen due to the excellent service that F.D.N.Y. provided. EMS folks also didn't appreciate the fact that Firemen would often have to 'nudge' them in the right direction to get them to do things like carry a patient with chest pains or immobilize a victim of an auto accident rather than to place him in a stair chair. There were some dedicated EMS folks back then who did appreciate the assistance rendered by Firemen and they preferred working with the F.D.N.Y. as opposed to any other agency.

Offline rdm258

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Re: station 43 site
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2010, 01:11:27 PM »
Both side'S will sure have their share of stories of the opposite agency. Being in EMS -- A lot of it is true, however they are just as much not caring EMS folks as FD folks. I LOVE the ambulance and to me its the most rewarding and thankful part of public service. Even when was in the USCG i did the EMS aspect and was hooked. When I am assigned to an Engine at work, it's still GREAT don't have to accompany the pt to the Hospital,dont have to do the full report, and most of all clean/restock the bus.The guys I work with DO care for the pt. Who like the 3am Nursing Home call--NO ONE. Attitudes arise, will always have ego issue's or I like to call Little *#@* Syndrome. He is wrong for posting on a public site. (very unprofessional). I am thankful ALWAYS for the help I can get or the help that arrives before me. We all strive for the same outcome -- TO SAVE A LIVE. Begins with the 911 call and finishes with the triage nurse. We all make a difference in some point along that road. Whether its intubation or giving a leaning shoulder to an elderly pt, it's ALL the same. Thank you to ALL of us. Fire--EMS--PD
« Last Edit: July 07, 2010, 01:53:12 PM by rdm258 »

Offline downtownmedic

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Re: station 43 site
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2010, 10:06:05 AM »
O.K. - I'll put my two cents in here - I've been in EMS for the last 15 or so years, working for various hospitals in Brooklyn and Manhattan.  I've also been a F.D.N.Y. buff for as long as I can remember.  That being said -

Yes, there are some horrible EMS crews out there that should just really never care for a human being ever again - but the majority of my EMS brothers and sisters provide some of the best pre-hospital care in the world under some of the worst conditions that any EMS system faces.

There are a few Engine companies out there who think EMS is beneath them - the attitude of "if I wanted to drive an ambulance, I'd work for EMS", guys who REFUSE to lift a finger to do anything to help until EMS finally says "O.K., you guys can go now".  This seems to be decreasing over the last few years though, for a variety of reasons - but by and large, the fire guys do a great job, and in my experience are always willing to help out.  More than once - probably dozens of times working in Brooklyn, the ONLY way a patient was getting out of a four-floor walk-up was strapped to a Stokes, and muscled down the stairs by an Engine while the EMS guys did CPR over their shoulders, under their arms, or wherever we could squeeze in.

The bottom line here - we are all here, doing this job to save lives, be it from a fire or a heart attack.  Perhaps if EMS and Fire were each properly funded and we weren't being told that "5 Engine Companies are being shut down so we can put more EMS units on the street", or the other side of the coin, that EMS units are being put out of service to reduce overtime since that money is needed to pay the firefighter O.T....

Lastly, if a certain EMS crew has there head up their ass, or an Engine is being especially jerky, please let's all be mature and talk about it after the job.  One of my partners was tired of the Captain on one particular Engine always trying to tell him what medications and treatments each patient needed - this Captain USED to be a volunteer EMT, so he knows how to be an urban medic.  Finally at a fire one day, my partner walked up to the Captain and started telling him what size line to bring in, what nozzle to use, and how to attack the fire.  Well, some colorful words were exchanged, but the next time they were on an EMS run together, the Captain pulled my partner aside and told him he got the point - never had an issue again.

Offline rdm258

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Re: station 43 site
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2010, 11:45:14 AM »
Great post, downtown. Agree 100%

 

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