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History / Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Last post by mack on Today at 06:57:00 PM »
I believe the comment from the 44 Aide, Seymore Schenker, was directed to TL-120.    120 was the Only individual company to do over 10,000 runs in 1 year, in 1971.  There were many 2nd sections But, only 1 company has that distinction.

Capt JC (ret)
TL-120 FDNY
Brownsville,  brooklyn


Capt - You are correct.  TL 120 had 10,989 runs in 1971.


 
2
General Discussion / Re: ANOTHER 9-11 MEMBER PASSES.
« Last post by 68jk09 on Today at 06:56:05 PM »
In regard to replies 267 thru 270 & 272....... Thanks to ladder2.....1988 Medal Day Book
Steuben Association Medal awarded to:

LT ROBERT P. MIUCCIO L113

Fire is not the only type of life-threatening situation that firefighters confront. There are other episodes of danger which can require the help of the Fire Department and place its members in perilous circumstances. The recent construction boom in all boroughs of the city has caused an upsurge in the removal of older, run-down buildings. During the demolition of a four-story non-fireproof multiple dwelling at 1430 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn, an oversight on the part of the workers had caused the roof to collapse onto the top floor. This abrupt calamity caused the injury of 23-year-old Frank Purcell, a construction worker who was trapped on the fourth floor.

The morning of November 11, 1987, had started out busy for Ladder 113. Their first box came in right at the start of the day tour and they had not yet returned to quarters when they were called on the Department radio at 0925 hours and ordered to respond to Box 925 for a building collapse. As L113 pulled up to the location, Lt Robert P. Miuccio saw workmen running around and screaming that the rear roof of the structure had collapsed, trapping a coworker on the fourth floor. The resulting crash caused a chain reaction as sections of the fourth and third floors also crumbled downward.

Entering the building through the interior to survey the situation, Bob located Purcell in a precarious position on what remained of the fourth floor, approximately 50 feet above the ground. The victim was partially covered with debris from the caved-in roof and lying on a small section of flooring that was perched on two highly unstable beams. Purcell screamed that he was in pain and obviously was unable to free himself or find a safe route to the ground.

Bob realized that the best approach to the trapped construction worker would be from the adjoining building. The lieutenant quickly went into it to plan his rescue strategy before a further collapse could bring down the rest of the building. He found a plank in the intact building next door, which he could use as a bridge over the air shaft to the partially remaining fourth floor. Once he made it to the building, he carefully worked his way out on the beams until he reached the victim. Bob speedily assessed Purcell's physical condition, then administered first aid to the injured worker. Since Purcell could have had a possible back injury requiring caution in moving him, Bob called for a backboard and a portable ladder. The lieutenant was joined at this time by FF Bruce Howard of R2, who helped him stabilize Purcell and prepare him for removal.

Working carefully on this small island 50 feet above the ground, which could have brought all three men crashing down with one false move, the two men managed to get Purcell secured to the backboard. Using the 25-foot portable ladder as a bridge, they were able to slide the victim across it to the other members of L113 and R2. From there, Purcell was removed to the bucket of TL 105, especially called for this procedure. Once he was on the ground, the EMS paramedics took over and transported him to Kings County Hospital in critical condition.

It is for the exemplary manner in which Lt Robert P. Miuccio took decisive command in the successful operation of a rescue, showing dedication and bravery, risking his own safety, that he is proudly awarded the Steuben Association Medal.

Robert P. Miuccio was appointed to the FDNY on September 14, 1968; Served in the United States Air Force 1960-1964; Attended John Jay College and the College of Staten Island; Member of the Holy Name Society, Columbia Association, and the Company Officers Association;

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History / Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Last post by jkal on Today at 06:26:39 PM »
I believe the comment from the 44 Aide, Seymore Schenker, was directed to TL-120.    120 was the Only individual company to do over 10,000 runs in 1 year, in 1971.  There were many 2nd sections But, only 1 company has that distinction.

Capt JC (ret)
FDNY
TL-120
Brownsville,  Brooklyn
4
General Discussion / Re: ANOTHER 9-11 MEMBER PASSES.
« Last post by 68jk09 on Today at 05:42:18 PM »
RET FF CHARLES WILLIAMS LAD*111 WTC RELATED... 65-2 Transmitted announcing WTC Related Death of RET FF Charlie Williams LAD*111.....REST IN PEACE BROTHER....PRAYERS FOR THE COMFORT OF THE FAMILIES.


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General Discussion / Re: ANOTHER 9-11 MEMBER PASSES.
« Last post by 68jk09 on Today at 05:34:16 PM »
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Brooklyn / Re: 7/18/18 Brooklyn All Hands Box 3748
« Last post by 147 on Today at 05:33:01 PM »
Assignment if all are in quarters or 10-08.
Box 3748   OCEAN AVE & CROOKE AVE   
Engines: 249   240   248   281   255   280   282   219   
Trucks:113 147 157   132   148   105   122   
Battalions: B48   B41
Div 15
R-2
Sq 1

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History / Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
« Last post by 68jk09 on Today at 05:19:19 PM »
^^^^^^BN*59 was originally in 275 to help BNs*50 & 54.....after they left 275 BN*51 was moved from 294 East to 308......& in 1984 when the Springfield Blvd FH was built & 326/160 were organized there BN*53 was moved South from 306 to 326 to help BN*54.....  BN*59 was later at 319 with the idea of helping BNs*28 & 46 but this did not really do much as they were in the slower area of both BNs.....at the height of BN*46s high running years the Job took a number of the 46s Boxes & gave them to BN*52.
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^^^^^ Prior to BN*28 being organized at 271 (from BN*37-2 at 222) 218 was in BN*35....BN*60 rotated every third night from 1800 to 2400 hrs between BNs 35...44 & ?? acting as another Section (some great BCs & BN*FFs in the Unit) ...during the remaining hrs they were in Qtrs w/218 & responded at the Dispatchers discretion.

FDNY Battalions had very high response activity in the 1960s and 1970s.

In 1968, Bn 44-1 and Bn 44-2 responded to 11,598 combined runs.

In 1971, the NY Times reported that Bn 44 responded to over 10,000 runs.  Bn 44 aide Seymour Schenker reported over the Department Radio, “The 44 Battalion has just completed its 10,000th run” (to which the dispatcher replied) – “Congratulations Bn 44, now take in number 10,001!”.  (http://watkinsst.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/battalion-44-history-complete1.pdf

In 1971, 43 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs, many doing more than 5000 or 6000 runs.

In 1973, 46 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs or more, Bn 56 responded 7123 times.

It was not uncommon for dispatchers to ask on the radio - "Is there an available chief for a working fire?"


FDNY created second sections in several battalions:

     Bn 3-2      E 94     1968-69     BX
     Bn 12-2    L 14     1968-69     MN
     Bn 14-2    E 60     1968-69     BX
     Bn 18-2    E 45     1968-69     BX
     Bn 37-2    E 222   1968-69     BK
     Bn 39-2    E 236   1968-69     BK
     Bn 44-2    E 231   1968-69     BK

FDNY created new battalions:

     Bn 27      E 82     1969      BX
     Bn 55      E 73     1969      BX
     Bn 56      L 27     1969      BX
     Bn 57      E 235   1969      BK
     Bn 58      E 231   1969      BK
     Bn 59      E 275   1970      QN
     Bn 60      E 218   1970      BK  (relocated nights where needed)

To reduce workloads, in the 1970s FDNY changed battalion locations, reassigned boxes, reduced units assigned for administration, introduced Adaptive Response, introduced Discretionary Response boxes and introduced ERS fire alarm boxes.


 
  You left out Bn's 25 & 26 that were formerly Bn's 12-2 & 14-2, respectively.

Battalion   3-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 27
Battalion 12-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 25
Battalion 14-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 26
Battalion 18-2      1965 to 1967   became Battalion 56
Battalion 44-2      1965 to 1969   became Battalion 58
Battalion 37-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 28
Battalion 39-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 29
Battalion 55          1969 to 1988
Battalion 57          1969
Battalion 59          1970 to 1989
Battalion 60          1970 to 1975

Battalions 18-2 and 44-2 were organized earlier than the others, in 1965

Bn 25      E 58         1969 to 1989   MN  from Battalion 12-2
Bn 26      E 60         1969                MN  from Battalion 14-2
Bn 27      E 82         1969                BX  from Battalion 3-2
Bn 28      E 222       1969                BK  from Battalion 37-2
Bn 29      E 236       1969 to 1975   BK  from Battalion 39-2
Bn 55      E 73         1969 to 1988   BX
Bn 56      L 27         1969 to 1989   BX  from Battalion 18-2
Bn 57      E 235       1969                BK
Bn 58      E 231       1969                BK  from Battalion 44-2
Bn 59      E 275       1970 to 1989   QN
Bn 60      E 218       1970 to 1975   BK  (relocated nights where needed)

Battalions 25, 29, 55, 56, 59, and 60 have been disbanded
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Brooklyn / 7/18/18 Brooklyn All Hands Box 3748
« Last post by UnitWithTheUrgent on Today at 04:58:59 PM »
Address: 97 Crooke Ave. off Ocean Ave.

Fire on the 3rd floor of a 9 story 75x125 MD

H&L-147: 10-75 - Fire on the 3rd floor. - 16:50

L-132 FAST

B-48: All Hands. - 16:57

B-48: Under Control. - 17:01

Duration: 19 min.

Maybe:
E-240, 248, 281, 255
L-113, 147, 132F
B-48, 41
R-2
SQ-1
D-15
RAC-2

Relocations:
E-246 to E-281
E-224 to E-255
L-176 to L-113
H&L-101 to H&L-147
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Queens / Re: 7/18/18 Queens 10-77 Box 1318
« Last post by 68jk09 on Today at 04:55:34 PM »
137/268s relocating tomorrow from the Beach 116 St FH.
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