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General Category => History => Topic started by: mack on December 31, 2017, 12:22:50 PM

Title: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on December 31, 2017, 12:22:50 PM
FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section - Thread continues 1st Section 

Many FDNY and NYC firehouses and berths served as quarters for FDNY, Brooklyn FD, Long Island City FD, fire patrols, police, airport, federal, military, commercial and volunteer departments and companies.  The original sheds which housed the first fire companies formed to protect NYC in the late 1700s and early 1800s are gone.  But many of the original firehouses built by the volunteer departments, FDNY, Brooklyn and LIC in the mid and late 1800s still exist - some operate as active firehouses, some serve community, business or housing purposes.  Current FDNY firehouses include historic and new state-of-the-art fire stations.  This thread is dedicated to the firehouses, their companies, their apparatus, their histories and the firefighters who served in them.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on December 31, 2017, 12:25:16 PM
Directory - FDNY Firehouse and Company Look-Up - Firehouse Thread 1 and Thread 2 Locations
     - compiled by fdhistorian

Company          Page   (Note - Pages 2-00+ are from 2nd Section Thread)

ENGINES
Engine 001   70,113
Engine 002   35,2-09
Engine 003   138
Engine 004   6,2-44,2-45
Engine 005   57,2-59,2-60
Engine 006   2-20
Engine 007   31,113,2-41
Engine 008   5,44,2-06
Engine 009   7,2-41,2-50
Engine 010   1,5
Engine 011   111,2-04
Engine 012   124
Engine 013   75,92,139,2-43,2-68
Engine 014   93,2-43
Engine 015   19,20,133
Engine 016   34,2-41,2-42,2-52
Engine 017   16,20,38,82,133
Engine 018   29
Engine 019   67,2-37
Engine 020   4,25,139
Engine 021   7,2-64
Engine 022   9,2-53
Engine 023   2-14,2-23
Engine 024   24,2-55
Engine 025   2-19
Engine 026   57,2-43
Engine 027   121
Engine 028   89,111,2-43
Engine 029   7,113
Engine 030   31,2-64,2-65
Engine 031   84,87
Engine 032   96
Engine 033   4,10,2-43
Engine 034   7,57
Engine 035   49,50,2-16
Engine 036   49,50,143
Engine 037   18,2-43
Engine 038   2-19
Engine 039   8,15,75,2-43
Engine 040   6,118,145
Engine 041   13,2-03
Engine 042   67
Engine 043   2-29
Engine 044   49,50,2-43
Engine 045   88,141
Engine 046   141,2-44,2-45
Engine 047   51,2-35
Engine 048   2,45,106,2-50
Engine 049   8,120,145
Engine 050   21,2-49
Engine 052   1,2-53,2-54
Engine 053   100
Engine 054   2-37
Engine 055   87
Engine 056   74
Engine 058   146
Engine 059   2-36
Engine 060   131
Engine 061   8
Engine 062   141
Engine 063   46,77,124
Engine 064   2-34,2-35
Engine 065   44
Engine 067   93
Engine 068   2-35
Engine 069   9,64,118,2-43,2-58,2-59
Engine 070   9,114
Engine 071   68,118,2-40
Engine 072   52,127,128
Engine 073   14,42,140
Engine 074   73,74,2-43
Engine 075   139
Engine 076   11,2-55
Engine 079   25
Engine 080   145,2-43
Engine 081   42
Engine 082   14,111,2-09,2-52
Engine 083   2-01,2-02
Engine 084   2-04
Engine 085   20,140,2-09,2-14,2-49
Engine 088   82
Engine 089   61,145
Engine 090   63
Engine 091   482-57
Engine 092   2-11
Engine 093   76
Engine 094   13,31,2-39
Engine 095   2-27
Engine 096   2-27
Engine 097   46 
Engine 151   4,125,2-54
Engine 152   29,125,2-61,2-62
Engine 153   57,2-08
Engine 154   28,123,147,2-47
Engine 155   29,2-36
Engine 156   1,19,125,2-57
Engine 157   12,125,2-67
Engine 158   27
Engine 159   29,125
Engine 160   29,133
Engine 161   2,125
Engine 162   125,135
Engine 163   121
Engine 164   35
Engine 165   25,122
Engine 166   88
Engine 167   53
Engine 168   28,2-48 
Engine 201   32,2-48,2-49
Engine 202   12,80
Engine 203   93,2-40
Engine 204   4,13,79,2-51
Engine 205   3,36,40,2-46
Engine 206   32,132
Engine 207   119
Engine 208   76
Engine 209   18,58,60,118
Engine 210   13
Engine 211   33,35,2-45
Engine 212   30,134,2-45
Engine 213   14,81,2-59
Engine 214   9,25,2-25,2-26
Engine 215   70,134
Engine 216   80,2-38
Engine 217   60,2-56
Engine 218   81,2-21
Engine 219   19,24,136,137
Engine 220   77,2-48
Engine 221   9,2-34,2-43
Engine 222   57,2-51
Engine 224   38,2-47
Engine 225   51,131,2-60,2-61,2-67
Engine 226   54
Engine 227   24,90,111,2-48
Engine 228   122
Engine 229   81,134,135
Engine 230   66,2-47,2-52
Engine 231   40,2-22,2-48
Engine 233   93,2-50
Engine 234   32,90,2-53
Engine 235   89,113
Engine 236   90
Engine 237   13,40,2-43
Engine 238   13,25,133
Engine 239   123
Engine 240   13,2-07
Engine 241   54
Engine 242   96
Engine 243   70,92,114
Engine 244   57, 2-13
Engine 245   1,44, 2-13
Engine 246   14,60,138,2-50
Engine 247   70
Engine 248   12,72,73,119,2-47
Engine 249   39,72
Engine 250   93
Engine 251   6,11,90,2-45
Engine 252   55
Engine 253   19
Engine 254   10,42
Engine 255   62, 2-18,2-19
Engine 256   129, 2-14
Engine 257   26
Engine 258   2-18
Engine 259   3,27,115
Engine 260   12,21
Engine 261   78,136,2-14,2-56
Engine 262   2-26
Engine 263   11,2-39,2-42
Engine 264   3,20,2-65
Engine 265   6,7
Engine 266   6,10,2-07
Engine 267   10,31,2-07
Engine 268   31,122
Engine 269   27
Engine 270   4,81
Engine 271   12,2-63
Engine 272   2,43
Engine 273   2-25
Engine 274   3,6
Engine 275   118,131,2-54
Engine 276   124
Engine 277   76
Engine 278   2-25
Engine 279   96
Engine 280   31,2-26
Engine 281   116
Engine 282   2-35
Engine 283   64,2-46
Engine 284   712-46
Engine 285   30
Engine 286   38
Engine 287   4,57,61,67,110,2-01
Engine 288   19,38,57,2-40
Engine 289   3,53,2-66
Engine 290   2-33,2-34
Engine 291   2-19
Engine 292   36,110,2-01
Engine 293   2-08
Engine 294   79
Engine 295   43,111
Engine 296   10,44,99
Engine 297   146,147
Engine 298   118,2-54
Engine 299   88,118,2-54
Engine 301   2-25
Engine 302   35
Engine 303   2-23
Engine 304   71
Engine 305   50
Engine 306   38,67
Engine 307   29,2-50
Engine 308   95
Engine 309   94
Engine 310   97
Engine 311   85
Engine 312   135
Engine 313   60,2-60
Engine 314   97
Engine 315   2-05
Engine 316   124
Engine 317   123
Engine 318   44
Engine 319   42,43
Engine 320   94
Engine 321   38 
Engine 323   52
Engine 324   53
Engine 325   92,2-39,2-40
Engine 326   1,71
Engine 327   14,60,138
Engine 328   3,20,2-65
Engine 329   27
Engine 330   97
Engine 331   10,63,125
Engine 332   10,50,51,2-62,2-63

LADDERS  
Ladder 001   31,113
Ladder 002   5,206
Ladder 003   4,57,94
Ladder 004   2-37
Ladder 005   242-55,2-56
Ladder 006   2-41
Ladder 007   2-42
Ladder 008   31,99
Ladder 009   10,2-43
Ladder 010   7,31,113
Ladder 011   89,111,2-43
Ladder 012   138
Ladder 013   9,29,2-53
Ladder 014   49,50,2-16,2-45
Ladder 015   1,5,2-44
Ladder 016   8,15,75,2-43
Ladder 017   131
Ladder 018   16,20,21,82,133
Ladder 019   21,2-49
Ladder 020   75,2-68
Ladder 021   7,57
Ladder 022   11,2-55
Ladder 023   145,2-43
Ladder 024   70
Ladder 025   73,74,2-40
Ladder 026   145,146
Ladder 027   141,2-44,2-45
Ladder 028   9,2-43,2-58
Ladder 029   2-01,2-02
Ladder 030   2-36
Ladder 031   14,111,2-09,2-52
Ladder 032   21,46,141
Ladder 033   139
Ladder 034   2-04
Ladder 035   6,118,145
Ladder 036   2-27
Ladder 037   25
Ladder 038   82
Ladder 039   9,46,64,93,118,124,145,2-59
Ladder 040   18,2-43
Ladder 041   63
Ladder 042   14,42,140
Ladder 043   48,100
Ladder 044   2-11
Ladder 045   76.93
Ladder 046   42
Ladder 047   2-34,2-35
Ladder 048   13,31,2-39
Ladder 049   2-35
Ladder 050   61
Ladder 051   2-19
Ladder 052   1,2-53,2-54
Ladder 053   9,52
Ladder 054   2-27
Ladder 055   68,118
Ladder 056   67
Ladder 057   47,129
Ladder 058   88,141
Ladder 059   20,140,2-29,2-49
Ladder 060   47
Ladder 061   55
Ladder 076   4,125
Ladder 077   57,2-08
Ladder 078   29,54,125,2-36
Ladder 079   19,125
Ladder 080   12,2-67
Ladder 081   29,125,133
Ladder 082   135
Ladder 083   121
Ladder 084   35
Ladder 085   25,122,125
Ladder 086   88
Ladder 087   52 
Ladder 101   12,80
Ladder 102   18,59,60,118
Ladder 103   14,19,87,2-33,2-34,2-39
Ladder 104   9,35,2-34
Ladder 105   7,24,136
Ladder 106   13,25,133
Ladder 107   48,50,2-60,2-61
Ladder 108   39,2-38,2-61
Ladder 109   54
Ladder 110   119
Ladder 111   9,25,2-25,2-26
Ladder 112   76
Ladder 113   39,72
Ladder 114   32,51,2-48,2-49
Ladder 115   2-18
Ladder 116   78,136,2-56
Ladder 117   11,2-39,2-42
Ladder 118   36,2-46
Ladder 119   11,33,35,2-45,2-53
Ladder 120   40,2-22,2-48
Ladder 121   6,7,10,31,2-07
Ladder 122   77
Ladder 123   90
Ladder 124   12,2-63
Ladder 125   81,2-05
Ladder 126   25,2-23
Ladder 127   118,2-54
Ladder 128   27,115
Ladder 129   2-25
Ladder 130   10,44,99,146,147
Ladder 131   96
Ladder 132   31,2-26
Ladder 133   131
Ladder 134   3,20,2-65
Ladder 135   38
Ladder 136   36,38,57,61,67,110,2-01
Ladder 137   31,122
Ladder 138   2-66
Ladder 139   Never organized
Ladder 140   2-19
Ladder 141   Never organized
Ladder 142   30
Ladder 143   79
Ladder 144   43,111
Ladder 145   Never organized
Ladder 146   81,134,135
Ladder 147   116
Ladder 148   2-35
Ladder 149   71
Ladder 150   2-25
Ladder 151   50
Ladder 152   38,67,88
Ladder 153   42
Ladder 154   29,2-50
Ladder 155   35,95
Ladder 156   124
Ladder 157   62,2-18
Ladder 158   85
Ladder 159   94
Ladder 160   71
Ladder 161   1,57
Ladder 162   71
Ladder 163   92,135,2-39,2-40
Ladder 164   60,2-60
Ladder 165   123
Ladder 166   44
Ladder 167   38,94
Ladder 168   70,92,114
Ladder 169   14,60,138,2-50
Ladder 170   26
Ladder 171   27,111
Ladder 172   97
Ladder 173   63,125
Ladder 174   97
Ladder 175   48,50,2-61,2-62,2-63
Ladder 176   20,74,93,138
TCU 712       2-14,2-49
TCU 732       2-50
TCUs            75
 

COMBINED FIRE COMPANIES
CFCs           127

BATTALIONS
BC01   31,113
BC02   24,84,87,2-55,2-63
BC03   13,14,31,75,2-09,2-39,2-68
BC04   16,20,133
BC05   29,31,75,2-64,2-65,2-68
BC06   4,57,93,94
BC07   29,138,2-09
BC08   5,44,2-06
BC09   2-37
BC10   9,13,29,2-03,2-53,2-63
BC11   11,18,2-55,2-63
BC12   49,50,143
BC13   76,2-04
BC14   131
BC15   9,46,124
BC16   9,145,146,2-43,2-58,2-59
BC17   21,67,2-11
BC18   73,88,141
BC19   139
BC20   
BC21   29,2-08,2-61,2-62
BC22   12,19,125,2-67
BC23   
BC24   13,2-59
BC25   48,2-57,2-58
BC26   21,42,68
BC27   13,14,25,40,2-09,2-42
BC28   12,57,2-42,2-63,2-64
BC29   50,90,2-62
BC30   
BC31   119
BC32   12,79,93
BC33   124,2-67
BC34   18,58,59,60
BC35   39,81,2-38
BC36   13,25,133,2-01
BC37   57,81,2-42,2-51
BC38   32,90
BC39   90,2-60,2-61,2-62
BC40   32,70,122,2-25
BC41   12,72,73
BC42   70,71,92,114
BC43   1,14
BC44   40,2-22
BC45   27,115
BC46   11,53,61,67,110,2-39
BC47   7,31,122,2-07
BC48   13,77,2-07
BC49   124,135
BC50   118,2-54,2-63
BC51   79,95,131
BC52   2,43,111
BC53   38,71
BC54   123
BC55   10,14,42
BC56   2-45
BC57   89,113
BC58   26,40,97
BC59   42,131
BC60   2-21

DIVISIONS   
DC01   24,31,84,139,2-68
DC02   73,87,127,2-68
DC03   70,73
DC04   49,100,2-58
DC05   49,53,145
DC06   68
DC07   118,128,2-09
DC08   28,29,123,133,147
DC09   55
DC10   123
DC11   35,81,119
DC12   13,93,96,97
DC13   55,81
DC14   29,53
DC15   26,55,64,93,2-46
DC16   
DC17   55

RESCUES 
RS01   29,30,31,38,44,57,139
RS02   13,32,138,2-39
RS03   68,76
RS04   36,110,124,2-01
RS05   29,2-36
RS06   


SQUADS
1         2-36
2         140
3         2-52
4         127,2-22,2-46
5
6
7         2-42
8         2-46,2-47,2-52
9
21
22
24
1
18       2-43
41
61
252
270
288
Squads 2-45




MARINE UNITS
Engine 043  2-29
Engine 051   7,2-33
Engine 057   1,2-33
Engine 066   39,51,55,2-32
Engine 077   8,2-29,2-30
Engine 078   8,9,51,2-33
Engine 085   2-32
Engine 086   1,2-31
Engine 087   1,2-32
Engine 223   2-31
Engine 232   5,20,40,74,138,2-32
M1   1,38,2-68
M2   
M3   63,125
M4   
M5   9,51
M6   39,51,55
M7   
M8   5,145
M9   7
MarDiv 2-30,2-31,2-32
 

FIRE PATROL
FP1      26
FP2      26,2-43
FP3      26
FP4      3, 26
FP5      26
FP6      2, 26
FP7      26
FP8      26
FP9      26
FP10    26
   
Sal      136
Sal 2    2-57

Salvage 1,2,3,4,5   2-28 


Superpumper      2-34,2-45
   
Water Towers    76,83
 
ACU 31               2-39
 
Hose                   2-08

EMS                 
17                      2-35
23                      2-48
26                      2-50

Yellow apparatus   2-37


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on December 31, 2017, 12:26:59 PM
Engine 287/Ladder136/Battalion 46    Firehouse  86-53 Grand Avenue  Elmhurst, Queens  14th Division 46th Battalion "Elmhurst Eagles"

     Engine 287 organized 86-18 Broadway former firehouse Wandowenock Engine 1    1913
     Engine 287 new firehouse 86-53 Grand Avenue                                                   1914
     Engine 287 moved to 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                               1996
     Engine 287 returned to 86-53 Grand Avenue                                                       1997

     Engine 287-2 organized 67-32 Queens Blvd former volunteer firehouse                 1913
     Engine 287-2 moved to new firehouse 64-18 Queens Blvd                                    1914
     Engine 287-2 became Engine 292                                                                       1918

     Ladder 136 organized 91-12 43rd Avenue former volunteer firehouse                    1913
     Ladder 136 new firehouse 86-53 Grand Avenue w/Engine 287                              1914
     Ladder 136 moved to 56-29 68th Street at Engine 288                                        1974
     Ladder 136 returned to 86-53 Grand Avenue at Engine 287                                 1976
     Ladder 136 moved to 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                              1996
     Ladder 136 returned to 86-53 Grand Avenue at Engine 287                                 1997

     Battalion 2 LICFD organized 40-08 Astoria Boulevard at Engine 5 LICFD               1891
     Battalion 2 LICFD becomes Battalion 16 FDNY                                                    1898
     Battalion 16 becomes Battalion 36                                                                     1898
     Battalion 36 becomes Battalion 46                                                                     1906
     Battalion 46 new firehouse 42-06 Astoria Boulevard with Engine 163                    1909
     Battalion 46 disbanded                                                                                      1909
     Battalion 46 reorganized 86-18 Broadway w/Engine 287                                      1913
     Battalion 46 new firehouse 86-53 Grand Avenue w/Engine 287                            1914
     Battalion 46 moved to 97-28 43rd Avenue at Engine 289                                    1974
     Battalion 46 returned to 86-53 Grand Avenue at Engine 287                               1976
     Battalion 46 moved to 108-01 Horace Harding Expressway at Engine 324            1996
     Battalion 46 returned to 46-53 Grand Avenue at Engine 287                               1997


Note:  Elmhurst was protected by the volunteer Newtown Fire Department prior to 1913.  Elmhurst companies were:
     Wandowenock Engine 1  86-18 Broadway        1843-1913
     Wandowenock Ladder 1  86-18 Broadway        1890-1913
     Elmhurst Ladder 11  91-12 43rd Avenue          1896-1913


September 1, 1913:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4fvev2tt1/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4fvev2tt1/)


86-18 Broadway (firehouse of Wandowenock Engine 1 and Ladder 1 - original firehouse Engine 287):   
   
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7zhckwjo5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7zhckwjo5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8p04x9rxh/3_E_287_Wan_Vol_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8p04x9rxh/)


Weathervane from 86-18 Broadway former firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9rabftxw5/4_E_287_Wan_Vol_fh_3_weathervane.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9rabftxw5/)


91-12 43rd Avenue (original firehouse L 136 - firehouse of volunteer Elmhurst Ladder 11 ):

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/x5iarrv91/5_Elmhurst_Ladder_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x5iarrv91/)


86-53 Grand Avenue:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9h7eakvwl/Eng_287_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9h7eakvwl/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4fvev56ol/6_E_287_fh_13.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4fvev56ol/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/x5iart5jp/7_E_287_fh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x5iart5jp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/55e77kk3p/8_E_287_fh_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/55e77kk3p/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/dnnnbxlhh/10_E_287_L_136_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dnnnbxlhh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4smt1frk5/11_E_287_fh_10.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/swdkprs1h/12_E_287_L_136_response.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/swdkprs1h/)


Engine 287:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/l51g4znkl/E_287_Mack.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l51g4znkl/)
     
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/y7shaj3ud/14_E_287_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5uwzk3kp1/15_E_287_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/55e77r7at/16_E_287_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)


Ladder 136:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7mpyf297p/17_ladder_136_1955.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/c8m2nfhw5/18_L_136_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/48cdch0k5/22490020_1885879878095135_5628824801904315718_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/48cdch0k5/)


Battalion 46:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wsqwly7xx/19_BC_46_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wsqwly7xx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6kfrwkvk5/20_BC_46_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6kfrwkvk5/)


SSL-136:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vixokfdrp/21032760_1831274650222325_6144109463932489548_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vixokfdrp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yd0txw339/21077399_1831274663555657_8067389319069677020_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yd0txw339/)


Engine 287/Ladder 136/Battalion 46:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsubXIHFY3I

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_94zsHRPyE

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gFkQLPA9X8


Engine 287/Ladder 136/Battalion 46 Centennial: 

     http://www.qchron.com/editions/central/firehouse-celebrates-years-in-queens/article_026ccdb8-f0a2-5792-a32a-c73f08ba7593.html


Ladder 136 FDNY Medals:

     FF JAMES J. FLOOD LAD. 136 OFF DUTY JUL. 4, 1944 PRENTICE

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6i0hnfrk5/Flood.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6i0hnfrk5/)

     LT WILLIAM A. SIEGEL BAT. 46 L-138 OCT. 29, 1981 HISPANIC

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/3mnegbv79/Siegel.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3mnegbv79/)

     LT JOHN W. COLLINS LAD. 136 APR. 23, 1986 SIGNAL 77

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ivdbuch8l/Collins.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ivdbuch8l/)

     FF ANTHONY SANNELLA, JR LAD. 136 FEB. 1, 1992 MARTIN

          (https://i.postimg.cc/HJB2K0n2/Sannella.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/HJB2K0n2)


Engine 287/Ladder 136 LODDs: 

     FF Peter Farley, Ladder 136, fell sliding pole, August 16, 1949

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/fi0hti8g5/21_LODD_Farley.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fi0hti8g5/)

     FF Joseph Dugan, Ladder 136, collision with Rescue 4, July 31, 1954

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/eshph5nc5/22_LODD_Dugan.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eshph5nc5/)
   
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/i9ocxxwdh/Rescue_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i9ocxxwdh/)

     FF Samuel A Schiller, Engine 324 detailed to Ladder 136, collision with Rescue 4, July 31, 1954

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/uqqf7cf05/23_Samuel.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uqqf7cf05/)

     FF Robert Dayton - Engine 287, November 26, 1988 - LODD Port Washington Fire Department - Captain Robert Dayton, a 28-year-old firefighter died after being trapped in a smoke-filled building.  It was the first time in 40 years that Port Washington's volunteer Fire Department had a LODD. Captain Dayton was a member of FDNY Engine 287 and was a volunteer in his hometown for 10 years.   

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/efqbb1xdh/24_Dayton_Family.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/efqbb1xdh/)

          http://www.pwfdhistory.com/g1/albums/memoriam_dayton/dpnews881208_pz_web.pdf

          http://www.pwfd.com/?page_id=567

     Capt Wayne Smith, burned Box 22-7876, 81-04 37th Avenue, died August 7, 1994

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/nar5lntwl/25_LODD_Smith.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nar5lntwl/)

     FF Michael Cawley, World Trade Center, September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/nar5lo9c5/26_Lodd_CAWLEY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nar5lo9c5/)

          http://www.ffmichaeljcawley.org/bio.html

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=126941

     FF Christopher Pickford, World Trade Center, September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ml8d9cyit/27_LODD_Pickford_Christopher.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ml8d9cyit/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/tnonline/story.aspx?personid=131674

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/noshl7gk5/20141009_125704.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/noshl7gk5/)
 
     RIP.  Never forget.



Elmhurst: 

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9h2swrtn9/9_E_287_fh_14.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9h2swrtn9/)

     Original Dutch name Middenburgh.  Changed to Newtown.  Then Elmhurst.

     https://www.flickr.com/photos/21253580@N06/with/2227501380/

     http://oldelmhurst.blogspot.com/

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2011/04/forgottentour-39-newtown-elmhurst-queens/



     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6lub3ohlx/Bn_46_patch.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6lub3ohlx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6a89d6yxh/E_287_logo.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6a89d6yxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lvpkx5qb9/L_136_logo.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lvpkx5qb9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/u17mvbtzp/xx_E_287_logo_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u17mvbtzp/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on December 31, 2017, 05:49:05 PM
Captain Wayne E. Smith, Ladder 136

NYTimes  Death of Queens Fire Company's Leader Ends 59-Day Vigil
By JAMES BARRON
Published: October 5, 1994

"The signal -- a sequence of five bells repeated four times -- echoed through firehouses across the city yesterday. Slowly, solemnly, it confirmed what a telephone call had already told the firefighters at Ladder Company 136 in Elmhurst, Queens: the 59-day vigil for their commanding officer was over.

The commander, Capt. Wayne E. Smith, was trapped in a two-alarm fire on Aug. 7. With burns over 40 percent of his body and lung injuries from the air in the burning building at 81-04 37th Avenue, Captain Smith died at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. His wife, Connie, had kept a daily vigil. Fire Commissioner Howard Safir had stopped by nearly every day.

"Fifty-nine days of waiting for what was really the inevitable, unfortunately," Commissioner Safir said yesterday. "The prognosis from the beginning was extremely critical. We all hoped against hope."

Captain Smith, at 37 one of the youngest captains in the department, was the fifth firefighter to die in the line of duty this year.

At Captain Smith's firehouse -- its nickname, chosen by the firefighters and emblazoned on T-shirts they wear off duty, is Wayne's World -- the news seemed not to have sunk in, despite the telephone call, the bells and the flag at half-staff.

"There's a feeling like it's not really happening, that Wayne's going to wake up," said a firefighter, Duecy Smith, who is not related to Captain Smith.

He and other rank-and-file firefighters at Company 136 -- "truckies," they call themselves with pride -- remembered Captain Smith as someone who, in only nine months as a commander, had raised morale.

"To win over a firehouse that quickly takes considerable talent," Commissioner Safir said. "He was a real leader in the firehouse. No one was surprised that Wayne led his men into this fire and was right in front. They found him on the floor above where the fire was. One of the duties of a ladder company is to go above the fire floor and search for victims. That's exactly what Wayne was doing, putting his life in jeopardy to save others."

On the way in, firefighters faced huge volumes of smoke and flame. Captain Smith was one of the first to go inside.

Other firefighters discovered Captain Smith, overcome by the smoke, on an upper floor. Fourteen other firefighters were also injured, two seriously. Commissioner Safir said the blaze was still under investigation but is believed to have been caused by faulty electrical  wiring."


RIP.  Never forget.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on December 31, 2017, 05:52:51 PM
Robert H. Dayton, Engine 287, was killed at an arson fire while serving as a member of Flower Hill Hose Co. #1, Nassau County, on, November 26, 1988.


3rd Alarm, 165 Main Street, Post Washington, LI
0729 hrs, November 26, 1988:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/p9blp5drp/ccccc.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p9blp5drp/)

While commanding a search and rescue team at an apartment fire on Main Street, he became trapped and ran out of air. Due to the intense heat and smoke, repeated efforts to rescue Captain Dayton were unsuccessful. He was later pronounced dead at St. Francis Hospital. The Nassau County Police Homocide Squad and Fire Marshall’s Office later ruled the cause of the fire to be arson.

Captain Dayton attended Schreiber High School and later studied computers at Nassau Community College. He joined Flower Hill Hose Co. #1 at 18 years old. In addition to serving as a volunteer in Port Washington, he was also a professional firefighter with the Fire Department, City of New York, assigned to Engine Company 287 in Elmhurst, Queens. He was posthumously promoted to Captain of Flower Hill Hose Company #1.

The Port Washington Fire Department continued to mourn the loss of Captain Dayton. In 2010 the Town of North Hempstead renamed Haven Avenue, where Flower Hill Hose Co. #1 is located, Captain Robert H. Dayton Way.


RIP.  Never forget.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on December 31, 2017, 06:44:11 PM
FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section - Thread continues 1st Section 

Many FDNY and NYC firehouses and berths served as quarters for FDNY, Brooklyn FD, Long Island City FD, fire patrols, police, airport, federal, military, commercial and volunteer departments and companies.  The original sheds which housed the first fire companies formed to protect NYC in the late 1700s and early 1800s are gone.  But many of the original firehouses built by the volunteer departments, FDNY, Brooklyn and LIC in the mid and late 1800s still exist - some operate as active firehouses, some serve community, business or housing purposes.  Current FDNY firehouses include historic and new state-of-the-art fire stations.  This thread is dedicated to the firehouses, their companies, their apparatus, their histories and the firefighters who served in them.

 "mack", let me THANK YOU for continuing with the FDNY and NYC Firehouse thread. By far the 1st section the MOST POPULAR and VIEWED thread on this site. As the year 2017 comes to a close and 2018 begins, that first thread had a total of 147 pages, about 2,200 replies and almost 800,000 views.

 The series now continues with "The 2nd Section", and I'm sure for many of us who have been around for awhile, we can certainly appreciate the newest title. Kind of rings a bell of those very busy days when the FDNY had so many fires and runs, some firehouses had to have TWO separate Engine Companies or maybe even TWO separate Ladder Companies operating out of the same firehouse. (examples: Engine 41-1, Engine 41-2, or Ladder 103-1, Ladder 103-2).

 With your most recent firehouse posting of Eng 287/Lad 136/B46, together some of us on this site had the privilege of visiting that firehouse a while back where the members there treated us GREAT.

 Thanks for the history, the pictures, the stories and the videos unique to each Firehouse of NYC that you post. As well as the many other contributions that other members have contributed as well.

 A GREAT start with only a few hours left to begin the New Year of 2018.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 01, 2018, 01:22:40 PM
Battalion 46 - Originally organized as Battalion 2 in paid Long Island City Fire Department (LICFD) in Astoria at quarters of Engine 5 (LICFD - became Engine 263 FDNY ) and Ladder 4 (LICFD - became Ladder 117 FDNY).  Battalion 2 (LICFD) became Battalion 16 (FDNY), then Battalion 36, then was disbanded, then reorganized as Battalion 46 in Elmhurst.

     Battalion 2 (LICFD) organized 40-08 Astoria Boulevard at Engine 5 (LICFD) and Ladder 4 (LICFD)      1891
     Battalion 2 (LICFD) became Battalion 16 (FDNY)                                                                             1898
     Battalion 16 became Battalion 36                                                                                                   1898
     Battalion 36 became Battalion 46                                                                                                   1906
   
          40-08 Astoria Boulevard firehouse:
         
                (https://s18.postimg.cc/pkkbtswdx/M3_Y46060.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pkkbtswdx/)
     
     Battalion 46 moved to firehouse 42-06 Astoria Boulevard with Engine 163/Ladder 67     1909
     
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/596862odx/E_263.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/596862odx/)
     
     Battalion 46 disbanded                                                                                      1909
     
     Battalion 46 reorganized 86-18 Broadway w/Engine 287                                       1913
     
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8mlb7wx9x/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8mlb7wx9x/)


Battalion 46 new firehouse 86-53 Grand Avenue w/Engine 287/Ladder 136            1914

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ar5o94onp/Eng_287_fh_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ar5o94onp/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/kcz8p4xqd/6_E_287_fh_13.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kcz8p4xqd/)


     - thanks fdhistorian
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on January 01, 2018, 02:26:14 PM
Battalion 46 - originally organized in Astoria at quarters of Engine 163 (became Engine 263) and Ladder 67 (became Ladder 117).  Engine 163 and Ladder 67 were paid Long Island City Fire Department companies located on Flushing Avenue (became Astoria Boulevard).  Battalion 46 was disbanded and then reorganized in Elmhurst at Engine 287 in 1913.

     Battalion 46 organized 40-08 Astoria Boulevard at Engine 163/Ladder 67               1906

     Battalion 46 moved firehouse 42-06 Astoria Boulevard with Engine 163/Ladder 67     1909
     
     Battalion 46 disbanded                                                                                      1909
 
     Battalion 46 reorganized 86-18 Broadway w/Engine 287                                  1913
     
     Battalion 46 new firehouse 86-53 Grand Avenue w/Engine 287/Ladder 136            1914


Originally, Battalion 46 came into the FDNY in 1898 as Queens Battalion 16 having been Long Island City Battalion 2.
Later in 1898, Queens Battalion 16 was renumbered as the original Battalion 36.
Battalion 36 was renumbered as Battalion 46 in 1906.
It was at 40-08 Astoria Blvd since 1894.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on January 02, 2018, 07:04:59 PM
BILL TOMPKINS FDNY FH PHOTOS....   http://www.btfirephotos.com/Firehouses/FDNY-New-York-Firehouses/FDNY-Firehouses/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on January 04, 2018, 10:11:55 PM
Some more info on Fire Patrol 2 FH but i put it here because it also contains info on former FDNY FHs in other Boros....   https://untappedcities.com/2014/02/13/7-repurposed-fire-stations-in-nyc/?displayall=true  ....In the "untapped cities" link above ^^^^^ Picture #1 in addition to ENG*31 also housed SQ*8......... #4 ENG*30 originally had 3 Sections...after they were disbanded the bldg housed the Medical Office (into the late '60s until the MO moved to Lafayette St w/LAD*20) the Spring St FH also had SATELITE*2 by itself which was manned by 2 FFs.....prior to The FDNY Museum moving to Spring St they were in the third & then separate bay & 3 floor portion of the FH on Duane St attached to ENG*7...LAD*1...BN*1.....after 9-11 that 1/3 of the FH was used as a Command Center during the Recovery then it became Manhattan Boro Command for awhile...... #8 ENG*206 was 2 separate houses built together.....206 was in the left half & the right side although lettered for LAD*133 was never occupied .....& in the '50s/'60s was primarily for storage of old equipment & pretty deteriorated...the apparatus floor had some antique horse & hand drawn rigs that were later refurbished & placed in the basement office area of the Dept Shops....the 2nd floor had hundreds of WW2 4 gal galvanized "Stirrup Pumps" that had originally been all around NYC for use by Auxiliaries & or Air Wardens in case of an incendiary bomb attack by air.....the 3rd fl had hundreds of red Civil Defense steel pot helmets.....after 206 moved to the new Qtrs just over on Grand in the late '70s the old FH became a wicker basket sales place for many years....during Sandy both the old & new FHs flooded as nearby Newtown Creek rose....some of these FHs have been discussed in more detail in other posts but this is just a little info on these pictures....also continue scrolling the "untapped" link for some more interesting non FD but NYC places.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 14, 2018, 10:03:19 PM
Engine 292  Firehouse  64-18 Queens Boulevard  Woodside, Queens  14th Division, 46th Battalion "Winfield Cougars"

     Engine 287-2 organized 67-32 Queens Boulevard at former volunteer quarters   1913
     Engine 287-2 new firehouse 64-18 Queens Boulevard                                       1914
     Engine 287-2 disbanded – became Engine 292                                                 1918
     Engine 292 organized 64-18 Queens Boulevard                                                1918

     Rescue 4 organized 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                              1931
     Rescue 4 moved 30-89 21st Street at Engine 262                                            1996
     Rescue 4 returned 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                               1997
     Rescue 4 moved 30-89 21st Street at Engine 262                                            1999
     Rescue 4 returned 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                               2000
     Rescue 4 moved 27-12 Kearney St with Engine 316                                         2013
     Rescue 4 returned 64-18 Queens Blvd at Engine 292                                       2015
     
     Foam Unit Queens located 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292              1965-1972

     Ladder 136 located 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                        1996-1997

 
Former Woodside volunteer company replaced by Engine 287-2 was Gooderson Engine 2 of the Newtown Fire Department.  Gooderson Engine 2 was organized in 1862 at Thompson Avenue (Queens Bouldvard) and Fisk Avenue.  Gooderson Engine 2 relocated a new firehouse at Thompson Avenue and Fisk Avenue (67-32 Queens Boulevard) in 1882.     

Original firehouse (Thompson Ave became Queens Blvd):

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hsqf7jgnp/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hsqf7jgnp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/eyn9u3m79/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eyn9u3m79/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/oj6wgzj91/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oj6wgzj91/)


64-18 Queens Boulevard firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/g4r9t7ng5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g4r9t7ng5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/aqshlqib9/4_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/aqshlqib9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5fdl113yd/4_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5fdl113yd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wpyw8yu0l/4_d.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wpyw8yu0l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4okuux1hh/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4okuux1hh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7jxy250g5/4_c.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7jxy250g5/)
   
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/k14lowqcl/4_f.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/k14lowqcl/)


Engine 292:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mrdxm5zx1/5_E_292_Ahrens_Fox.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mrdxm5zx1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9guo6cgpx/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9guo6cgpx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/e94hhu8tx/6_E_292_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e94hhu8tx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4okuuyyxh/7_E_292_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4okuuyyxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cu2wt5i1h/12_E_292_ap_15.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cu2wt5i1h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/djlp5j5qd/13_E_292_ap_15_relocated_E_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/djlp5j5qd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/o6fiayllh/14_E_292_Ap_19.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o6fiayllh/)


     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9v1qXQKpa4

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnFW7GpOyvY


Engine 292 - 1st due - 8/25/09 All-Hands 65th Pl & 50th Ave

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rszTZhGuzrA


Engine 292 FDNY Medal:

     FF John Marshall  February 1, 1956 Kane Medal


Engine 292 LODDs:

     LT Robert Grant, heart attack in quarters, March 25, 1932:

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/eyn9uah45/8_E_292_LODD_Lt_Grant_Robert.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eyn9uah45/)

     LT Grant had been seriously injured as a member of Engine 23 in November 1913 when his steamer swerved to avoid a truck and he was thrown from apparatus.  He was also seriously injured as a member of Engine 33 in a collision with a hose wagon responding to a Manhattan fire in 1930. He was hospitalized for 3 months and required life-saving blood donations from 22 FFs.  He returned to full duty and was promoted to LT.
     

     FF Howard V. Colbert, KIA Saipan, Marianas Islands, WWII, July 9, 1944

          FF Colbert was killed on Saipan while serving as a Sergeant with Company H, 105th Infantry.

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/5e3n7ezhx/9_E_292_Lodd_Colbert_1944.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5e3n7ezhx/)

          Prior injury:

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/9agz3es79/10_E_292_LODD_Harry_Colbert.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9agz3es79/)


FF Vincent Schmitt. Engine 292, KIA, Belgium, WWII, January 6, 1945:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cu2wt82mt/11_E_292_LODD_Schmitt_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cu2wt82mt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/gdouj1d2d/12_E_292_LODD_Schmitt.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/gdouj1d2d/)


WWII Notes:

     The two Engine 292 members who were KIA during World War II have a sad similarity.  Both members fought in major WWII battles, the Battle of Saipan and the Battle of the Bulge.  Both battles had extremely high casualties and both were important Allied victories. Both Engine 292 members, unfortunately, lost their lives near the end of each battle.

FF Colbert - SGT US Army, 105th Infantry, KIA July 9, 1944

     Battle of Saipan:  The Battle of Saipan was a major battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands from June 15 to July 9, 1944. The US 2nd Marine Division, US 4th Marine Division and the US Army 27th Infantry Division defeated the 43rd Infantry Division of the Imperial Japanese Army, commanded by LT General Yoshitsugu Saito.
     By July 7, the Japanese had nowhere to retreat. Saito made plans for a final suicidal Banzai Charge. At dawn, with a group of 12 men carrying a great red flag in the lead, the remaining able-bodied troops — about 3,000 men — charged forward in the final attack. Amazingly, behind them came the wounded, with bandaged heads, crutches, and barely armed. The Japanese surged over the American front lines, engaging both Army and Marine units.
     MAJ Edward McCarthy, then in command of 2-105 Infantry and one of the few officers of the regiment to survive the attack, described the scene as follows: "It reminded me of one of those old cattle-stampede scenes of the movies. The camera is in a hole in the ground and you see the herd coming and they leap up and over you and are gone. Only the Japanese just kept coming and coming. I didn’t think they’d ever stop". This charge hit the 105th directly and violently, and the two lead battalions were overrun. LTC O'Brien led the defense in the 1-105 area, with a pistol in each hand and even manning a nearby .50 Caliber machine-gun until he was killed. When his body was found, there were 30 dead Japanese around him, and he received a posthumous Medal of Honor.
     When the carnage of the final charge finally ended, 2,295 dead Japanese lay in front of the 105th's positions, and another 2,016 lay intermingled or in the rear of the 105th's positions for a total of 4,311 dead. US casualties were also heavy, and 1-105 and 2-105 suffered 406 KIA and 512 WIA.  SGT Colbert was one of the KIAs and lost his life just before Saipan was declared "Secured".

     http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-saipan

FF Schmitt PVT US Army:

     PVT Schmitt was appointed to FDNY in 1939 just prior to the war.  He arrived in Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge, December 16, 1944 – January 25, 1945, which  was the last major German offensive campaign of World War II. It was launched through the densely forested Ardennes region in Belgium, France, and Luxembourg, on the Western Front, towards the end of World War II, in the European theatre. PVT Schmitt lost his life January 6, 1945, during the final German counter-offensive of the campaign.

     http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-the-bulge

RIP - Never forget.


Winfield history: 

     Named after General Winfield Scott

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2004/12/the-general-and-queens/

     1873 map:  http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/1700/Winfield+Town/Long+Island+1873/New+York/

          Note - Gooderson Engine 2 located at Columbia Avenue and North Shell Road (old street names)


     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7io08o8w5/15_E_292_Logo.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7io08o8w5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/grq6ivht1/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/grq6ivht1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5gniucy1h/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/5gniucy1h/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 14, 2018, 10:48:18 PM
Looks like "141 Hook & Ladder 141" is lettered above left front door bay on this early photograph of Engine 292's firehouse:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/q3c8fu22d/L_141.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q3c8fu22d/)


Ladder 141 was never organized.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 14, 2018, 11:59:12 PM
Gooderson Engine 2  Newtown Fire Department - Winfield, Long Island - Pre-FDNY Engine 292

     Gooderson Engine 2 was organized in 1862 at Thompson Avenue (Queens Boulevard) and Fisk Avenue. 
     Gooderson Engine 2 relocated a new firehouse at Thompson Avenue and Fisk Avenue (67-32 Queens Boulevard) in 1882.     


67-32 Queens Boulevard firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hsqf7jgnp/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hsqf7jgnp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/eyn9u3m79/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eyn9u3m79/)


Gooderson Engine 2 members:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/oi1k1gbzp/Gooderson_Engine_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oi1k1gbzp/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 12:16:23 PM
Engine 83/Ladder 29 Firehouse 618 East 138th Street, Mott Haven, Bronx 6th Division, 14th Battalion  "da' Bums on da' Hill"

     Engine 83 organized 618 East 138th Street w/Ladder 29                      1906

     Ladder 29 organized 618 East 138th Street w/Engine 83                      1906

     Bridge Chemical 63 located at 618 East 138th Street at Engine 83     1939-1944

     Satellite 2 located at 618 East 138th Street at Engine 83                  1965-1975


618 East 138th Street firehouse built 1906:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/h3hqpmath/e_83_FH_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h3hqpmath/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/fog613cd1/fdny_engine_771_medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fog613cd1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6gnxk8kol/E_83_fh_36.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6gnxk8kol/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hg94vuqj9/E_83_fh_25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hg94vuqj9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ht0j22bdx/E_83_l_29_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ht0j22bdx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pyil087cl/E_83_fh_47.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pyil087cl/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ht0j23lol/E_83_fh_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ht0j23lol/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/h3hqpqsut/E_83_fh_28.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h3hqpqsut/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/jxkw37agl/E_83_fh_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jxkw37agl/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/88gwf8yxh/E_83_fh_32.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/88gwf8yxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/jkthx2a79/E_83_fh_43.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jkthx2a79/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/c4u8bahd1/E_83.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c4u8bahd1/) 


Engine 83:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/s4cvuvnph/E_83_HORSES.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s4cvuvnph/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ijt981gdx/fdny_engine_951_medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ijt981gdx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/fpq3uk3x1/E_83_1936_Mack_1000_GPM.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fpq3uk3x1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ldwelgnp1/E_83_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ldwelgnp1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/40m46nptx/fdny_engine_465_medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/40m46nptx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/y5aks1i2d/fdny_engine_220_medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y5aks1i2d/)


Ladder 29:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/s5mtnypfp/L_29_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s5mtnypfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9q2cqkqqt/L_29_ap_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9q2cqkqqt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4typzaqpx/L_29_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4typzaqpx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/xjllvya5h/L_29_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xjllvya5h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/jr76zs8xx/L_29_ap_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jr76zs8xx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yzx4dmuxh/L_29_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yzx4dmuxh/)


Satellite 2:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cpdurqn4l/Sat_2_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cpdurqn4l/)


Engine 83/Ladder 29 Videos:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFlVY-pOLkA

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv-seVvmGqs

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yl2bcBwiIic


Engine 83 FDNY Medals:

     CAPT MICHAEL J. CLEARY 1949 STEPHENSON

     LT FRANK M. JACOBY MAR. 11, 1969 KENNY

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5v3k1wx0l/88_Jacoby.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5v3k1wx0l/)

     LT ANTHONY J. ALVA  JAN. 18, 1973 CONRAN

          FDNY 1959-1990, "Tough Tony", retired Captain Ladder 19.

     FF JOHN T. DONNELLAN MAR. 16, 1980 BRUMMER


Ladder 29 FDNY Medals:

     FF JAMES J. FLEURY  APR. 7, 1973 DELEHANTY

     FF JOSEPH KREBBS  SEP. 21, 1974 STEUBEN

     FF ELI V. GIAQUINTO   JUN. 17, 1978 HISPANIC

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ab96x8b9/Eli.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ab96x8b9/)

     LT DENNIS P. MARTIN  MAR. 16, 1980 AMERICAN LEGION

          FDNY 1962-1995, retired Deputy Chief

     FF FRANK UNGARO  APR. 29, 1980 MC ELLIGOTT

     CAPT FRANCIS G. GRIFFIN JAN. 11, 1981 FIRE MARSHALS

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/mvmgakumd/88_Griffin.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mvmgakumd/)

     FF RICHARD P. KEARNS  DEC. 3, 1986 WILLIAMS

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/imhq8feid/88_Kearns.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/imhq8feid/)

     FF ALFRED J. ZAHRA  DEC. 3, 1986 EMERALD

         (https://s18.postimg.cc/agzoaadet/88_Zahra.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/agzoaadet/)

     FF JAMES M. KERLEY  MAY 21, 1992 FIRE CHIEFS


Engine 83/Ladder 29 LODDs:

     FF JOSEPH FINGER LADDER 29 December 25, 1906

          Christmas Day, 1906, FF Finger was driving Ladder 29 back to quarters from a fire at 271 Ryder Avenue. While turning from St. Ann’s Avenue onto East 138th Street, the horses bolted. FF Finger, not wearing a seat belt, was jerked from his seat to the ground and the wheels passed over him. Six other fireman were injured, none seriously. Once at Lincoln Hospital, doctors discovered that FF Finger suffered from internal injuries and six fractured ribs. He died shortly after arriving at the hospital.

     FF JOHN DUFFY ENGINE 83 September 7, 1915

          On September 6, 1915, Engine 83 responded to an excavation site on 138th Street near Cypress Avenue for a trapped 12 year old boy who had fallen into the work site.  In trying to rescue the boy, FF Duffy fell 20 feet into the site.  The boy, Aaron Steinburg of 609 East 138th Street and FF Duffy sustained injuries.  They were rescued and transported to Lincoln Hospital.  The boy had scalp lacerations and survived but FF Duffy died the next day from head and internal injuries.  FF Duffy was 45 years old and lived at 3825 Eagle Avenue in the Bronx.   

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ih9maa79/Lo0dd_Duffy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ih9maa79/)


     FF THOMAS SCHOALES ENGINE 83 September 11, 2001

          FF Thomas Schoales, responded the World Trade Center terrorist attack on September 11, 2001, with members of Engine 4.  FF Schoales lost his life when the building collapsed while he was trying to save others.  FF Schoales was the son of BC Edward Schoales, FDNY.

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/rwp8y8f9x/engine-4-thomas-g-schoales-27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rwp8y8f9x/)
 
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/r7v9oaj6d/511822725a206a8d1126943a00f475f0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r7v9oaj6d/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/cantonrep/story.aspx?personid=147297

          https://nypost.com/2002/01/13/golden-boy-fireman-found-in-wtc-rubble/


     RIP.  Never forget.


Mott Haven:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mott_Haven,_Bronx

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2013/11/mott-haven%E2%80%94port-morris-bronx/


Pre-FDNY Mott Haven fire protection:

     Mott Haven Fire Department, a volunteer department, protected Mott Haven from the mid-1800s (unknown organization date) until it merged with the volunteer Morrisania Fire Department in 1856.  MFD provided fire protection until FDNY expanded into the Bronx when it was disbanded in 1874.

          Jackson Engine Company 4 served until 1874

          Mott Haven Ladder Company 2 served until 1874 at 2594 3rd Avenue

               Former firehouse current use: 
 
                    (https://s18.postimg.cc/w73wu07k5/2594_3rd_Ave_JL_Mott_Ladder_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/w73wu07k5/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 02:11:17 PM
Engine 83/Ladder 29 firehouse - Landmarks Preservation Commission - 2012

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yib5pok8l/z_57215979_0_ICRCd6_A0_F7b1_O2_Auo_NLw0_QUNs31zj2_BIc_Pg_TVl_Zy_JQ.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yib5pok8l/)

Landmarks Preservation Commission: The firehouse was completed in 1905 and landmarked in 2012.  The building, an early example of a "two-vehicle-bay firehouse", was designed by Robert Kohn and incorporates "Vienna Secessionist" style.


FIREHOUSE, ENGINE COMPANY 83, HOOK & LADDER COMPANY 29,  618 East 138th Street (aka 618-620 East 138th Street), the Bronx.  Built 1904-05; Robert D. Kohn, architect.
 
LANDMARK SITE: Borough of the Bronx
 
     On May 15, 2012, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held a public hearing on the proposed designation as a Landmark of the Firehouse, Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29 and the proposed designation of the related Landmark Site (Item No. 3).  The hearing had been duly advertised in accordance with the provisions of law.  There were two speakers in favor of designation: representatives of the Historic Districts Council and The Victorian Society New York. There were no speakers in opposition to designation. In addition, the Commission received a communication from the Fire Department of the City of New York in support of designation.
 
SUMMARY:

     The imposing two-story neo-Classical style Firehouse, Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29, in the Mott Haven section of the South Bronx, was constructed in 1904-05 during the period when an enormous number of public structures were being placed in neighborhoods throughout the five boroughs following the Consolidation of Greater New York in 1898. The architect of this firehouse was Robert D. Kohn, a graduate of Columbia University and the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, who emerged around this time as one of the few American architects (like Emery Roth early in his career) who produced major designs influenced by the Vienna Secession, between about 1905 and 1915. An early example of the two-vehicular-bay firehouse, a type that predominated in New York City for the next quarter century, this building is clad in salmon-colored brick with a monumental three-bay limestone enframement on the first story and a bracketed terra-cotta cornice. Within the elegantly composed neo-Classical ornamental vocabulary are subtle Secessionist references. Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29 has continuously served the neighborhood in this building since 1906.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS:
 
     Firefighting in New York - Even in the colonial period, the government of New York took the possibility of fire very seriously.  Under Dutch rule, all men were expected to participate in firefighting activities. After the English took over, the Common Council organized a force of 30 volunteer firefighters in 1737, operating two Newsham hand pumpers that had recently been imported from London. By 1798, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY), under the supervision of a chief engineer and six subordinates, was officially established by an act of the New York State Legislature.    As the city grew, this force was augmented by new volunteer companies. In spite of growing numbers of firefighters and improvements in hoses and water supplies, fire was a significant threat in an increasingly densely built up city. Of particular significance was the “Great Fire” of December 16-17, 1835, which caused more damage to property than any other event in New York City. The damages resulting from several major fires which occurred between 1800 and 1850 led to the establishment of a building code, and an increase in the number of firemen from 600 in 1800 to more than 4,000 in 1865. Despite rapid growth, the department was often criticized for poor performance.  Intense competition between companies began to hinder firefighting with frequent brawls and acts of sabotage, often at the scenes of fires. During the Civil War, when fire personnel became harder to retain, public support grew for the creation of a professional firefighting force, similar to that established in other cities and to the professional police force that had been created in New York in 1845.   In May 1865, the State Legislature established the Metropolitan Fire District, comprising the cities of New York (south of 86th Street) and Brooklyn. The act abolished the volunteer system and created the Metropolitan Fire Department, a paid professional force under the jurisdiction of the state government.  By the end of the year, the city’s 124 volunteer companies with more than 4,000 men had retired or disbanded, to be replaced by 33 engine companies and 12 ladder companies operated by a force of 500 men. Immediate improvements included the use of more steam engines, horses, and a somewhat reliable telegraph system. A military model was adopted for the firefighters, which involved the use of specialization, discipline, and merit. By 1870, regular service was extended to the “suburban districts” north of 86th Street and expanded still farther north after the annexation of part of the Bronx in 1874. New techniques and equipment, including taller ladders and stronger steam engines, increased the department’s efficiency, as did the establishment, in 1883, of a training academy for personnel. The growth of the city during this period placed severe demands on the Fire Department to provide services, and in response the department undertook an ambitious building campaign. The area served by the FDNY nearly doubled after the Consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, when the departments in Brooklyn and numerous communities in Queens and Staten Island were incorporated into the city. After the turn of the century, the Fire Department acquired more modern apparatus and motorized vehicles, reflecting the need for faster response to fires in taller buildings. Throughout the 20th century, the department endeavored  to keep up with the evolving city and its firefighting needs. 
 
FIREHOUSE DESIGN:

     By the early 20th century, the firehouse as a building type had evolved from the wooden storage shed used during the 17th century to an imposing architectural expression of civic character. As early as 1853, Marriott Field had argued in his City Architecture: Designs for Dwelling Houses, Stores, Hotels, etc. for symbolic architectural expression in municipal buildings, including firehouses. The 1854 Fireman’s Hall, 153 Mercer Street, with its highly symbolic ornamentation, reflected this approach, using flambeaux, hooks, ladders, and trumpets for its ornament.  Between 1880 and 1895, Napoleon LeBrun & Son served as the official architectural firm for New York’s Fire Department, designing 42 firehouses in a massive effort to modernize the facilities and to accommodate the growing population of the city. Although the firm’s earliest designs were relatively simple, later buildings were more distinguished and more clearly identifiable as firehouses. While the basic function and requirements of the firehouse were established early in its history, LeBrun is credited with standardizing the program, and introducing some minor, but important, innovations in the plan.  Placing the horse stalls in the main part of the ground floor to reduce the time needed for hitching horses to the apparatus was one such innovation. Firehouses were usually located on mid-block sites because these were less expensive than more prominent corner sites. Since the sites were narrow, firehouses tended to be three stories tall, with the apparatus on the ground story and rooms for the company, including dormitory, kitchen and captain’s office, above. After 1895, the department commissioned a number of well-known architects to design firehouses.  Influenced by the Classical Revival which was highly popular throughout the country, New York firms such as Hoppin & Koen, Flagg & Chambers, Horgan & Slattery, and Robert D. Kohn created facades with bold Classical style designs.   
 
GROWTH OF MOTT HAVEN AND THE BRONX:

     The site of the Firehouse, Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29 was originally part of the extensive land holdings purchased in 1670 by the Welsh-born Richard Morris (died 1672) and inherited in 1691 by his son Lewis Morris (1671-1746), later an Acting Governor of New York and Governor of New Jersey. Their estate, known as “Morrisania,” was part of Westchester County during the late 18th and most of the 19th centuries. In 1828, Jordan L. Mott, inventor of the coal-burning stove, bought a large tract of land in the southwestern part of Morrisania and established the Mott Haven Iron Works on the Harlem River at Third Avenue and 134th Street. The area around this business was developed with houses for Mott and his workers and became known as Mott Haven. Even though the larger area of Morrisania continued as a quiet, rural district, this section of Mott Haven developed more rapidly because of the expansion of the iron works and the advent of other industrial enterprises attracted by the Mott Haven Canal, which led from the Harlem River north to 138th Street. The New York & Harlem Railroad, incorporated in 1831, expanded over the Harlem River in 1840, bringing goods and people to the industrial community of Mott Haven. As the railroads and streetcars crossed the area, beginning in the 1860s, streets were laid out and land speculation began in earnest. In 1874, the townships of Morrisania, West Farms and Kingsbridge split from Westchester County and became the 23rd and 24th Wards of the City of New York, this area of the Bronx becoming known as the Annexed District. Beginning in the early 1880s, booster organizations such as the North Side Association advocated for infrastructure improvements; streets were paved, sewers dug, and mass transit lines brought the elevated trains to the Bronx. The El spurred tenement construction. By 1897, just a decade after the El began operation, the once vacant blocks east of Third Avenue were almost completely built over with solid brick buildings. This area held a mixture of building types: single-family rowhouses built in the late 1880s; multi-story apartment houses, built with increasing frequency in the 1890s; and various industrial and manufacturing establishments located along the neighborhood’s southern fringe. The population of the Bronx grew rapidly –  in 1890, there were 89,000 people living in the area of the Bronx known as the North Side, ten years later the population had more than doubled to over 200,000, and by 1915 the number had increased threefold to 616,000. As the population and number of new buildings increased,  protection from the ever present danger of fire became increasingly important. The firefighters of Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29 played a vital role in the Mott Haven community.
 
ENGINE 83, HOOK & LADDER 28:

     In the mid-19th century, as the Mott Haven Iron Works and the neighborhood’s residential development expanded, fire protection in Mott Haven became increasingly important. A volunteer company, J. & L. Mott Ladder 2, was established in a three-story wooden building at 2608 Third Avenue. With the annexation of this section of the Bronx to New York City in 1874, this volunteer squad was disbanded and replaced at the same location with Hook & Ladder Company 17, which moved in 1877 into a  rented four-story brick stable nearby at 589 (later re-numbered 341) East 143rd Street. By 1891, this company had 12 men and officers stationed here, with two horses, and one roller-frame hook-and-ladder truck with a fifty-foot extension ladder. That year they fought 60 fires, out of the total 158 fires that occurred in the entire lower Bronx. Following the Consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, when the entire Bronx became part of the city, it benefitted, as did all five boroughs, from the construction of an enormous number of new public structures, placed in all neighborhoods. Hook and Ladder Company 17 received a new two-bay firehouse (1906-07), designed by Michael J. Garvin.9  Immediately after Consolidation, plans were made for a second engine company and firehouse to be located in Mott Haven. A three-story $24,000 firehouse was proposed for 898 (later re-numbered 618) East 138th Street near Cypress Avenue in 1899, and plans were produced by architect Manly N. Cutter, Deputy Building Superintendent of the Fire Department, but these were not acted upon. In December 1903, the Fire Department signed a contract with architect Robert D. Kohn to prepare plans and specifications. Kohn filed for a two-story firehouse in July 1904, and construction occurred between January and October 1905 at a cost of $41,698. The contractor was Alfred Nugent & Son, a firm that built numerous public buildings, such as schools and firehouses, during this period. The Real Estate Record & Builders Guide noted that “The site for the new building is in a district crowded with factories and tenements. At present there is no firehouse within a radius of half a mile.”  The firehouse is an early example of the two-vehicular-bay firehouse, a type that predominated in New York City for the next quarter century. Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29 was officially organized in February 1906. It has continued to serve the neighborhood since that time.
 
THE ARCHITECT:

     Robert David Kohn (1870-1953), born in Manhattan, graduated from the College of the City of New York (1886) and Columbia University (1890), then attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris (1891-95). Upon his return to New York, he worked for a number of architectural firms before establishing his own independent practice in 1896. Among Kohn’s early commissions were town houses designed in an abstracted Beaux-Arts style, including 352-353 Riverside Drive (1899-1901); River Mansion, 337 Riverside Drive, and the neighboring 322 West 106th Street (1900-02); and 46 East 74th Street (1901-02).12 He was associate architect, with Carrere & Hastings, of the abstracted neo-Renaissance style New York Society for Ethical Culture School (1902-04), 33 Central Park West 13 (Kohn was a close personal friend of Dr. Felix Adler, the founder (1876) of the Society, and was a member and, later, president, of the congregation). His practice came to encompass warehouses, factories, and residential, commercial, office, and institutional buildings. Kohn emerged as one of the few American architects (like Emery Roth in his early career) who produced major designs influenced by the Vienna Secession, between about 1905 and 1915. These works, all aesthetically noteworthy and among Kohn’s most interesting work, included the Hermitage Hotel (1905-07; demolished), 592 Seventh Avenue, a bachelor apartment hotel; New York Evening Post Building (1906), 20 Vesey Street; Spero Building (1907-08), 23 West 21st Street, a store-and-loft structure for a wholesale millinery goods firm; and New York Society for Ethical Culture (1909-10), 2 West 64th Street.14 Kohn was married in 1905 to the sculptress Estelle Rumbold, who collaborated on the Evening Post and Ethical Culture projects.  Kohn’s Firehouse, Engine Company 83, Hook & Ladder Company 29 (1904-05), an imposing two-story neo-Classical style building, is clad in salmon-colored brick with a monumental three-bay limestone enframement on the first story and a bracketed terra-cotta cornice. Within the elegantly composed neo-Classical ornamental vocabulary are subtle Secessionist references, such as the concave segmental arches of the first-story enframement, the entablatures of the central pedestrian entrance and  first-story enframement, and the end terminating elements of the roof parapet. Kohn later explored a different modern aesthetic that sometimes referenced his earlier Secessionist influence, and presaged or paralleled such stylistic trends as modern Classicism and Art Deco. He designed the 11-story Auerbach & Sons factory (1915), 628-644 11th Avenue, which features vertical articulation, wide horizontal windows, and stylized geometric ornament, and additions to the R.H. Macy & Co. Department Store (1922-31), Seventh Avenue and West 34th Street.15 Kohn was a founder (1921) and president (1929) of the New York Building Congress and served as president of the American Institute of Architects (1930-32), director of the housing division of the Public Works Administration (1933-34), and vice president of the New York World’s Fair (1939-40), as well as a member of the fair’s board of design. He received the medal of honor in 1933 from the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Certain of his commissions were executed under the firm name of Robert D. Kohn & Associates. Kohn’s office address after 1917 was the same as architect Charles Butler’s,16 and he apparently formed a partnership with Butler that lasted, informally and formally, to at least 1952.17 They entered the competition for the design of the Nebraska State Capitol in 1919, and were responsible for the A.I. Namm & Son Department Store (1924-25, 1928-29), 454 Fulton Street, Brooklyn,18 and the 12-story Dorothy Gray Building (1928), 683 Fifth Avenue, which received a silver medal from the Fifth Avenue Association in 1929.19 Kohn and/or Butler joined with Clarence S. Stein on a number of projects. Stein (1883-1975), born in Rochester, New York, trained as an architect at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts (1908-11) and entered the office of Bertram G. Goodhue, where he became chief designer. Stein became best known as a pioneering planner, with Henry Wright, of housing projects and planned communities, including Sunnyside Gardens (1924-28), Queens, and Radburn, New Jersey (1928-32), for which Kohn was one of the architectural consultants. Among the collaborations of Kohn, Butler and Stein were: Parkwest Hospital (1925-26, Butler and Stein), 170 West 76th Street;20 Fieldston School buildings (1927-28, Kohn and Stein), operated by the Ethical Culture Society in Riverdale, the Bronx; Temple Emanu-El (1927-29, Kohn, Butler and Stein, with Mayers, Murray & Phillip), 840 Fifth Avenue; 21 and Fort Greene Houses (1942-44, Butler and Stein, with numerous other architects), Brooklyn.
 
DESCRIPTION - HISTORIC:

     Two-story neo-Classical style firehouse; salmon-colored brick cladding with three-bay, first-story limestone enframement; outer bays have historic pull-down paneled wood doors and historic FDNY company names; central bay has pedestrian entrance surmounted by entablature with bronze dedication plaque and segmental-arched window with leaded glass panes; three second-story tripartite windows with one-over-one double-hung wood sash; flagpole at central second-story window; bracketed terra-cotta cornice; roof parapet with stone coping and end terminating elements
 
ALTERATIONS:

     Metal pedestrian door; sidelights of central first-story leaded glass window; first-story electrical conduits and lighting fixtures  West Wall: paInted brick cladding, with a door; ventilating pipe 
 


     http://www.neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org/db/bb_files/2012-FirehouseEngineCompany83.pdf
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: scoobyd on January 16, 2018, 08:43:24 PM
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 09:00:09 PM
 Engine 83/Ladder 29  - from "1st Responder Broadcast Network"

"'83 Engine and 29 Truck'

     By Larry Woodcock Correspondent   1st Responder Newspaper     Story Number 032615109

     Disclaimer: This article is a direct street report from our correspondent and has not been edited by the 1st Responder newsroom.


     The South Bronx has always been synonymous with mean streets and urban decay. Mention the South Bronx and right away people remember buildings and blocks on fire and crime on such a grand scale that police officers didn’t even want to work there.

     Thankfully, times have changed and places have improved. So too has the area known as Mott Haven.
Originally owned by the Morris family, it is also known as Port Morris with a population of over 50,000 within a square mile today. It is dominated by tenements and large public housing projects.
From the end of the 1800’s through the 1940’s, the neighborhood was quickly developed and at the same time became an upper middle class residential area marked by elaborate brownstones and became known as Doctors Row and the Irish Fifth Avenue.
     
     With its large German and Irish population made possible by public transportation, it supported the construction of tenement buildings. One of the city’s largest parades took place here every year on Easter Sunday in the 1940’s and 1950’s, marching down Willis Avenue to 138th Street. Saint Ann’s church, which was built in 1840, is the oldest church in the Bronx and is located on Saint Ann’s Avenue. It was added to the Register of Historic Places in 1980 and includes a graveyard that dates back to the early 1700’s.

     Mott Haven is also home to Da’Bums on Da’Hill, 83 and 29. The nickname goes back to the 1930’s, when surrounding companies would refer to them as such. Rivalries were much bigger then as competition was fierce.

     This firehouse was built in 1905 and opened in 1906 to incorporate two new companies. On January 31, 1906, 83 Engine was organized and on February 1, 1906 so too was 29 Truck.
At the time, Mott Haven had become a major shopping district for the Bronx (along 138th Street) and the need for more adequate fire protection was becoming apparent. The early days of firemen back in those days were typical of the times, ten days on followed by one day off and four hours a day for meals.

     As the neighborhood grew, so did the call volume and in the mid to late 1960’s as in so many urban areas, it changed overnight-first with civil unrest then in the 1970’s it was stricken by social and physical decline.  That was followed by drugs, crime, and the neglect by the city during its fiscal crisis. Building abandonment and arson swept through like a plague. Both company’s runs jumped from less then 300 runs per year in 1966 to over 5,000 in 1968. It even topped 6,000 in 1973. The trend continued until the early 1980’s.  Combined, the companies received over thirty unit citations and fourteen individual medals of valor.

     Two members were killed in the line of duty.

     Fighting fires one after the other and multiple fires burning simultaneously became the norm until virtually nothing was left to burn.  Some neighborhoods lost as many as 90 percent of their buildings and with 83 and 29, theirs was no different.

     With so many notable fires in the city’s history, one very memorable fire occurred with 83 and 29 first due.  On December 29, 1989 at 1:10 p.m., a backhoe accidentally ruptured a high-pressure gas main at 132nd Street and Locust.  The enormous explosion was felt in quarters as well as ten miles away. Ensuing was a fireball, 100 feet in the air and visible for blocks.  First responding 83 and 29 did all they could to evacuate nearby buildings, as five alarms were transmitted.  One worker was killed immediately and a civilian was blown into the East River, dieing later that night. The blast created a 25-foot deep crater and the heat from the fire melted cars and buses right down to their frames.  No structures were lost due to the quick and decisive actions of the firefighters and just plain luck.

     Along with 83 and 29, Satellite 2 responded out of this house when it was organized on October 1, 1965.  Members of the engine would take it on second alarms or greater, until the satellite relocated to 72 Engine in July of 1975."

     - http://www.1strespondernews.com/webpages/news/displaynews.aspx?PT=columns&cat=FDNY%20Houses&ID=f0c02455-35e6-44c4-950b-2c72104c6331
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 09:09:07 PM
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.

Scoobyd - Thanks alot for TL 29 info.  What years did they have a tower ladder assigned?  I will make appropriate notes in company details. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 09:13:15 PM
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.

Obituary - Eli V. Giaquinto

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/u4ggiwdrp/s0088697_1_20170513.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u4ggiwdrp/)

Feb 13, 1936 - May 1, 2017

Passed away unexpectedly at CPMC in San Francisco. Born and raised in Harlem, NYC to Babette and Peride Giaquinto. Eli was a navy veteran and decorated NYC fireman. He drove the ladder truck at Engine 83, Ladder 29 "Da Bums On Da Hill" So. Bronx and retired after 25 yrs. He moved to SF after meeting Susan, who became the love of his life. Eli started two successful business in SF, Giaquinto Janitorial and Great Escape Fire Escape Service. Eli had a warm and generous heart that showed by spoiling any animals. He would cook special meals for Truckie, Maggie, Rocky, Rita and Kook-A-La.

He loved playing softball, starting in NYC as a teenager until age 58 in the SF bar leagues. Eli also spent his years having fun as a bartender at Zhivago's and "The Bell" and being a patron to many others. He frequented the Abbey Tavern with everyone laughing from his stories complete with NY accent while drinking his favorite, a Makers Mark Manhattan on the rocks.
Eli was into gaming and had the magic touch in choosing many winning horses at Bay Meadows OTB, picking yearly football pool winners; even just winning the 2017 Masters Golf pool by picking the long shot. His infamous AA "Attitude Adjustment" party he hosted with Susan for 12 years and monthly poker nights with "the guys" allowed him to express his love for entertaining friends.

Everyone has a favorite "Eli" story to smile upon; The Big "E" will be missed by all.

He leaves behind his wife, Susan Stanich Giaquinto; daughter Kim Giaquinto Hart, granddaughters Toni Marie Wright (Benny), Sammi Jo Jean; and Kayla Rae Powell, daughter of the late Lori Giaquinto-Powell; sister and brother-in-law Francine Stanich Bailey and Jim Bailey; nephew Michael Bailey; half-brother and sisters Bill, Carol, Marian and Nancy.
A Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, August 26th at the Irish Cultural Center of San Francisco at Noon.

     - Published in San Francisco Chronicle on May 14, 2017

RIP.


Great Escape Fire Escape Company

     http://greatescapeinc.com/about-us/

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 09:36:18 PM
Ladder 29 - 1986 Seagrave rearmount:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/j69secz3p/29-truck-south-bronx-da-bums-on-da-hill_5958018266_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j69secz3p/)

     - thanks Willie D
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: scoobyd on January 16, 2018, 10:01:22 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e2/ad/16/e2ad1609096013fd0c65244e5361a419.jpg)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 16, 2018, 10:10:20 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e2/ad/16/e2ad1609096013fd0c65244e5361a419.jpg)

Great "War Years" picture.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 16, 2018, 10:14:41 PM
     That firehouse was one of my favorites to visit back around 1960-64 because they kept three pumpers there. E83's pumper was a 1959 Mack C-95 1000gpm (#1024), their hosewagon was a 1947 American LaFrance (#9025 ex-E220) 750gpm "bathtub" that we kids used to sit in, and a 1954 Ward LaFrance Civil Defense pumper C.D. 46 that was used as a 2nd pc. wagon more often than the '47 ALF. In 1963, they got a 1954 Mack L 1000gpm (#1099 ex-E10) that would be there until 1965 when Satellite 2 came along. Two years later, from 1967-69, I would get to see that '54 Mack almost every day when I worked at a Camera store next to Engine 65 on W. 43rd St. BTW, Ladder 29's 1960 American LaFrance was the first 100ft. aerial assigned to the Bronx. The next Bronx 100ft. aerials in came in 1962 with L19 & L27 getting 1962 Seagraves and L31 & L41 getting 1962 ALF's.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 16, 2018, 10:22:15 PM
Engine 83's 1947 ALF (front/left) and 1959 Mack (rear/right) operating at the 1961 "Ice House fire" at 137th St. & Rider Ave. Ladder 29's aerial with two ladderpipes is seen on the right side of the 2nd photo. The aerial on the left was a 1959-60 Mack/Maxim, either L14 or L30.

(https://s13.postimg.cc/4mti2y4fn/Ice_house_fire_c.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4mti2y4fn/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/h1ga37j2b/Ice_house_fire_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h1ga37j2b/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mac8146 on January 16, 2018, 10:26:44 PM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 16, 2018, 10:30:03 PM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.
There was an issue regarding tower ladder responses onto bridge from Randalls to Wards Island.
 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on January 17, 2018, 02:33:41 AM
Yes the weight of the TL over the Bridge to Randalls Island was the problem.






















 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on January 17, 2018, 02:50:13 AM
Extremely disappointed in some of the buffs here.  L 29 was TL 29 for a time.  No one noticed!   

Also noteworthy, the late FF Eli Giaquinto, a L 29 medal winner, went on to start a major fire escape servicing company in San Francisco.
I remember LAD*29 before TL's were in fashion & Charlie Bohan was the Chauf  of 29 when we 108 while interchanged with 106 (by request) Relocated to 29. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on January 17, 2018, 07:17:48 AM
 I too had also heard it was the weight of the Tower Ladder (TL 29) being the reason for the change to a rear mount. A friend and member here, BFD151, had been an auxiliary firefighter with 83/29/14 back in the early 70s before the FDNY closed about 50 companies and laid off about 300 firefighters.

 With those lay offs, it was the first time that anybody had heard of such an event. Even during the Great Depression of the 1930s, no firefighters were ever laid off. Job security was given to firefighters for the protection of it's citizens. And this happened during the busiest time in history for the FDNY.

 How that city (NYC) didn't burn down with nothing left still amazes me. Of course the neighborhood of 83/29 certainly showed the scares of one such neighborhood that came pretty close.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 811 on January 24, 2018, 03:15:18 PM
Wasn't the bridge that restricted Towers just beyond, and south of, the entrance to the Rock?  At one time the roadway spanned Little Hell Gate a waterway that separated Randalls and Wards Islands. It was ultimately filled, but the remaining bridge may still not have allowed the weight.  I think the bridge or its ramp was used in a roadblock scene toward the end of "The French Connection" or some similar cop movie.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 811 on January 24, 2018, 03:29:28 PM
Below track level of the Hell Gate Bridge are a series of inverted bowstring arches.  These are right at the entrance of the Rock, and at one time spanned Little Hell Gate.  More at https://hiddenwatersblog.wordpress.com/2016/03/16/little-hell-gate-2/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on January 24, 2018, 11:10:18 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e2/ad/16/e2ad1609096013fd0c65244e5361a419.jpg)

 This picture comes from the GREAT Collection of "Our Most Valuable Players" web site, www.fdnysbravest.com. Owned and operated by Mike D., aka "mikeindabronx". It is a Great picture of TL 29 about to go to work.

 The picture is located on page 11 of that web site.

 It was also mentioned, by "mac8146" earlier about the swapping of TL 50 with TL 51 due to the turning radius getting out of the firehouse for TL 50. I also seem to remember that as well.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: enginecap on January 25, 2018, 08:24:14 AM
Lol.  The Bums on the Hill’s rig doesn’t look like it’s getting ready to “go to work”at all.  Completely vacant.  Looks like Chauffeur parked it in perfect spot for quick egress 😂😂
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 25, 2018, 10:58:33 PM
Squad 41  Firehouse  330 E 150 Street  Melrose, Bronx   Special Operations Command   "The Best of Both Worlds"

     Engine 41 organized 2801 3rd Avenue former firehouse volunteer Jackson Engine 4  1874
     Engine 41 new firehouse 330 E 150th Street                                                          1904
     Engine 41 disbanded                                                                                            1989
     Engine 41 reorganized as Enhanced Engine Company 330 E 150th Street                 1990
     Engine 41 became Squad 41                                                                                 1998

     Engine 41-2 organized 330 E 150th Street at Engine 41                                          1957
     Engine 41-2 disbanded                                                                                         1958
     Engine 41-2 reorganized 330 E 150th Street at Engine 41                                       1968
     Engine 41-2 disbanded                                                                                         1974

     Battalion 10 organized 2801 3rd Avenue at w/Engine 41                                         1874
     Battalion 10 new firehouse 491 E 166 Street w/Ladder 18                                       1882
   
     Squad 5 moved to 330 E 150th Street at Engine 41                                                1974
     Squad 5 disbanded                                                                                              1975
     Squad 5 reorganized 330 E 150th Street at Engine 41                                            1975
     Squad 5 disbanded                                                                                              1976

     Hazardous Material Technical Unit Bronx organized 330 E 150th Street at Squad 41  1998


Pre-FDNY: 

     The Morrisania Fire Department provided fire protection from 1856 to 1874 with 6 volunteer engine companies, 2 volunteer hose companies and 4 volunteer hook and ladder companies.  Jackson Engine 4 was located at 2801 3rd Avenue.  Engine 41 FDNY was organized in Jackson Engine 4's former firehouse.

     1900 Bronx map: http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~30317~1140838:Map-of-the-borough-of-the-Bronx---C


History of Engine 41/Squad 41:

     Squad Company 41 was organized as an Engine Company on January 1, 1874. Their first firehouse, located at 2801 Third Avenue in the Bronx, was the former volunteer house of Jackson Engine Company 4. The history of Engine 41 is extensive and at one point, in 1989 the company was disbanded. On April 4, 1904, they moved into their current firehouse at 330 East 150 Street.
During the 1960’s through the 1970’s the South Bronx as well as other New York City neighborhoods were going through a conflagration. Working fires were being fought in record numbers and South Bronx fire companies were going to work in amazing proportions. In 1968, the busiest engine and ladder companies were assigned a second piece of apparatus to “relieve” the work of the first piece.
     During this time, Engine Company 41 received a second piece. This second section used the apparatus and manpower of disbanded Manhattan Engine Co. 72 (now a Bronx engine). This second section was used from 1957-1958 and again in 1968 to 1974. The company was designated as Engine Company 41-2. In 1974, the F.D.N.Y. was responding to 353,458 alarms. Working fires were at 130,324, with 52,473 structural fires. Engine Company 41’s second piece was disbanded and was reorganized to be Squad Company 5. Squad Company 5 was disbanded in 1976.
In 1981, the F.D.N.Y. began to experiment with a different color rig, lime-yellow and in 1982 Engine 41 received one of these pumpers.
On May 3, 1989, Engine Company 41 (now only one piece) was disbanded. Because the City needed to cut back on expenses, fire companies were then disbanded and Engine 41 was one of them. Engine 41 has played a vital role in the South Bronx as a fire fighting company. Due to a rise in fire fatalities in the area and protests by the residents of the area, Engine 41 was re-organized and placed back into service on July 1, 1990.
     On July 1, 1990, a new chapter in the history of Engine Company 41 began. The company was reinstated but this time, Engine 41 would have a new responsibility. Engine 41 was designated Engine/ Squad 41 dubbed an “enhanced engine company”. Engine/ Squad 41 would not only respond to they’re first, second, and third due alarm boxes, but would perform squad company work at working fires outside of those areas. They were now responding as a squad company to working fires in Bronx Battalions 3, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 26, and to Manhattan’s Battalions 12 and 13.
As a Squad Company, members are trained in both engine and truck work. Upon their arrival at a job, the incident commander would utilize them to his desire. The company rides with an officer and five firefighters. As an engine, the riding positions are: The engine company chauffeur (Motor Pump Operator), the Officer, Nozzle, Back-up, Door, and the Control position. The Squad Company the positions are as follows: chauffeur, Officer, Iirons, Hook, Saw, and Roof position. The Officer, Hook, and Irons are the inside team, and the Saw, Roof, and Chauffeur are the outside team.
     Members of a squad company are not normally assigned. Like a Rescue Company, firefighters or officers wanting to be a member of a squad, would request an interview with the Squad Company Captain. Experience in a busy company as well as other trades e.g.: carpentry, iron or steel work, construction are very beneficial and would improve your chances of getting onto this specialized unit.
     In 1998, The F.D.N.Y. made several changes. Due to the increased awareness in Hazardous Materials, six engine companies were designated as squad companies. Engines 18, 61, 252, 270, and 288 were designated squads. Squad Company 1 in Brooklyn remained Squad 1. The establishment of the squads on F.D.N.Y. Department Order 68 states 'The Squads are equipped with ladder company tools and are trained and equipped to operate as a ladder or engine company. They will continue to respond to their assigned first-alarm boxes.' Effective August 1, 1998, Squad members will be Haz-Mat Technician Units equipped with a second apparatus and equipment for responses to haz-mat incidents. On July 2, 1998 Engine/ Squad 41 was officially designated Squad Company 41. Also in 1998, Squad Company 41 received they’re new rig. They respond in a custom-built apparatus known as a rescue-pumper. The pumper has a 1000gpm capability with a 500 gallon booster tank.
     With two Squad Companies now in The Bronx, Squad 41 has a new response area for working fires. Squad 41 would now respond to working fires in Bronx Battalions 3, 17, 19, 26, and in Manhattan above 90th Street on the East Side and 100th Street on the West Side covering Battalions 11, 12, 13, and 16. Squad 41 is located in Battalion 14’s district and responds to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd due boxes in these areas.


330 E 150th Street firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lqhd81pv9/E_41_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lqhd81pv9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/z6lfhs2ed/S_41_fh_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z6lfhs2ed/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/b3nk2nkat/48035203_LBPUOYE1uusf_O0ihdt_VHy_ZKFVPd5_Ih_Qd_Qp_Nx_W1jrko_I.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b3nk2nkat/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/r1w9ssm8l/60825_129649573753913_3222980_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r1w9ssm8l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3noagvz6d/E_41_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3noagvz6d/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/eai3mbmr9/E_41_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eai3mbmr9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/rrf25b7ed/E_41_fh_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rrf25b7ed/)


Engine 41:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5fh9c5sxh/E_41.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5fh9c5sxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/d87x43gw5/16486870_1352671631451695_5924331649716801643_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d87x43gw5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/40fong79x/E_41_ap_25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/40fong79x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/tj810hlp1/engine_41.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tj810hlp1/)

Squad 41:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/s5ge4nz51/fdny_squad_23_medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s5ge4nz51/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/l0vvbfaw5/8951162300_b2fc95482d.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l0vvbfaw5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8aucijzd1/S_41_ap_19.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8aucijzd1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/kph4ivyl1/S_41_ap_18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kph4ivyl1/)


Squad 41 members:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/xgsl4o42t/465282_360630467322488_1667984385_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xgsl4o42t/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/rqm5w5eqt/65815_149396575112546_5961094_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rqm5w5eqt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/41mwvn4o5/firephoto306.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/41mwvn4o5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/c6es5grpx/METAL_DAY_6-4-08_020_Small.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c6es5grpx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7tg8n1qp1/firephoto327.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7tg8n1qp1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/o90cnzk5x/15250955_1284168261635366_6016517166839404901_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o90cnzk5x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yj2rn8hr9/15259772_1284184121633780_3967725116991842801_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yj2rn8hr9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ge9kedlhh/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ge9kedlhh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/budknov8l/15025662_1270025216383004_6245990673148734591_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/budknov8l/)


Squad 41 videos:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EHZODejN84

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2C32KR1TLuQ

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddJeekvn4ko

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jK1YzgKlr5M

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAja5uPmH-4


Engine 41 Runs & Workers 1954-1997:

     Year Engine Runs       Workers  OSW
     1954   41    1347
     1961   41    1661
     1969   41    5884
               41-2 5477
     1971   41    6808
               41-2 6692
     1975   41    5148          3819       
     1976   41    6257          4720       
     1977   41    6009          4995       
     1978   41    5259          4327       
     1979   41    3210          2204       
     1980   41    4142          3026   
     1981   41    3631          2485   
     1982   41    3225          2193   
     1983   41    2916          1983    302 
     1984   41    3258          2076   
     1985   41    3343          2217    250 
     1986   41    3260          2178    278 
     1987   41    3418          2180    282 
     1988   41    3456          2224    250 
     1989   disbanded
     1990   41    2009          1095    292  (6 month total only - became enhanced engine July 1)
     1991   41    4152          2177    521 
     1992   41    4301          2393    566 
     1993   41    4194          2267    580 
     1994   41    3872          1814    469 
     1995   41    3449          1701    404 
     1996   41    3262          1881    402 
     1997   41    3629          1997    444
     1998   became squad


Squad 41 Runs & Workers:

    Year     Runs     Workers   Emergencies     OSW      Fires
    1998    3316      2049                              235 
    1999    3400      1853                              451
    2000    3756      2435                              463
    2001    3637      2267                              380
    2002    3027      1596                              376
    2003    3437      1908                              408
    2004    3718      1958                              407
    2005    3906      2122                              415
    2006    3422      1887                              413
    2007    3569      2025                              472
    2008    3478      1793                              360
    2009    3567      1802                              355
    2010    3790      2215                              335
    2011    3710      1919                              315
    2012    3790      2215                              335
    2013    3499      1968                              272
    2014    4571      2526                              270
    2015    4485                     3654                            831
    2016    4095                     2069                            746     


Engine 41/Squad 41 FDNY Medals:

     LT JAMES BYRNE ENG. 41 R-3 NOV. 26, 1939 SCOTT

     FF FRANK QUILES ENG. 41 NOV. 21, 1982 THIRD ALARM

     JOHN E. KEENAN ENG. 41 SEP. 24, 1990 JOHNSTON

     FF CRAIG F. BUCCIERI ENG. 41 JAN. 26, 1991 STIEFEL

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/608qliqkl/Buccieri.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/608qliqkl/)

     LT STEPHEN J. GERAGHTY ENG. 41 MAR. 2, 1991 AMERICAN LEGION

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/qx4yq7411/Ger.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qx4yq7411/)

     FF JOSEPH R. GANDIELLO ENG. 41 SEP. 21, 1992 BRUMMER

     LT CHARLES H. SCHMIDT ENG. 41 AUG. 22, 1993 THOMPSON

     LT DENIS M. MIRONCHIK ENG. 41 MAY 5, 1994 FIRE CHIEFS

     FF DONALD J. REGAN ENG. 41 MAR. 23, 1994 DOLNEY

     FF ROBERT J. D'ELIA ENG. 41 MAY 7, 1995 FRIEDBERG

     FF MICHAEL J. SHEPHERD SQUAD 41 MARCH 22, 2012  PRENTICE

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/wfv20jmb9/Shephard.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wfv20jmb9/)

     FF MICHAEL J. SHEPHERD SQUAD 41 MARCH 26, 2015  MCELLIGOTT

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/on4e8k8md/SHEPHERD_2015.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/on4e8k8md/)

     
E 41/S 41 LODDs:

     FF WILLIAM HOBUNG ENGINE 41 JANUARY 25, 1886

          When returning from watch line, FF Hobung fell from the railroad bridge that crosses Cromwell Creek and drowned. His body was discovered May 19, 1886 by 2 boys fishing. He was identified by the badge on the uniform he was wearing.

     FF THOMAS CULLEN III September 11, 2001  World Trade Center

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5aashop11/070-_Cullen-webrr.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5aashop11/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4yxxi7njp/Lodd_Cullen_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4yxxi7njp/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4yxxicl0l/Cullen.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4yxxicl0l/)

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/thomas_cullen_31_fdny_passiona.html

          http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members/cullen_thomas_iii_fr_sq041.html

     FF ROBERT HAMILTON September 11, 2001  World Trade Center 

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ryzzh7191/134-_Hamilton-_R.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ryzzh7191/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/fx4ln27g5/Lodd_Hamilton_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fx4ln27g5/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/gzes5mdet/squad-41-robert-hamilton-43.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gzes5mdet/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=97163

     LT MICHAEL HEALEY September 11, 2001  World Trade Center

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6ckz03xit/145-_Healey-_M.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ckz03xit/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/3v97sv0rp/Healey_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3v97sv0rp/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8twq7ecad/Healey.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=147183

     FF MICHAEL LYONS September 11, 2001  World Trade Center S
 
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/d31g9hfit/191-_Lyons-_M.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d31g9hfit/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/bnzvkrm5h/Lyon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bnzvkrm5h/)

          http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/lohud/obituary.aspx?n=michael-j-lyons&pid=148866288

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=152795

     FF GREGORY SIKORSKY  September 11, 2001  World Trade Center

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5n26nk22d/302-_Sikorsky-_G.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5n26nk22d/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5aashemdh/greg_and_dog.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5aashemdh/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/c0r9qtu3p/Gregory_Sikorsky.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c0r9qtu3p/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=110646

          http://www.imao.us/archives/006171.html

          http://todayremember.blogspot.com/2010/10/today-we-remember-ff-george-sikorsky.html

     FF RICHARD VAN HINE September 11, 2001  World Trade Center

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8h5c0vm79/323-_Van_Hine-_R.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8h5c0vm79/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6ckyztffp/128-_Van_Hine.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ckyztffp/)

          http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/vagazette/obituary.aspx?pid=146579


     http://www.fdnylodd.com/9-11-Never-Forget/FDNY-Heroes/Members-of-Squad-41.html

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pye19ypat/661189.jpeg.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pye19ypat/)

     http://www.fdnylodd.com/FDNY-Heroes/Members-of-Squad-41

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/z669qo42t/911_Rem_Square58bb7df4a150f.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z669qo42t/)


NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission - June 12, 2012

FIREHOUSE, ENGINE COMPANY 41 (now ENGINE COMPANY/SQUAD 41)

     330 East 150th Street, Bronx
     Built: 1902-03
     Architect: Alexander Stevens
     Landmark Site: Borough of the Bronx

     On May 15, 2012, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held a public hearing on the proposed designation as a Landmark of the Firehouse, Engine Company 41 (now Engine Company/Squad 41) and the proposed designation of the related Landmark Site (Item No. 4). The hearing had been duly advertised in accordance with the provisions of law. There were two speakers in favor of designation including the representatives of the Historic District Council and the Victorian Society in America. There were no speakers in opposition. The Fire Department sent correspondence indicating their support for designation.

SUMMARY:

     The Firehouse for Engine Company 41, built 1902-03, was one of the first firehouses constructed in the Bronx after the Consolidation of the City of New York in 1898. Engine Company 41 was first established as a paid, professional company in 1874, just after the annexation of the Bronx to Manhattan. Their original building was located on Third Street in the populous Mott Haven section, in the building that had previously been used by the local volunteer company. With the tremendous population growth of the period and expansion of fire services after Consolidation, Engine Company 41 moved a few blocks north to South Melrose, to a new building that was one of the many new structures erected by the city to provide more government services to these new sections of the city. This building was designed by the Superintendent of Buildings for the Fire Department, Alexander Stevens, and is one of seven firehouses for which he is credited. All of Steven’s designs were in the Renaissance Revival style, a restrained classically-inspired style appropriate to the growing city and the popular ideas of the City Beautiful movement of the early 20th century. This building exhibits an imposing facade of ashlar limestone and brick, with round arches, keystones, moldings, colonnettes and a prominent eagle to reinforce its association with the American government.
     Standing out from the industrial and residential buildings on this block, this firehouse represented the government and its protective services to the many new immigrants moving into this area at the turn of the century, and continued to do so through the difficult years of the 1960s and 70s. The engine company has expanded its services to become a Squad Company, and continues to use this building today.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

     Firefighting in New York

     From the earliest colonial period, the government of New York took the possibility of fire very seriously. Under Dutch rule all men were expected to participate in firefighting activities. After the English took over, the Common Council organized a force of thirty volunteer firefighters in 1737. They operated two Newsham hand pumpers that had recently been imported from London. By 1798, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY), under the supervision of a chief engineer and six subordinates was officially established by an act of the state legislature.
     As the city grew, this force was augmented by new volunteer companies. In spite of growing numbers of firefighters and improvements in hoses and water supplies, fire was a significant threat in an increasingly densely built up city. Of particular significance was the “Great Fire” of December 16-17, 1835, which caused more damage to property than any other event in New York City. The damages resulting from several major fires, which occurred between 1800 and 1850, led to the establishment of a building code, and an increase in the number of firemen from 600 in 1800 to more than 4,000 in 1865. Despite rapid growth, the department was often criticized for poor performance.2 Intense competition between companies began to hinder firefighting with frequent brawls and acts of sabotage, often at the scenes of fires. During the Civil War, when fire personnel became harder to retain, public support grew for the creation of a professional firefighting force, similar to that which had been established in other cities and to the professional police force that had been created in New York in 1845.
     In May 1865, the New York State Legislature established the Metropolitan Fire District, comprising the cities of New York (south of 86th Street) and Brooklyn. The act abolished the volunteer system and created the Metropolitan Fire Department, a paid professional force under the jurisdiction of the state government. By the end of the year, the city’s 124 volunteer companies with more than 4,000 men had retired or disbanded, to be replaced by 33 engine companies and 12 ladder companies operated by a force of 500 men. Immediate improvements included the use of more steam engines, horses and a somewhat reliable telegraph system. A military model was adopted for the firefighters, which involved the use of specialization, discipline, and merit. By 1870, regular service was extended to the “suburban districts” north of 86th Street and expanded still farther north after the annexation of parts of the Bronx in 1874.
     New techniques and equipment, including taller ladders and stronger steam engines, increased the department’s efficiency, as did the establishment, in 1883, of a training academy for personnel. The growth of the city during this period placed severe demands on the fire department to provide services, and in response the department undertook an ambitious building
campaign. The area served by the FDNY nearly doubled after consolidation in 1898, when the departments in Brooklyn and numerous communities in Queens and Staten Island were
incorporated into the city. After the turn of the century, the Fire Department acquired more modern apparatus and motorized vehicles, reflecting the need for faster response to fires in taller
buildings. Throughout the twentieth century, the department has endeavored to keep up with the evolving city and its firefighting needs.

FIREHOUSE DESIGN

     By the early twentieth century, the firehouse as a building type had evolved from the wooden storage shed used during the seventeenth century to an imposing architectural expression
of civic character. As early as 1853, Marriott Field had argued in his City Architecture: Designs for Dwelling Houses, Stores, Hotels, etc. for symbolic architectural expression in municipal
buildings, including firehouses. The 1854 Fireman’s Hall,4 with its highly symbolic ornamentation reflected this approach, using flambeaux, hooks, ladders, and trumpets for its ornament.
     Between 1880 and 1895, Napoleon LeBrun & Son served as the official architectural firm for the fire department, designing 42 firehouses in a massive effort to modernize the facilities and to accommodate the growing population of the city. Although the firm’s earliest designs were relatively simple, later buildings were more distinguished and more clearly identifiable as firehouses.
While the basic function and requirements of the firehouse were established early in its history, LeBrun is credited with standardizing the program, and introducing some minor, but important, innovations in the plan. Placing the horse stalls in the main part of the ground floor to reduce the time needed for hitching horses to the apparatus was one such innovation.6
Firehouses were usually located on mid-block sites because these were less expensive than more prominent corner sites. Since the sites were narrow, firehouses tended to be three stories tall,
with the apparatus on the ground story and rooms for the company, including dormitory, kitchen and captain’s office, above. After 1895, the department commissioned a number of well-known architects to design firehouses. Influenced by the classical revival which was highly popular throughout the country, New York firms such as Hoppin & Koen, Flagg & Chambers, and Horgan & Slatterly created facades with bold, classical style designs. After the turn of the 20th century, the Fire Department also used its own employees to design a series of buildings, all executed in a formal neo-classical style consistent with the ideas promoted by the City Beautiful movement. Government buildings were placed in neighborhoods throughout the city, with the intention of inspiring civic pride in the work of the government and the country as a whole. Buildings such as these fire houses are easily recognizable and announce themselves as distinct from private structures, using quality materials, workmanship and details to create buildings of lasting beauty and significance to their localities. Growth of The Bronx The area where Engine Company 41 is located, in the southwestern part of the Bronx, is called South Melrose. It was originally part of the extensive holdings purchased in 1670 by the Welsh-born Richard Morris (died 1672) and inherited in 1692 by his son Lewis Morris, later an Acting Governor of New York and Governor of New Jersey. Their large estate, known as “Morrisania,” was part of Westchester County during the late eighteenth and most of the nineteenth centuries.  In 1828, Jordan L. Mott, inventor of the coal-burning stove, bought a large tract of land in the southwestern part of Morrisania and established the Mott Haven Iron Works on the Harlem River at Third Avenue and 134th Street. The area around this business was developed with houses for Mott and his workers and became known as Mott Haven. The neighborhood of Melrose is located just to the north of Mott Haven. The development of this entire section was due to the expansion of the iron works and the advent of other industrial enterprises attracted by the Mott Haven Canal, which led from the Harlem River north to 138th Street. The New York & Harlem Railroad, incorporated in 1831, expanded over the Harlem River in 1840, bringing goods and people to the community.

     Soon Morris began to develop the rest of his property and, in 1850, worked with surveyor Andrew Findley to lay out the villages of Woodstock, Melrose, and Melrose East and Melrose
South. By 1868 there were 488 citizens living in Melrose South, primarily Germans who came from the crowded area of Kleinedeutschland on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Beginning in the
1860s, streets were laid out and land speculation began in earnest, aided by the railroads and streetcars that began to serve the area.In 1874, the townships of Morrisania, West Farms and Kingsbridge split from Westchester County and became the 23rd and 24th wards of the City of New York. This area of the Bronx became known as the Annexed District. Beginning in the early 1880s, booster organizations such as the North Side Association advocated for infrastructure improvements such as street paving and new sewers. The elevated railroad opened a line along Third Avenue in1888, opening the area to the process of urbanization, which increased substantially with the arrival of the subway in 1904.By 1897, just a decade after the el began operation, the once vacant blocks east of Third Avenue were almost completely built over with solid brick buildings. This area held a mixture of building types: single-family town houses built in the late 1880s; multi-story apartment houses, built with increasing frequency in the 1890s; and various industrial and manufacturing establishments along the neighborhood’s southern fringe.  Encouraged by all this growth, grocery stores, restaurants, vegetable and fruit markets, tailors and hardware stores were established. By the turn of the 20th century, the commercial heart of Melrose was centered on the intersection of East 149th Street, Melrose, Willis and Third Avenues, known as the Hub. It is the oldest major shopping district in the Bronx, patronized by residents of all areas of the Bronx, and its offerings grew to include department stores, boutiques, movie palaces and vaudeville theaters.
     The population of the Bronx grew rapidly. In 1890, there were 89,000 people living in the area of the Bronx known as the North Side; ten years later it had more than doubled to over
200,000. By 1915, this number had increased threefold, to 616,000. As the population and number of new buildings increased, protection from the ever present danger of fire became
increasingly important. The firehouse for Engine Company/Squad 41 was built on East 150th Street as part of the effort to protect the expanding numbers of houses and tenements in this area
of South Melrose.

FIREHOUSE ENGINE COMPANY 41

     Engine Company 41 was one of the first organized as a professional company in the Bronx, just after its annexation in 1874. Its organizing date is January 1, 1874 and it was located at 501 (later renumbered as 2801) North Third Street, the former home of the volunteer Jackson Engine Company 4. This building was located within the populous neighborhood of Mott Haven. After Consolidation of the City of New York in 1898, the fire department set about creating and upgrading their facilities in the large areas now under their control. Substantial bond issues were released to enable the department to purchase many new lots for this construction. The land for a new house for Engine Company/Squad 41 was purchased as part of such a bond issue in 1902. It was located somewhat north of the original house, on East 150th Street, in the expanding Melrose section. Although many of the new buildings from this period were designed by contract with different architectural firms, the design for this house was created by the Superintendent of Buildings of the Fire Department, in order to save time and money. A New Building permit was issued in June, 1902. Construction began in February, 1903 and was completed by the following December. Construction work was performed by the firm of Fanning & Reilly and the building cost $32,800.00.
     Engine Company 41 has remained at this address since that time, although various organizational changes have occurred. The company was extremely busy during the period of the 1960s and 70s when fires were started in record numbers in the South Bronx. They received a second piece of equipment to help with this heavy load and the second section was designated as
Engine Company 41-2, which continued (later as Squad Company 5) until it was disbanded in 1976. In an effort to economize, Engine Company 41 was disbanded in May 1989, but a rise in
fire fatalities in the area and protests by residents resulted in the company being reorganized and put back into service on July 1, 1990. In 1990, the Company was designated Engine Company/Squad 41, an “enhanced engine company.” This appellation indicated increased responsibility to respond to more and higher levels of alarms and to perform squad company work outside of their regular area. Squads have more highly trained and differentiated personnel and can also respond to Haz-Mat situations.
     Engine/Squad 41 is one of two squad companies now working in the Bronx.  This company responded to the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 and consequently lost six men on that day.

ALEXANDER STEVENS

     Alexander Stevens graduated as a civil engineer from Columbia College in 1887. A resident of New York City, he was first employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. In 1897 he was appointed as Superintendent of Buildings for the Fire Department. In this capacity he probably oversaw the renovation of existing firehouses, assembled the specifications for the commissions that the Fire Department awarded independent architects, and supervised the construction of new buildings for the department. In the Superintendent’s Report of the Fire Department Annual Report for 1902, Stevens remarks that his department is capable of designing new firehouses as well as outside architects and thus can save funds for the department. In his designs, Stevens follows the established pattern of three-story, three-bay wide firehouses with classical ornament established by Napoleon LeBrun and others who had designed many New York firehouses.  Stevens is credited with designing seven firehouses in the city between 1903 and 1906 while he served in this position. The building for Hook & Ladder Company 8 stands in the Tribeca West Historic District (10 North Moore Street, 1903). Engine Company 23, 215 West 58th Street is a designated New York City Landmark. All of his designs use similar neo-Renaissance motifs such as a dominant central bay with round-arched openings embellished with colonnettes, moldings and keystones.

DESCRIPTION

     Three story, three bay firehouse faced in ashlar limestone on 1st story and most of 2nd story with brick above. A stepped, granite base sits below the limestone.
     Historic: Symmetrical arrangement with large central, round-arched opening for fire truck flanked by pedestrian opening and window, both with triangular pediments; “Engine 41” over
opening; tympanum filled with shield and swags, topped by elaborate keystone and anthemion; stone frieze; colonnettes, eagle, friezes and medallions ornament 2nd story windows; stone
commemorative plaque in center bay of 2nd story; third story has three windows with continuous stone sill supported by brackets, round-arched windows with stone colonnettes, moldings and
elongated, ornamented keystones.
     Alterations: Pedestrian and vehicular doors replaced; 1st story window replaced by wood with wood enframement; original iron cornice covered by sheet metal; spotlights, flagpole added.
Site: Both side facades are plain, painted brick. The firehouse sits at the lot line on East 150th Street and fills its entire lot.

FINDINGS AND DESIGNATION
 
     On the basis of a careful consideration of the history, the architecture, and other features of this building, the Landmarks Preservation Commission finds that Firehouse, Engine Company/Squad 41 has a special character and a special historical and aesthetic interest and allure as part of the development, heritage, and cultural characteristics of New York City.
The Commission further finds that this firehouse for Engine Company/Squad 41, constructed 1902-03, was one of the first firehouses constructed in the Bronx after the Consolidation of the City of New York in 1898; that this company was one of the first organized as a professional company immediately following the annexation of the Bronx in 1874, in their first home located in Mott Haven; that after Consolidation, as the Bronx was growing rapidly, this was one of the numerous new buildings the Fire Department constructed to serve the areas newly under its jurisdiction, such as this area slightly farther north, called South Melrose; that the building for Engine Company/Squad 41 was one of seven firehouses designed by the Superintendent of Buildings for the Fire Department, Alexander Stevens; that Stephens, who oversaw the construction of numerous firehouses designed by outside architectural firms, based his designs on other firehouses being built at the time; that this building has a three-story, three-bay wide, symmetrical facade with an ashlar limestone base and brick above; that its strong, round-arched openings with moldings and keystones, its classical ornamental vocabulary such as engaged colonnettes and modillioned cornice, as well as its solid construction are typical of government buildings built during the heyday of the City Beautiful movement at the turn of the 20th century; that this building has remained in use for its original purpose and continues to serve as the home of Engine Company/Squad 41, and serves as a reminder of the period of growth and promise in the years after the consolidation of New York City.


Melrose, Bronx:

     http://www.mcny.org/story/view-melrose

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ttwl3ntxh/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ttwl3ntxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/th56xito5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/th56xito5/)


(https://s18.postimg.cc/km4cn8pit/57_big.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/km4cn8pit/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/mqopoa1f9/patch-34_large.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mqopoa1f9/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 26, 2018, 01:04:07 AM
  Engine 41's original 2 story wood frame firehouse at 2801 Third Ave. just south  of 148th St. still stands today as a small store that sells African items.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 26, 2018, 06:19:42 PM
  Engine 41's original 2 story wood frame firehouse at 2801 Third Ave. just south  of 148th St. still stands today as a small store that sells African items.

Engine 41 former firehouse 2801 3rd Avenue  - 1980s:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5p5iwzd3p/E_41_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5p5iwzd3p/)

2801 3rd Avenue - current - new building - electronics store:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/q9acvlaw5/2801_3rd_Ave.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q9acvlaw5/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 26, 2018, 08:04:14 PM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.

TL 50 95 ft tower:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/dcsfffwdx/FDNYL050-_B.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dcsfffwdx/)


TL 50 75 ft tower - former L 50:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4uizb2v05/FDNYL050-_C.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4uizb2v05/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 26, 2018, 08:15:39 PM
South Bronx:

     June 30, 1981
     22-2261 
     835 E 152 Street

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/l6t10meet/t_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l6t10meet/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/tcb2ywcz9/t_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tcb2ywcz9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/rx9ia6rbp/t_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rx9ia6rbp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/82ngo2z9h/t_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/82ngo2z9h/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 26, 2018, 08:59:06 PM
South Bronx

     November 9, 1981
     22-2343

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/60mz9r8z9/22-2343_1981_11_09.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/60mz9r8z9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ycsr8sqt/2243_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ycsr8sqt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ycsr9nlx/2243_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ycsr9nlx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cr3gj9og5/2243_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cr3gj9og5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lm4atskyd/2243_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lm4atskyd/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/evntkdd85/2243_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/evntkdd85/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/u4dqy5mc5/2243_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u4dqy5mc5/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 26, 2018, 10:02:46 PM
South Bronx

     November 9, 1981
     22-2243

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/60mz9r8z9/22-2343_1981_11_09.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/60mz9r8z9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ycsr8sqt/2243_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ycsr8sqt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ycsr9nlx/2243_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ycsr9nlx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cr3gj9og5/2243_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cr3gj9og5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lm4atskyd/2243_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lm4atskyd/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/evntkdd85/2243_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/evntkdd85/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/u4dqy5mc5/2243_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u4dqy5mc5/)
Hey Mack, correct the box number to 2343



Hey Mack, box number was 2343 @Third Ave. & 161st for 2nd alarmer at B & L Auto Parts, 3217 3rd Ave. & 162nd St.  ;)   
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 26, 2018, 10:13:33 PM
South Bronx

     November 9, 1981
     22-2243

Hey Mack, box number was 2343 @Third Ave. & 161st for 2nd alarmer at B & L Auto Parts, 3217 3rd Ave. & 162nd St.  ;)

Done - Thanks Gman.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 26, 2018, 10:22:19 PM
E 234/TL33/Squad 41/Rescue 3 member - Ret FF Garrett Lindgren - aka "69 Mets":

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8n734gkfp/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/8n734gkfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/65vbx7fyt/GL_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/65vbx7fyt/)


     Father (Ret) DC Robert Lindgren - RIP:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pozx6eeol/19149169_1617992858211398_3751330167070230837_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pozx6eeol/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on January 27, 2018, 12:57:49 AM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.
Did any other Ladder Companies revert to aerial ladders after having tower ladders, like L29?
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 27, 2018, 01:14:13 AM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.
Did any other Ladder Companies revert to aerial ladders after having tower ladders, like L29?
Yes,
 L84 on Staten Island
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on January 27, 2018, 03:59:02 AM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.
Did any other Ladder Companies revert to aerial ladders after having tower ladders, like L29?
Also LAD*103-1 had a TL for a short period then when the Second Section was disbanded they got their RM.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: MT8410 on January 27, 2018, 10:54:02 PM
Also in the mid 1980's, 21 Truck in Hell's Kitchen switched from a rear-mount to a tower ladder.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 28, 2018, 12:01:58 AM
Not sure of when This happened thinking late 80’s early 90’s but TL29 switched rigs with L50 who had a rearmount. Maybe other members can be more specific as to reasons, also remember that TL50 had received a 95’ tower and swapped that rig with TL51 due to turning radius out of quarters being tight so they became a 75’ tower again.
Did any other Ladder Companies revert to aerial ladders after having tower ladders, like L29?
Yes,
 L84 on Staten Island

Ladder 84 had a tower ladder until 2001.
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ge1r9dvxh/1102bb3c635173ad4c54469488cd50e2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ge1r9dvxh/)

TL 76 (Tottenville), TL 84 (Huguenot), TL 85 (New Dorp), TL 86 (Bulls Head) and TL 87 (Annadale) - were all tower ladders and covered more than half of SI with then only non-tower ladder was L 82 (Great Kills), which had a rearmount.  Ladder 84 was assigned a 2001 Seagrave rearmount.



Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 28, 2018, 05:43:21 PM
Engine 84/Ladder 34  Firehouse 513 W. 161st Street  Washington Heights, Manhattan  7th Division, 13th Battalion  "Where Harlem Reaches the Heights"

     Engine 84 organized 513 W 161st Street w/Ladder 34           1907

     Ladder 34 organized 513 W 161st Street w/Engine 84           1907

     Battalion 13 located at 513 W 161st Street at Engine 84    2001-2003

     Purple K Unit 84 organized 513 W 161st Street at Engine 84  2007


513 W 161st Street firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/43dumbdmd/E_84_fh_12_Firehouse_Engine_84_Hook_Ladder_34_from_front.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/43dumbdmd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6xgzzrv85/E_34_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6xgzzrv85/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/oaraemy91/E_84_fh_24.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oaraemy91/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/84uxrmqdx/E_84_fh_78.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/84uxrmqdx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/osmfu4sv9/E_84_fh_79.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/osmfu4sv9/)


513 W 161st Street firehouse design and history - Landmarks Preservation Commission 1997

      - http://www.neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org/db/bb_files/1997FireEngineCo84.pdf


Engine 84:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4swmysohh/E_84_ap_10.gif) (https://postimg.cc/image/4swmysohh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/upqbax7f9/E_84_L_34_ap_99.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/upqbax7f9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vf93nb2tx/E_84_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vf93nb2tx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/b7vnv107p/E_84_ap_36.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b7vnv107p/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/f48zr10mt/E_84_ap_37.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f48zr10mt/)


Ladder 34:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mwznj0m1h/L_34_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mwznj0m1h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/whja5wyit/L_34_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/whja5wyit/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/y9c90ucqt/L_34_ap_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y9c90ucqt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7o9q5apt1/L_34_ap_28.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7o9q5apt1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/kfnwbt7at/L_34_ap_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kfnwbt7at/)
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/bxeg7hvn9/L_34_ap_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bxeg7hvn9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/k2wi5o71h/L_34_ap_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k2wi5o71h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8dsihs8dx/L_84_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8dsihs8dx/)


Purple K Unit 84:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/65ixdwvpx/296463-large.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/65ixdwvpx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cvzencqlh/f_d_n_y_e_33_ang_e_84_purple_k_unit_by_medic1543-d8o9pug.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/cvzencqlh/)


Engine 84/Ladder 34 videos:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MogukThZwY4

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBH2AynbHuE

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-iwWXSq020

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4a-VJSPZQc


FDNY Medals:

     WILLIAM F. MURPHY, JR. FF. LAD. 34 OFF DUTY DEC. 12, 1941 BROOKMAN
     
     EDWARD C. BALDAUF FF. LAD. 34 AUG. 16, 1944 CRIMMINS

     JOSEPH F. SMYTH FF. LAD. 34 JUN. 15, 1972 HISPANIC

     JAMES F. MCHUGH FF. LAD. 34 JAN. 30, 1978 KANE

     MICHAEL A. TELESCA FF. LAD. 34 DEC. 19, 1982 PIPES & DRUMS

     CHARLES ROBERTO FF. LAD. 34 DEC. 19, 1982 CONNELL

     VINCENT SAVARESE FF. LAD. 34 NOV. 3, 1983 SIGNAL 77

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6yqxtbf39/Savarese.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6yqxtbf39/)

     FABRICE E. DE LACOUR FF. LAD. 34 JAN. 11, 1985 DELEHANTY

     JOHN J. HALPIN FF. LAD. 34 MAY 28, 1985 GOLDENKRANZ

         (https://s18.postimg.cc/qumx8bdyt/Halpin.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qumx8bdyt/)

     WILLIAM F. MALONEY LT. LAD. 34 DEC. 3, 1986 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

         (https://s18.postimg.cc/co76d1ddh/Maloney_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/co76d1ddh/)

     WILLIAM F. MALONEY LT. LAD. 34 DEC. 3, 1986 NYS HONORARY FIRE CHIEFS

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/co76d1ddh/Maloney_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/co76d1ddh/)

     JAMES M. KLESS FF. LAD. 34 JAN. 11, 1989 HOLY NAME

     WILLIAM F. MALONEY LT. LAD. 34 1990 HARRY M. ARCHER

         (https://s18.postimg.cc/awe7i59g5/MALONEY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/awe7i59g5/)

     SHAWN J. ASHE FF. LAD. 34 NOV. 19, 1992 LAUFER


LODDs L 34:

     CAPTAIN ERICK W. THOMAS LADDER 34 April 3, 1959

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/smfw3ffdx/Thomas.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/smfw3ffdx/)

     FIREFIGHTER TIMOTHY J. GRAY LADDER 34 December 7, 1970
       
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/toq2m2t39/Gray.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/toq2m2t39/)

          He was killed when he fell 10 stories down an elevator shaft while searching for trapped occupants at a 2-alarm fire in an 11-story building.

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN T. McKENNA LADDER 34 March 19, 1979

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/dqhcvtojp/Mc_Kenna.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dqhcvtojp/)

          Fireman John T. McKenna was operating on the roof of an apartment building when it gave way and he fell into the fiery apartment below in this two-alarm fire. He was pulled from the burning apartment by fellow firemen but not before receiving burns over seventy-four percent of his body. He was taken to the hospital where he was cared for until his death on March 17. He was thirty years old and a member of the Department since August 13, 1977. He was not married. -                          "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz and Melhan

     LIEUTENANT ANTHONY JOVIC LADDER 34 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/eg0581jwl/Jovic.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eg0581jwl/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/nnsdorltx/Jovic_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nnsdorltx/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/my9lcf0px/Jovic_2.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          https://inavukic.com/2013/09/11/croatian-hero-of-911-lt-anthony-jovic/


     RIP.  Never forget.


Washington Heights:

     Washington Heights is a neighborhood in the northern portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan. The area, with over 150,000 inhabitants as of 2010, is named for Fort Washington, a fortification constructed at the highest point on the island of Manhattan by Continental Army troops during the American Revolutionary War, to defend the area from the British forces

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4l901uath/E_84_fh_70.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4l901uath/)

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Heights,_Manhattan

(https://s18.postimg.cc/4vgilfhsl/E_84_logo_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4vgilfhsl/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/dqhcw3brp/E_84_logo_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dqhcw3brp/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 28, 2018, 07:56:38 PM
CHARLES ROBERTO FF. LAD. 34 DEC. 19, 1982 CONNELL

     Captain Charlie Roberto, Ladder 26 video:

          http://www.buzzpls.com/content/SkdONU1qRko4ZDA=/Captain-Charlie-Roberto-FDNY.html

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/g6nrnegkl/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/g6nrnegkl/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 28, 2018, 08:12:39 PM
MICHAEL A. TELESCA FF. LAD. 34 DEC. 19, 1982 PIPES & DRUMS

Battalion Chief Talesca, Bn 19, was inside the basement of the South World Trade Tower (#2) when it collapsed:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mye6q4ft1/o-911-_FIRST-_RESPONDERS-570.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mye6q4ft1/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 28, 2018, 08:30:28 PM
JOHN J. HALPIN FF. LAD. 34 MAY 28, 1985 GOLDENKRANZ

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/axsqpoqhh/halpin-john.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/axsqpoqhh/)

     John J. Halpin died in New York City on May 29, 2014, from causes related to the recovery efforts at the World Trade Center after September 11, 2001.
Lieutenant Halpin was a decorated member of the New York City Fire Department for 28 years.

RIP.  Never forget.

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 28, 2018, 09:28:21 PM
Also in the mid 1980's, 21 Truck in Hell's Kitchen switched from a rear-mount to a tower ladder.
  That happened after the big fire next to Rescue 1's firehouse. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on January 28, 2018, 10:07:23 PM
MICHAEL A. TELESCA FF. LAD. 34 DEC. 19, 1982 PIPES & DRUMS

Battalion Chief Talesca, Bn 19, was inside the basement of the South World Trade Tower (#2) when it collapsed:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mye6q4ft1/o-911-_FIRST-_RESPONDERS-570.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mye6q4ft1/)
I believe on 9-11 Mike was working in the Safety BN.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 28, 2018, 10:22:35 PM
MICHAEL A. TELESCA FF. LAD. 34 DEC. 19, 1982 PIPES & DRUMS

Battalion Chief Talesca, Bn 19, was inside the basement of the South World Trade Tower (#2) when it collapsed:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mye6q4ft1/o-911-_FIRST-_RESPONDERS-570.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mye6q4ft1/)
I believe on 9-11 Mike was working in the Safety BN.

Chief - Yes - Safety Battalion - "Firehouse" story below:

     - http://www.firehouse.com/article/10567893/battalion-chief-michael-telesca
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 30, 2018, 08:59:31 PM
Engine 11  Firehouse  437 E Houston Street  Lower East Side, Manhattan  1st Division, 4th Battalion  DISBANDED

     Engine 11 organized 437 E Houston Street former volunteer firehouse       1865
     Engine 11 relocated unknown location                                                     1879
     Engine 11 new firehouse 437 E Houston Street                                        1880
     Engine 11 disbanded                                                                             1957

Pre-FDNY volunteer department:     

     Engine 44 Live Oak organized Columbia Street vicinity Houston Street       1824
     Engine 44 Live Oak moved Houston Street and Manhattan Street              1828
     Engine 44 Live Oak disbanded                                                                1845
     Engine 44 Live Oak reorganized new firehouse 437 E Houston Street         1851
     Engine 44 Live Oak disbanded                                                                1865

     - Engine 11 organized in former firehouse of volunteer Engine44 Live Oak


Engine 44 Live Oak firehouse Houston Street and Manhattan Street:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5mjus9xxh/003.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5mjus9xxh/)


Engine 44 Live Oak members (date unknown):

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lapncvfsl/roster.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lapncvfsl/)


437 E. Houston Street:

     (https://i.postimg.cc/r0R4kGxZ/437-E-Houston-Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/r0R4kGxZ)

     (https://i.postimg.cc/7fKSSLHV/437-E-Houston-Street-3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7fKSSLHV)


Engine 11 FDNY:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/al7d6t9g5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/al7d6t9g5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/59sgm42t1/E_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/59sgm42t1/)

     (https://s29.postimg.cc/5rfhnrob7/E_11_AP_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5rfhnrob7/)

     (https://s7.postimg.cc/vwbfbevav/E_11_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vwbfbevav/)


Engine 11 FDNY Medal:

     Assistant Foreman James Horn, Engine 11, March 26, 1875  James Gordon Bennett Medal

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/mzu575o3p/Horn.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mzu575o3p/)

          On March 26, 1875, Assistant Foreman James Horn responded with Engine 11 to a tenement fire at 353-355 Rivington Street approximately midnight.  Horn found Anthony Paul who was trapped by fire on the 4th floor.  Paul was ready to throw his 3 children, Josephine, Joseph and Catherine, and his wife Adeline out the 4th floor window and then jump.  Horn burst into the room, carried 2 children and led the other family members to safety. 

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: wfd444 on January 30, 2018, 09:11:24 PM
TL21 swapped out their rearmount with whoever had the TL
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 30, 2018, 10:46:58 PM
   TL21 swapped out their rearmount with whoever had the TL
  It looks like 21 got TL138's 1979 Mack TL (#MT7908) right after 138 had received a new 1984 Mack TL (#MT8412). Then in 1986, TL21 got a brand new 1985 Mack TL #MT8504. :)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 30, 2018, 11:04:38 PM
Engine 11  Firehouse  437 E Houston Street  Lower East Side, Manhattan  1st Division, 4th Battalion  DISBANDED

     Engine 11 organized 437 E Houston Street former volunteer firehouse       1865
     Engine 11 relocated unknown location                                                     1879
     Engine 11 new firehouse 437 E Houston Street                                        1880
     Engine 11 disbanded                                                                             1957

Pre-FDNY volunteer department:     

     Engine 44 Live Oak organized Columbia Street vicinity Houston Street       1824
     Engine 44 Live Oak moved Houston Street and Manhattan Street              1828
     Engine 44 Live Oak disbanded                                                                1845
     Engine 44 Live Oak reorganized new firehouse 437 E Houston Street         1851
     Engine 44 Live Oak disbanded                                                                1865

     - Engine 11 organized in former firehouse of volunteer Engine44 Live Oak


Engine 44 Live Oak firehouse Houston Street and Manhattan Street:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5mjus9xxh/003.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5mjus9xxh/)


Engine 44 Live Oak members (date unknown):

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lapncvfsl/roster.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lapncvfsl/)


Engine 11 FDNY:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/al7d6t9g5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/al7d6t9g5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/59sgm42t1/E_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/59sgm42t1/)


Engine 11 FDNY Medal:

     Assistant Foreman James Horn, Engine 11, March 26, 1875  James Gordon Bennett Medal

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/mzu575o3p/Horn.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mzu575o3p/)

          On March 26, 1875, Assistant Foreman James Horn responded with Engine 11 to a tenement fire at 353-355 Rivington Street approximately midnight.  Horn found Anthony Paul who was trapped by fire on the 4th floor.  Paul was ready to throw his 3 children, Josephine, Joseph and Catherine, and his wife Adeline out the 4th floor window and then jump.  Horn burst into the room, carried 2 children and led the other family members to safety.

Engine 11 was disbanded in 1957 to form Engine 91-2.  Engine 11's firehouse was razed to build housing projects - Lillian Wald Houses.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 30, 2018, 11:43:12 PM
  Makes me wonder if they had kept E11 in service until the new E. 2nd St. firehouse a couple of blocks away was completed. Would it have been Engine 11 Ladder 11 instead of E28 L11? ???
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 30, 2018, 11:43:47 PM
Video of FDNY water tower going into operation - 1930:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nBVeX2N7UY
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 30, 2018, 11:55:57 PM
1937 new FDNY apparatus video:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6jy3ZKY_bg


     - 19 new Mack pumpers including Engine 299:

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8lzy6s6px/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8lzy6s6px/)

     - H&L 24 turns-out

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/y4sak3nsl/ggh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y4sak3nsl/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/i6jktz1ad/gghh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i6jktz1ad/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/h49ebfxwl/ggghhh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h49ebfxwl/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 31, 2018, 12:06:13 AM
1967 Queens 13 alarm Jamaica gas explosion video:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYk_qduyXmE


January 13, 1967 - Queens Box 8803 - Engine 298/Ladder 127 1st due companies - apparatus destroyed by explosion

     https://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/August-2017-Jamaica-Gas-Leak-13-Alarms.pdf

     https://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/gas-leak-13-alarm-explosion-fire-in-1967/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 31, 2018, 01:17:29 AM
1937 new FDNY apparatus video:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6jy3ZKY_bg


     - 19 new Mack pumpers including Engine 299:

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8lzy6s6px/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8lzy6s6px/)

     - H&L 24 turns-out

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/y4sak3nsl/ggh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y4sak3nsl/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/i6jktz1ad/gghh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i6jktz1ad/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/h49ebfxwl/ggghhh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h49ebfxwl/)
Those 19- 1937 Mack Type 21 1000gpm pumpers were originally assigned to engine(s): 20, 34, 36, 46, 50, 53, 55, 59, 64, 69, 154, 210, 229, 231, 245, 249, 283, 290 & 299. These were the first pumpers delivered with solid (not leather) subway straps.  Engine 20's had a special box behind the driver's side front fender for their mascot Dalmation, "CHIEF" to ride in. Also, the 10-1937 Seagrave Model 6-GF 85ft. tillers were originally assigned to Ladder(s): 6, 20, 21, 24, 27, 31, 103, 113, 120 & 123. They were the first Seagrave ladder trucks delivered with front windshields and left-hand steering wheels.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on January 31, 2018, 01:28:18 AM
G'man,

Do you have any idea how long the 1937 Seagrave Model 6-GF 85ft. tiller assigned to Ladder 24 remained in service with that company?  That was where I visited and played on the apparatus very often in the late 1950s and '60s.

Thanks.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on January 31, 2018, 02:10:36 AM
G'man,

Do you have any idea how long the 1937 Seagrave Model 6-GF 85ft. tiller assigned to Ladder 24 remained in service with that company?  That was where I visited and played on the apparatus very often in the late 1950s and '60s.

Thanks.
The '37 Seagrave was #321 and was L24's until April 5, 1948, when L24 received their 1948 American LaFrance. The '37 Seagrave went onto L15, got a 1948 WLF tractor, then went to L167 in 1955.  ;)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on January 31, 2018, 02:20:17 AM
Holy cow!  I'm younger than I thought!!

Thank you. :)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: t123ken on January 31, 2018, 01:54:33 PM
Concerning Engine 11 and Houston Street.
Houston Street used to be a normal-width street, as it still is west of 6 Avenue by Engine 24/Ladder 5/Battalion 2.
When it was widened and buildings were razed (mostly old law tenements I was told), they didn't do too good a job in leveling the now widened street.  Much of the debris was just shoveled into the cellars and that's why for decades it was a bumpy ride on Houston.  The foundation walls remained solid but the debris filling the cellars settled.
About 10-15 years ago the street was redone and you could still see the foundation walls as excavation was in progress. 
There's a building on the southwest corner of Broadway and Houston that has some steel sticking out of its north side.  I've often wondered if that's the remains of a loft building that was demolished to widen the street.

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on January 31, 2018, 02:18:08 PM
I believe those steel beams sticking out of the north face of the building were an art installation going back to the 1970s or perhaps the '60s.  They can be interesting when the sun hits them and casts shadows on the building, which I think was the artist's intention.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: t123ken on January 31, 2018, 04:36:19 PM
I did some research and you are correct.

The southwest corner of Broadway and West Houston for many years featured an art installation, called “The Wall” consisting of a few dozen aquamarine girders poking out of a blank wall. It was installed in 1972 by artist Forrest Myers.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: t123ken on January 31, 2018, 04:42:09 PM
I just found this article which gives information on the work of art:
http://sohobroadway.org/a-look-back-at-sohos-broadway-forrest-myers-the-wall/

It does mention in the article "Charles Tannenbaum, the owner of 599 Broadway originally commissioned it to cover existing architectural scars, joists that remained since an adjoining building was taken down to widen Houston Street."
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on January 31, 2018, 08:13:17 PM


I just found this article which gives information on the work of art:
http://sohobroadway.org/a-look-back-at-sohos-broadway-forrest-myers-the-wall/

It does mention in the article "Charles Tannenbaum, the owner of 599 Broadway originally commissioned it to cover existing architectural scars, joists that remained since an adjoining building was taken down to widen Houston Street."

Broadway and Houston Street - 1920 - original 599 Broadway building and building to right before Houston Street widened:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mcds19axx/B_H_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mcds19axx/)


Broadway and Houston Street - 1930s - after Houston Street widened and building to right razed:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cf2r8aqid/Broadway_Houston.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cf2r8aqid/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/f95wlsq4l/Broadway_Houston_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f95wlsq4l/)


Broadway and Houston Street - current - 599 Broadway with artwork:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/rnsom84t1/Boradway_Houston_Current_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rnsom84t1/)
     
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/nenyjytt1/Boradway_Houston_Current.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nenyjytt1/)


Houston Street History:
 
     Houston Street is named for William Houstoun, who was a delegate from the state of Georgia to the Continental Congress from 1784 through 1786 and to the Constitutional Convention in 1787. The street was christened by Nicholas Bayard III, whose daughter, Mary, was married to Houstoun in 1788.[4] The couple met while Houstoun, a member of an ancient and aristocratic Scottish family, was serving in the Congress. Bayard cut the street through a tract he owned in the vicinity of Canal Street in which he lived, and the city later extended it to include North Street, the northern border of New York's east side at the beginning of the 19th century.

     The current spelling of the name is a corruption: the street appears as Houstoun in the city's Common Council minutes for 1808 and the official map drawn in 1811 to establish the street grid that is still current. In those years, the Texas hero Sam Houston, for whom the street is sometimes incorrectly said to have been named, was an unknown teenager in Tennessee. Also mistaken is the explanation that the name derives from the Dutch words huis for house and tuin for garden. The narrow, westernmost stretch of the current Houston Street, from Sixth Avenue to the West Side Highway, was known as "Hammersley Street" (also spelled "Hamersly Street") until the middle 19th century, and was inside Greenwich Village. It later came to be regarded as the Village's southern boundary.

     In 1891, Nikola Tesla established his Houston Street laboratory. Much of Tesla's research was lost in an 1895 fire.

     The street, originally narrow, was markedly widened from Sixth Avenue to Essex Street in the early 1930s during construction of the Independent Subway System's Sixth Avenue Line. The street widening involved demolition of buildings on both sides of the street, resulting in numerous small, empty lots. Although some of these lots have been redeveloped, many of them are now used by vendors, and some have been turned into playgrounds and, more recently, community gardens."  - Wikipedia

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 05, 2018, 09:22:41 PM
Engine 315/Ladder 125 Firehouse  159-06 Union Turnpike  Jamaica Hills, Queens  13th Division, 50th Battalion  "Clown College"

     Engine 315 organized 159-06 Union Turnpike                                    1929

     Ladder 75 organized 91-45 121st Street former volunteer firehouse    1907
     Ladder 75 moved 91-62 111th Street at Hose 2                                1912
     Ladder 75 became Ladder 125                                                         1913 
     Ladder 125 new firehouse 91-45 121st Street with Engine 270           1913
     Ladder 125 moved 159-06 Union Turnpike at Engine 315                   1953

     Ladder 125 notes:

          Pre-FDNY - Ladder 125 organized in former quarters of volunteer Richmond Hill Engine 1 as FDNY Ladder 75

          Ladder 125 moved new firehouse 91-45 121st Street with Engine 270:

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/hk33auuyt/E_279_fh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hk33auuyt/)


159-06 Union Turnpike firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/r4mpxt4w5/E_315_fh_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r4mpxt4w5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7zjgo30it/E_315_fh_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7zjgo30it/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/gukaym4qt/E_315_fh_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gukaym4qt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4364s4aed/E_315_fh_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4364s4aed/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vx14mkwj9/E_315_fh_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vx14mkwj9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/swfostbf9/E_315_fh_77.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/swfostbf9/)


Engine 315:
   
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/upilgmh11/E_315_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/upilgmh11/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/nz24771l1/E_315_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nz24771l1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/nz24779at/E_315_ap_34.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nz24779at/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/44g2l39it/E_315_ap_24.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/44g2l39it/)



Ladder 125:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/tah0s7sw5/L_125_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tah0s7sw5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ookwjw285/L_125_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ookwjw285/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9fuz65b4l/L_125_ap_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9fuz65b4l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ucr7aryut/L_125_ap_34.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ucr7aryut/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3roof8jmt/L_125_ap_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3roof8jmt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ylvxd079x/L_125_ap_26.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ylvxd079x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yynbj7ket/L_125_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yynbj7ket/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/b7ny13rxh/L_125_ap_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b7ny13rxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/e1r3ekh91/L_125_ap_38.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e1r3ekh91/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7bam551t1/L_125_ap_39.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7bam551t1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/b7ny13rxh/L_125_ap_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b7ny13rxh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/qgdvex3md/L_125_ap_28.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qgdvex3md/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/dc8b28r05/L_125_ap_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dc8b28r05/)


Engine 315/Ladder 125:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/toicrgi11/E_315_L_125_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/toicrgi11/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pqv324v8l/E_315_members.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pqv324v8l/)


Engine 315/Ladder 125 videos:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFBMV7XRsgg

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zm-YNo19wk

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87nZoTsVC3o


Engine 315/Ladder 125 FDNY medals:
               
     OSCAR WINEGAR FF. ENG. 315 MAR. 27, 1950 CRIMMINS

     THOMAS E. DOYLE FF. ENG. 315 MAR. 27, 1950 MC ELLIGOTT

     JAMES A. MILLS FF. ENG. 315 OCT. 29, 1982 MC ELLIGOTT

     BRIAN T. O'CONNOR LT. ENG. 315 JUN. 1, 1995 HOLY NAME

     KENNETH G. BAUMEISTER FF. LAD. 125 NOV. 19, 1975 BROOKMAN

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/602uwct91/Baumaster.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/602uwct91/)

     JOHN J. FLANAGAN FF. LAD. 125 NOV. 19, 1975 KRIDEL

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/e5kwuop9h/003.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e5kwuop9h/)

     ROBERT E. WILLIAMS CAPT. LAD. 125 OCT. 29, 1982 DOLNEY


Engine 315/Ladder 125 LODDs:

     CAPTAIN DANIEL J. MURPHY ENGINE 315 February 20, 1941

          Captain Daniel J. Murphy died from injuries he received at Box 6997 while operating at a fire on February 2nd, 1940 at Northern Boulevard and 223rd Street while detailed to Engine 274. He died as a result of the severe smoke inhalation. He was appointed to FDNY on June 7, 1919, promoted to Lieutenant on April 1, 1930 and assigned to Engine 29. He was promoted to Captain on October 2, 1938 and assigned to Engine 29. He transferred to Engine 315 on April 1, 1939. He was fifty-two years old at the time of his death. (From "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz & Melahn, 2007)


     FIREFIGHTER JOHN FLANNIGAN LADDER 125 December 8, 1975

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/3vihvfjyd/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3vihvfjyd/)

          Firefighter Flanagan died as a result of inhaling poisonous fumes and carbon monoxide poisoning while operating at a fire in the basement of a discount store on November 19th.


     RIP.  Never forget.


Jamaica Hills:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica_Hills,_Queens

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2008/12/jamaica-hills-queens/


(https://s18.postimg.cc/opzfqvtdx/new-york-engine-315-ladder-125-greatest-show-on-earth-patch-new-.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/opzfqvtdx/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/59a4qh3ph/patch-184_large.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/59a4qh3ph/)


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 05, 2018, 10:10:14 PM
FF Joseph J. O'Neill Ladder 125 (then H&L 75) - 16 year veteran firefigher dies from fall on lunch break - August 19, 1910:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8mmyr84r9/L_125_O_Neill_19_August_1910.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8mmyr84r9/)

     RIP.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 05, 2018, 10:21:33 PM
Ladder 125 - 1969 Mack MB-series cab with 1955 FWD wooden aerial:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/tah0s7sw5/L_125_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tah0s7sw5/)


Note: FDNY purchased 1969 10 Mack MB-series tractors for older aerial ladders.  Some of the truck companies who received the new Mack tractors were:  L 5; L 39; L 85; L 115; L 140. 

Not sure about other ladder companies.

Ladder 5:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lkeu0iq5h/Ladder_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lkeu0iq5h/)

Ladder 39:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/xv7skset1/L_39.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xv7skset1/)

Ladder 85:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lx686pnut/L_85.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lx686pnut/)

Ladder 140:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/miv730t9h/L_115.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/miv730t9h/)


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on February 06, 2018, 02:42:14 AM
In a very earlier unrelated post (not sure what thread) which i had related but a friend who was a Chauffer years ago  in 140 told me they had got this enclosed Sub Nosed Mack Postal Service type cab retrofitted to thier Rig & he said "it even had a cigarette lighter in the dashboard" .....well after their first job when i asked him how the job went he said "when i pulled the Power Takeoff Handle to engage the Aerial the dashboard knob came off in my hand & the cable kept coming out but never engaged " .


 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: johnd248 on February 06, 2018, 09:49:09 AM
A long time ago, I had a cousin who worked many years in E 214 and transferred to E 315 where he worked until he retired.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 06, 2018, 09:37:47 PM
Question:  What FDNY ladder company "walked like an Egyptian" in 1986?


     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ocr1ntedx/L_25_Bangles_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ocr1ntedx/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: CFDMarshal on February 06, 2018, 09:44:44 PM
Ladder 25!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 06, 2018, 10:05:22 PM
Question:  What FDNY ladder company "walked like an Egyptian" in 1986?


     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ocr1ntedx/L_25_Bangles_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ocr1ntedx/)

You got it, Reverend  -  Ladder 25.   

(https://s18.postimg.cc/thwuj2e3p/L_25_Bangles.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/thwuj2e3p/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/djo4t7u91/L_25_Bengles.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/djo4t7u91/)


"Walk Like an Egyptian"  -  The Bangles  - #1 US Billboard 1987

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv6tuzHUuuk

     Ladder 25 members at 1:46 in video
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walk_Like_an_Egyptian


Song facts:

Songwriter Liam Sternberg wrote this. He got the idea when he was on a ferry boat, and saw people struggling to keep their balance. The way they held out their arms and jerked around made it look like they were doing Egyptian movements, and if the boat moved suddenly, they would all topple over.
This was the biggest hit for the Bangles, but they considered it one of their least favorite songs, as their rock pedigree was compromised by a goofy song they had nothing to do with composing. Most Bangles songs were written by at least one member of the group, with the notable exception of "Manic Monday," which was written by Prince.
All members except drummer Debbi Peterson sang a verse. Peterson was originally supposed to sing the whole thing, but producer David Kahne had each member audition the lyrics to determine who would sing what verse.
This was offered to Toni Basil, but she turned it down. The Bangles needed one more song to complete their album, so they took it.
The difficult recording process caused a lot of tension within the band. These tensions would eventually break them up.
In the US, this was the #1 song of 1987 according to Billboard's year end chart.
The video for this song made the band superstars, as it aired in heavy rotation on MTV. The Bangles became darlings of the network, but early on they weren't sold on the medium. Here are some quotes from 1985 where they kvetch:
Debbi Peterson: "When you listen to a record you can imagine what they look like and what they were doing when they recorded, but when you see the video it ruins it for you."

Susanna Hoffs: "I wish they could be more like movies, I wish they could somehow fulfill you, bring you through an experience."  -  http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=595
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 06, 2018, 10:15:32 PM
NYC EMS (pre-FDNY) members unit also "walked like an Egyptian" later in video:

(https://s18.postimg.cc/6mtygn0id/EMS.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6mtygn0id/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: t123ken on February 07, 2018, 11:04:19 AM
A couple of members of Engine 8 had a cameo in Cyndi Lauper's "Girls Just Want To Have Fun."
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 07, 2018, 12:31:34 PM
A couple of members of Engine 8 had a cameo in Cyndi Lauper's "Girls Just Want To Have Fun."

Engine 8 - "Girls Just Want to Have Fun"  1983

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/405pre8ud/E_8_Girls.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/405pre8ud/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ezqx30u4l/E_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ezqx30u4l/)

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIb6AZdTr-A

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girls_Just_Want_to_Have_Fun

     3.51 into video


Engine 8:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/uz9kmj0g5/11060915_900734873283334_2082110074154236727_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uz9kmj0g5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/web5b9wed/11025841_887833157906839_3986380379241496244_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/web5b9wed/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ja5kyojt1/11046388_878744218815733_4130474519222101233_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ja5kyojt1/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 09, 2018, 11:21:59 PM
Engine 8/Ladder 2/Battalion 8 Firehouse  165 E 51st Street  Midtown East, Manhattan  3rd Division, 8th Battalion “Midtown Highrise”

     Engine 8 organized 128 E 50th Street former firehouse Relief Hose 51                         1865
     Engine 8 new firehouse 165 E 51st Street                                                                  1869
     Engine 8 moved 126 E 50th Street at Ladder 2                                                           1944
     Engine 8 returned 165 E 51st Street w/Ladder 2                                                        1945
     Engine 8 moved 157 E 67th Street at Engine 39                                                         1957
     Engine 8 moved 213 E 50th Street w/Ladder 2                                                           1960
     Engine 8 new firehouse 165 E 51st Street w/ Ladder 2                                                1961
     Engine 8 moved 157 E 67th Street at Engine 39                                                         2006
     Engine 8 returned 165 E 51 Street w/Ladder 2                                                           2006
 
     Ladder 2 organized 126 E 50th St former firehouse Liberty Hook and Ladder 16           1865
     Ladder 2 moved 129 E 52nd Street                                                                          1912
     Ladder 2 moved 165 E 51st Street at Engine 8                                                          1912
     Ladder 2 moved 159 E 67th Street former firehouse Ladder 16                                   1912
     Ladder 2 new firehouse 126 E 50th Street                                                                 1913
     Ladder 2 moved 165 E 51st Street w/ Engine 8                                                         1945
     Ladder 2 moved 238 E 40th Street at Engine 21                                                        1957
     Ladder 2 moved 213 E 50th Street at Engine 8                                                          1960
     Ladder 2 new firehouse 165 E 51st Street w/Engine 8                                                1961
     Ladder 2 moved 238 E 40th Street at Engine 21                                                        2005
     Ladder 2 returned 165 E 51st Street w/Engine 8                                                        2006

     Ladder 2-2 organized 126 E 50th Street at Ladder 2                                                  1913
     Ladder 2-2 disbanded                                                                                             1939

     Battalion 8 organized 160 E 33rd Street “Alone”                                                        1869
     Battalion 8 moved 217 E 28th Street at Ladder 7                                                      1877
     Battalion 8 moved 160 E 33rd Street “Alone”                                                            1900
     Battalion 8 moved 248 W 48th Street former firehouse Battalion 9                             1903
     Battalion 8 moved 160 E 33rd Street “Alone”                                                            1904
     Battalion 8 moved 126 E 50th Street at Ladder 2                                                      1909
     Battalion 8 moved 129 E 52nd Street  w/Ladder 2                                                     1912
     Battalion 8 new firehouse w/Ladder 16 126 E 50th Street w/Ladder 16                       1912
     Battalion 8 moved 165 E 51st Street w/Engine 8                                                      1945
     Battalion 8 moved 33 W 43rd Street at Engine 65                                                    1957
     Battalion 8 moved 213 E 50th Street w/Engine 8                                                     1960
     Battalion 8 new firehouse 165 E 51st Street w/Engine 8                                           1961
     Battalion 8 moved 157 E 67th Street at Engine 39                                                   2005
     Battalion 8 returned 165 E 51st Street w/Engine 8                                                   2006

     Assistant Chief of Department                                                                                1961


Pre-FDNY volunteer companies:

     Engine 8 organized in Relief Hose No 51 former firehouse in 1865:

          "Relief Hose No 51 - Foreman, Stephen L. McCoy. Located 106 East Fiftieth street; performs duty in the first and second districts. House in ordinary condition; have applied for a new house; petition granted; carriage in good condition; built in 18Î4, by Charles E. Hartsborn; present number of men, 23; 700 feet of hose, in bad condition, and 300 feet good ; hose tender, in good condition.”  -  from Hose Companies of New York City 41-61 1865 Valentine's Manual of the City of New York 1865

     Ladder 2 organized in Liberty Hook and Ladder 16 former firehouse in 1865:

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6fr1ffvdx/Liberty_H_L_16.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6fr1ffvdx/)



Engine 8 original roster – 1865:
 
     Foreman John Van Tassell; Asst Foreman William Frost; Engineer Hiram S. Williams; Stoker George Jarvis; Driver Albert Homer; Fireman John Pye; Fireman John H. Grooves; Fireman Thomas Harrison; Fireman Charles H. Smith; Fireman John I. Egan; Fireman George W. Bell   

Ladder 2 original roster - 1865:

     Foreman Andrew J. Brady; Asst Foreman John Rourke; Driver Ernest Keyser; Fireman Henry Holdsworth; Fireman Edward Story; Fireman Robert Amos; Fireman Roger B. Hamblett; Fireman Edward S. Smith; Fireman Minthorne B. Tompkins; Fireman Thomas Hutchingson; Fireman Samuel Hunt; Fireman Philip Ramee



Engine 8 - 165 E 51st Street firehouse - built 1852:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/y33qtr6cl/E_8_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y33qtr6cl/)


Ladder 2 - 126 E 50th Street firehouse - built 1861:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yfv500wd1/L_2_fh_00.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yfv500wd1/)


Engine 8 - 165 E 51st Street firehouse - built 1869:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6ye7p4a79/E_8_fh_1938_E_51st_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ye7p4a79/)

     Engine 8 located next to NYPD 17th Precinct


Ladder 2 - 126 E 50th Street firehouse - built 1913:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9u97vv15x/L_2_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9u97vv15x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4eikvbk5x/L_2_50th_Lexington.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4eikvbk5x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wiyevefyt/L_2_fh_6_E_50th_street.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/wiyevefyt/)


Engine 8/Ladder 2 - 165 E 51st Street firehouse - built 1961:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vw95gjjv9/E_8_fh_000.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vw95gjjv9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/dz27i0mat/E_8_fh_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dz27i0mat/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/df53en305/E_8_fh_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/df53en305/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4k49463xx/E_2_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4k49463xx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4wvnabjmt/E_8_fh_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4wvnabjmt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/kv4d0ho5h/E_8_fh_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kv4d0ho5h/)
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9vj5oyxr9/E_8_new_firehouse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9vj5oyxr9/)

   
Engine 8:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ywqwzqlb9/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ywqwzqlb9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5hl8qqw79/E_8_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5hl8qqw79/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/z1k3vyz39/E_8_ap_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z1k3vyz39/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yc1bjmtet/11060915_900734873283334_2082110074154236727_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yc1bjmtet/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/r8tg41b4l/11025841_887833157906839_3986380379241496244_o.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r8tg41b4l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ptrvfbx6t/E_8_ap_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ptrvfbx6t/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/usfdtvgf9/E_8_ap_19.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/usfdtvgf9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/jg2sc4i11/E_8_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jg2sc4i11/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/7e7ei0bdh/E_8_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7e7ei0bdh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/71g0bu8j9/E_8_ap_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/71g0bu8j9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/59n1gyzh1/E_8_ap_25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/59n1gyzh1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mo79onwfp/E_8_ap_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mo79onwfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ambvuq59h/E_8_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ambvuq59h/)


Ladder 2:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vvzi5wtdh/L_2_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vvzi5wtdh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/eip7r2dhx/L_2_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eip7r2dhx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ce4upzz0l/L_2_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ce4upzz0l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/b0ht7vc45/L_2_ap_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b0ht7vc45/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pwgcfi5j9/L_2_ap_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pwgcfi5j9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5cbih157p/L_2_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5cbih157p/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/oherqtmgl/L_2_ap_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oherqtmgl/)


Engine 8/Ladder 2:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/d52695gdh/E_8_L_2_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d52695gdh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/y1yedugz9/E_8_L_2_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y1yedugz9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4zk4b12f9/E_8_L_2_ap_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4zk4b12f9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/sqjht5i1x/E_8_L_2_fh_13.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sqjht5i1x/)


Battalion 8:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/kl1fv0wdx/Bn_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kl1fv0wdx/)


Engine 8/Ladder 2/Battalion 8:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9Hm5GFZzYw

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ukvufk3s8yg

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGPA7qAtttc

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8Tvm40WxVQ


Engine 8/Ladder 2/Battalion 8 members:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9bw5g5jhh/E_8_member_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9bw5g5jhh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5e8vqy70l/E_8_member_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5e8vqy70l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3z7b28ld1/E_8_member_2017.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3z7b28ld1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9bw5g1gvp/E_8_member_2017_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9bw5g1gvp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/xfmx4ces5/L_2_member_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xfmx4ces5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/sfpgwptth/E_8_members_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sfpgwptth/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hsvnrb13p/E_8_members_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hsvnrb13p/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ssgv2x6yd/E_8_members_2017.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ssgv2x6yd/)


Engine 8/Ladder 2 FDNY Medals:

     JAMES LEVINS FF. LAD. 2 OCT. 9, 1880 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          FF Levins responded to a fire with Ladder 2 on October 9, 1880, at 99 Park Avenue.  FF Levins climbed to the roof and jumped 12 feet to rescue an unconscious woman, Bridget Murray, who was trapped on the top floor. 

     JAMES MONAGHAN FF. LAD. 2 JAN. 2, 1900 TREVOR-WARREN

     THOMAS F. FREEL CAPT. ENG. 8 1901 STEPHENSON

     WILLIAM B SYTHES FF. LAD. 2 APR. 17, 1908 STRONG

     JOHN B. HOWE BATT. CHIEF BAT. 8 MAY 10, 1908 DEPARTMENT

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/kz2ruhyg5/Howe.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kz2ruhyg5/)

          “On May 10, 1908, he responded to a fire at 214 East 65th St. While companies were attacking the fire, two men became visible through the smoke trapped at a fourth-floor window. A ladder was quickly raised, but proved too short. Seeing one of the men climb out and dangle from the windowsill, Howe sprang into action. He dashed to the top rung of a ladder, grabbed the man by the legs and lifted him above his head, then lowered him down to firemen on the ladder below him. Still on the topmost rung, he repeated this feat of strength and balance with the second man. For his actions Howe was awarded a department medal.” – Firehouse 
           http://www.firehouse.com/article/11213191/rekindles-hall-of-flame

     JAMES SHERLOCK CAPT. LAD. 2 JAN. 6, 1916 CRIMMINS

     JAMES  J. WALSH FF. LAD. 2 APR. 9, 1920 CRIMMINS

     RICHARD RYNN FF. LAD. 2 NOV. 16, 1925 TREVOR-WARREN

     WILLIAM M. FEELY FF. LAD. 2 MAR. 13, 1934 CRIMMINS

     JOHN CORCORAN FF. LAD. 2 JAN. 24, 1936 HUGH BONNER

     JOHN COLGAN FF. LAD. 2 APR. 17, 1942 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

     WALTER J. MANN FF. LAD. 2 DEC. 21, 1945 TODD

     JAMES P. REILLY FF. LAD. 2 DEC. 21, 1945 PRENTICE

     JAMES P. POWDERLY FF. LAD. 2 FEB. 16, 1945 MC ELLIGOTT

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/3yjvlz611/Powderly.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3yjvlz611/)

     WILLIAM H. CARNEY FF. LAD. 2 JAN. 15, 1948 FDR

     BERNARD J. CANNON LT. ENG. 8 MAR. 6, 1949 MC ELLIGOTT

     ROBERT A. WEINER FF. LAD. 2 DEC. 25, 1951 KENNY

     CHARLES J. BOLL FF. LAD. 2 JAN. 9, 1953 BROOKMAN

          LODD May 20, 1959

     WALTER J. MANN FF. LAD. 2 APR. 8, 1954 DOUGHERTY

     CHARLES J. BOLL FF. LAD. 2 APR. 8, 1954 DELEHANTY

          LODD May 20, 1959

     GILBERT W. O'NEILL FF. LAD. 2 AUG. 29, 1955 JOHNSTON

     LAWRENCE J. SCHMEELK FF. LAD. 2 DEC. 13, 1955 DELEHANTY

     MALACHY COX FF. LAD. 2 AUG. 29, 1955 CONRAN

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6sn0zkddx/Cox.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6sn0zkddx/)

          “Malachy Cox, left, and Gilbert O’Neill rescued Eugenie Ward of Chicago from her burning room at the Madison Hotel on 58th Street. While the two men were making their dramatic rescue, Otto H. Knocenhauer, deputy fire chief in command of the Fire Department’s Third Division, was overcome by smoke in a vain attempt to reach Mrs. Ward’s locked room.” – “History by Hashegan”

     RONALD P. KERLEY FF. LAD. 2 JUL. 21, 1963 DELEHANTY
     
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/wo6riva3p/Kerley.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wo6riva3p/)

     FRED WEIS FF. LAD. 2 AUG. 29, 1963 PULASKI

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/tvdjybmgl/Weis.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tvdjybmgl/)

     JOHN T. MC ELLIGOTT LT. ENG. 8 NOV. 10, 1966 MC ELLIGOTT

     ALBERT SOTO FF. LAD. 2 DEC. 4, 1970 KRIDEL

     DANIEL A. NASTRO LT. LAD. 2 DEC. 4, 1970 WAGNER

     MAX SIEGEL FF. LAD. 2 DEC. 4, 1970 KANE

     DENNIS J. ANDERSON FF. LAD. 2 AUG. 30, 1984 PULASKI
         
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/7jfr53v45/Anderson.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7jfr53v45/)

     RAYMOND J. HINE FF. LAD. 2 OCT. 29, 1984 PRENTICE

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/katxbscnp/Hine.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/katxbscnp/)

     JOSEPH C. CAVANAGH FF. LAD. 2 AUG. 8, 1995 COMPANY OFFICERS

     EUGENE W. MAGUIRE FF. LAD. 2 NOV. 14, 1995 PIPES & DRUMS

     WILLIAM J. KUHENS FF. LAD. 2 AUG. 8, 1995 DE FRANCO

     JOHN F. LOVETT FF. LAD. 2 E-21 OCT. 27, 1996 DE FRANCO

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/523zy3j05/Lovett.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/523zy3j05/)


Engine 8/Ladder 2/Battalion 8 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER GEORGE BELL ENGINE 8 NOVEMBER 8, 1865

          He died as a result of inhaling gas fumes at a fire on October 29th.

     FIREFIGHTER HENRY C. MOUNT ENGINE 8 DECEMBER 9, 1879

          Died December 9, 1879 due to fatal injuries received in November at an 8th Avenue stables fire.  His family survived by collections made by fire department supporters.   

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN ENNIS ENGINE 8 AUGUST 30, 1885

     CAPTAIN JOHN J. GRADY LADDER 2 March 24, 1900

          CAPT John J. Grady - Ladder 2
          FF Peter F. Bowen - Engine 21
          FF William J. Smith - Engine 21

          While operating at a 3-alarm fire, they drowned when they were pitched into 8 feet of water in the cellar of the building when it collapsed. Several other F/Fs were injured when they fell into the water while trying to rescue the trapped men.

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/gqlh8ualh/Flood.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/gqlh8ualh/)

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN GEARY LADDER 2 February 21, 1901

          Killed in collision with streetcar when responding.

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/t6i720j6t/Geary.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t6i720j6t/)

     BATTALION CHIEF WILLIAM J. DUFFY BATTALION 8 May 5, 1913

     FIREFIGHTER CHARLES B. FRANSSEN ENGINE 8 May 24, 1919

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/qp6fuqjut/Franssen.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qp6fuqjut/)

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN J. DONOHUE  LADDER 2 April 3, 1928

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/413r8jmgl/Donohue.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/413r8jmgl/)

          Killed in collision with trolley returning from fire.

     LIEUTENANT CHRISTOPHER J. PLUNKETT ENGINE 8 September 3, 1938

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/m20ucv0qd/LODD_Plunkett.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m20ucv0qd/)

          He died as a result of injuries sustained on August 31st, when he fell down an elevator shaft while working at a single-alarm fire.

     FIREFIGHTER JAMES P. REILLY LADDER 2 November 14, 1956

     FIREFIGHTER CHARLES J. BOLL LADDER 2 May 20, 1959

     FIREFIGHTER ROBERT PARRO ENGINE 8 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/qmmk89b5x/Parro.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/qmmk89b5x/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=151798

     FIREFIGHTER MICHAEL CLARKE LADDER 2 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6s0im2j2t/060-_Clarke-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6s0im2j2t/)

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/michael_clarke_27_firefighter.html

     FIREFIGHTER GEORGE DIPASQUALE LADDER 2 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8wkvndahh/083-_Di_Pasquale-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8wkvndahh/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5pqc3r5h1/Di_Pasquaile.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5pqc3r5h1/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ojc50hvwl/George_Di_Pasquale.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ojc50hvwl/)

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/george_dipasquale_33_fireman_n.html

     FIREFIGHTER DENIS GERMAIN LADDER 2 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/v8iogmz9x/118-_Germain-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v8iogmz9x/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/v8iognmf9/Germain.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v8iognmf9/)

          http://www.legacy.com/Sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=146296&location=2
 
     FIREFIGHTER DANIEL HARLIN LADDER 2 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/7uap4r72t/138-_Harlin-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7uap4r72t/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/xpufnygmd/harlin_daniel.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xpufnygmd/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/oi2779wph/Harlin_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oi2779wph/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/butlereagle/Story.aspx?PersonID=146352&location=2

     CAPTAIN FREDERICK ILL LADDER 2 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/abmgc4lv9/158-_Ill-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/abmgc4lv9/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/gdu3237l1/Ill.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/gdu3237l1/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/e99q0zy8l/Ill_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e99q0zy8l/)

          http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/lohud/obituary.aspx?pid=148866427

     FIREFIGHTER CARL MOLINARO LADDER 2 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/mrj65ex2d/226-_Molinaro-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mrj65ex2d/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/rdfadsdgl/Milinaro_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rdfadsdgl/)

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/carl_molinaro_32_firefighter_f.html

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=146369

     FIREFIGHTER DENNIS MULLIGAN LADDER 2 September 11, 2001
         
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/brxytuonp/234-_Mulligan-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/brxytuonp/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ygn5tflh1/Mulligan_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ygn5tflh1/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/iv5u9hh8l/mulligan_dennis.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iv5u9hh8l/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=147174

     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS MCCANN BATTALION 8 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4oqjxy09h/mccann_thomas_2.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/4oqjxy09h/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/e1hyan9ud/mccann_thomas.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e1hyan9ud/)

          http://www.is125q.org/thomas-j-mccann-remembered.html

     BATTALION CHIEF THOMAS DEANGELIS BATTALION 8 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5e8vqnoxh/Diangelis.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5e8vqnoxh/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4oq3ebyol/Chief_D.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4oq3ebyol/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/c4pd051th/Diangelis_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c4pd051th/)

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/humble/story.aspx?personid=127872

          http://livingmemorial.voicesofseptember11.org/nytpog/37975


     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4oq3egw5h/E_8_lodds.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4oq3egw5h/)


     RIP.  Never forget.



Midtown East:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lchlgwth1/E_8_FH_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lchlgwth1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/eysidnwat/E_8_FH_54.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eysidnwat/)

     http://nymag.com/realestate/articles/neighborhoods/midtowneast.htm


(https://s18.postimg.cc/7it8ry0wl/c909aee1b781b3c7c42eb22b01a6d092.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7it8ry0wl/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/hg49l2do5/normal_FDNY_Engine_8_NYF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hg49l2do5/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/pydppbzlh/57f0de944bf02bf9ceab73e10a7ee8f7--fire-dept-fire-department.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pydppbzlh/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/kzq7aut8l/eee31b04772f8a9aba6bd9cbed74262d.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kzq7aut8l/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/ytejzxw4l/E_8_logo_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ytejzxw4l/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 10, 2018, 12:21:10 AM
Engine 8/Ladder 2/Battalion 8 located next to NYPD 17th Precinct:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vewdjtg5h/E_8_17th_PCT.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vewdjtg5h/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on February 10, 2018, 04:26:25 AM
This Rig was the Pride & Joy & meticulously worked on & maintained in showroom condition by a well known Chauffer back then who is also the Father of a frequent Poster on here... https://postimg.cc/image/b0ht7vc45/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on February 10, 2018, 04:28:44 AM
There was also a "quonset hut" type FH temporarily used for a period. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: memory master on February 10, 2018, 05:17:09 AM
This Rig was the Pride & Joy & meticulously worked on & maintained in showroom condition by a well known Chauffer back then who is also the Father of a frequent Poster on here... https://postimg.cc/image/b0ht7vc45/
Possibly E.M.?
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 10, 2018, 09:44:38 AM
When Engine 8/Ladder 2/Battalion 8 new firehouse went into service in 1961, the Assistant Chief of Department also was located at the new firehouse.  He had an office on the 2nd floor and his car was pafrked on the apparatus floor.

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vw95gjjv9/E_8_fh_000.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vw95gjjv9/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 10, 2018, 09:55:50 AM
Engine 8/Ladder 2 had apparatus blessed after moving into new quarters.  Engine 8 had a 1958 Mack 750 GPM pumper.  Ladder 2 had a 1960 American LaFrance 100 foot tiller.
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/z8c1nc8n9/E_8_blessed.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z8c1nc8n9/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: johnd248 on February 10, 2018, 11:24:10 AM
Great house with great companies of men.  I used to hang out there when I worked for First National City Bank (now Citibank) at 399 Park Avenue between 53rd and 54th.  A friend, Walter Wagner, transferred to L 2 from L 147 in Flatbush and I would visit him.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 10, 2018, 01:50:24 PM
1910: Mike, the Extraordinary Trolley-Riding Fire Dog of Engine Company 8

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/b4zinodud/mikedalmation2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b4zinodud/)

     Mike was the fire dog of Engine Company 8 from 1908 to 1914. Twice, he won the blue ribbon in the Dalmatian class at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden.  Mike was no ordinary fire dog. In fact, he was no ordinary Dalmatian. As the son of Oakie and Bess, two of the most famous mascot dogs in the history of the Fire Department of New York, he was destined for greatness.

    Oakie was raised in Newport, Rhode Island on Oakland Farm, the residence of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt. In March 1907, Vanderbilt shipped the dog by crate to Engine Company 39 at Fire Headquarters after he heard that their fire dog, Pinkie, was killed trying to slide down the pole at the firehouse. Oakie was placed in charge of Foreman Edward J. Levy.  Mike’s father, Oakie, was raised on Oakland Farm, the country residence of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt in Newport, Rhode Island.

    Bess also came from a litter of aristocratic dogs, but her master is not known. As the story goes, he very much admired the work of the firemen who responded to a fire at his house, so he decided to give them a Dalmatian.
One day he drove up to the firehouse of Engine Company No. 8 in his touring car and gave them a puppy. He didn’t say who he was, but told them that the dog’s name was Bess and that he wanted her to be a real dog working with firemen.

     Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, Sr. was the third son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Claypoole Gwynne. He was among the 1,198 passengers who died on the RMS Lusitania when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat on May 7, 1915, off the coast of Ireland. He was called a hero for helping others into lifeboats – he even offered his own life jacket to a woman with an infant even though he couldn’t swim. Vanderbilt’s body was never recovered.

     Boisterous, beefy Michael Creegman, aka, Mickey the Breeze, clicked with little pup right off the bat, and took her uptown every night for dinner. Perhaps he had connections, or perhaps it was his dominating presence, but somehow Mickey got her a special pass to ride the Third Avenue Railroad trolley cars with him.

     In March 1908, Bess gave birth to several noble pups. From the litter, a puppy the firemen named Mike was selected and turned over to driver David M. Lynx of Engine Company 8.  Shortly after Mike starting training for the position of fire dog with Engine Company 8, Bess was transferred to a quieter station house in Queens to recover from injuries sustained from running into burning buildings.

     Since she would no longer need her surface rail pass, Fireman David Lynx escorted Mike to the office of Receiver Frederick Wallington Whitridge to see if it could be transferred to Bess’ son.

     Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 8 was organized on September 11, 1865. The company spent the first four years at 128 E. 50th Street, and then moved to its current location at 165 East 51st Street in 1869. Today the company shares headquarters with Ladder Company 2 and Battalion 8.

     Now, Mike was not one for acknowledging anyone not wearing a fireman’s uniform. But according to David Lynx, he jumped right up on Whitridge’s lap “just like a politician asking for a favor.” Whitridge gave the fireman permission to transfer the pass to Mike, saying, “It’s the only pass of the kind ever issued by the road, and if Mike is willing to take all the risks and not sue the company in case of accident I guess we’ll transfer the pass to him.”

     Frederick Whitridge of 16 East 11th Street was appointed Receiver of the Third Avenue Railroad on January 6, 1908, following its foreclosure under the collapse of the Metropolitan Street Railway, which then controlled the rail company. In 1910, the Third Avenue Railway was chartered, acquiring all the properties of the former Third Avenue Railroad. Whitridge was named president of the new company around 1915.

     The special pass was engraved on a silver plate attached to his collar, which also held a tiny brass fire helmet. The inscription read: “To conductors: permission is hereby granted to carry a fire dog on the cars of this company.

     All the conductors were instructed to honor this pass, which let him ride back and forth on the front platform of all the Third Avenue lines. Mike used the pass often to go home with the firemen for dinner and to visit his fire dog pals in uptown fire houses.

     The Third Avenue Railroad Company formed in 1852 and began operating its horse-drawn cars on July 3, 1853. By 1859, using the 125th Street Railroad and tracks along 10th Avenue (Amsterdam Avenue), the line ran from the Astor House (Broadway and Park Row) north along Park Row, the Bowery, and Third Avenue to 130th Street near the Harlem River, a distance of about 8 miles.

     One of Mike’s best canine friends was Jerry, an ordinary mongrel attached to what was then the 29th Precinct at 163 E. 51st Street. Jerry was brought to the police station on March 4, 1909, by a woman who had found him outside starving and shivering. Captain John J. Lantry accepted the dog and the men named him Jerry in honor of the station’s doorman (they were originally going to call him Bill Taft in honor of President William Taft’s inauguration that year but the vote went to Jerry).

     One of the dogs’ favorite activity was taking the ferry-boat from East 53rd Street to Blackwell’s Island. If it was a warm day, they’d go swimming to cool off. Sometimes they would stay there for two or three days, but they always returned to their respective stations.

     By the mid-1880s, the Third Avenue Railroad Company began operating cable cars on the Tenth Avenue cable line and 125th Street line. The surface railway used cable cars as well as horse-drawn streetcars until 1899 when the company switched over to electric-powered trolleys.

When it came to the job, though, Mike and Jerry were all business. Jerry would accompany the policeman on patrol or ride along with the patrol wagon that picked up the prisoners for night court, and Mike would ride along with the fire engines. The two never switched jobs or mixed pleasure with business.

     Mike did his job very well, and the firemen say he saved many lives. He’d jump up and down in excitement as the horses, Jerry, Pat, and Miguel got into their harnesses, and would run ahead to bark and snap at pedestrians in cross streets to let them know the horses were coming. On the scene of the fire, Mike would always run into the buildings with the firemen, just like he mother once did. His reward on hot nights was getting hosed down with the horses when their work was done.

     Mike’s friend Jerry was attached to the 29th Precinct – originally the 19th – which was established at 163 East 51st Street on September 7, 1877. Today it’s known as the 17th Precinct.

     Mike’s two other good four-legged friends at the firehouse were a big grey horse named Jerry who also arrived in 1908 and a large black cat named Tom. The three animals loved being together, and always slept in Jerry’s stall – Mike would put his head on Jerry’s neck and Tom would sleep on Jerry’s back. Jerry fussed over his small friends in the stall, and would always lie down carefully so as not to crush them.

     When an alarm came in at night, Tom would jump out of the way and walk to the street to watch the engines pull away. Then he’d go back inside to sleep until his friends came home (who said cats were not as smart as dogs?) Actually, one time Tom tried to ride on Jerry’s back as he raced to a fire. He held on for a few seconds and then jumped, landing on his end and injuring himself (so maybe he wasn’t that smart).

     Although Mike usually went inside the buildings with the men, he must have sensed that his friend Jerry was about to lose his job when he noticed the horse was falling asleep on the scene. According to Captain Joseph Donovan, no sooner would Dave Lynx place a blanket over his team, Jerry would drop down in the gutter and take a nap.
Dave and the engine men Dennis McNamara and Frank Leonard didn’t know what to do – but Mike had an idea.
For the next few nights, Mike remained outside with the horses and began nipping Jerry on the knees as soon as he started to kneel down. Sometimes he’d nip him 10 times in a half hour, but eventually the trick worked and Jerry stopped falling asleep on the job.

     On December 5, 1914, Jerry stumbled and fell while racing to a fire. The large horse landed on top of Mike, crushing his hind legs. The firemen carried Mike back to the station and placed him in Jerry’s stall to quiet the horse – she seemed to know that the end was near for her dear canine friend.

     Although Mike had a short life, it was a very rewarding one. Not only did he help save lives, he also took first place in the Dalmatian class at the 34th annual Westminster Kennel Club show at Madison Square Garden in 1910 and 1911. The class was specifically dedicated to firemen’s dogs. In 1910, second place went to two-year-old Smoke II of Engine Company 68 on Jay Street in Brooklyn.

     This story is dedicated to the families and friends of the firefighters from Engine 8, Ladder 2, and Battalion 8 who made the supreme sacrifice on September 11th, 2001.


     http://hatchingcatnyc.com/2015/02/21/mike-trolley-riding-fire-dog-engine-8/


Engine 8 firehouse/17th Precinct:
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6ye7p4a79/E_8_fh_1938_E_51st_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ye7p4a79/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: CVILLE 7111 on February 10, 2018, 09:47:51 PM
Slid my first pole with my Dad there!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 11, 2018, 08:10:19 PM
FDNY Responds to Great Baltimore Fire - February 1904

FDNY Companies - Engines 5, 7, 12, 13, 16, 26, 27, 31, 33  H&L 5  - 85 members

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/qecvhlcj9/Balt_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qecvhlcj9/)

Chief - John Howe, Battalion 8

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/gfwi8zpyd/Howe.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gfwi8zpyd/)

FDNY Surgeon - Dr Harry M. Archer 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/kxyt0w3dh/Archer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kxyt0w3dh/)

LODD - Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly, Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and died - RIP.


"Great Baltimore Fire"

It was at 1:40 A.M. on Feb. 8, 1904, when the telephone next to Howe’s bed rang. The call was from the acting chief of department, Charles Kruger.
“Is that you, Howe?” Kruger asked.
“Yes,” Howe replied.
“Howe, you are ordered to proceed at once with the companies and apparatus that I designate to Baltimore.”
“What’s that? Baltimore? Where?” Howe rubbed the sleep from his eyes.
“Listen to me,” Kruger continued. “There is a big fire raging in Baltimore and the mayor of that city has appealed to Mayor McClellan for help from our department…”
With that, Howe was dressed and out the door heading toward a special ferry boat waiting at Liberty Street that would carry the companies to New Jersey, where a special train waited to take them directly to Baltimore. Nine flat cars carried seven gleaming steam fire engines, several hose tenders and a hook-and-ladder truck, all lashed down securely. Two cars were filled with 35 horses. Two coaches were for Howe and his 85 men and 10 New York City newspaper reporters. Several other companies followed later on another train.
The following telegram was sent to the mayor of Baltimore:
 
Robert M. McLane, Mayor, Baltimore, Md.

Nine fire engines and one hook and ladder company shipped to you on 6:34 o’clock train this morning in charge of battalion chief. The city of New York extends heartfelt sympathy and puts itself at your service. I shall be grateful if you call on me for any assistance New York can lend.
George B. McClellan, Mayor

After some delays, the expeditionary force of New York firemen reached Baltimore. With the winds blowing hard from the northwest, they were sent to the southeast fringe of the fire line to try to stop the fire from spreading to a neighborhood of tenements, lumber yards, factories and icehouses.
Their position was on West Falls Avenue alongside Jones Falls and Dock Street. They moved the seven six-ton engines into position and fired the pumps to their full 1,200-gpm capacity. Numerous lines were stretched and the New Yorkers made a stand. With wind-driven smoke and heat pounding their position, they held their ground and drove back some of the fire. Working in conjunction with the Baltimore fireboat Cataract, the FDNY firemen held their position through the night. With little visibility, they worked continually, taking breaks company by company only to have a sandwich and a cup of warming coffee before returning to the lines.
Howe led members of Engines 5 and 27 in a dangerous attempt to keep the spreading flames from igniting a huge malt warehouse. With the help of reinforcements the line held and the flames were stopped. For hours, they flowed water across the smoldering ruins, helping to ensure the fire was extinguished. Finally, dirty, cold and exhausted, the New Yorkers were ready to go home. The fire was out – their duty was done.
 
After meeting with Baltimore City Chief August Emrich and accepting his personal thanks and praise, Howe told him, “This is the worst fire I have ever seen. There seemed to be no stopping it when we got here. It was in so many places at once. I don’t believe our men have ever had a harder fight.” Regarding the Baltimore firemen, he told reporters, “The men themselves in this city are plucky fighters and good firemen. The way they have stuck to this fight against awful odds proves that.”
Howe and the New York City firemen had won the admiration and respect of not only the citizens and politicians, but also the Baltimore firefighters and the other cities that responded and operated in Baltimore including Philadelphia, Annapolis, Chester, York and Washington, DC.

The exhausted New Yorkers, who had been awake and operating for more than 48 hours, finally boarded a train for the trip home. Sadly, one FDNY member, Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly of Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and later died. Howe also became very ill after the Baltimore fire, but refused to go sick. He was finally taken to the hospital on July 10, 1904, suffering from acute inflammatory rheumatism. One notable visitor to the chief was William Aiken, who had been rescued from a fire by Howe three years earlier. After a brief stay, Howe’s condition improved and he returned to work.

     - from "Firehouse"  http://www.firehouse.com/article/11213191/rekindles-hall-of-flame


"Longest Run on Record" - WNYF 4th Issue 1966

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ilm7pme9x/Balt_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ilm7pme9x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/799m7usqd/Balt_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/799m7usqd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6jqtvi7md/Balt_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6jqtvi7md/)

     Notes:

     - most responding companies were double FDNY companies
     - responding members did not know they were going to Baltimore (had no money or winter clothing)
     - no provisions were made for feeding members
     - Dr Archer paid for meal for all 85 members


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_a8KgzWpYg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCxUG65HGsc


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 11, 2018, 08:22:32 PM
Dr Harry M. Archer, Honorary FDNY Battalion Chief/2nd Deputy Commissioner, 60 years service to FDNY members


     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JVUULu96Ao


     -1924 awarded James Gordon Bennett Medal - only civilian to ever be awarded this medal

     -Harry M Archer medal for heroism awarded in his honor

     -Fireboat "Harry M. Archer", Engine 78/Marine 6, named in his honor


Dr. Archer was born to a prominent New York family. He attended Columbia University and received an M.D. degree from Bellevue Medical College in 1894. Since his childhood he loved the FDNY, not unlike many youngsters in the City. But after becoming a physician, Dr. Archer dedicated himself to New York's Bravest. Perhaps to the disappointment of his family, rather than becoming a private physician to New York's high society, he accepted a salaried position with Aetna Life Affiliated Companies with the proviso that he could, and would, leave his office to attend greater alarm fires. On March 7, 1907, Dr. Archer was appointed to the Department with the rank of honorary Battalion Chief and was designated a Medical Officer. Though never receiving compensation for his medical services to the FDNY, there is no doubt that this was his full-time job.

Whether by horse, bicycle, his Locomobile outfitted with bell and Maltese cross, or by "bus" - the 1914 FDNY Ambulance he designed - Dr. Archer's appearance at second and greater alarms was a matter of routine. But once at the scene, he was not satisfied with merely tending to the wounds, major or minor, of the firefighters. On multiple occasions, Dr. Archer entered burning or collapsed buildings to treat firefighters and civilians alike. At the Equitable Building fire in 1912, he made his way into the basement vaults of the building to administer aid to trapped firemen. For this action, he received his first medal of valor. He was cited a total of four times during his career including the Department's highest award, the James Gordon Bennett Medal, for his participation in the rescue of two workmen trapped in a building collapse at 39 to 41 Eldridge Street in Manhattan. Dr. Archer himself became trapped briefly when a second collapse shook the building as he was making his exit. Twenty-four years later, at the age of 78, Dr. Archer was still at it, this time crawling through the rubble and debris to spend over ten hours on a freezing New Year's Eve to try to keep two firefighters, Battalion Chief William Hogan and Fireman Winfield Walsh, alive. They were trapped in the collapse of a loft building at 749 Broadway. Dr. Archer administered plasma to them, perhaps the first time this was done outside of a hospital in other than a combat setting, as well as broth through feeding tubes. Unfortunately, both men succumbed to their injuries but not until several days after their ordeal.

In 1939, Mayor LaGuardia asked him to serve as Second Deputy Commissioner which he did until 1940. To do so, he had to resign his honorary position and rank.

Dr. Archer's activities earned him the respect of his professional colleagues as well as the firefighters he treated. Perhaps the first Fire Surgeon to truly embody that title, he became nationally known for his expertise in treating toxic gas poisoning, having developed ground-breaking treatment modalities. Some times his methods were "low-tech." He was known to stock woolen Navy watch caps in his ambulance that he would make injured men wear on cold, wet nights.

Though the firefighters who benefited from Dr. Archer's intense concern and caring are of a generation long since passed, his memory lives on. In 1947, a medal was endowed in his name. It is awarded every third year to one of the three previous Bennett Medal recipients. In 1956, Commissioner Cavanaugh unveiled a plaque in Headquarters honoring Dr. Archer's sixty years of devotion and service to the members of the Department. In 1958, a fireboat was commissioned in his name. It was retired in 1994.

Dr. Archer was given a full Departmental funeral at St. Patrick's Cathedral. He is buried in the family crypt at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Tarrytown, New York.

     - https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86601573/harry-mortimer-archer


Fireboat "Harry M. Archer", Engine 78/Marine Company 6

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/51014fb1x/Untitled.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/51014fb1x/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on February 12, 2018, 12:40:18 AM
FDNY Responds to Great Baltimore Fire - February 1904

FDNY Companies - Engines 5, 7, 12, 13, 16, 26, 27, 31, 33  H&L 5  - 85 members

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/qecvhlcj9/Balt_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qecvhlcj9/)

Chief - John Howe, Battalion 8

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/gfwi8zpyd/Howe.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gfwi8zpyd/)

FDNY Surgeon - Dr Harry M. Archer 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/kxyt0w3dh/Archer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kxyt0w3dh/)

LODD - Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly, Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and died - RIP.


"Great Baltimore Fire"

It was at 1:40 A.M. on Feb. 8, 1904, when the telephone next to Howe’s bed rang. The call was from the acting chief of department, Charles Kruger.
“Is that you, Howe?” Kruger asked.
“Yes,” Howe replied.
“Howe, you are ordered to proceed at once with the companies and apparatus that I designate to Baltimore.”
“What’s that? Baltimore? Where?” Howe rubbed the sleep from his eyes.
“Listen to me,” Kruger continued. “There is a big fire raging in Baltimore and the mayor of that city has appealed to Mayor McClellan for help from our department…”
With that, Howe was dressed and out the door heading toward a special ferry boat waiting at Liberty Street that would carry the companies to New Jersey, where a special train waited to take them directly to Baltimore. Nine flat cars carried seven gleaming steam fire engines, several hose tenders and a hook-and-ladder truck, all lashed down securely. Two cars were filled with 35 horses. Two coaches were for Howe and his 85 men and 10 New York City newspaper reporters. Several other companies followed later on another train.
The following telegram was sent to the mayor of Baltimore:
 
Robert M. McLane, Mayor, Baltimore, Md.

Nine fire engines and one hook and ladder company shipped to you on 6:34 o’clock train this morning in charge of battalion chief. The city of New York extends heartfelt sympathy and puts itself at your service. I shall be grateful if you call on me for any assistance New York can lend.
George B. McClellan, Mayor

After some delays, the expeditionary force of New York firemen reached Baltimore. With the winds blowing hard from the northwest, they were sent to the southeast fringe of the fire line to try to stop the fire from spreading to a neighborhood of tenements, lumber yards, factories and icehouses.
Their position was on West Falls Avenue alongside Jones Falls and Dock Street. They moved the seven six-ton engines into position and fired the pumps to their full 1,200-gpm capacity. Numerous lines were stretched and the New Yorkers made a stand. With wind-driven smoke and heat pounding their position, they held their ground and drove back some of the fire. Working in conjunction with the Baltimore fireboat Cataract, the FDNY firemen held their position through the night. With little visibility, they worked continually, taking breaks company by company only to have a sandwich and a cup of warming coffee before returning to the lines.
Howe led members of Engines 5 and 27 in a dangerous attempt to keep the spreading flames from igniting a huge malt warehouse. With the help of reinforcements the line held and the flames were stopped. For hours, they flowed water across the smoldering ruins, helping to ensure the fire was extinguished. Finally, dirty, cold and exhausted, the New Yorkers were ready to go home. The fire was out – their duty was done.
 
After meeting with Baltimore City Chief August Emrich and accepting his personal thanks and praise, Howe told him, “This is the worst fire I have ever seen. There seemed to be no stopping it when we got here. It was in so many places at once. I don’t believe our men have ever had a harder fight.” Regarding the Baltimore firemen, he told reporters, “The men themselves in this city are plucky fighters and good firemen. The way they have stuck to this fight against awful odds proves that.”
Howe and the New York City firemen had won the admiration and respect of not only the citizens and politicians, but also the Baltimore firefighters and the other cities that responded and operated in Baltimore including Philadelphia, Annapolis, Chester, York and Washington, DC.

The exhausted New Yorkers, who had been awake and operating for more than 48 hours, finally boarded a train for the trip home. Sadly, one FDNY member, Engineer of Steamer Mark Kelly of Engine 16, contracted pneumonia and later died. Howe also became very ill after the Baltimore fire, but refused to go sick. He was finally taken to the hospital on July 10, 1904, suffering from acute inflammatory rheumatism. One notable visitor to the chief was William Aiken, who had been rescued from a fire by Howe three years earlier. After a brief stay, Howe’s condition improved and he returned to work.

     - from "Firehouse"  http://www.firehouse.com/article/11213191/rekindles-hall-of-flame


"Longest Run on Record" - WNYF 4th Issue 1966

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ilm7pme9x/Balt_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ilm7pme9x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/799m7usqd/Balt_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/799m7usqd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6jqtvi7md/Balt_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6jqtvi7md/)

     Notes:

     - most responding companies were double FDNY companies
     - responding members did not know they were going to Baltimore (had no money or winter clothing)
     - no provisions were made for feeding members
     - Dr Archer paid for meal for all 85 members


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_a8KgzWpYg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCxUG65HGsc
  Except for Eng. 7 (located at 49 Beekman), every company that responded including H&L 5 was a double company that day so there was no need for relocators to cover them during their long run. ;)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on February 12, 2018, 12:42:56 AM
How far back in history does the concept of "relocators" go?
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on February 12, 2018, 01:34:48 AM
How far back in history does the concept of "relocators" go?
  From the Book: "FDNY Tales"    http://www.fire-police-ems.com/misc/fdny-tales-stories-assign2.shtml
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: memory master on February 12, 2018, 06:03:26 AM
Very interesting and thanks for posting Gman.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 12, 2018, 07:55:02 AM
How far back in history does the concept of "relocators" go?
  From the Book: "FDNY Tales"    http://www.fire-police-ems.com/misc/fdny-tales-stories-assign2.shtml

Thanks Gman.  The 1909 assignment card shows a lot of changes:

     - Disbanded Engines 13, 30, 20, 31, 27, 17, 29, 12, 25, 32, 11, 19
     - Disbanded Water Tower 1
     - Relocation - Engine 72 to the Bronx
     - Transition - Engine 18 to Squad 18
     - Disbanded Division 2
     - Disbanded Battalion 3, 5
 
Different operations:

     - No rescue companies, squads, special units - except water towers
     - Number of chiefs - only 1 Deputy and 5 BCs at 5th alarm (at a time they did not have radios)
     - Few relocations - due to 2-section companies
     - No relocations from other boros
     - 5 fuel wagons required
     - Horses

FDNY would be able to handle a 5th alarm in lower Manhattan with only 5 engines and 1 truck relocated.  For Box 220, 13 of the assigned engines and 3 of the assigned trucks were double companies. 
 

Engine 13 - 1st due Box 220 - former firehouse 99 Wooster Street:

     http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2016/01/engine-company-no-13-no-99-wooster.html

Engine 31/Water Tower 1 - former firehouse 87 Lafayette Street:

     http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2010/05/napoleon-le-bruns-fantastic-french.html

Engine 27 - former firehouse 173 Franklin Street:

     http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2016/09/engine-company-27-no-173-franklin-street.html
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on February 12, 2018, 10:48:41 AM
Thanks, Gman and Mack.  Lots of great information.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 12, 2018, 10:41:20 PM
Engine 240/Battalion 48  Firehouse  1309 Prospect Avenue, Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn  11th Division, 48th Battalion  “The Road Runners” 

     Engine 40 BFD organized w/Ladder 21 BFD 1309 Prospect Avenue                                               1896
     Engine 40 BFD became Engine 40 FDNY                                                                                     1898
     Engine 40 became Combined Engine Company 40                                                                       1898
     Combined Engine Company 40 became Combined Engine Company 140                                       1899
     Combined Engine Company 140 became Combined Engine Company 240                                     1913
     Combined Engine Company 240 became Engine 240                                                                   1914       
 
     Ladder 21 BFD organized w/Engine 40 BFD 1309 Prospect Avenue w/Engine 40 BFD                     1896
     Ladder 21 BFD became Ladder 21 FDNY                                                                                    1898
     Ladder 21 disbanded                                                                                                                1898

     Battalion 38 organized 395 4th Avenue at Engine 139                                                                1906
     Battalion 38 became Battalion 48                                                                                             1906
     Battalion 48 moved 530 11th Street at Engine 220                                                                    1930
     Battalion 48 moved 1309 Prospect Avenue at Engine 240                                                           1978
     
     Hydrant Service 12 organized 126 Foster Avenue at Engine 250                                                 1934
     Hydrant Service 12 moved 1309 Prospect Avenue at Engine 240                                                1948
     Hydrant Service 12 moved 126 Foster Avenue at Engine 250                                                     1951
     Hydrant Service 12 disbanded                                                                                                 1957


Pre-BFD:

     Windsor Terrace Hose Company No. 3 was formed in January 1888 to protect the growing community of Windsor Terrace.  It was consolidated with the Washington Engine Company and the Melrose and Woodbine fire companies of Parkville to form the Flatbush Fire Department.  The firehouse was located at 1286 Prospect Avenue.  Windsor Terrace Hose Company No 3 had about 40 members.   The Windsor Hose Company was mustered out of duty when the new firehouse for Brooklyn Fire Department Engine Company 40 was completed and City of Brooklyn assumed responsibility for paid fire-fighting companies in the area.

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/oxfb5rbt1/Windsor_Hose_3_fh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oxfb5rbt1/)


Brooklyn Fire Department 1309 Prospect Avenue firehouse - Engine 40/Ladder 21:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wdekrkudh/E_240_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wdekrkudh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/g2egv9plh/E_240_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g2egv9plh/)

     The firehouse for Engine Company 40/ Hook & Ladder Company 21 was put into service in January 20, 1896.  It was manned with experienced officers from several different Brooklyn fire companies; several of the firefighters were from former Flatbush volunteer companies.  Engine 40 was equipped with a new 1895 Lafrance steamer and an 1896 P.J. Barrett hose wagon; the ladder company was equipped with an 1896 Holloway 50 foot City Service ladder truck with a 40 gallon chemical tank.  The Engine Company fought its first fire at 53rd Street and Third Avenue on January 29, 1896.  In February 1896, both Engine Company 40 and Ladder Company 21 were called to a fire in a three story frame building on Seeley Street, in Windsor Terrace. 

     - Landmarks Preservation Commission February 12, 2013   http://www.neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org/db/bb_files/2013-FirehouseEngineCompany40Company21.pdf


FDNY 1308 Prospect Avenue firehouse - Engine 240/Battalion 48:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/t6k17zk85/E_240_fh_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t6k17zk85/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/h9x00wkfp/E_240_fh_10.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/h9x00wkfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vnvsfbopx/E_240_fh_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vnvsfbopx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yuqbywjfp/E_240_fh_26.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yuqbywjfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/x47awwelx/E_240_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x47awwelx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vp5q86syd/E_240_fh_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vp5q86syd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ekf0a5h1/E_240_fh_25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ekf0a5h1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/dz41n6hyd/E_248_fh_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dz41n6hyd/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vcec21kz9/E_248_fh_32.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vcec21kz9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/fe5mbx66t/E_240_fh_16.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fe5mbx66t/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/vcec22fud/E_240_fh_door.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vcec22fud/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/kct4qgx51/E_240_fh_66.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kct4qgx51/)


Engine 240:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5koezetv9/240_rig_1979.txt.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5koezetv9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/nnhhqmxfp/E_240_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nnhhqmxfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/p2j2fe13p/E_240_ap_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p2j2fe13p/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8erkcwthh/E_240_ap_20.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/8erkcwthh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6a77btzkl/E_240_ap_19.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6a77btzkl/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/bydi2qr2d/E_240_ap_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bydi2qr2d/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/4v5mn512d/E_240_ap_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4v5mn512d/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cnwaf4er9/E_240_ap_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cnwaf4er9/)

Battalion 48:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/urzazczgl/Bn_48_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/urzazczgl/)


Engine 240 responding:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieAr3QDJaO4


Engine 240/Battalion 48 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER EDWARD D. LAHEY ENGINE 240 September 25, 1907

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/8l9uterwl/Leahey.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8l9uterwl/)

          FF Lahey fell from Engine 240's tender while responding to a fire.

     BATTALION CHIEF JOHN J. DOOLEY BATTALION 48 June 6, 1931

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/v8p4027lx/Dooley.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v8p4027lx/)

          Battalion Chief John J. Dooley of the 48th Battalion was sliding the pole from the third floor to the second floor when he lost his grip and fell. He fractured his skull in the fall. After a time in the hospital he returned home and then back to the hospital suffering from pneumonia. A member of the old Brooklyn Fire Department since October 15, 1887, he was promoted to Captain on July 1, 1889. A Battalion Chief since 1922 he had been in command of Battalion 48 for the last five years. The fifty-year veteran was married and had one son and was seventy-one years old at the time of his death. - "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz & Melahn
     
     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS J. OSBORN ENGINE 240 March 3, 1941

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/wp0mhqcyd/Osborn.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wp0mhqcyd/)

          Fireman Thomas J. Osborn died on March 3, 1941. He was performing house watch in quarters on the night tour. He complained of being ill to his officer and was ordered to bed. Shortly later, Box 2514 was received and Fireman Osborn responded to the apparatus floor. Not being assigned to the box, he went back to bed. At 9:45, he was found not breathing in his bed. He had died from a heart attack. He left a wife and two children. (From "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz & Melahn, 2007

     FIREFIGHTER EUGENE F. KELLY ENGINE 240 March 22, 1943

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6tgvypb6d/Kelly.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6tgvypb6d/)

          FF Eugene Kelly was killed when a trolley struck Engine 240 while responding to a fire.

     LIEUTENANT JOHN A. LYDEN ENGINE 240 December 24, 1949

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/7a23l096d/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7a23l096d/)
         
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/3zdqlcogl/Lyden.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3zdqlcogl/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/c4vsjg7jp/Lyden_Fire.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c4vsjg7jp/)

          LT John Lyden was overcome by smoke fighting a fire at 324 Church Avenue.

     FIREFIGHTER JOSEPH J. TUCKER ENGINE 240 December 19, 1957

          FF Joseph J. Tucker was injured fighting a fire. He retired on disability on July 4, 1956 and died from his injury on Dec. 19, 1957.

     FIREFIGHTER MICHAEL BOCCHINO BATTALION 48 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/sfvwfuk2d/Bocchino.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sfvwfuk2d/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/rdlpxbgol/Bocchino_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rdlpxbgol/)

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/michael-l-bocchino/

     BATTALION CHIEF JOSEPH GRZELAK BATTALION 48 September 11, 2001

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/b2lm11m79/Grzelak_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b2lm11m79/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/9nk1cc89h/Grzelak.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9nk1cc89h/)

          http://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/joseph_grzelak_52_fdny_battali.html

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=146335

   
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/a0bfij5yt/E240logo2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a0bfij5yt/)


     RIP.  Never forget.



Engine 240 history: "WINDSOR TERRACE AND ENGINE 240"  - Mike Boucher   

     Engine 240 was placed in service on January 20, 1896. At that time it was not part of the F.D.N.Y. and the fire truck was not painted white over red or diesel powered. One hundred years ago the apparatus was pulled buy a team of horses and was painted a two tone green. Engine 240 was called Engine 40 back then and was part of the City of Brooklyn, the fourth largest city in the country.  The village of Windsor Terrace  was a farm that belong to John Vanderbilt. He sold the farm to developers in 1849 and the village was formed in 1851. Between 1851 and 1888 there was no fire protection in the village. On January 11 of that year, a fire company was placed in service at 1288 Prospect Avenue and it  was called Windsor Terrace Hose 3. They affiliated with the Flatbush Fire Department which was located to the south of Windsor Terrace.  The town of Flatbush was annexed by the City of  Brooklyn on April 24, 1894 along with Windsor Terrace. The Brooklyn Fire Department kept the volunteers active until the City could build fire stations, buy equipment and hire manpower. For their services, each of the volunteer fire companies were paid $1,000.00 a year. The Flatbush Department had one engine, five hose companies and three ladder companies.

     The Brooklyn Fire Department had to hire members from the Flatbush Department to man the new companies. Over three hundred members belong to the Flatbush Department, but only forty four could be pick. Of the forty four picked, thirty two were Republicans. The reason thirty two Republicans were picked is because that is all that was on the department.  Flatbush was a Democratic strong, while the City of Brooklyn was Republican. One member of the Hose Company 3 was assigned to Engine 40.

     The first members of the company were; Foreman James Cummings and Assistant Foreman George H. Fletcher came from other Brooklyn companies. The members from the Flatbush companies were; Thomas F. Regin, William Gremeler, Douglas Murray, John Levanion, Walter T. Tibball, Henry Dorsch, Thomas Gorman, Anton Newman, Enos Pierson, John A. Boddy, Peter J. Velia, J. J. Mctigue and Frederick Meyer. Fireman Walter T. Tibball belonged to Hose Company 3.

     Engine 40 and Ladder 21 were organized on the same day along with Engine 48 and Ladder 22 in Flatbush, Engine 49 and Ladder 23 in Midwood, and Engine 50 and Ladder 20 in Parkville. A lot was purchased from Anna M. Ferris on April 1, 1895 for a cost of $1,600.00. The lot measured 40 feet in the front and 100 feet deep. Engine 40 and Ladder 21 moved into the newly built firehouse on Prospect Avenue near the corner of Greenwood Avenue. New apparatus was assigned to the company, Engine 40 received a 1895 Lafrance 4th size (300 to 500 gpm) steamer, 1896 P. J. Barrett hose wagon and a 1896 Holloway 50 foot City Service Ladder truck with a 40 gallon chemical tank.

     The two bay, two story house was built by J. T. Lauretzen for a cost of $15,600.00. The front of the building which measures 32 feet across has a Romanesque style, using Wyoming blue stone, Indiana limestone and gray pressed brick. On the left side is a circular tower supported on a richly carved cobble of limestone. The cornice is made of brick in an ornamental pattern. The two apparatus doors are rich in details with the frame work highly ornamental. The first floor has room for a steam fire engine, hose wagon and ladder truck. In the rear six stalls were provided for the horses and behind the stalls was a one story room for the feed and supplies for the horses, now the kitchen. The on left side in the front is the raised platform for the house watch and on the right side are hose racks, which can hold 700 feet of hose. The second floor has a sitting room, and an engineer room in the front, a dormitory with twelve beds,  the foreman and assistant foreman's room in the back, and a general toilet room.

     Prior to 1896, the fire department always boasted of the latest and most modern convinces and comforts for the men. With these new houses a new feature was added for the comfort of the men, a water heater for hot water. Now the men could take a hot bath after a fire. In the 1896 Annual Report it was reported "... to have the convenience of taking a refreshing bath, without the risk or danger of taking cold, which was the case in former years, when only cold water was obtainable."

     A fireman did not have worry about finding a mutual partner or  wonder "do I go to work today". The work schedule was very simple, 24 hours a day, 6 days on and the seventh day off. Each fireman could go home twice a day for two hours for meals. The assistant foreman and the engineer could also be detailed to a neighboring company to cover meals at that house.  A fireman could also be detail to another firehouse for a 24 hour period to cover vacancies. The paid was a little over $1,000.00 a year, or thirteen and half cents an hour for a 144 hour week.
The Cities of New York (including the Bronx), Brooklyn, Long Island City, parts of Western Queens, and Staten Island merged into the five Boroughs of New York City on January 1, 1898. Engine 40 and Ladder 21 officially became part of the F.D.N.Y. on January 28th. On April 15, 1898 Ladder 21 was disbanded as a separate fire company and the ladder truck assigned to Engine 40 to make it a combination company of an engine, hose wagon, and ladder truck.

     On October 1, 1899 Engine 40 was renumber to Engine 140 to avoid confusion with Engine 40 in Manhattan. Engine 140 would last only to January 1, 1913 and after this date it would be called Engine 240.  Combination Engine 240 status was changed on May 15, 1914 when it lost the ladder truck. Ladder 147 and Ladder 148 were placed in service in neighboring firehouse. The two motorized rigs replaced the three horse drawn ladder trucks at Engines 240, 248 and 250.

     The fire horse would be given a high place in fire service history. They were treated better than the men and were well taken care of. The department had an ambulance to take the horses to hospital when hurt or sick, before the fire department had an ambulance for the men. The also received vacations before the men. The old timers would say that the horses were smart, some of the horses could count the box numbers when the bells sounded and knew which box they responded on. After a fire on a cold snowy winters night, the horses would come back to the firehouse and the firemen would dry the horses, feed them and brush them down, then the men could take a hot bath, change clothes and warm up. The up keep on the horse for one year was around $800.00 a year, a new motor operated apparatus cost $64.00 for fuel. The pasting of the horses in most companies spelled the end of the fire department.

     Engine 240 lost its horses on October 21, 1921 when they received a new American LaFrance 700 gpm pumper. The 1896 hose wagon was replaced in 1909 with a new Seagrave hose wagon. When the new LaFrance pumper arrived the hose wagon was not replaced until  December 12, 1925 with a used 1914 Mack/Boyd hose wagon from Engine 255. The 1921 American LaFrance was replaced on June 26, 1936 with new LaFrance, 1923 model from Engine 11. This rig also could pump 700 gpm. On November 2, 1946 a new Ward LaFrance 750 gpm pumper replaced the 1923 model. The '46 LaFrance cost $9,700.00 new. The company received another new Ward LaFrance 750 gpm pumper on January 22, 1954. The price had increased to $14,405.00.  In 1970 the company was assigned two different Mack pumpers, the first was a used 1965 Mack that came from Engine 225 on January 1, 1970 and was kept until June 12, 1970. The second rig was a new 1970 Mack pumper that could pump 1000 gallons of water per minute. Another 1970 Mack was delivered on Feb. 21, 1980 and used until August 8, 1980 at which time a new 1979 Mack was received. The current rig is a 1989 Mack that replaced the 1979 model on December 13, 1989.

     By the mid 1920's the firehouse was starting to show it age. The new rigs were getting wider than the horse drawn apparatus and the doors were narrow. On November 20, 1925, $10,000.00 allocated for the repairs of quarters, new apparatus doors, removing the roof of the tower and other general repairs. Before the work could be started some emergency work to one of the fireboats postponed the work for a lack of funds. In March of 1926 new bids were received for the work. The bids ranged from $13,210.00 to $24,184.00. The $13,210.00 bid won the contract and the work was completed during 1926.

     Beside Engine 240, the firehouse on Prospect Avenue has housed several other pieces of apparatus. Division 12 relocated on November 1, 1948 and Hydrant Service Unit 4 moved in on December 12, 1948. Both of these moves were temporary for some work being done in from Engine 250's quarters, While at Engine 240 the Hydrant Service 4 was renumber to #12 on April 18, 1949. Both units moved back to Engine 250's quarters on February 6, 1951 for the Division and February 9th for the Hydrant Service 12.

     Today Engine 240 shares it quarters with the 48th Battalion. The Battalion moved into quarters on October 19, 1978. Battalion 38 was organized on April 1, 1906 at Engine 139 (now E-239) quarters on 4th Avenue and 6th Street. On April 15, 1906 the 38 Battalion was renumber to the 48 Battalion. The 10th Division was reorganized on January 1, 1930, in Engine 239's quarters and  the 48th Battalion moved to Engine 220's quarters on 11th Avenue between 8th  & 7th Avenues. In 1978 to Engine 240.
 
     The fireman performs his job  in the most hazardous of conditions, Most jobs a person knows he'll be home at the end of his shift but, not a fireman, he could have been hurt and in the hospital. Even worst he could lose his life. In the history of the New York City Fire Department 776 members have lost their lives.  Five members of Engine 240 have paid that supreme price with their life.

     Engine 140 was responding to fire on 56th Street and 12th Avenue in Borough Park on September 20, 1907. Fireman Edward D. Lahey was reaching for his boots when the hose wagon made a sharp turn from E. 3rd Street on to Ft. Hamliton Parkway throwing him off of the rig. He landed on his head, fracturing his skull and he lost consciousness. He died on September 25, never regaining consciousness. He was single and 27years old.
 
     Fireman Thomas J. Osborn died on March 3, 1941. He was performing house watch in quarters on the night watch. He complained of be ill to his officer and was ordered to bed. Shortly Signal Station 2514 was received and Fireman Osborn responded to the apparatus floor, not being assigned to the box he went back to bed. At 9:45 he was found not breathing in his bed. He had died from a heart attack. He left a wife and two children.

     Fireman Eugene F. Kelly and Fireman Robert W. Lane of Ladder 105, who were detailed to the company for the day, were injured on March 20, 1943. The company was responding to a automobile fire at Bedford Avenue and Hawthrone Street. Traveling north on Flatbush Avenue, a southbound trolley car sideswiped the apparatus throwing the six fireman to the street. Firemen Kelly and Lane received severe brain injuries in the accident. Fireman Kelly died two days later of his injury, and Fireman Lane died on April 9.

     Lieutenant John A. Lyden was overcome by smoke while fighting a fire in a row of taxpayers on December 23, 1949 . The fire at 324 through 328 Church Avenue was confined to the first floors of the three buildings and was label arson. He died shortly after reaching the hospital. He was 49 years old and left a wife.
The last member to died was Fireman Joseph J. Tucker. He was hurt at fire. He retired on disability on July 4, 1956 and died from his injury on Dec. 19, 1957.

     Engine 240 is ready for any type of emergency, fire, water leak, EMS or just to pump air in a kid's bicycle tire. Engine 240 has been serving the citizens of Windsor Terrace and the rest of New York for 100 years and will continue serving the public no matter what part of the City it is, Brooklyn, Manhattan Queens, The Bronx or Staten Island, Engine 240 will be there.



THE APPARATUS OF ENGINE 240

     1895 HORSE DRAWN LAFRANCE 4TH SIZE STEAMER #334 JAN. 20, 1896-OCT. 21, 1921
     1896 P. J. BARRETT HOSE WAGON JAN, 20, 1896-1909
     1896 HOLLOWAY COMBINATION C.S.T. 50' #8B JAN, 20, 1896-APR. 15, 1914
     1909 SEAGRAVE HOSE WAGON #129B  1909-OCT. 21, 1921
     1921 MOTORIZED APPARATUS 1921 AMERICAN LAFRANCE  700 GPM #3580 OCT. 21, 1921-JUN.  6, 1936
     1923 AMERICAN LAFRANCE 700 GPM #4273 JUN.  6, 1936-NOV. 22, 1946
     1946 WARD LAFRANCE 750 GPM #2199 NOV. 22, 1946-JAN. 22, 1954
     1953 WARD LAFRANCE  750 GPM #3301 JAN. 22, 1954-JAN.  9, 1970
     1965 MACK 1000 GPM #1318 JAN. 9, 1970-JUN. 12, 1970
     1970 MACK 1000 GPM #MP7073 JUN. 12, 1970-FEB. 21, 1980
     1970 MACK 1000 GPM #MP7045 FEB. 21, 1970-AUG. 8, 1980
     1979 MACK 1000 GPM #MP7954 AUG. 8, 1980-DEC. 13, 1989
     1989 MACK 1000 GPM #MP8908 DEC. 13, 1989-PRESENT


Engine 240 -Department Orders:

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FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK BOROUGHS OF BROOKLYN & QUEENS
_____________
SPECIAL ORDER No 114                                                                                      New York September 25, 1907
___________________________________________
        1    With feelings of the of the deepest regret the death of Fireman 1st grade Edward D. Leahey of Engine Co. 140, who died from injuries received while responding with his company to a fire at 56th Street & 12th Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn on September 20th, 1907, Station 2-463 is hereby announced to the Department.                             The Department mourns the loss of this brave fireman from its ranks and extends its most heartfelt sympathy to the relatives and friends of the deceased in the sad loss which has so suddenly befallen them.
                The funeral escort will consist of one company of the men composed of two fireman each from the 31st, 32nd, 33rd and 38th Battalions under the command of Asst. Foreman Dennis McAuly, Engine 136.                            The members of Engine Co. 140 will act as pallbearers and mourners. The funeral will take place from his late residence No. 455 5th Street, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9:30 A. M. sharp on the 28th instant, thence to the Church of St. Saviour, Cor. 6th St. and 8th Avenue. Interment in Calvary Cemetery. 

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HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK
_____________ SPECIAL ORDER                                                                                                        New York, March 5, 1941      No. 44
___________________________________________
1       With regret, the death of Fireman 1st grade Thomas J. Osborn, Engine Co. 240, which occurred at 11.40 P. M., March 3, 1941, is hereby announced to the department.
           Funeral will take place from the Duffy Funeral pallor, 237 Ninth Street, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9.30 A. M., Thursday, March 6, 1941. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery, Brooklyn.
           The Deputy Chief of the 10th Division shall detail one Lieutenant and twelve Fireman, who, together with six Members from the off platoon of Engine Co. 240 (who shall act as pallbearers), shall report, in full uniform, at the quarters of Engine Co. 239, at  9.15 A. M. on the 6th inst., proceed to the above-mentioned funeral parlor, thence to the Church of St. Thomas Aquinas, 9th Street and 4th Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn, and after the service, shall accompany the remains a reasonable distance, when detail shall be dismissed.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK _____________ SPECIAL ORDER                                                                                                      New York,  March 24, 1943      No. 65 ___________________________________________
1       With regret, the death of Fireman 1st grade Eugene F. Kelly, of Engine Co. 240, which occurred at 6.55 P. M., March 22, 1943, from Fracture of the skull and Lacerations of the brain, caused by and introduced in the performance of duty, while responding to Signal Station 1091, at 7.50 P. M., March 20, 1943, is hereby announced to the Department.
        The heartfelt sympathy of the entire Department goes out to the family, relatives and friends of the deceased in the midst of the great loss which they and the Department have sustained.
        Funeral will take place from the Funeral Home of Walter B. Cooke, Inc., 1218 Flatbush Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9.30 A. M., Friday, March 26, 1943. Interment Calvary Cemetery.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK _____________ SPECIAL ORDER                                                                                                New York,  December 27, 1949      No. 217 ___________________________________________
 1       With regrets, the death of Lieutenant John A. Lyden, of Engine Co. 240, which occurred at 12.20 A. M., December 24, 1949, from injuries sustained in the performance of duty while operating at Signal Station 3775, Brooklyn, received at 11.54 P. M., December 23, 1949, is hereby announced to the Department.
         The heartfelt sympathy of the entire Department goes out to the family, relatives and friends of the deceased in the midst of the great loss which they and the Department have sustained.
         The funeral will take place from Walter B. Cooke Funeral Home, 20 Snyder Avenue, Borough of Brooklyn, at 9.30 A. M., Tuesday, December 27, 1949. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. -

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HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK UNIFORMED FORCE   
DEPARTMENT                                                                                                   New York,  December 20, 1957             ORDER No. 232 ___________________________________________
1.1        With regret, the death of retired Fireman Joseph J. Tucker, formerly of Engine 240, residing at 1485 East 52nd Street, Brooklyn, N.Y., which occurred on December 19, 1957, is hereby announced to the Department.
             Funeral will take place from the Michael J. Smith Funeral Home, 248 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, N.Y., on December 21, 1957, followed by a 9>30 A. M. Requiem Mass at Holy Name R. C. Church, 245 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, N.Y. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery.

     - http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_240/engine_240.pdf


Windsor Terrace:

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2007/03/windsor-terrace-brooklyn/
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/90l4mj105/E_248_fh_neighborhood.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/90l4mj105/)

     

(https://s18.postimg.cc/ht23ajm8l/a8801a82bfe64aa947abaf9c08d06d96.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ht23ajm8l/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/ge0iltsv9/patch-10_large.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ge0iltsv9/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/y5c505q8l/FDNY_E240_BATT48_BACK_1024x1024.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y5c505q8l/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on February 13, 2018, 02:48:06 PM
 As I view this "FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section", it is amazing the amount of work that this site member Joe M., aka "mack" puts into the research and telling of each fire company and fire house listed. In less than two months, already this thread has seen over 5,000 views. There is a huge interest in these stories, videos, links, photos, history, members, awards, LODDs, apparatus, etc. I'm sure from the senior man to the newest probie, there is a special interest in the firehouse and the company history they are assigned to.

 Add to that the retired members who spent several years of their lives there as well as the buff who considers them a special group of the FDNY members.

 This thread came about because of the inability to continue posting information to the Original FDNY and NYC Firehouse thread. Which continues today to be very popular with over 800,000 views. When "mack" was unable to post anymore firehouse histories on that thread, it was necessary to begin this second section. This is merely a continuation of that original thread.

 I guess therefore if anybody would like to add any information or ask a question about any firehouse/company already posted in that original thread, it can be posted here. We can all follow it through with the company listed and maybe the page number can also be posted to make it easier.

 I hope somehow this information can be saved and never lost, because I don't think there will ever be another one like it.   
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on February 13, 2018, 05:59:18 PM
^^^^^Well said Willy.... amazing job done by mack on these history posts.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 1261Truckie on February 14, 2018, 12:30:44 PM
Indeed, an amazing job by Mack. THANK YOU, Mack !!!!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 19, 2018, 06:20:16 PM
Engine 266  Firehouse  92-20 Rockaway Beach Boulevard  Rockaway Beach, Queens  13th Division, 47th Battalion  "Holland House"
                                                                                                                                                                       
     Engine 166 organized 211 Beach 86th Street former volunteer firehouse                            1905
     Engine 166 became Engine 266                                                                                      1913
     Engine 266 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 267                        1922
     Engine 266 moved 58-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 265                                  2000
     Engine 266 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Battalion 47                              2000

     Engine 167 organized 102-10 Rockaway Beach Boulevard former volunteer firehouse         1905
     Engine 167 became Engine 267                                                                                     1913
     Engine 267 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                       1922
     Engine 267 disbanded                                                                                                   1972

     Ladder 71 organized 88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard former volunteer firehouse            1905 
     Ladder 71 became Ladder 121                                                                                       1913
     Ladder 121 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                       1922
     Ladder 121 moved 58-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                                 1954
     Ladder 121 new firehouse 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                       2004

     Battalion 47 organized 88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Ladder 71                             1905
     Battalion 37 became Battalion 47                                                                                  1906
     Battalion 47 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                     1922
     Battalion 47 moved 259 Beach 116th Street at Engine 268                                              2000
     Battalion 47 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                             2000
     Battalion 47 new firehouse 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                     2004

     Brush Fire Unit 7 organized 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 266                    1997
     Brush Fire Unit 7 moved 58-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 265                        2000
     Brush Fire Unit 7 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                     2000

     Thawing Unit 5 organized 97-28 43rd Avenue at Engine 289                                           1957
     Thawing Unit 5 moved 103-17 98th Street at Engine 285                                               1973
     Thawing Unit 5 moved 89-40 87th Street at Engine 293                                                 1984
     Thawing Unit 5 moved 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 266                          2005
     Thawing Unit 5 became Thawing Unit 266
     Thawing Unit 266 moved 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 265                      2005
     Thawing Unit 266 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Engine 266                   2006

          - Note: thanks fdhistorian

 Pre-FDNY volunteer history - Rockaway Beach Fire Department - 1886-1905:

     https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/50422400/?terms=seaside%2Bengine%2B1

     Rockaway Beach was protected by 2 engine companies, 4 hose companies, 1 chemical hose company, 1 rescue company and 2 hook and ladder companies with approximately 400 members.  New paid FDNY companies were organized in 1905 in former volunteer firehouses:

     FDNY Engine 166 - Atlantic Engine 1/Atlantic Hose 1 211 Beach 86th Street
           
          (https://s18.postimg.cc/r1cak09rp/Atlantic_Hose_Beach_86th_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r1cak09rp/)

     FDNY Engine 167 - Seaside Engine 1/Seaside Hose 1 102-10 Rockaway Beach Boulevard 

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5exa340yd/Seaside_Engine_1_fh_1_Beach_102_Rockaway_Beach_Blvd.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5exa340yd/)

     Ladder 71 - Oceanus Hook & Ladder 1  88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard                           

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ixif45y8l/Oceanus_Eng_1_and_Oceanus_H_L_88th_Street_Rockaway_Beach_Bouleva.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ixif45y8l/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/x91x8ngad/L_71_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x91x8ngad/)
 
     Battalion 47 - Arverne Engine 2/Hose 2 64th Street/Rockaway Beach Boulevard

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/6ivn3e411/47th_Bn_Near_Henry_86th_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ivn3e411/)


FDNY replaces Rockaway Beach Fire Department - September 1, 1905:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6wwz30b9x/Volunteer_Disband_1905.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6wwz30b9x/)


Engine 166 1st fire - September 20, 1905:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5vwqdu4k5/E_166_266_1st_Run_Sep_20_1905.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5vwqdu4k5/)


92-20 Rockaway Beach Boulevard firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lu5g401d1/Beach_94th_Street_Rockaway_Beach_Blvd.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lu5g401d1/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/up6aeoihh/E_266_fh_15.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/up6aeoihh/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pdrdtzbud/E_266_fh_24.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pdrdtzbud/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/jpl333un9/E_266_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jpl333un9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5j5c7yc39/E_266_fh_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5j5c7yc39/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mjo8goeut/E_266_fh_36.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mjo8goeut/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/56dy1tyz9/E_266_fh_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/56dy1tyz9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/56dy1ueet/E_167_fh_32.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/56dy1ueet/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/p0zzo16hx/E_266_fh_38.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p0zzo16hx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/r5kcp5aph/E_266_fh_59.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r5kcp5aph/)


Engine 266:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/v37me6fet/E_266_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v37me6fet/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/rjloods4l/E_266_ap_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rjloods4l/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/zcccgdsyt/E_266_ap_19.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zcccgdsyt/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/a6be9jzed/E_266_ap_15.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a6be9jzed/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/k3mf2mepx/E_266_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k3mf2mepx/)


Engine 267: DISBANDED

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lvfdxjl85/E_267_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lvfdxjl85/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9tk03erf9/E_267_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9tk03erf9/)


Brush Fire Unit 7:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/udou1yrrp/BFU_7_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/udou1yrrp/)


Famous fires - September 22, 1892:

     ROCKAWAY BEACH, THE FAMOUS RESORT, ALMOST WIPED OUT. FIRE DESTROYS TWENTY-ONE BLOCKS OF BUILDINGS -- A LADY BURNED TO DEATH -- LOSS, $500,000.  Hotels And Cottages Burned.   Rockaway Beach, the popular summer resort situated on the south shore of Long Island, 20 miles from New York, was almost destroyed by fire Tuesday afternoon. Twenty-one blocks, covering an area of 10 acres, were swept clean of their hotels and cottages. The loss is estimated roughly at $500,000 with less than a third as much insurance. One life was lost.

Famous fires - June 15, 1922 Arverne Conflagration - Engine 266 1st due:

     Queens Box 4962 - Engine 266 Ladder 121 - 1st due companies
     13.5 acres and 141 structures destroyed

     https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/60022191

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/eps88pr79/Arverne_Fire1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eps88pr79/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/gucl9t89h/Arverne_Fire_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gucl9t89h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/tyi5mingl/Arverne_Fire_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tyi5mingl/)


Famous fires - July 4, 1937 - Rockaway Beach Explosion and Fire:

     Explosion and fire destroyed amusement park, concessions, bungalows, boardwalk.

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/pqnddrm11/1937_Rockaway_Beach_Fire.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pqnddrm11/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3v66tfnyt/FDNY_47_BATTALION_1937_BIG_FIRE_SEASIDE_BEACH_1937_PLAYLAND.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3v66tfnyt/)


Famous fires - Hurricane Sandy - October 29-30, 1912:

     https://iafss.org/2013/04/29/fires-during-the-2012-hurricane-sandy-in-queens-new-york-a-first-report/

FDNY medals:

     ENG. 267 MEMBERS NOV. 11, 1914 FIRE COLLEGE MEDAL

     DAVID J. QUINN, JR. FF. ENG. 267 JAN. 24, 1945 BROOKMAN MEDAL

          FF Quinn and FF Carey rescued two US Navy fliers from a half-submerged military aircraft that had crashed into Jamaica Bay vicinity of Broad Channel Bridge.  FF Quinn and FF Carey had heard the crash and immediately left quarters and used an old row boat without oars using their hands to move their boat. The rescue was made in the hours of darkness at great personal risk. 

     JAMES F. CAREY, JR. FF. ENG. 267 JAN. 24, 1945 TREVOR-WARREN MEDAL


Engine 266 LODD:

     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS MCNAMARA ENGINE 266 January 23, 1907

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5zqju57hh/mcnamara_27_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zqju57hh/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/ngz93dnhh/Mc_Namara_1907_E_166.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ngz93dnhh/)

     RIP.  Never forget.


Rockaway Beach:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/nncy67otx/e_266_FH_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nncy67otx/)

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockaway_Beach,_Queens

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2006/09/rockaway-beach-queens/


(https://s18.postimg.cc/cxz9dwv0l/e266.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cxz9dwv0l/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/nxkgpj0v9/E_266_logo_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nxkgpj0v9/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 19, 2018, 07:00:05 PM
Engine 266 LODD - FF Thomas McNamara  -January 23, 1907

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/5zqju57hh/mcnamara_27_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zqju57hh/)


FF McNamara was a decorated veteran who served with the paid Brooklyn Fire Department Engine 27 and then with FDNY Engine 225 (125) when BFD combined with FDNY in 1898:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/i35296a5x/Mc_Namara_227.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i35296a5x/)


FF McNamara was well-respected and made several rescues with Engine 225 (125):
 
     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lzie57d5x/Mc_Namara_1898.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lzie57d5x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/juy144yol/MCNamara_1902.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/juy144yol/)


FF McNamara, a veteran with 29 years service, was transferred from Engine 225 (125) to Engine 266 (166) in Rockaway in 1905, : 

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/tfhnr1ivp/Mc_Namara_Transferred.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tfhnr1ivp/)


FF McNamara, senior man in E 166 (266), 31 years in the job, died leading his company into a smoke-filled Rockaway structure fire, with the nozzle, January 23, 1907:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ngz93dnhh/Mc_Namara_1907_E_166.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ngz93dnhh/)


     RIP - FF Thomas "Pop" McNamara - Engine 266 - Never forget.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 19, 2018, 07:17:47 PM
Engine 267 - 1951 Ward LaFrance Quad:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/lvfdxjl85/E_267_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lvfdxjl85/)


WNYF:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wdeml6639/Quad_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wdeml6639/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ciskz2lqt/Quad_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ciskz2lqt/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on February 19, 2018, 10:23:18 PM
Engine 267 got that 1951 WLF Quad after L121 was relocated to E265 firehouse in 1954. It was shop #2614 that was originally assigned to L76 on Staten Island. It was available after L76 received one of the 25 1955 FWD 75ft. wood aerials. ;)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 20, 2018, 11:03:51 PM
WRITTEN PERSONAL HISTORY OF THE FDNY IN THE ROCKAWAYS  1961 TO 1976 BY JOHN R.KELLY      email jkelly309@msn.com

     http://www.fdnyfloridaretirees.com/PDF-Files/History-Of-Rockaways/WRITTEN_HISTORY_-_ROCKAWAY_FDNY_-_BY_JOHN_KELLY.pdf

 
My name is John R. Kelly and I am 61 years old living in Tampa, Florida. I always wanted to write down the FDNY history I witnessed growing up in the Rockaway’s as a young man. I was a fire buff and Auxilary FF from 1961 to 1976 at Engine 265 at the old Arverne firehouse located at 58-03 Rockaway Beach Blvd. Some of what I have written is humorous, sad, heroic and unbelievable by today’s standards in the FDNY. I hope this history is enjoyed by others who may know of some place, person or event I have written about. If you know an older Rockaway fireman or his family member, please pass this writing on, they may enjoy reading it.
 
Where to begin? 
 
January 1961 my family moved to the Rockaway Beach Edgemere Housing Projects for a better life. We had 6 kids and my mom and dad. The projects gave us 4 bedrooms, one bathroom, a kitchen and a living room and the famous 6 th floor terrace complete with a view of the Atlantic Ocean. Moving from Dyckman Street in Manhattan to the Rockaways was like going to heaven. We finally had an ocean to swim in rather than the open fire hydrants and nights of sleeping on the fire escapes in Manhattan in the summer heat. This was also the beginning point for my dad’s officer’s career with the FDNY, John F. Kelly, who was a newly appointed Lieutenant assigned to Engine Company 328 in Far Rockaway on Central Ave. My dad served in the FDNY for 37 years, retiring in the early 1980’s as the Battalion Commander for the 47 Battalion. He worked in L.25, L.36, E.328, L.137, E.318 and Battalion 47. He passed away in 2004.
 
 
At age 11, I spent a lot of time with my dad at E.328’s firehouse on Central Ave in Far Rockaway. (“The Big House” as it is now called ). 
 
Some of the names of the members I remember were Lt. Bat Masterson Eng.264, Lt. Uhlendale Eng. 328, Lt. Bertram Eng.264, FF Jim Metz Eng.328, Lt. Walter Lehman L.134, FF John Mahoney L.134, who died too early in life from Lou Gerigh’s disease, the famous Buff/Auxilary Fireman, Ralph Stein, who by the way, typed every fire report that Eng.328 and Eng.264 went on, then it was signed by the officer in ink. Ralph was only 20 years old then, but boy, could he type fast and he knew the name and location of every street in Far Rockaway, which was a godsend when a out of area fire company was
relocating in the fire house on Central Ave, Ralph rode with them and got them to the fire. 
 
Who could forget the gentle hearted Fireman from Ladder 134 named Nick Masterides, Nick was the best and being a professional Golden Gloves Champion also helped. In 1961, Engine 264 always responded with two pieces of apparatus, the regular engine company and also a hose wagon.
 
 
 
JULY 2, 1963 –TRAGIC DAY FOR LADDER 134 AND ENGINE 328
 
My dad (John F. Kelly) had now transferred to Ladder 137 on Beach 116 Street and our whole family was attending the annual L.137 and E. 268 Company Picnic at Hempstead Lake State Park, when someone made a phone call back to the fire house ( no cell phones in those days ) and was informed that FF.Ray Meyer of Ladder 134 had just been killed in a ice house fire on Redfern Ave. in Far Rockaway (across from the Redfern Projects). Two other fireman from Engine 328 were seriously injured, one was operating a hand line on a portable ladder, dove thru the window and rode the wall down when it fell and a second firefighter was crushed by the falling wall while working on the outside of the building, both firefighters were very seriously injured for the rest of their lives.
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/b3nbz6ldx/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b3nbz6ldx/)
 
In 1963 I started to hang around and buff at the fire house on Beach 58 street and Rockaway Beach Blvd, Engine 265 and Ladder 121.
 
I remember the first day I went to this fire house. I introduced myself to Fireman Ray McDermott L.121 who was on house watch and asked if I could come in and look around, I stayed at that fire house til I married in 1975. What a look around!!!
 
Most of my life’s “real world” education came from the experiences I had with this fire house and the officers and men of both companies. 
 
Most of the older firemen I meet in 1963 at Ladder 121 and Engine 265 are no longer with us but here are just a few names with some side notes about them. In 1968 I became an auxiliary fireman assigned to E.265. Back them you needed to be 18 years old to join the FDNY Auxilary Fire Corp.


 
From Ladder Company 121 :
 
FF Milty Shapiro, big strapping Jewish firefighter. FF Sam Greenberg, another Jewish firefighter, chauffeur L.121. FF Charlie Snowhite, worked in busy Squad 4 in Brownsville before coming to Rockawy, broken his leg in two places at a serious Rockaway fire. FF Jack Frain, could back in a hook and ladder truck into the fire house at 20 mph and never hit anything. Nobody wanted to drive the tiller when Jack was driving the hook and ladder truck up front. FF Fred Rabuse, the quietest man I ever knew. FF Joe Doherty, one of the great ones. FF Lester Roselle, worked in busy L.26 in Harlem, overcame an alcohol issue, rose to be a Lieutenant only to die early of a heart attack after a busy night at L.118 in Brooklyn as a covering Lieutenant. Lester was only in his early 40’s at the time of his death. FF Arthur Buell, Chauffeur L.121, his brother Joe Buell was a Captain and worked with my dad in CANS. (Community and News Service – Car 71). FF Jim Mc Nally, one of the best, worked in busy L.17 in the Bronx them came to Rockaway FF Ray Sutton, Ray worked as a waiter in a few of the famous LI catering halls during his off duty time. FF Jack Cannon, Jack was always tanning in the sun and when going to fire calls never wore a t shirt or regular shirt under his turnout coat, worked at Lafayette Radio Company in his off time selling electronics on Jamaica Ave.  FF Jim Gillen, Jim was always the student, made a great rescue with Jack Frain L.121 in the early 1960’s in an early morning Edgemere bungalow fire – saved two kids from a fiery death without the protection of a fire hose. Both received medals of valor from the FDNY.
FF Eddie Mills, Eddie never let anything bother him, he had 8 children and lived in Broad Channel, one of the oldest members of L. 121 at this time FF Chuck Funke, built like a pro wrestler, nobody bothered Chuck. FF Jerry Heffernan, one of the best, believe Jerry went on to be a Captain at E 268. FF John Schneider, “Jake the Snake” as he was called around the fire house, was one of the most aggressive firefighters I have ever seen in action.  FF John McGlone, “Junior” was his fire house nickname. He always worn white socks which was not department policy. FF James Lavin, I witnessed Jim rescue 3 small children and their mother from a house fire on Beach 69 St and Hillmeyer Ave on a cold winter night in the late 1960’s.  Ladder 121 was operating at another alarm in Far Rockaway at the time of the fire, I responded with first due E.265, E. 265 stretched the first line on the fire and the hose line burst and had to be replaced, delaying water getting on the fire. FF Bill Denton E. 265  was the company MPO for this fire.  For about 5 minutes E.265 was the only unit on scene and working hard at getting the fire out from the interior stairs, when Ladder 121 finally arrived late, Jim Lavin effected the 4 rescues via a portable ladder from the front living room window. It seemed like forever watching FF Jim Lavin L.121 hand down 4 bodies to FF Dan Coughlin L.121 who was on the portable ladder backing him up. FDNY members performed CPR on all 4 victims but they all died at Peninsula General Hospital. The fire started about 6:30 PM and was caused by a TV set in the living room. This tragic fire made the front page of the Long Island Press newspaper the next day. I believe the family that died in this blaze was the Hale family.
 
The heartbreak continues, FF James Lavin L.121 lost his own life several years later in the line of duty, when he lost his grip on the safety rail of the Hook and Ladder and fell off the fire truck and hit his head on the street while responding on L.121 to a working fire on Beach 20 st and Seagirt Blvd.
 
FF Dan Coughlin, the most respected and senior of members of L. 121. Dan had a strong Irish accent and always was a talker. Although Dan was in his 60’s during the above mentioned rescue (Beach 69 st and Hillmeyer Ave) with FF Jim Lavin he performed like a 20 year old young man during the rescue attempt. He was a Rockaway icon during his day. FF Jim Wheeler, Jim was a seasoned and veteran FF and worked at L. 121 for many years. He was a true friend of mine who helped me greatly when I was in my teen years. FF John Weir and FF Don Weir, two brothers in the same fire house, John worked at L.121 and Donald worked at E. 265.
 
Capt. John Acerno, a very short man to be a Captain of a Ladder Company, heart of gold. Lt. Augie Horvath, stern but reliable line officer. Lt. Horvath was working one night tour when the man on watch duty fell asleep at the house watch desk, around 4 am, an alarm rang out on the bell system for a fire alarm at Beach 73 st and the Rockaway Freeway, when Lt. Horvath did not hear the man on watch turn on all the lights in the fire house and shout out the alarm to the other men, he slide down the fire pole from his 
2nd floor office, looked up the alarm box number on the assignment cards and shouted out the alarm to all the men sleeping in the bunk room and the man on watch. When the units arrived at Beach 73 st and the Freeway, they were meet by a fully involved 3 story wooden frame building on fire. This fire went to an “all hands” and burnt the concrete side of the Freeway subway structure. Talk about sleeping with “one eye open” Lt. Bill McLoughlin, VIP in veteran affairs for the whole USA, responded to a sad medical call at his own home with L. 121 while on duty to find his wife having a heart attack and passing away at the scene. Lt. Richard Galenick, feisty line officer, would give you the shirt off his back.  Lt. John Murphy, quite the character, liked his liquor. I remember Lt. Murphy asking me to get him a bottle of whiskey on a Christmas morning in the late 1960’s after he and the men of Ladder 121 had just returned from an all night Christmas Eve working fire on Beach 129 where a whole family died in the fire. After he told me about this, I went and got him the whiskey, he had a tough night. 
 

 
From Engine Company 265 :
 
FF Lou Schilling, Lou was the senior man in Engine 265 when I meet him in 1963. He was big into Boy Scouts. He was the best mentor a young person could have. I remember me and him melting lead in a smelting pot on the kitchen stove in the fire house to make home made ammo for his hunting rifles, he was always hunting or fishing.  FF John O’ Leary, John was a MPO for E. 265 and always worked with Lt. Paul Kazoricz, when I was riding with him to fires and we pulled into the smokey fire block, all he kept saying to me was “ John find me a hydrant, John fine me a hydrant” John drove the big charter buses during his off hours. Lt. Paul Kazoricz E. 265 was my best friend, he always let me ride the fire truck when he was working, he never worried about me not be 18 years old and legal to ride. FF Tony Krizel, Tony was a nice guy, always came to work with his own lunch or dinner and one bottle of beer. He was never in on the “company meal”. FF Jack Kelly, Jack was a MPO for E.265 and always drove the Company Captain. He was a hard working, hard drinking, hard smoking fireman. If ever there was a “leatherneck” it was Jack Kelly. FF Tony DiResta, Tony was also one of the senior guys, he was always a “acting Lieutenant when needed by the chief. Cool under pressure and knew his fire stuff. Tony’s brother Joey Di Resta E.266 was also a Rockaway fireman and drove my father (BC John Kelly) as battalion aide. I once witnessed Joey DiResta carry a 200 lb. women over his shoulders and injured in a fire in the Hammel Projects from the interior of the projects to Beach 81 st and Rockaway Beach Blvd where the EMS ambulance was located. FF Bill Denton, Bill was a Marine in WW2 and nothing got in his way as a firefighter. I remember once at a DOA fire scene , Chief of Dept Hartnett yelled at him for not having on his helmet, coat and boots ( hours after the fire was out ) Bill did not blink a eye.
FF Pete Ferrante, Pete came to E.265 after years of working with the Rescue companies thru out the city. He was one of the most trained FF I ever saw in action. FF George Marlowe, George was a MPO operator at E.265 and went on to be a chief’s aide to BC Golden of the 47 Battalion. George knew FDNY politics better than anybody. If you worked in the 47 Battalion and needed something done, George was the guy to go to. His son also followed in his dad’s steps and became a member of the FDNY. FF Bill Terra, Bill was a young FF assigned to E. 265 and was a trained pilot and flew many planes back and forth from NYC to the state of Maine. Bill was always a lady’s man. FF Sam Feinberg, Sam was only a 3 rd or 4th grade FF when his short FDNY career was ended early one morning as he was fighting a fire at a junkyard on Beach 84 street and Jamaica Bay. The men of E. 265 had advanced a hand line on the junkyard fire and were waiting for the MPO to charge the line when a large propane tank just exploded and the top of the propane tank surged into the air and hit Sam in his leg, severing a major artery in his leg. He was rushed to the hospital and nearly died from the loss of blood. He never worked another tour. The men of E.265 saved one of their own that day. FF John Paul Rodgers, was called Packey in the firehouse. Packey was in the army reserve thru out most of his FDNY career. He was always on Military Leave it seemed. I would take his car when he was working at E. 265 and go to Fort Hamilton for him and pickup his army uniforms from the base dry cleaners and return them to him at the firehouse.  He also let me use his car at night to go on dates with girls into Manhattan. FF Bobby Watkins, Bobby worked with my dad at E.74 and L.25 in Manhattan before coming to E. 265 in the Rockaways. It turned out my future father in law had some pull and got him transferred to E. 265. Bobby was the first person to invent the RV. He purchased a old yellow school bus and converted it into a RV. He would take his whole family on it for trips around the US. He would leave it parked in the back of the fire house when not in use. Bobby was also one of the greatest cooks of E.265. FF Hank Granau, Hank was a former Navy sailor and really looked like a sailor. Hank had a very big nose and this was cause for many a joke. I hear that he was not retired for a long time and had a accident on a bike and was killed. FF Walter Houseman, Walter was another of the great FF I remember from E. 265. He was always a good friend of my father’s when my dad was a BC in the 47 Battalion. FF Walter Moran, Walter was a former sandhog who worked in the big tunnel projects in NYC before joining the FDNY. Walter never wore a coat even when the temperature was below freezing. He would operate as a MPO for E. 265 in his t shirt all year long. He always had a cigar in his mouth. His son went on to become a BC in the FDNY and was lost on 9/11. FF Lou Depasquale, Lou owned a lawn care company on the side and I remember working for him part time cutting lawns of the homes on Beach 20 th street and Seagirt Blvd. FF Donald O’Shaunessy, joined the FDNY late in life and was always a very nervous guy. He was always worried about making a mistake on the job. FF Frank Ambroisio, Frank was the commissar for the house and was in charge of stocking the coffee, soda machine and other items. I always remembered when Frank was on housewatch,  I used to tap the companies back in service for him after a run with the telegraph key because he was afraid to use it.
FF John Mallon, Jack was the proby at E. 265, in those days not many probies were assigned to the Rockaways. FF John Trainor, John was one of the old salty FF of his day. His turnout coat, helmet and boots looked like they had gone thru WW2. He was always holding the knob at the fires and the most trusted interior man to be with. FF Lou Einbinder, I remember meeting Lou for the first time around 1961, he was a very religious Jewish man and was quite along in years in 1961. He retired in the mid 1960’s and I was recently astonished to read his recent obit this year. This man lived a long, long, long life. FF Eric Bressler, Eric was a Rockaway native for years and worked out of E.265. I vividly remember in the mid 1960’s Eric was on light duty (broke his leg) medical leave and worked as a fire security guard, securing the firehouse of L.123 and E.227 on Ralph Ave in Brooklyn during the riots. I would go to work with him and the men of E. 227 would let me ride the rig with them all day and get in on the lunch meal. FF Ed Segur, Ed worked at E.54 in Manhattan before coming to the Rockaways. He owned a bar business at Rockaway Beach Blvd and Beach 44 st. I believe the bar was called the “The Blue Waters”
 
Captain Robert Keller, was the commanding officer for E. 265, went on to become a Division Chief. He always looked and acted like a Division Chief before being one. Lt. Paul Kazoriz, Paul was a very easy going guy, nothing bother him in life. I remember riding with him one night with L.121 and he was in the officer’s front seat standing up holding on to the windshield, as the rig turned Beach 54 st and Edgemere Ave Paul could see a roaring fire in progress on Beach 32 st and transmitted a third alarm when the rig was still on Beach 54 street. The fire was in one of those big 4 and 5 story old wooden hotels. Lt. Yale, I cannot remember his first name but he was a great guy. Lt. Herb Sussman, Herb always had a Florida tan year round and would never be seen without his uniform hat, shirt and tie on in the firehouse. Always looked like a gentleman no matter how dirty he got at a fire. Lt. Tom Bayer, Tom always had a short military haircut and was a very aggressive fire officer. He went on to be a Captain in the South Bronx during the war years. Captain George Behr, was the skipper of E. 265 during the tough “war years” came out of Engine 50 in the South Bronx to work in the Rockaways.
 

 
Historical Rockaway Fire Facts:
 
Did the FDNY ever have a part time engine company working in Rockaway? Yes, in the 1960’s an engine company was put in service with a officer and 5 men that worked out of the Broad Channel Volunteer fire house on Saturday, Sundays and Holidays during the summer months. This was needed because the traffic going to and leaving from the beach on Cross Bay Blvd was so heavy and with the old Cross Bay draw bridge, if a fire happened in Broad Channel it would take a very long time for fire units to arrive at the Broad Channel fire.
 
Was Hook and Ladder Company 121 ever housed at the Beach 92 st firehouse? Yes, see the attached photo. Looks like the late 1940’s or early 1950’s. Backing the rig into the firehouse from a call. NYPD 100 th Pct to the left of the firehouse.
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/s4687v651/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s4687v651/)
 
Did Queens Rockaway fire companies ever work in Manhattan? Yes, in the 1960’s war years L. 121 (Beach 58 st fire house)  relocated to L.15 in the Wall St area during the night time hours as part of an interchange program where busy companies (L.121) were relocated to slower companies (L.15) to give the men some relief from heavy fire duty. 
 
What fire alarm box did Rockaway fire fighters dread to come in on a cold windy winter night in the 1960’s? Lewmay Road and Beach 29 Street. This area was heavily populated with 4 and 5 story old unoccupied wooden hotels from the beach hotel boom era in early Rockaway. It was routine to have a 5 alarm fire or a borough call for structures on this block thru out the 1960’s. Some Rockaway fire companies operated for 2 or 3 days straight at these fires.

 
The famous FDNY Super Pumper saw many nights of action in this area ( Lewmay Rd and Beach 29 th Street ) in the Rockaways during the 1960’s.
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/grtmq355x/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/grtmq355x/)
 
What 1960’s Rockaway ladder company was assigned to the west end of Rockaway Beach? Ladder Company 171 was assigned to be housed with E. 329 at Beach 169 St. They actually spent little time fighting fires in Rockaway. They would always get called to go to the south section of the borough of Brooklyn to fight big fires because Brooklyn was always so busy with fire duty. L.171 was disbanded a few years after it came to be.
 
Having only 3 Hook and Ladder Companies in the Rockaways, what Rockaway Engine Company was a dual Engine and Truck Company in the 1960’s? E. 267, located at the Beach 92 street fire house was a “Quad” engine company. Fully supplies with portable ladders, it operated as either a ladder company or an engine company. This unit was disbanded in the 1970’s. This unit was a great source of additional manpower and supplies to the Rockaways during serious fires. The length of this engine company was very long as to allow the portable ladders to be stored under the hose bed.
 
Before the age of computers and fire alarm transmission by printers, how did Rockaway fire units respond quickly to fire calls? Rockaway fire companies used the old bell system just like the rest of the city fire units. One short cut that was used in conjunction with the bell system was that when a civilian called in a fire via a telephone to the fire dispatcher, the dispatcher would first alert the first due engine and truck company by ringing in the fire house, the “Department” phones with 3 short rings of the phone bell rather than the long regular ring folks would expect. All the “department” phones ( there could be as many as 4 in the fire house ) would be heard to ring “3 short rings” and the “first due” firemen knew they had a actual phone call from a civilian reporting a real fire. The fireman on house watch duty would answer the phone from the calling fire dispatcher and write down the address of the fire, then shout it out to the other firemen and they were out the fire house door with the fire truck responding to the fire even BEFORE the bell system was activated to notify all the other fire companies assigned to respond to the fire. 
 
   
Did Rockaway fire units ever respond Mutual Aid outside of Rockaway to help at other fires? It is very rare that Rockaway units are called to respond outside of Rockaway due to how remote the Rockaway peninsula is, but on March 14, 1960 several Rockaway units responded on a Mutual Aid to Nassau County. Rockaway fire units responded to a major fire in progress in Atlantic Beach (just west of Long Beach, L.I. ). The fire was in a large boardwalk hotel (6 stories in height and taking up a full block). The fire had been discovered about 10 am and Nassau County fire units were in dire need of more units when the afternoon came around for firefighting and relief purposes. More than likely E.328, E.264 and L.134 were the first units in due to the fact they are so close to Atlantic Beach. I have attached 3 old photos of this fire. One photo shows FDNY Fire Commissioner Ed Cavenaugh talking to Inwood, L.I. Fire Chief Jesse Mistero about fire conditons. The Inwood Fire Dept. was responsible for fire protection to Atlantic Beach on this date. Just about every volunteer Fire Dept. on the south shore of Long Island had been called to the scene before the FDNY arrived.
 
Photo below shows Inwood LI Fire Chief Jessie Mistero (white turnout coat) with FDNY Fire Commissioner Ed Cavenaugh (2nd man to his right ).
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/6hr7qun05/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6hr7qun05/)
 
Nautilus Hotel Fire – Atlantic Beach, Long Island – 3/14/60. Nassau County Fire Depts from the Five Towns, South Shore and FDNY responded to this fire. Inwood Fire Dept was the first to arrive on scene.
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/sgxme2bk5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sgxme2bk5/)
 
Valley Stream volunteer firemen receiving a well deserve hot “cup of joe” after the fire. Nautilus Hotel Fire – 3/14/60 – Atlantic Beach, LI – Nassau County - FDNY Mutual Aid.
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/grtmq3sb9/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/grtmq3sb9/)
 
Another Mutual Aid FDNY and Nassau County occurred in 1975 on Rockaway Blvd on the Nassau County - NYC Queens border line. Many of the Nassau County 5 Town’s Fire Depts responded along with FDNY units from the 47 Battalion and 54 Battalion. 
 
(https://s18.postimg.cc/64ztkq26d/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/64ztkq26d/)
 


Chiefs of the 47 Battalion :
 
BC Walter Seegan – Short stocky man always had a cigar in his mouth. Commanded some of the largest fires in the last 1950’s and early 1960’s. BC James Maloney – picked up most of the big ones in the war arson years in the Rockaways. Always calm and never panicked at some of the biggest fires I have ever seen. BC John Griffith – worked along side Chief Maloney during the arson years in the Rockaway. My dad, BC John Kelly – noted for reducing the high number of false alarm calls from fire alarm street boxes by having many of them removed in vacant areas. Also famous for putting “dog poop” on the handles of the alarm boxes to reduce the number of kids pulling the false alarms. He also was able to get the brass to allow only a single engine company to respond on high false alarm fire alarm box locations instead of the normal 5 companies responding.



Closing thoughts:
 
The Rockaway firemen of this era lived the following.
 
No apparatus floor ventilation system was in place once the fire trucks were started when responding to a fire call. The dangerous fumes from the mufflers on the fire trucks filled the entire fire house with dangerous chemicals that the men breathed going to and returning from alarms. Solution – just open a lot of windows in the fire house and hope for a breeze.
 
No personal PASS audible life safety devices were used, they were not invented yet.
 
Very few firefighters had portable radios in those days to call out a MAYDAY signal. Firemen where instructed to toss their helmet into the street from the burning building as a signal they were in trouble and needed help.
 
Very few firefighters used Scott air packs, this was a new technology in the 1960’s, most engine companies simply advanced hose lines and hoped they did not pass out from the smoke.
 
Tower Ladders were few and far between, most hook and ladder companies used ladder pipes at big fires which required firemen to stand on the extended ladders and direct water streams on the fire for hours.
 
Most engine companies carried about 20 lengths of cotton hose (each length was 50 feet long ), after a big fire and back at the fire house, the men needed to hoist up by rope and pulley 20 lengths of wet hose up a hose tower to “dry out”. Then they needed to hoist down 20 reserve dry lengths of clean hose down from the hose tower. Then the clean dry hose needed to be packed neatly on the engine company ready for the next fire. This whole process took about 2 hours from start to finish. If this was not enough work, every length of hose had a serial number stamped into the brass fitting at both ends of the hose and these serial numbers needed to be recorded in the company journal as well ( the company officer usually had this job ) – beats hauling 40 lengths of hose up and down the hose tower! If the engine company was housed with a hook and ladder company in the same fire house, the men of the hook and ladder company usually felt sorry for the engine company men and helped them with this big task.
 
Enclosed cab fire trucks with heat and air conditioning for the firemen? Was not even on the drawing board. Officers and men responded on fire trucks by hanging onto the back open step of engine companies and on the sides of hook and ladder companies. Seatbelts were no were to be found.
   
The Arson years in Rockaway. From about 1966 to the late 1970’s arson surged in Rockaway as it did in most other areas of New York City. Larkin Ave between Beach 61 street and Beach 68 street from the Boulevard to Ocean Promenade was the home of large numerous wooden “Queen Ann” buildings from the glory beach days of the 1940’s and 1950’s. In the 1960’s this area became very depressed and the population shifted drastically. It was not unusual on a Friday or Saturday night after the sun went down for two or three “second alarm fires” to be raging in this area at the same time. Hundreds of people would fill the street greeting the fire due fire companies with the slogan “burn baby burn”
 
To make matters worse, more arson fires shifted to the “bungalow colonies” up in the forty and fifty streets south of Edgemere Ave to Ocean Promenade. Fire units would be operating at serious fires on Larkin Ave in the sixty blocks and look east toward Edgemere and see hugh wooden bungalow fires being fought by Brooklyn FDNY units at the same time.
 
My only regret about this writing is that I never took or collected any old black and white or color fire photos during this era in the Rockaways. If you have any photos and can share them with me, please send them to my email jkelly309@msn.com or mail to my home – John Kelly 9742 Fox Chapel Road, Tampa, Florida 33647. I would appreciate it very much.

 
Photos credits for this writing go to Frank Parise of the Inwood Fire Dept.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on February 21, 2018, 08:35:23 AM
 Thank you mack for taking the time to post these FDNY history stories and photos of NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies.

 And THANK YOU to John Kelly for telling his story and Frank Parise for his photos as well.

 I might have a couple of photos of Eng 265 and Ladder 121 operating at a Queen Anne fire in Rockaway that I will try to send to John Kelly.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on February 21, 2018, 12:28:16 PM

     Battalion 47 organized 88-03 Rockaway Beach Boulevard at Ladder 71                             1906
     Battalion 47 new firehouse 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                     1922
     Battalion 47 moved 259 Beach 116th Street at Engine 268                                              2000
     Battalion 47 returned 92-22 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 266                             2000
     Battalion 47 new firehouse 48-06 Rockaway Beach Boulevard w/Engine 265                     2004


Battalion 47 was organized as Battalion 37 in 1905 and renumbered as Battalion 47 in 1906 at the same location
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 21, 2018, 07:38:11 PM
Engine 245 - 1960 - Coney Island - Hurricane Donna:


     (https://s18.postimg.cc/v5osg81wl/E_245_Hurricane_Donna_1960.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v5osg81wl/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: t123ken on February 22, 2018, 01:41:00 PM
A nice shot of Engine 245 heading west on Surf Avenue.
The tall building in the background is the old Half Moon Hotel.  It was an old age home and then vacant for a while before it was torn down over twenty years ago.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: johnd248 on February 22, 2018, 01:50:57 PM
No need to use the Washington Baths that day.  LOL
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 23, 2018, 05:39:26 PM
Engine 293  Firehouse 89-40 87th Street  Woodhaven, Queens  13th Division, 51st Battalion  "Woodhaven Wildcats"

     Hose 2 organized 91-70 111th Street former Clarenceville Hook & Ladder 2 volunteer firehouse        1907
     Hose 2 disbanded                                                                                                                       1915
     Engine 293 organized new firehouse 89-40 87th Street                                                                  1915
     Engine 293 disbanded                                                                                                                 1975
     Engine 2923 reorganized 89-40 87th Street                                                                                  1975
     Engine 293 moved 101-02 Jamaica Avenue at Engine 294  (firehouse renovation)                            2016

     Thawing Unit 5 located at 89-40 87th Street at Engine 293                                                     1984-2005


Pre-FDNY - 91-70 111th Street former firehouse - Clarenceville Hook & Ladder 2:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/yp71vgkyd/111th_91st_street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yp71vgkyd/)

     Clarenceville Hook and Ladder 2 was a company in the Richmond Hill Volunteer Fire Department.


89-40 87th Street firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/kpsfj18ol/E_293_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kpsfj18ol/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3rtexd72d/E_293_fh_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3rtexd72d/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/zbjg7gso5/E_293_fh_51.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zbjg7gso5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/of4mw2pw5/E_293_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/of4mw2pw5/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hbwrgjs79/E_293_fh_35.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hbwrgjs79/)

     http://www.qchron.com/editions/engine-to-move-starting-next-month/article_f5443880-a782-11e6-9199-d7b0f6d8f86a.html


Engine 293:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ustpzm55h/E_293_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ustpzm55h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hbwrgr2jp/E_293_ap2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hbwrgr2jp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/bp0eipfad/E_293_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bp0eipfad/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/mbu7o52v9/E_293_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mbu7o52v9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ej3jw7ewl/E_293_ap25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ej3jw7ewl/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wyo0tkqg5/E_293_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wyo0tkqg5/)


Engine 293:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlfSgDy2Sc4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyLbLSo1Kis


Engine 293 - September 13, 1997:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/m0ht8p339/E_295_medal_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m0ht8p339/)

     NYFD.com - This story was submitted by: Captain Robert J. Majesli, former Captain Engine 293
     
     On September 13, 1997, at 1552 hours, Engine 293 responded to box 8512. The alarm was for an electrical fire in apartment 3L. The address was 74-24 88 Road, Woodhaven, Queens. Upon arrival at the location, Lieutenant Dennis Eberhart(Division 13, Covering) directed Engine 293 to test and hook up to the hydrant. Lieut. Eberhart then proceeded to the third floor of the building to locate the cause of the alarm. Shortly thereafter, a female civilian came down the stairs and stated a firefighter had collapsed on the third floor. EMS was immediately notified via the Department radio. Upon hearing that a member collapsed, the members of Engine 293 dropped their masks in the street. Firefighter Attridge, the chauffeur of Engine 293, gathered the defibrillator and portable suction unit that are located in the cab of the apparatus. The other members collected the oxygen bag and the medical supply bag. All the members raced up the stairs. They found lieutenant Eberhart lying on the third floor public hallway. Firefighter Kevin DeLano (Ladder 142) was in the process of giving chest compressions. Due to the combined area of the hall landing, members decided to move Lt. Eberhart into the apartment. Firefighter Steven Ross (E293) checked for breathing and pulse. He verified that indeed Lt. Eberhart had no vital signs. Chest compressions resumed. F.F. Glen Franke (F293) connected a bag valve mask to the oxygen cylinder while F.F. Ross inserted the C-Tube. FF John Veracka (294) placed the defibrillator pads on the Lieutenants' chest while FF Steven Huron (E293) readied the defibrillator for use. Compressions were interrupted while the defibrillator analyzed the patient. It indicated that "shock" was necessary. FF Huron cleared members away from the lifeless body and shocked the patient. FF Ross and FF Franke rechecked Lt. Eberhart and noted the vital signs were restored. The Lieutenant was rolled on his side and foam in his mouth was removed by GG Huron by the suction unit. Life support was continued and his condition was monitored. Within 5 minutes, EMS personnel arrived. Lt. Eberhart was then placed on a backboard and taken down the three flights of stairs. The member was placed in an EMS ambulance and transferred to the cardiac intensive care unit of Jamaica Hospital for recovery.  Members who directly assisted in the operation:

     FF Jeffery Attridge (293)
     FF Steven Ross (E293)
     FF Glen Franke (E293)
     FF Steven Huron (E293)
     FF Kevin DeLano(EL142)
     FF John Verack(E294)
     LT. Charles Clarke(E294)


Engine 293 Centennial 2007:

    (https://s18.postimg.cc/q9mjanoad/E_293_100_yrs_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q9mjanoad/)
 
     http://qns.com/story/2007/07/26/woodhaven-wildcats-turn-100/


Engine 293 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER  IGNATIUS F. NEUSCH ENGINE 293 April 3, 1916

          Firefighter Neusch was killed responding to a false alarm.

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/flisbwtrp/Neusch.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/flisbwtrp/)

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/lmgh8z0yd/Neusch_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lmgh8z0yd/)     


     FIREFIGHTER  JOSEPH A. SCANLON ENGINE 293 May 13, 1936

         (https://s18.postimg.cc/j54q1t485/Scanlon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j54q1t485/)

         Firefighter Joseph A. Scanlon of Engine 293 suffered a fractured skull when he was pitched off the apparatus as it hit a rut in the road returning to quarters from a false alarm. The company returned to quarters via 87th Street when it hit a large rut at 79th Avenue. None of the other firemen noticed Scanlon fall off the rig and the truck continued to the firehouse before he was discovered missing. Three detectives discovered the unconscious fireman lying in the street. An ambulance was called and he was rushed to Jamaica Hospital where he died a short time later. He was married and had three children. Firefighter Scanlon was a member of the Department for 28-years.   Firefighter Scanlon was awarded the Thomas A. Kenny Medal for heroism in 1921.


     FIREFIGHTER ROBERT W. JOHNSTON ENGINE 293 December 31, 1943

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/4lxl0e3dh/Johnson.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4lxl0e3dh/)

          Firefighter Robert W. Johnston was a New York City fireman assigned to Engine 293, Woodhaven, Queens, New York. He was inducted into the United States Army Air Corps as a Aviation Cadet. He died in a training accident at the Army Air Force Navigational School, San Marcus Army Airfield, San Marcus, Texas, on December 31st 1943. His service ID number was 1217670.

     RIP. Never forget.


Woodhaven:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/u4pxdrplx/E_293_map.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u4pxdrplx/)

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2015/11/woodhaven-queens-2/

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodhaven,_Queens



(https://s18.postimg.cc/kd11cvdk5/E_293_logo_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kd11cvdk5/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 24, 2018, 10:19:40 AM
FDNY Hose Companies 1905-1922:

     FDNY organized hose companies as it expanded to replace volunteer fire companies in newly annexed areas of Staten Island and Queens which had poor water supply systems and poor roads.  These were also areas that were rural with fewer structures and did not require steamers which engine companies of that era were normally assigned.  Hose companies were assigned hose wagons or combination chemical hose wagons, and may have been apparatus purchased from disbanded volunteer department.  New FDNY paid members were also frequently selected from former volunteer rosters.  FDNY hose companies became FDNY Engines 159, 161, 275, 293, 296, 297, 298, 299, 302, 303. 



     SI     Hose 1 organized 181 Seaside Blvd. former volunteer firehouse                                       1905
             Hose 1 disbanded to organize Engine 161                                                                      1923
 
               Hose 1 originally assigned 1 officer, 4 firefighters

               Engine 161 - 1914:

                    (https://s18.postimg.cc/5zyv6jyc5/E_161.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zyv6jyc5/)

               
     QNS  Hose 2 organized 91-70 111th Street former volunteer firehouse                                     1907
             Hose 2 disbanded to organize Engine 293                                                                      1915
 

     QNS  Hose 3 organized 146-39 105th Avenue former volunteer firehouse                                 1907
             Hose 3 disbanded to organize Engine 303                                                                      1922


     QNS  Hose 4 organized 92-11 150th Street former volunteer firehouse                                    1907
             Hose 4 new firehouse 137-24 Rockaway Boulevard                                                         1912
             Hose 4 disbanded to organize Engine 302                                                                      1921

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/6s1j5zn6d/Hose_4_E_302.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6s1j5zn6d/)


     QNS  Hose 5 organized 90-22 Grace Court former volunteer firehouse                                     1907
             Hose 5 disbanded to organize Engine 298                                                                      1918

               (https://s33.postimg.cc/gpzf39jnv/Hose_5_-_Engine_298.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gpzf39jnv/)
 
     QNS  Hose 6 organized 90-26 161st Street former volunteer firehouse                                      1907
             Hose 6 disbanded to organize Engine 299                                                                       1920

 
     QNS  Hose 7 organized 89-19 168th Place former volunteer firehouse                                       1907
             Hose 7 disbanded to organize Engine 175 (Engine 275)                                                    1909


     SI    Hose 7 organized 1592 Richmond Road former volunteer firehouse                                    1912
            Hose 7 disbanded to organize Engine 159                                                                        1913

               Former volunteer company - Cromwell Engine 1/Cromwell Hose 1:

                     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wq55brd5h/SI_Cromwell_Hose_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wq55brd5h/)

               Engine 159 - 1913:

                    (https://s18.postimg.cc/zf4jff5et/E_159.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zf4jff5et/)

 
     QNS Hose 8 organized 18-18 125th Street former volunteer firehouse                                      1908
            Hose 8 disbanded to organize Engine 296                                                                        1918

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/gcl5so25x/E_296.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gcl5so25x/)

 
     QNS Hose 9 organized 14-11 114th Street former volunteer firehouse                                      1908
            Hose 9 disbanded to organize Engine 297                                                                        1918

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/nsp0s2hs5/QN_Hose_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nsp0s2hs5/)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/nfxmlwexx/QN_Hose_8_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nfxmlwexx/)

               (https://s33.postimg.cc/yg13ogxaj/Hose_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yg13ogxaj/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 24, 2018, 11:01:46 AM
1907 - new FDNY companies - Jamaica and Richmond Hill - fire activity:

     New FDNY companies in Jamaica averaged 5 runs per month.  New FDNY companies in Richmond Hill averaged 3 runs per month.

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/f6lr7wlc5/1907_Paid_department.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f6lr7wlc5/)


1907 - NYC newspapers reported daily fire activity.  Brooklyn and Queens appeared to get about 10 to 15 reported structures fires daily.  Below is a typical list of Brooklyn and Queens fires in a 16 hour period with estimated damage.  Multiple alarm fires were frequent occurrances and were reported in detail. 

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/qa5dd71dx/Fires.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qa5dd71dx/)


1902 - FDNY Runs and Workers - indicates FDNY fire activity of that era - horse-drawn apparatus:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/8mnkf49hx/R_W_1902.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8mnkf49hx/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: memory master on February 24, 2018, 11:08:25 AM
As always, great and informative information! That's Mack.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 25, 2018, 02:35:10 PM
Engine 153/Ladder 77  Firehouse 78 Broad Street Stapleton, Staten Island  8th Division, 21st Battalion  “Broad Street Bullies”

     Engine 203 organized 51 Broad Street former volunteer firehouse                   1905
     Engine 203 moved to 68 Broad Street                                                           1912
     Engine 203 became Engine 153                                                                    1913
     Engine 153 new firehouse 74 Broad Street w/Ladder 77                                  1915

     Ladder 102 organized Canal St and Wright St former volunteer firehouse         1905
     Ladder 102 became Ladder 77                                                                      1913
     Ladder 77 new firehouse 74 Broad Street w/Engine 153                                  1915

     Battalion 1 organized 135 Richmond Road former volunteer firehouse              1905
     Battalion 1 became Battalion 21                                                                   1906
     135 Richmond Road address became 481 VanDuzer Street                             1910
     Battalion 21 new firehouse 74 Broad Street w/Engine 153                              1915
     Battalion 21 moved 256 Hylan Boulevard at Engine 152                                 1976


Pre-FDNY:

     Stapleton was protected by Edgewater Fire Department and these Stapleton volunteer companies:

          Excelsior Hose 1 (Bucket) 1 Bay Street and Union Place

          Enterprise H&L 1 Canal St and Wright Street

          Protection Engine 3  68 Broad Street

          Relief Hose 2 (Bucket 1) Bay Street and Thompson Street

          Rescue Engine 9 135 Richmond Road  (481 VanDuzer Street)

          Ben Brown Hose 3  Broad Street

          Robinson Hose 9 528 VanDuzer Street

          Peter Weidner Hose 11  24 Osgood Avenue


74 Broad Street firehouse:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/dmcqykb5x/E_153_fh_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dmcqykb5x/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/njnrrhlat/E_153_fh_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/njnrrhlat/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/cwtym2kv9/E_153_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cwtym2kv9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/d9lcsa5px/E_153_fh_36.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d9lcsa5px/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/k01u1qg11/E_153_fh_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k01u1qg11/)


Engine 153:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3qbnykaf9/E_153_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3qbnykaf9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/fffnmle9h/E_153_ap_15.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fffnmle9h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/3qbnynpvp/e_153_AP_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3qbnynpvp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/ima76fw79/E_153_ap_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ima76fw79/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/e0e2y45j9/e_153_AP_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e0e2y45j9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/wiifi4adx/E_153_members_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wiifi4adx/)


Ladder 77:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/44czy5uit/6_L_77_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/44czy5uit/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hl9yh7zr9/tl_77_AP_9.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/hl9yh7zr9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5jekmy0rp/L_77_ap_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5jekmy0rp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5w5yt3ggl/L_77_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5w5yt3ggl/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/zbbn2786d/L_77_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zbbn2786d/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/uco4nvmfp/tl_77_AP_10.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/uco4nvmfp/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/45mxrdm05/l_77_AP_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/45mxrdm05/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/5xfwmc2t1/L_77_ap_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5xfwmc2t1/)


SSL 77:

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/r73ixc3px/ny_nyc_fdny_ssl_77.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r73ixc3px/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/bydljkhr9/SSL_77.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bydljkhr9/)


Engine 153/Ladder 77:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMw408axvw0

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y581r8nlWIM

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PU_qjyJ7mI

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7bmYaR-m00

         
LODDs:

     BATTALION CHIEF MATTHEW J. CUMMINGS  BATTALION 21 October 25, 1918
         
         BC Cummings responded to a ship fire, “City of Birmingham”, pier 4.  He became ill and was ordered back to quarters  where he died of a heart attack.


     FIREFIGHTER DOMINIC VILLANO  ENGINE 153  May 22, 1966

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/uzn1cvob9/Villano.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uzn1cvob9/)

          FF Dominic Villano was assigned to Engine 153 on January 1, 1948. He reported sick with laryngitis and bronchitis on November 14, 1956 after a working fire.  He returned to work and was then assigned to light duty at the Richmond Communications Office. He suffered a heart attack at his home on May 22, 1966. A fireman for eighteen years, he was planning to retire the next year. He was forty-seven years old and married with one daughter.

     FIREFIGHTER HARRY J. KETT LADDER 77 March 10, 1938

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/g3oi59xh1/Kett.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g3oi59xh1/)

          FF Harry Kett died from smoke inhalation and a heart attack following fire at Richmond Box 258, March 9, 1938 at 98 Canal Street. FF Kett of Ladder 77 became ill around 10:30 at night while working at the fire in a shoe store which was caused by a short circuit. He was rushed to the hospital and kept overnight for smoke inhalation. At 5:24 in the morning he was found dead in the hospital. He had died while sleeping, a victim of a heart attack. He was married and the father of four children.


FDNY medals:

     DANIEL O' LEARY CAPT. LAD. 77 1933 STEPHENSON MEDAL

     PATRICK J. SULLIVAN LT. ENG. 153 MAY 29, 1944 CONRAN MEDAL

          (https://s18.postimg.cc/s4ejjq745/Sullivan.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s4ejjq745/)

          LT Sullivan was awarded the Conrad Medal for rescuing another fire officer from the steamship Benito Juarez, which was on fire at Pier 13, Staten Island, May 29, 1944.

     ANTHONY E. ROWAN CAPT. ENG. 153 1947 STEPHENSON MEDAL


Stapleton: 
     https://www.oldstatenisland.org/stapleton.html


     (https://s18.postimg.cc/6a7asrsv9/e153.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6a7asrsv9/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/9h1ucg31h/4edab287a8d58827758b4353dd956067.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9h1ucg31h/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/z144ijglx/Picture_530-_S.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z144ijglx/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/hb2fxoq85/Picture_522-_S.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hb2fxoq85/)

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/59723njlh/E_153_logo_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/59723njlh/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 25, 2018, 03:19:13 PM
Pre-FDNY Stapleton, Staten Island, was protected by the Stapleton Fire Department (1860s) and then the Edgewater Fire Department (1871-1905).  The Edgewater Fire Department had 5 steam engine companies, 3 hook and ladder companies and 11 hose companies when it disbanded .  It also protected Clifton, Concord and Tompkinsville and the waterfront areas.  These were Stapleton volunteer fire companies:

          Excelsior Hose 1 (originally Bucket 1)  Bay Street and Union Place

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/5zzs98yrp/Excelsior_Bucket_Stapleton.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zzs98yrp/)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/bj6x4asxh/Excelsior_Hose_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bj6x4asxh/)


          Enterprise H&L 1  Canal St and Wright Street - original firehouse FDNY Ladder 102 (Ladder 77)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/nc4q8drwl/Enterprise_H_L_1_Bay_Street_Firehouse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nc4q8drwl/)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/4ep3v2j1h/Enterprise_H_L_1_SI_Stapleton.gif) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ep3v2j1h/)

          Protection Hose 3   68 Broad Street (still occupied)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/j45cm2gkl/Protection_Engine_7_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j45cm2gkl/)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/vis4mefsl/Protection_Engine_7_76_Broad_Street_Stapleton_E_153.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vis4mefsl/)

          Relief Hose 2 (originally Bucket 1)  Bay Street and Thompson Street

          Rescue Engine 9  135 Richmond Road  (481 VanDuzer Street)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/lf803y6f9/E_153_E_204_fh_44_van_duzer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lf803y6f9/)

          Ben Brown Hose 3   Broad Street

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/d9py637z9/Brown.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d9py637z9/)

          Robinson Hose 9  528 VanDuzer Street (still occupied as private dwelling)

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/5tqojr245/Robinson_Hose_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5tqojr245/)

          Peter Weidner Hose 11  24 Osgood Avenue


          Stapleton fire alarm tower and bell:

               (https://s18.postimg.cc/3k75my0md/s-l1600.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3k75my0md/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 25, 2018, 04:20:35 PM
Stapleton - pre-FDNY fire history - "How A 19th Century Mob Of Arsonists Burned Down Staten Island’s Quarantine Hospital"
 
       - phillipe martin chatelain 12/03/2013   Architecture, New York

     On the night of Sept. 1 1858, a mob of villagers stormed the grounds of the quarantine station on Staten Island and set fire to almost all of the buildings in the hospital complex.

     In 1858, before Staten Island consolidated with the rest of New York City, the New York Marine Hospital housed around 1,500 persons suffering from infectious diseases. The practice of medicine was in a less sophisticated state and in the 19th century this was the City’s best defense against new diseases, such as smallpox, cholera, typhus and yellow fever. While quarantine is a practice that strictly limits the civil and human rights of an otherwise “free” person, the architecture of the City’s many islands reflect this once mainstream practice. On September 1, 1858 the site was burned down in a mob protest that stemmed from community outrage about the hazards of housing a quarantine hospital of this scale in what was essentially their backyards.

(https://s18.postimg.cc/jjpt6jeol/staten-island-quarantine-new-york-marine-hospital-nyc-untapped-c.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/jjpt6jeol/)

     Opened in 1799, the NY Marine Hospital which became known solely as the “Quarantine,” was located in the Tompkinsville section of Staten Island. This island in New York Harbor was pushing 20,000 residents in a landmass of roughly three times the size of Manhattan–which had 630,000 residents. It was a mass of farmland, with various communities located on the northeastern shore. The Quarantine was accessible primarily by steamboat, and was fortified by six-foot-tall brick walls on all sides.

     The New York Harbor at this time was a place of new beginnings, as the immigrant population was booming. Foreign-born settlers with their sights on New York City carried with them all their belongings and, perhaps unknowingly, new infectious diseases. According to the Public Health Chronicles, many of these new immigrants arrived sick with one of the diseases common to sea travelers in the 19th century. Vessels entering New York Harbor were vigorously inspected. All it took was a single passenger or crew member with an infectious disease for an arriving ship to be redirected from the docks of Brooklyn or Manhattan to the piers of the Quarantine.
 
     The Quarantine became somewhat of a prison to the sick, who were “laid in wagons by the boatmen” and brought to the appropriate hospitals, while the rest “although healthy, were kept in hospital quarters for observation.” It was a major enterprise, and the Quarantine expenses and salaries were paid for by the hefty taxes imposed on the vessels that used the port–“$2 for each cabin passenger and $0.50 for each traveler in steerage”– today worth about $61 and $15 respectively.

     After an 1848 yellow fever outbreak in the neighboring Staten Island communities, opposition to the Quarantine kept building grew.  The perception among Staten Islanders at the time was that if not for the Quarantine, there would be virtually no disease on the Island at all. Staten Islanders were convinced that illness came to their towns in two ways. One theory was that diseases were blown by the wind from infected vessels anchored offshore… Locals were also convinced that infectious diseases were carried into the community by Quarantine staff [who] reside in the village.

     On September 1, 1858, thirty men approached and ransacked the establishment, which had relatively low occupancy for the night (some assume that administrators were aware of the impending attack). The hospital staff, at first scrambling to release the animals and rescue patients, were confused to find that they had all been moved. As the mob made its way around the Quarantine grounds, setting new fires, it had swelled to several hundred people. The mob resolved to return the next day to “celebrate” the burning of the Quarantine Hospital, which resulted in the burning of any remaining buildings.

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/th0tzlu05/staten-island-quarantine-new-york-marine-hospital-nyc-untapped-c.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/th0tzlu05/)

     Astoundingly, only two people died in the whole ordeal. One man was killed by a Quarantine worker who took the opportunity to settle an old score. Another died of yellow fever.
The organizers, Ray Tompkins and John C. Thompson, who were charged for the arson of the former Marine Hospital were acquitted of all charges by Judge Henry B. Metcalfe (himself a Staten Island man who argued for the removal of the Quarantine in 1849).

     https://untappedcities.com/2013/12/03/how-19th-century-mob-of-arsonists-burned-down-staten-islands-quarantine-hospital/


     Note - The Qurantine's services were transferred to a new facility built in Stapleton under the US Marine Hospital Service, which later became the US Public Health Service.  The hospital was sold to the Sisters of Charity and was run as a private hospital, Bayley Seton Hospital, 1980-2002.  It is now abandoned.

     (https://s18.postimg.cc/a0g4ctyth/index-php1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a0g4ctyth/)

     https://abandonednyc.com/tag/bayley-seton-hospital/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on February 27, 2018, 07:45:45 PM
Engine 2 Firehouse  530 W 43rd Street  Midtown West, Manhattan 3rd Division, 9th Battalion  DISBANDED

     Engine 2 organized  304 W 47th Street former quarters of volunteer "Hudson" Engine 1          1865
     Engine 2 moved to 530 W 43rd Street former quarters of volunteer "Washington" Hose 12      1870
     Engine 2 moved to 604-606 W 43rd Street                                                                          1894
     Engine 2 moved to new firehouse 530 W 43rd Street                                                            1895
     Engine 2 disbanded                                                                                                           1972

     Battalion 7 located 304 W 47th Street at Engine 2                                                          1874-1879


Pre-FDNY:

     - "Hudson" Engine 1 was established 1731 in a shed on Wall St vicinity of then City Hall - original apparatus brought from London - everyone in neighborhood was required to turn out for fires -company moved several times and built firehouse at 304 W 47th St which served as original quarters for FDNY Engine 2 (1865-1870), FDNY Chemical Engine 5 (1875-1877) and FDNY Battalion 7 (1874-1879)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/t5r6apnor/Vol_E_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t5r6apnor/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/h3vsgkm63/Hudson_Engine_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h3vsgkm63/)

     - LODDs - Engine 1 Assistant Foreman Francis Joseph died in line of duty at a fire in 1827, with Fireman David W. Raymer, Engine 40, on March 8, 1827.  Joseph and Raymer were operating on a ladder at a store fire on Maiden Lane.  In heavy smoke, a portion of the building cornice collapsed on the firefighters.  RIP.  Never forget.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/6fs1i8zhn/Joseph.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6fs1i8zhn/)


Engine 2:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/b2y3jjpa3/E_2_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b2y3jjpa3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/b2y3jkk57/E_2_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b2y3jkk57/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/c58a24aob/E_2_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c58a24aob/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ivorbk5jv/E_2_ap_1936_Mack.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ivorbk5jv/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/dk9uqv6mj/E_2_ap_7_1947.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dk9uqv6mj/)


FDNY medals:

     THOMAS W. SMITH CAPT. ENG. 2 APR. 17, 1914 JAMES GORDON BENNETT MEDAL
 
          (https://s9.postimg.cc/bfphpuxaz/Smith.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bfphpuxaz/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/rdy7g0me3/Smith_Rescue.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rdy7g0me3/)
     
     WILLIAM J. MAAS FF. ENG. 2 JUL. 1, 1926 PRENTICE MEDAL

     ANDREW M. DOYLE FF. ENG. 2 MAY 6, 1972 FDR MEDAL


Engine 2 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM KRATTINGER, FEBRUARY 16, 1882
     
          He died as a result of a severe skull fracture sustained while operating at an alarm on February 11th.

     LIEUTENANT JOHN DURKIN, November 24, 1937

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/64al57o3v/DURKIN.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/64al57o3v/)
         
          Lieutenant John Durkin died in Knickerbocker Hospital from the effects of inhaling carbon tetrachloride the day before. The fire at 10:15 in the morning was at 688 to 690 Eleventh Avenue. He did not become ill until reaching home that night and died in the hospital the following night.

     LIEUTENANT ARTHUR WAGNER, February 27, 1965

          Lieutenant Wagner suffered a fatal heart attack while returning to quarters from a 4-alarm fire.

     RIP.  Never forget.


530 W 43rd Street - Rescue 1 firehouse - 1973-1985 - destroyed January 23, 1985 during adjoining warehouse multiple alarm fire and collapse:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/j8g5hydln/R_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j8g5hydln/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fou7s5iln/R_1_fire.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fou7s5iln/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qcxyr2kvv/R_1_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qcxyr2kvv/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3o8rriixn/R_1_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3o8rriixn/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/twjwgwaqz/R_1_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/twjwgwaqz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fdcrfirwr/R_1_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fdcrfirwr/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/4drk3x97f/R_1_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4drk3x97f/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5g1qmgzqj/R_1_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5g1qmgzqj/)


Midtown:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midtown_Manhattan


(https://s9.postimg.cc/6ttdhrjkb/0088e7d4a135b8b70004c6a6dd09e5eb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ttdhrjkb/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 02, 2018, 12:50:39 AM
FDNY bullet holes:

     Engine 42 - Bronx - 1980s:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VSYWxiJVio&t=200s


     Engine 234 - Brooklyn - 1993:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s1zD-wZ7J4
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 01:33:28 AM
Engine 82/Ladder 31  Firehouse 1215 Intervale Avenue  West Farms, South Bronx  6th Division, 26th Battalion  "La Casa Grande"

     Engine 82 organized 1215 Intervale Avenue                                          1905
     Engine 82 became Combined Engine 82                                                1905
     Combined Engine 82 became Engine 82                                                1907 
 
     Ladder 31 organized 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                       1907

     Engine 85 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 92                       1967-1971

     Tactical Control Unit 712 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82  1969-1971

     Searchlight 3 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                   1951-1967

     Hydrant 7 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                        1951-1957

     Division 7 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82        1948-1949 and 1951-1956

     Battalion 3 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                       1956-1968

     Battalion 27 located at 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                     1969-1978


1215 Intervale Avenue firehouse:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/rltp5kmp7/E_82_B_W_old_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rltp5kmp7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3uubnh1xn/E_82_B_W_old.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3uubnh1xn/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/rltp5lhkb/E_82_fh_B_W_fh_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rltp5lhkb/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/frly82tm3/E_82_fh_9.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/frly82tm3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/6wl3xl7ej/E_82_fh_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6wl3xl7ej/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/wfdgalyob/E_82_fh_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wfdgalyob/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/hjex30uzf/E_82_fh_41.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hjex30uzf/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ommsinfuj/E_82_fh_43.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ommsinfuj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/l30usukuj/E_82_fh_44.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l30usukuj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ia7n88cm3/E_82_fh_46.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ia7n88cm3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/wtes9nl6j/E_82_fh_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wtes9nl6j/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/t9xfxnsfv/E_82_fh_47.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t9xfxnsfv/)


Engine 82:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/wx8lq6663/E_82_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wx8lq6663/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/tdmo0elgr/E_82.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tdmo0elgr/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3tkdu5uzv/E_83_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3tkdu5uzv/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/yb08lq5i3/E_82_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yb08lq5i3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/j2ab7yyyz/E_82_ap_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j2ab7yyyz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fiodi63yz/E_82_ap_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fiodi63yz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5mnaii3bv/E_82_ap_Mack.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5mnaii3bv/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/sbchi37uz/E_82_April_1972.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sbchi37uz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/rxb5ii36z/Eb_82_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rxb5ii36z/)
   
     (https://s9.postimg.cc/u35gcilxn/E_82_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u35gcilxn/)
   
     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ynrmrxy2j/E_82_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ynrmrxy2j/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/58lyiy18r/E_82_ap_44.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/58lyiy18r/)


Ladder 31:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/4x4i5qpt7/L_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4x4i5qpt7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/lwdglgj5n/L_31_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lwdglgj5n/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/orqjrqup7/L_31_ap_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/orqjrqup7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/9vs0k5yq3/L_31_ap_13.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/9vs0k5yq3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/lkw087aa3/L_31_ap_16.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lkw087aa3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/47lptcuej/L_31_ap_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/47lptcuej/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fwpphc0sr/L_31_ap_49.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fwpphc0sr/)


Engine 85:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/q822a6v4r/E_85_responding_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q822a6v4r/)


Tactical Control Unit 712:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3w49gnbej/TCU_712.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3w49gnbej/)


Battalion 27:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3w49gzbi3/Bn_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3w49gzbi3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/4ln1tcz6z/E_82_ff_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ln1tcz6z/)


Engine 82/Ladder 31:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAkyljTlFQQ

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUQmoD1aWhw

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PC534FyvR1o

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rvp6E9zva3E


BBC "Bronx is Burning":

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQO5CXdiwqQ&t=145s

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSKxV1_VVvM

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LExWjeKRgG0&t=324s

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVXMyIRUQCI


Engine 82/Ladder 31 members:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qrgsul5gr/L_31_group_WNYF_2008_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qrgsul5gr/)

     FF Dennis Smith, Engine 82, author, firefighter advocate:

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/i7xewewzv/Dennis_Smith_Firefighter.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/i7xewewzv/)

          http://www.dennissmith.com/

     CAPT Bob Farrell, Ladder 31 1970s:

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/6yeccqnsb/Farrell.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6yeccqnsb/)
   
          http://firebytrade.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Bob-Farrell-Face-Book-Stories-.pdf

     FF Mickey Maye, Ladder 31, UFA President 1970s:

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/n5azhe97v/4d9299a600d7c08e2d1623a445a167da--firefighting-vintage-photos.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n5azhe97v/)

          http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/mickey-maye-83-champion-ring-article-1.1265891

     Assistant Chief Robert Manson - former captain Engine 82 1973-1976
 
          (https://s9.postimg.cc/pzns5ujzv/manson.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pzns5ujzv/)

     Fire Commissioner Carlos Rivera - former Lt Engine 82 1970s

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/oajabp95n/Rivera.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/oajabp95n/)


Engine 82 FDNY medals:

     THOMAS J. WALSH LT. ENG. 82 MAR. 31, 1975 KENNY

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/ipnif8nzv/Wa_LSH_k_ENNY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ipnif8nzv/)

     ROBERT RODRIGUIZ FF. ENG. 82 OFF DUTY JUN. 21, 1976 MC ELLIGOTT

          (https://i.postimg.cc/8FV6xKpv/RODRIGUEZ.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8FV6xKpv)

     RICHARD A. DE SIMONE LT. ENG. 82 JUL. 9, 1978 UFOA

           (https://i.postimg.cc/r0H5mSXC/DISIMONE.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/r0H5mSXC)

     ROBERT W. BEATLEY FF. ENG. 82 MAY 12, 1979 CRIMMINS

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/jwo4lplsr/Beatley.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jwo4lplsr/)


Ladder 31 FDNY medals:

     JOHN P. CANNY FF. LAD. 31 NOV. 3, 1949 KENNY

     EDWARD B. HOETZEL FF. LAD. 31 NOV. 22, 1957 FDR

     WILLIAM V. BOHNER FF. LAD. 31 NOV. 22, 1957 SCOTT

     EARL J. MALONEY FF. LAD. 31 MAR. 26, 1959 COMMERCE

     MICHAEL MAYE FF. LAD. 31 DEC. 7, 1965 FDR

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/a7j484y4b/Scan_20180304_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a7j484y4b/)

     MICHAEL MAYE FF. LAD. 31 MAY 29, 1967 WILLIAMS

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/z76dbinl7/maye16n_1_web.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     VINCENT J. BOLLON FF. LAD. 31 FEB. 11, 1968 JOHNSTON

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/r6s2n6yzf/Bollon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r6s2n6yzf/)

          http://www.ufanyc.org/cms/contents/view/10421

     DONALD H. BUTLER FF. LAD. 31 DEC. 8, 1968 HOLY NAME

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/opgbfyhnv/Butler.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/opgbfyhnv/)

     RICHARD J. RITTMEYER FF. LAD. 31 AUG. 9, 1969 HUGH BONNER

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/5lhy2j12z/Rit_Bonner.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5lhy2j12z/)

     RICHARD J. BITTLES FF. LAD. 31 MAY 30, 1969 COLUMBIA

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/8fl3fvvij/Bittles.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8fl3fvvij/)

     WILLIAM P. GRIMES CAPT. LAD. 31 AUG. 6, 1969 STEUBEN

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/4qvegm3jv/Grimes.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4qvegm3jv/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/b9o8td09n/Grimes_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b9o8td09n/)

     DANIEL P. GAINEY FF. LAD. 31 AUG. 19, 1971 LA GUARDIA

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/rxfqvunbf/Gainey.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rxfqvunbf/)

     CHARLES P. MC CARTHY FF. LAD. 31 AUG. 29, 1971 FDR

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/7q2b3lna3/Mc_Carthy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7q2b3lna3/)

     RICHARD J. RITTMEYER FF. LAD. 31 JAN. 20, 1972 WILLIAMS

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/qv5kde4iz/Rit_Williams.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qv5kde4iz/)

     VINCENT J. BOLLON FF. LAD. 31 JAN. 6, 1972 CRIMMINS

          (https://i.postimg.cc/k2LcGvnM/BOLLON-CRIMMINS.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/k2LcGvnM)

     MELFORD J. HAZEL FF. LAD. 31 AUG. 23, 1973 HUGH BONNER

          (https://i.postimg.cc/rDTxKVbb/HAZEL.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/rDTxKVbb)

     THOMAS J. NEARY FF. LAD. 31 APR. 4, 1974 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          (https://i.postimg.cc/xk7PkynT/NEARY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/xk7PkynT)
 
     - account from NYCFirenet member ******:

          "The James Gordon Bennet Medal, the FDNY's Medal of Honor. One more time. I had the privilege of witnessing a member perform a rescue that was awarded to him the Bennet medal.

          Warm night. Around 1900 hours the 6th Division chief, DC Curley, came into our qtrs. (82,31,B27), with the chief was a photographer from Life Magazine. The photographer had permission from downtown to take photo's of 82/31 apparatus, qtrs. and members for a human interest spread in the magazine generated by Smith's book "Report From Engine 82, which was on the best seller list at the time. As we lined up for a roll-call a box came in, both companies were first due. We responded and Chief Curley followed us in the division car. E94 and L48 were returning from another box in the area when they saw a column of smoke from this fire. Normally 2nd due they both arrived first. As I arrived I saw the fire was on the top floor of a 5 story occupied tenement. There was a front fire escape. On the top floor exposure 2 side a woman was hanging out the 2nd window over from the fire escape window. The woman was holding a small child out in front of her. Smoke was showing from all 3 windows with some fire now beginning to show from the fire escape window. 94 was stretching. 48 was raising their rearmount. The ladder was malfunctioning, it would elevate and extend but was jamming on rotation, rotating only a few inches at each try, the tip still 8 to 10 feet from the window. There was several hundred people in the street half yelling for her to hold on the other half to throw the child down to several men under her in the street. There was an outside cellar entrance (OLT) under this line of apartments with a iron picket fence. If she and the child went out the window they most likely would have been impaled by the fence. We carried a life net on 82, I told my guys to get the net. 31 arrived and FF Tom Neary went up the buildings steps into the fire building followed by his officer Lt. Don Butler. The remaining 31 members went for their roof rope. The fire escape window was now fully involved in fire with fire now showing at the top of the 1st window over, in the same room as the woman and child. This whole incident took about as long as it takes to read this. The woman raised the child to throw her as fire was now over her head. Then a firefighter was seen by her side, FF Neary, a second later by Lt. Butler. Butler took the child and dove out the window to the now 4 foot or so 48 ladder tip, caught and held by a 48 member. Neary then threw the woman out the window onto the ladder a few seconds later. Neary then dove out the window head first his turnout smoldering his pants on fire, no bunker gear then. Neither Butler or Neary had a mask. All 4 went to the hospital. Neary was out for several months from the leg burns. I went over to the Life photographer and asked him if he had gotten any shots of the rescue. He said no as he was so taken by what he was seeing he forgot to take any pictures, a shame as that would have made some "human interest" spread in the magazine. Both Butler and Neary were awarded a Class 1 medal (rescue made under extreme personal danger, highest medal class by the FDNY). That year Neary was awarded the Bennett medal.

          A few years later Neary was promoted to Lt. and assigned to 28 truck in Harlem. Another fire and another child trapped in a rear tenement room with a fully involved room trapping her. Neary took a door off an adjoining apartment door. He used the door as a shield sliding under it to the child's room, grabbed the child and slid back, again no bunker gear or mask. Again he was out for several moths with burns to the hand even received even with his gloves on from holding the door over him. Neary received a second Class 1 medal that year and a second Bennet medal.

          The War Years, best of times worst of times. The worst the junkies and criminals that burned down so many neighborhoods, the best the men of the FDNY, the Bravest, Neary comes to mind."

     MELVILLE F. FLYNN FF. LAD. 31 JAN. 21, 1974 PRENTICE

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/of8swrfy3/44990757_125967829704.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/of8swrfy3/)
     
     THOMAS M. KENNEDY FF. LAD. 31 JAN. 21, 1974 DELEHANTY

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/ku7vg8xbf/Kennedy_Del.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ku7vg8xbf/)

     DONALD H. BUTLER LT. LAD. 31 APR. 4, 1974 BRUMMER

          (https://i.postimg.cc/CzPJTVXq/BUTLER.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/CzPJTVXq)

     THOMAS M. KENNEDY FF. LAD. 31 APR. 12, 1975 JOHNSTON

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/fisyvkljf/Kennedy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fisyvkljf/)

     ROBERT E. FARRELL CAPT. LAD. 31 APR. 12, 1975 THIRD ALARM

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/xlm1mq4ij/FARRELL3_RD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xlm1mq4ij/)

     BERNARD P.D. CASSIDY FF. LAD. 31 MAY 19, 1976 KRIDEL

          (https://i.postimg.cc/XGSQHch1/CASSIDY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/XGSQHch1)

     CARMINE A. CROCE FF. LAD. 31 JAN. 11, 1977 KRIDEL

          (https://i.postimg.cc/qhDgBjTj/CROCE-1978-KRIDEL.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/qhDgBjTj)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/wsehrd2a3/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wsehrd2a3/)

     THOMAS J. MC BRIDE FF. LAD. 31 JUL. 24, 1978 CONRAN

          (https://i.postimg.cc/5YL86hsn/MCBRIDE.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5YL86hsn)

     DANIEL P. GAINEY FF. LAD. 31 APR. 13, 1978 TREVOR-WARREN

          (https://i.postimg.cc/k2YQZFVF/GAINEY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/k2YQZFVF)

     CARL W. FLORENCO FF. LAD. 31 FEB. 4, 1981 MC ELLIGOTT

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/q54v1e9dn/Scan_20180304_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q54v1e9dn/)

     HENRY E. WALTER FF. LAD. 31 JUL. 13, 1988 1988 1989 CONNELL

          (https://i.postimg.cc/3d7FDw5p/WALTER-CONNELL.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/3d7FDw5p)

     DAVIS J. GIAMBALVO FF. LAD. 31 OCT. 29, 2007 2008 BROOKMAN

          (https://i.postimg.cc/p94mzSdg/DAVIS-J-GIAMBALVO.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/p94mzSdg)

          (https://i.postimg.cc/Vdg5Dv69/DAVIS-J-GIAMBALVO-LAD-31-OCT-29-2007-BROOKMAN.png) (https://postimg.cc/Vdg5Dv69)

     LUCAS A. NISKANEN FF. LAD. 31 DEC. 17, 2017 2018 HUGH BONNER

          (https://i.postimg.cc/jwDkkDtD/LUCAS-A-NISKANEN-FF-LAD-31-DEC-17-2017-2018-HUGH-BONNER-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/jwDkkDtD)

          (https://i.postimg.cc/14NjGVvT/LUCAS-A-NISKANEN-FF-LAD-31-DEC-17-2017-2018-HUGH-BONNER.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/14NjGVvT)


LODDs:

     FF Michael J. Cunningham Engine 82 May 12, 1927

          FF Cunningham lost his balance and fell to the floor while shining the brass pole in quarters. His skull was fractured, his spine snapped and he suffered four broken ribs. Cunningham was taken to Lincoln Hospital where he died the next morning without regaining consciousness. He had been with the Department since June of 1920, appointed in Engine 53, and transferred to Engine 82 the past November. He was only thirty-four years old.

     LT Geoffrey Guja, Engine 82  September 11, 2001 World Trade Center.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/8ahc69dxn/guja_geoffrey.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8ahc69dxn/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/hi9kn0aq3/Guja_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hi9kn0aq3/)

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/geoffrey-e-guja/

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=94805

     RIP.  Never forget.


South Bronx:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Bronx


(https://s9.postimg.cc/l1viczsx7/E_82_logo_1.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/l1vid0g2j/FDNY_E_82.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l1vid0g2j/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/cjm28oozf/patch-71_large.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cjm28oozf/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/6iodbmpij/99_big.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6iodbmpij/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/mtoh7zzgb/67dc9e1f42103871fe28854e027c957d.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mtoh7zzgb/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/xvtk69lrf/2165958.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xvtk69lrf/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 02:34:21 AM

(https://s9.postimg.cc/7fzuhehkb/R_W_1949.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7fzuhehkb/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/hdavahzgr/R_W_1954.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hdavahzgr/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/u4p1gvjhn/R_W_1964.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u4p1gvjhn/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/crer21j1n/R_W_1965.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/crer21j1n/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/4lrn7440b/R_W_1966.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4lrn7440b/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/flcuifccb/R_W_1967.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/flcuifccb/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/i2olpjbmj/R_W1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i2olpjbmj/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/mbtbrocaz/R_W_1969.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mbtbrocaz/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/tqinkio17/R_W_1971_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tqinkio17/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/g9lp1ovq3/R_W_1972.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g9lp1ovq3/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/ds9xug6or/R_W_1973.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ds9xug6or/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/6dkm1ifi3/R_W_1974.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6dkm1ifi3/)


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 02:37:37 AM
"When the Bronx Was Burning"  - John Finucane  - Engine 85 - South Bronx

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fhOjRoPN4U
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 02:46:56 AM
"Why the Bronx Burned" - NY Post  By Joe Flood  May 16, 2010 |

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ekhnqarcr/fire-300x4501.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ekhnqarcr/)

It was game two of the 1977 World Series, a chilly, blustery October night in the South Bronx. The Yanks were already down 2-0 in the bottom of the first inning when ABC’s aerial camera panned a few blocks over from Yankee Stadium to give the world its first live glimpse of a real Bronx Cookout. “There it is, ladies and gentlemen,” Howard Cosell intoned. “The Bronx is burning.”

The scene quickly became a defining image of New York in the 1970s, a fitting summation of the decade perfect in every way but one: It never happened. Cosell, tapes of the game show, never said, “The Bronx is burning.”
“It’s a great quote, if it had been a real one,” says Gordon Greisman, who co-wrote and produced ESPN’s “The Bronx is Burning” mini-series based on the Jonathan Mahler book. “But we got all of this footage from Major League Baseball, including the entire broadcast of that game, and we went through all of it and it’s not there, because God knows if it was there we would have used it.”

More likely, the phrase was invented by New Yorkers — what the broadcaster should have said — and spun by credulous journalists. But Cosell’s “Play It Again, Sam” moment is hardly the only myth that has sprung out of one of the darkest chapters of New York City history. The South Bronx (along with Brooklyn’s Brownsville, Bushwick, and Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhoods, and Manhattan’s Harlem and Lower East Side) was indeed burning. Seven different census tracts in The Bronx lost more than 97% of their buildings to fire and abandonment between 1970 and 1980; 44 tracts (out of 289 in the borough) lost more than 50%. “The smell is one thing I remember,” says retired Bronx firefighter Tom Henderson. “That smell of burning — it was always there, through the whole borough almost.”

But many of these fires were not — as was suggested then and is popular opinion now — caused by a rash of arsons. In fact, there’s a good chance that not even the World Series blaze was intentional. That fire was in an abandoned schoolhouse, there was no insurance policy for anyone to cash in on.
Hoodlums did not burn The Bronx. The bureaucrats did.

IN 1971, Mayor John Lindsay asked the FDNY’s chief of department, John O’Hagan, for a few million dollars in savings to help close a budget deficit. O’Hagan turned to a team of statistical whiz kids from the New York City-RAND Institute, a joint endeavor of the mayor’s office and the Santa Monica-based defense think tank famous for all but inventing the fields of game theory, systems analysis and nuclear strategy (and for devising a series of spectacular strategic failures in Vietnam).

NYC-RAND’s goal was nothing less than a new way of administering cities: use the mathematical brilliance of the computer modelers and systems analysts who had revolutionized military strategy to turn Gotham’s corrupt, insular and unresponsive bureaucracy into a streamlined, non-partisan technocracy.

For O’Hagan’s fire department, RAND built computer models that replicated when, where, and how often fires broke out in the city, and then predicted how quickly fire companies could respond to them. By showing which areas received faster and slower responses, RAND determined which companies could be closed with the least impact. In 1972, RAND recommended closing 13 companies, oddly including some of the busiest in the fire-prone South Bronx, and opening seven new ones, including units in suburban neighborhoods of Staten Island and the North Bronx.
RAND’s first mistake was assuming that response time — a mediocre measure of firefighting operations as a whole, but the only aspect that can be easily quantified — was the only factor necessary for determining where companies should be opened and closed. To calculate these theoretical response times, RAND needed to gather real ones. But their sample was so small, unrepresentative and poorly compiled that the data indicated that traffic played no role in how quickly a fire company responded.

The models themselves were also full of mistakes and omissions. One assumed that fire companies were always available to respond to fires from their firehouse — true enough on Staten Island, but a rarity in places like The Bronx, where every company in a neighborhood, sometimes in the entire borough, could be out fighting fires at the same time. Numerous corners were cut, with RAND reports routinely dismissing crucial legwork as “too laborious,” and analysts writing that data discrepancies could “be ignored for many planning purposes.”
Finally, the models fell prey to the very thing that technocracies are supposed to prevent, political manipulation. At the outset the RAND studies didn’t need to be manipulated — they provided what the politicians wanted without prompting. The models’ flaws all tended to make it appear that poor, fire-prone (and generally black and Puerto Rican) neighborhoods were actually over-served by the fire department, and recommended the cuts be focused in these politically weak areas. But as the cuts deepened, the models began recommending closings in wealthier, more politically active communities, an untenable development for the ambitious chief O’Hagan, who was well-connected in the Democratic clubs of Brooklyn and Queens and was later appointed fire commissioner.
“There was no question that where the commissioner kept his car was not a house that was going to be closed,” says RAND’s Rae Archibald, who was later hired as an assistant fire commissioner. “If the models came back saying one thing and [O’Hagan] didn’t like it, he would make you run it again and check, run it again and check.”
When the results still didn’t come back to his liking, O’Hagan’s men handled the problem. “Mostly we used [the RAND models] for the cuts, but if they came back saying to close a house in a certain neighborhood, well . . . if you try to close a firehouse down the block from where a judge lived, you couldn’t get away with it,” says retired chief Elmer Chapman, who ran the department’s Bureau of Planning and Operations Research. In those cases, continues Chapman, you could simply skip down the list of closings to a company in a poorer neighborhood. The models said there were less painful cuts to be made, “ut the people in those [poorer] neighborhoods didn’t have a very big voice.”

As the city’s budget deficit ballooned, the RAND studies were used to close dozens more companies; in all, 50 fire units were shuttered or moved. Fire inspections were cut by 70%; the fire marshal program was gutted; ancient rigs with outmoded safety features and rickety wooden ladders were pressed into service, and fire alarm boxes broke down by the score.

“I’d say a quarter to a third of the hydrants didn’t work,” says Jerry DiRazzo, who fought fires in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn. “You can see the way an area changes when they don’t repair a neighborhood. Every day I drove over the border from Queens to Brooklyn to go to work, and it was like this imaginary line was crossed. Almost like suddenly the sun wasn’t shining, like it was darker somehow . . . People would ask me, ‘How can you deal with this, seeing that every day?’ And I’d tell them, ‘I have a front row seat to the greatest show on earth.’ This was history being made, a city collapsing.”

DESPITE the models’ predictions of minimal impact, response times shot up and the number of fires that nearby companies fought as much as quadrupled. Citizens who lost their neighborhood firehouses protested. But by citing the supposed statistical infallibility of RAND and its computer models, City Hall was able to mollify the constituencies that really mattered. When the firefighters’ union filed a lawsuit to stop the closings, the department trotted out the models and convinced a U.S. District Court judge to threw the case out, and convinced New York Times editorial page to come out in favor of the closings and to credulously cite one RAND analyst who said the cuts would have no serious impact on coverage.

With fire rates already rising thanks to poverty, family dysfunction and an overcrowded, aging housing stock, the closings helped turn the fire problem into a scourge, consuming block after block of once densely populated, viable neighborhoods. Thanks in large part to technological innovations like smoke detectors and fire-retardant building materials — O’Hagan’s own pet projects — the country at large experienced a 40% drop in fire fatalities from the mid 1960s to late 1970s. In the city O’Hagan was charged with protecting, though, fire fatality rates more than doubled.
Despite the conventional wisdom that arson was to blame, it was ordinary fires, caused by things like faulty wiring, errant cigarettes, and space heaters that drove the destruction. During the 1950s, city fire marshals attributed less than 1% of fires to arson. Until 1975, when the final round of fire cuts went into effect, that ratio never rose above 1.1%.

Where arson was a problem, it was largely the consequence of government intervention intended to mitigate the social consequences of the fires, namely no-questions-asked fire insurance for landlords in fire prone neighborhoods, and special welfare payments made to fire victims. But even at its peak in the late 1970s, arson made up less than 7% of fires, and occurred primarily in already burned-out, abandoned buildings.

The fire cuts even helped lead to the Son of Sam shootings. In the mid-1970s, fire marshal Mike DiMarco was staking out David Berkowitz’s Bronx home after his yellow Ford Galaxy was spotted fleeing the scene of two trash fires set on City Island in the Bronx. “We had him under surveillance for months, watching his car late at night when we didn’t have any fires to run off to,” says DiMarco. But when Berkowitz moved to Brooklyn, the cut-to-the-bone fire marshal division dropped the tail, Berkowitz forgotten until he was arrested for the Son of Sam murders.

AS New York City faces its worst budget shortfall since it almost went bankrupt in 1975, some shadows of the RAND fire closings loom. The mayor’s initial budget plan calls for closing 20 fire companies by July 1, with more closings likely to come if other savings aren’t realized. The fire units up for closing will be announced this week.
Once again, the fire department is making cuts with computer models based on data of questionable validity, releasing incomplete and misleading statistics when it suits the department’s purposes, and refusing to release raw data so that their claims can be verified by anyone outside the department.

But FDNY spokesperson Frank Gribbon says this time will be different. “The chiefs are looking at other factors as well,” as the models, he says. “”There’s a whole host of criteria, and then it’s the expertise of the chief officers who have to consider all of the facts and all of the data.”” Gribbon says the department doesn’t share the data behind the models, nor will it discuss the specifics of how the models work. “The public doesn’t understand,” Gribbon continued. “In terms of what the criteria [for closings] are, we’re not going to convince anybody by discussing, you know, the facts. We’re not going to convince anybody.”

Fire Commissioner Sal Cassano finds himself is in a difficult spot. On the one hand is an understaffed fire department going on as many calls as it ever has (building fires are down 50% from the 1970s, but the department now responds to more 200,000 medical emergencies every year). On the other hand is the man who Cassano, who was the chief of department before being promoted last year, owes his last two jobs to, a mayor intent on closing a looming budget gap.

Like the 1970s, firehouses are being closed while futuristic technology projects, outside consultants and computer models are still being funded. Last year the department paid computer consultants from Hewlett-Packard $3.5 million, about as much as it costs to keep two firehouses open and fully staffed for a year, to continue fine-tuning the Automatic Vehicle Locator (AVL) system they’d already installed. AVL is part of a new dispatch modeling system built by Deccan International (the same company that built the computer models being used to close fire companies), which in turn is part of a $2 billion overhaul of the city’s emergency dispatch system.

That the department needs to maintain a modern communication and dispatch system is clear, but the usefulness of spending millions to update street-corner fire alarm boxes that the department is planning on shutting down anyway, and equipping 911 operators with special software programs to receive live video feeds from callers, is questionable when basic city services are being slashed.

In a move strangely reminiscent of Rudy Giuliani’s ill fated decision to put all of his Office of Emergency Management eggs in a 7 World Trade Center-housed basket, the department is spending more than $300 million consolidate each borough’s fire dispatch office into one unit at the department’s Metrotech headquarters, and hundreds of millions more to build backup dispatch unit in The Bronx in case the Metrotech unit breaks down or is attacked.

The city has spent more than $20 million on a new Unified Call Taker (UCT) system that lets 911 call takers write down fire information and send it directly to fire dispatchers, instead of simply passing the caller along to more experienced fire call takers. Firefighters have taken to calling UCT the “U Can’t Tell” system after being sent to a series of incorrect addresses by the 911 call takers. And fire call takers are now playing a larger role in the call taking process — eliminating much of the reason for building the UCT system in the first place — after 911 call takers sent fire crews to the wrong addresses for fires in Brooklyn and Queens last November, and three people died in each fire.
A month after the fatal fires, Deputy Mayor Skyler praised UCT in testimony before the city council, saying that it “lowers response times in an effort to save lives.” But according to fire union critics, those lower response times are only true on paper, not in reality. Unlike most fire departments, the FDNY does not count the time a caller spends on the phone with a 911 operator in its response time calculations. And now that 911 operators are taking down fire information, that time is more than a minute, according the Uniformed Firefighters Association. This means that while the FDNY is reporting faster response times, the amount of time it actually takes fire crews to arrive might actually be longer.

THERE is little in New York’s current criminal, economic or building fire trends to indicate that the city will be returning to the ashen anarchy of the 1970s any time soon, but some of the management lessons to be learned from that era are clear: Whiz Kid consultants with plans to save the city through technology have their place, but shouldn’t come at the cost of basic services. And while numbers can sometimes cut through the fog of government decision-making, they can just as easily be mistaken or manipulated.
 
“The models might be able to help you a little bit with closing fire companies,” says former fire commissioner Thomas von Essen, who led the department through the terrorist attacks of 9/11. “But there are so many other parts to those decisions, not just response time but the effectiveness of the unit, the political response from the neighborhood, what kind of buildings are nearby, whether there are schools or hospitals or terrorist targets.
“There’s no question that there are neighborhoods where if the firehouse is removed, it will have a minor impact. But there are also many communities that need additional fire units. It should be an ongoing process, not just something to scare the public in a fiscal crisis.”

Joe Flood is the author of “The Fires: How a Computer Formula, Big Ideas, and the Best of Intentions Burned Down New York City — and Determined the Future of Cities” (Riverhead), in stores on May 27.

     https://nypost.com/2010/05/16/why-the-bronx-burned/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 02:53:16 AM
Howard Cosell's "The Bronx is Burning" Comments During 1977 World Series:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnVH-BE9CUo
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: johnd248 on March 04, 2018, 03:58:54 PM
Casa Grande AKA Casa Willy D due to the amount of time he spent there.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: grumpy grizzly on March 04, 2018, 04:27:07 PM
I have the Code 3 house and both sets of apparatus for Engine82/Tower 31. Now I have the rest of the story.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on March 04, 2018, 06:13:48 PM
Casa Grande AKA Casa Willy D due to the amount of time he spent there.

 John understands. We were both volunteer firefighters together then. He had his stories of Brooklyn and I had my stories of the Bronx.

 I was already "hooked" into it when the book Report from Engine Co 82 came out in 1972 (?). A few years earlier was my introduction into the FDNY at Engine Co 210 and Rescue 2. Then Harlem companies too. (see; "My Younger Buffing Years" in the History Section)

 For so many of us, we still talk about it to this day. All those stories, the pictures, the videos that mack posted about 82/31, and the guys that were a part of it, forever changed the lives of so many of us.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 06:49:18 PM
Former captain of Engine 82 during War Years - NYCFirenet member ****** Chief Bob Manson w/DAC John O'Hagen:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/pzns5ujzv/manson.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pzns5ujzv/)

     Picture posted by "MikeintheBronx"  (http://www.fdnysbravest.com/)


Chief Manson post:

  "The first FDNY firehouse I walked into for a tour was 19 truck on March 30th,1960. Crazy but at that time myself and another 100 proby's did not have one minute of training. The training school on Welfare Island was in session with the previous class and we had to wait until they finished to begin our training. My Lt. told myself and my partner proby (2 were assigned to a 6th Div. house) to get gear off the rack, each carry a can and stay with him. He said that if reached out and could not touch us we were in trouble.19 had a spare wooden aerial for the tour. During the tour a kid walked into qtrs. and said a "cat was in a tree down the street". The Lt. said come on we will take the spare out and test it. We did and that was the only time in my 37 years that I took a cat out of a tree.  Caught a few jobs in the 6 weeks there before school, nothing major. After school I was assigned to 74 engine in Manhattan for 4 years then transferred to 127 truck in Queens for 5 years. My first year in 74 we were 9th in workers with about 1200 runs and 700 or so workers. Hard to say when the war years actually began. I remember hearing that 26 truck did 350 runs one month around 1963 and I couldn't believe that a company could do that much running. A guess would be that the war started around 63 or 64, peaked probably around 76, burned itself out.

I was promoted to Lt. 8/69 out of 127. While 127 was fairly busy for Queens (South Jamaica section) there was no comparison for the busy companies in the actual war zones, S. Bx, Brownsville, Harlem etc. We would hear stories about 120 truck, 31 truck, 82 etc. But hearing and being there is/was a whole different ball game. On promotion 8/69 I was assigned to the 19th Battalion covering. Worked in what would become busy companies years later, 33 truck, 75 engine etc, but they were not busy at that time. Being in the Bx though every tour the circuits would be open due to jobs and all the boxes being transmitted would be heard throughout the boro, never stopped. One day tour I was assigned for the tour in 50 engine. I have to say though it was not an exceptional busy tour maybe 10 runs no real work I fell in love with the guys and the house, just the way they handled themselves. At this time there were only 2 Lts. assigned to 50 with no Captain. They were waiting for Charlie Rivera (later Fire Commissioner) to be promoted out of 76 engine to be given 50. I put in for the company and was assigned 1/7/70. I worked there until 4/73 when I made Captain. I have to say that these were the best years of my time in the FDNY. Just to rub shoulders with those men was an honor and a privilege. Some fires I remember well others not at all. A few. Came in one summer night for a 6x9. Was a busy day in the Bx. 50 was in qtrs. 19 was not. A 2nd alarm was going over by 82. At the first minutes of the tour we were sent to a box a few blocks from the 2nd by ourselves. On arrival we found a rubbish fire going good in an ally  between 3 story row frames. We dropped 2 lines one to knock down the rubbish and the other into the exp. 4 side occupied frame that had fire on all 3 floors. We knocked the fire down couple of rooms on the1st and 2nd floors but when we got up to the 3rd we were short hose. Fire was in 2 rooms and the cockloft. I sent one of the guys down for a roll-up. As we were waiting a BC came up and ordered us out of the building. We left the line and came down into the street. We went across the street and sat on a stoop. No masks our eyes were bothering us beside other things. A 3rd had been transmitted for the box. A BC was coming down the street and when he saw us he asked "if we wanted to go to the hospital and have our eyes washed out?" I said sure so 5 of us went in the BC car to the hospital (Bx Leb). I found out later that when the chief returned to the car the aide told him that they were at the wrong 3rd they should have been at the 82 3rd. So they responded to the other 3rd. As we are at the hospital the frame we were in collapses. All that can be seen is the collapse on top of our line going into the frame. An Assistant Chief comes in and does a roll call. No 50. He is about to transmit a 4th with additional rescues, chaplains etc. for a company in a collapse when a ff from 19 tells him that "50 got in a chief's car and left." I'm at the hospital and a nurse asks me my name. I tell her and she says "you have a phone call." It is the Bx dispatcher and he says by order of A.C. Snyder I was to immediately return to the scene, a car was being sent for me. I think he wants to give me a well done for all the fire we knocked down, didn't know about the collapse. But it was not so. As he was chewing me out I told him that the BC had put it over the radio that he was removing ff's to the hospital, he hadn't. This stopped the A.C. and that was it. We were all granted "remainder of tour off" by the medical officer. Was a great tour, had a good fire and was back home by 2100 hours.

Another 6x9 around 0600 hours we go in 3rd due to a box. Fire is in an occupied 5 story tenement. Arson. Someone had thrown gasoline throughout a 1st floor apartment and on the stairs 5th floor down. The 1st engine 71 takes their line into the 1st floor apartment. 50-2 is ordered to stretch into the exposure to prevent extension. We are ordered to knock down the stairs. The apartments have dumbwaiters in the kitchens. Two apartments per floor. We knock down the stairs 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd and 3rd to 4th and hit the kitchens where the fire in the dumbwaiter has spread to them. As we are making the hall on the 4th floor we find a badly burned dead body. It takes us a few seconds to "get around him." As we make the turn the stairs from the 5th floor to the roof collapses. We can't get by as the stairs are completely blocked with a ton or more of debris, close call. The body was a father who went back up the stairs to try and save his family, but they were already out. I always have thought that he saved us, another second or two and we would have been on the stairs.

I was promoted to Captain 4/73. During my years in 50 my wife would be after me to transfer to a slower house so that I wasn't always so tired after tours. I would put her off by saying that when I made Captain I would be assigned to a slow Division as department policy. On promotion I was assigned to the 15th Division, the second busiest division in the FDNY at the time. My first tour was in103 truck and we had 27 runs. I came home tired and my wife just said "you don't look any different." There was 6 of us promoted to Captain. One of the news guys was mad out of the 16th Division, probably the slowest Division in the job, east end of Queens. He stays in the 16th covering. I call up the transfer Lt. and ask him if I have ghetto next to my name. He says why and I say I go from the 6th to the 15th and another new Captain stays in the 16th? Like him I want to see my grandchildren grow up. He says O.K. send me your paper. I do and a few weeks later am transferred to the 13th Division in Queens. Am there a week when the Division Commander of the 6th, DC Kelsey, calls me and says that Captain Grey (Albergrey in Smith's book) is being promoted and do I want 82. I say sure and send in my paper. The Lt. in the transfer unit calls me and tells me I am a wise ass.

Assigned to 82 9/1/73. 50 was very busy, 82 even more so. 50 would run heavy until 0200 or 0300, 82 would never stop, go all night. But like 50/19 the guys in 82/31 were great. As above in 1960 74 did 1200 runs 700 workers, 9th busiest engine that year out of 212 engines. July of 1975 82 (the number) did 210 structural fires with 205 structural hours for the one month. And this was as 82 was slowing down. Busy box of course was 2743, Charlotte and 170. Good times and some not so. We had the strike 11/73, with ordered lifts, the lay-offs, some tough times.

There were thousands of FDNY guys doing heavy work during those years. I'll be 78 next August don't know how much longer I'll be here so I hope other brothers add to this thread as to their experiences during this FDNY period. Best of times, working with the greatest firefighters in the world and the worst of times seeing so many people lose their lives and homes, why was it allowed? "

     - thank you Chief
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 07:13:00 PM
Engine 82/Ladder 31 War Years - continued - per Chief Bob Manson:

     1960 Ward LaFrance - Firebrand                 Reg #5928
     1968 Mack CF with Jump Seat Enclosures    Reg #1072
     1971 Mack CF 4 Door Cab                          MP7111
     1975 Mack CF 4 Door Cab                          MP7505
     1978 Mack CF 4 Door Cab                          MP7838

Engine 82 Interchange:

     During the War Years - FDNY created a "INTERCHANGE PROGRAM" that rotated busy units to slower areas of the city. Here was 82's Schedule:

          Monday - 6x9 (Night Shift 6pm - 9am) Interchange with Engine 295 in Queens
          Tuesday - Squad 2 (shared Quarters with Engine 73) would run FIRST DUE from 82's from 1900 - 0100
          Wednesday - 6x9 (Night Shift 6pm - 9am) Interchange with Engine 297 in Queens
          Thursday - Squad 2 would run FIRST DUE from 82's from 1900 - 0100
          Friday, Saturday & Sunday - it was not uncommon to see as many as FIVE other Engines at the house called "ACTING ENGINE 82"


Fires:

     July 1975 - Engine 82 responded to 210 Structural Fires IN ONE MONTH - They had somewhere near 1700-1800 Building Fires A YEAR!!!


Staffing:

     Trucks - 7 FFs; Engines - 6 FFs


Apparatus that shared "LA CASA GRANDE" from 1960 to 1980 during the War Years:

     Ladder 31

          1962 ALF 900 Series Open Cab Tiller      Reg #460
          1969 ALF 900 Series Tiller                     AL6905
          1973 Mack CF Tower Ladder                  MT7313
          1980 Mack CF Tower Ladder                  MT8010

     Engine 85 (formed by members from Squad 9)

          7/1/67 - 7/8/71 @ Engine 82
          7/9/71 - Disbanded 1882 - @ Boston Rd

          1968 Mack CF                                     
          1971 Mack CF                                     MP7131
          1975 Mack CF                                     MP7515
          1981 Mack CF LIME Yellow                     MP8106


     TCU-712

          11/15/69-7/8/71 @ Engine 82 Operations (Stored at Engine 43)
          7/9/71-11/24/72 @ Engine 85 - Disbanded to form Ladder 59 with Engine 43
         

          1961 Mack C/Grove                             Reg #456
          1970 Seagrave Rearmount                    SL7015


     Searchlight 3

          5/17/51 - 6/24/67 relocated to Engine 96
          1954 International/Diehl

     Battalion 27

          7/26/69 -6/1/78 relocated to Engine 79


The way rigs were parked in the station... IF they bothered to even go back inside:

     Ladder 31 a Tiller was on the side marked Ladder 31.
     Bn 27 was in the middle usally outside during day light hours.
     Engine 82 and 85 would park in the side marked Engine 82 side by side
     TCU 712 would be in front of these. IF During the time TCU was in quarters otherwise they might be "stacked" one in front of the other.
     This is why most TCU Ladders & 2nd Section Ladders were Rearmounts. They had to stack rigs and a 2nd Tiller would NOT fit.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 04, 2018, 09:23:03 PM
CAPT Robert E. Farrell - James Gordon Bennett Medal

Firefighter - Ladder 4 - Manhattan Box 878 - February 27, 1965 - 0330 hrs:
 
     (https://s9.postimg.cc/pn0zdhjez/Farrell_-_L_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pn0zdhjez/)

     "Fireman 1st Grade Robert E. Farrell awarded James Gordon Bennett Medal.  On February 27, 1965 Ladder Company 4 was assigned to Box-878 for a fire at 989 Second Avenue in Manhattan.  The building was a 5-story non-fireproof dwelling, class-A.  Upon arrival, Ladder 4 was assigned to assist in the search and evacuation of civilians from the fire building.  The interior stairs were already compromised by the fire, so the crew from Ladder 4 utilized the stairs of one the exposures to access the roof of the fire building, however, before they could get there the roof had collapsed.  The crew of Ladder 4 checked the rear of the fire building to find heavy fire conditions coming from the windows of floors 3, 4 and 5.  These conditions eliminated the option for using the rear fire escape.
 
     During this time, Firefighter Farrell heard a call for help.  He discovered a trapped civilian at a fourth floor window, to the left of the fire escape.  The crew decided to initiate a rescue using their roof rope.  This decision had its share of risks and dangers, being that the rescuer would have to be lowered through and work as heat, smoke and flames continued emitting from the windows.  The plan was to lower the rescuer, swing him to the window where the victim was located and then swing him back to his right in order to reach a fire escape on the adjoining building.
 
     Firefighter Farrell was lowered into position just opposite to where the victim was.  He worked himself to the window where the victim was located.  He grabbed the trapped woman, and as he then tried to swing back to the fire escape as planned, he discovered that the woman had become entangled in the venetian blind cords and window drapes.  In order to free the woman, Firefighter Farrell was forced to hold her with one arm while dangling on the rope, and clear the entanglement with his other hand.   
 
     At enormous risk and with great difficulty, having been suspended pendulum fashion and with having had only one leg to maintain his position at the window, the woman was finally freed.  Bob then swung away from the window to the fire escape of the adjoining building where he was grabbed by another firefighter.  At that moment, then window where the woman had been trapped erupted into flames.
 
     “This woman is alive today due to Fireman Farrell’s efforts."  With complete disregard for his own safety, he rapidly and competently performed his duty in the highest traditions of this department”.

     - June 6, 1965 printed copy of the FDNY Medal Day Book.   
 


CAPT Bob Farrell - Ladder 31:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3p4ijmz8r/Farrell_L_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3p4ijmz8r/)


Lt Farrell's/Captain Farrell's Ladder 31 helmet:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/h61h2nmgr/Helmit_0.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/kcw0mamcb/Helmit_1.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/vp8m43agr/Helmit.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: scoobyd on March 05, 2018, 07:35:37 PM
Also very noteworthy about Capt. Farrell-  he went on to be founder and CEO of www.firehooksunlimited.net

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 06:47:28 PM
Is this Squad 5 in the Bronx?  There was no info with this picture.


     (https://s9.postimg.cc/v4racpk0r/Squad_5_1977_Blackout.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v4racpk0r/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on March 07, 2018, 06:51:46 PM
^^^^ mack pretty sure that is ENG*5 on the Lower East Side.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 07:08:13 PM
^^^^ mack pretty sure that is ENG*5 on the Lower East Side.

Chief - You are right.  I had this unmarked picture for a while and right after I posted it tonight, I found this article:

     http://www.businessinsider.com/photos-nyc-blackout-2014-7

It is a picture from the 1977 Blackout - July 13, 1977 - a year after Squad 5 was disbanded.  It was a company operating in the Bronx - and had to be Engine 5.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 07:15:18 PM
Another 1977 picture without description:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5r7amrpcb/June_1977.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5r7amrpcb/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on March 07, 2018, 07:27:10 PM
^^^^ i believe ENG*88 BX.   Chief might be BN*56 i do'nt remember exactly about the BN.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 07:30:04 PM
^^^^ mack pretty sure that is ENG*5 on the Lower East Side.

Chief - You are right.  I had this unmarked picture for a while and right after I posted it tonight, I found this article:

     http://www.businessinsider.com/photos-nyc-blackout-2014-7

It is a picture from the 1977 Blackout - July 13, 1977 - a year after Squad 5 was disbanded.  It was a company operating in the Bronx - and had to be Engine 5.

Article:  "Dramatic Photos Of Chaos And Looting During New York's Notorious Blackout 37 Years Ago Today"

     "Sunday marks the 37th anniversary of the infamous blackout that led to looting and rioting all around New York City. That date, July 13, 1977, was a time of extreme strife and tension in America's largest metropolis.
3,800 arrests were made, according to the New York Times, and more than $1 billion in damage was recorded, with some of the worst coming in the Brooklyn's Bushwick neighborhood. The FDNY reported 1,037 fires throughout the city, with at least 50 being very serious, according to The Times.

The root cause of the blackout was a series of lightning strikes occurring between 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. that cut electricity off from two major power plants. The chaos would soon follow.
LaGuardia and JFK were closed, and the subways were evacuated.

''The looters were looting other looters, and the fists and the knives were coming out,'' Carl St. Martin, a neurologist in Forest Hills, Queens, recalled years later, according to the Times.

Here are some of the shocking photos of the eery darkness and mass chaos:

     Firefighters battle flames in a Bronx storefront:
     
          (https://s9.postimg.cc/iilgtfjqj/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/iilgtfjqj/)

     This shot shows the Twin Towers in near-darkness.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/5efwgswuj/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/5efwgswuj/)

     Owners of a sporting goods store carry bats on the night of July 13.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/vzifcdu2z/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/vzifcdu2z/)

     Two men carry a chest down the street in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/5r7an1ka3/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/5r7an1ka3/)

     Firefighters try to put out one of the hundreds of fires set that night.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/3zebs5o2j/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/3zebs5o2j/)

    This photo shows 110th Street and Third Avenue on July 14, in the wake of the looting.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/tuy2bd5bv/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/tuy2bd5bv/)

     Here's another shot of a heavily looted 110th Street

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/wc9tiphjf/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/wc9tiphjf/)

     Police oversee a crowd in Harlem

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/iwmssp3qj/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/iwmssp3qj/)

     A man peers into the broken window of a jewelry store on Utica Avenue in Brooklyn.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/6ureykx2z/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ureykx2z/)

     A street in Bedford-Stuyvesant is filled with trash and people.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/7x1lh4vbv/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/7x1lh4vbv/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 07:53:31 PM
^^^^ i believe ENG*88 BX.   Chief might be BN*56 i do'nt remember exactly about the BN.


(https://s9.postimg.cc/5r7amrpcb/June_1977.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5r7amrpcb/)


Thanks Chief - Picture came from this article: "Bronx Trilogy: The Bronx Was Burning (1955 to today)":

     http://www.boweryboyshistory.com/2016/09/bronx-trilogy-bronx-burning-1955-today.html



Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 07:57:01 PM
Another picture without description:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/k06x4qgor/Unknown.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k06x4qgor/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on March 07, 2018, 08:11:13 PM
LAD*43 East River Drive & E 106 St.....trying to bridge the Drive to get a 2 1/2" line for a Fire on the old amusement pier mid '60s.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 07, 2018, 08:29:22 PM
This one goes back to 1912 - from the newspaper "The Brooklyn Eagle" - a firehouse where companies were staging for a ceremony or parade.


     (https://s9.postimg.cc/43857zlpn/Unknown_Bklyn_Firehouse_1912.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/43857zlpn/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 811 on March 07, 2018, 11:52:54 PM
Looks like the old Brooklyn FD Horse Hospital on Canton (later St Edwards) Street near Willoughby (south of Myrtle Ave)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on March 08, 2018, 01:41:34 AM
I dont remember the horse hospital in BKLYN even though i worked nearby (after it was gone) while in R*2 but i do remember the horse hospital on Chyrstie  St on the Lower East Side ...it was a single bay 3 sty house with ramps from floor to floor so the horses could get upstairs....i do not remember it with horses in it but in the late '60s / early '70s when it was used as an FDNY Communications facility. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 811 on March 08, 2018, 08:16:54 AM
Here is the even older Brooklyn FD Shop at Canton & Bolivar Sts.  Bolivar ran east-west between Willoughby & Myrtle opposite the western side of Fort Greene Park. Probably former vollie house next door, Lafayette Engine 5 which was on Canton Street now used by BFD.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 12:21:01 AM
The paid Brooklyn Fire Department, which became part of FDNY when Brooklyn was annexed by NYC in 1898, had 56 horses, a department hospital for sick horses and a department veterinarian. The department horses cost $350 each and served on fire duty for 10 years.

BFD 1870:
 
     (https://s9.postimg.cc/pg41bzifv/Horse_Hospital.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pg41bzifv/)

BFD Vet:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/k4p4rabsr/BFD_Vet.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k4p4rabsr/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/z0nnywi2j/BFD_Vet_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z0nnywi2j/)


     - Thanks for info 811.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 01:03:58 AM
1912: Victor, the New York Fire Horse That Finally Lost it on Varick Street

     http://hatchingcatnyc.com/2015/06/10/1912-victor-the-new-york-fire-horse-that-finally-lost-it-on-varick-street/


1913: The Upstate Farm for Inebriates and Retired New York Fire Department Horses

     http://hatchingcatnyc.com/2015/02/01/upstate-farm-for-retired-fdny-horses/#comments
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 01:12:16 AM
1915 FDNY horse ambulance:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/o3re7neln/Horse_ambulance.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o3re7neln/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 01:28:03 AM
Back in the day:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/yrv56bw8r/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yrv56bw8r/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ohsq74gnv/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ohsq74gnv/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 01:57:25 AM
FDNY/NYFP horsepower:

Engine 12:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ky6shcvyj/E_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ky6shcvyj/)

Engine 261:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ouk4dd43f/E_261.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ouk4dd43f/)

Engine 263:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/4zy2r9z6j/E_263.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4zy2r9z6j/)

Engine 55:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/csoqjauvv/E_55.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/csoqjauvv/)

Ladder 20:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/6g9l901yz/L_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6g9l901yz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5pgv3r2bv/L_20_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5pgv3r2bv/)

Ladder 10:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/rpx7jw7zv/L_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rpx7jw7zv/)

Engine 30:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/6g9l92euj/E_30_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6g9l92euj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/7ijrrt0aj/E_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7ijrrt0aj/)
 

Engine 20:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5180kd0wr/E_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5180kd0wr/)

Engine 271:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/elrn79de3/E_271.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/elrn79de3/)

Ladder 8:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/z5wh5rvq3/Ladder_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z5wh5rvq3/)

Fire Patrol 7:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/mr9p5iwiz/Fire_Patrol_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mr9p5iwiz/)

Searchlight Engine 1:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fo1tpxe8r/SL_E_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fo1tpxe8r/)

Engine 18:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/hfuskwah7/E_18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hfuskwah7/)

Water Tower:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fbafju3pn/Water_Tower.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fbafju3pn/)

Ladder 2:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/6g9l9d4nf/Ladder_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6g9l9d4nf/)

Engine 27:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ctyocnc4b/E_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ctyocnc4b/)

Engine 1:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/4ogmelb1n/E_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ogmelb1n/)

Fire Patrol 5:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/h6x7uypyz/E_71_838_Courtlandt.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h6x7uypyz/)

Engine 41:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/jo8z28x0r/E_41_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jo8z28x0r/)

Engine 233:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/v0lkk2nq3/E_233_ap_1_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v0lkk2nq3/)

Engine 5:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/nxdp4hd5n/E_5_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nxdp4hd5n/)

Engine 39:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/mic4ftwnv/E_39_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mic4ftwnv/)

Water Tower 6:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/nkmayduwr/Brooklyn_Fire_Hq.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nkmayduwr/)

47th Battalion:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/wgx32co3v/M3_Y46016.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wgx32co3v/)

3rd Battalion:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/441lbwht7/M3_Y46084.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/441lbwht7/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 02:04:40 AM
FDNY Parade 1904:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNNmaYCHa-I

FDNY 1896:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vjm12pa10o

FDNY Returning to Quarters 1903:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ppbco_NN6Dw

Brooklyn:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRYQUplbhcY

Turning Out w/Horses:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5GWgDOgfYQ
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 10, 2018, 02:52:41 AM
Last FDNY run with horse-drawnapparatus:

Engine 205
December 20, 1922
Brooklyn Box 5-93-205


     (https://s9.postimg.cc/bdrr7yo7v/E_205_last_run_horses.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bdrr7yo7v/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/sguj3mht7/E_205_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sguj3mht7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fpgcx40bf/E_205_horses.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fpgcx40bf/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 11, 2018, 03:45:21 AM
Bronx firehouses:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53f4K7nO-Zc

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WU9pinh9ZPg

Brooklyn firehouses:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hpyc9T5tu6k

Queens firehouses:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxlbCeG7-E0

Manhattan firehouses:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTTY6rleArk

Staten Island firehouses:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izuadzXj6-k

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 18, 2018, 10:45:13 AM
Engine 92/Ladder 44/Battalion 17 Firehouse 1261 Morris Avenue  Concourse, Bronx  6th Division, 17th Battalion "Popeye South Bronx"
 
     Engine 92 organized 1259 Morris Avenue w/Ladder 44                       1913
     Engine 92 moved 1155 Washington Avenue at Engine 50                   1997
     Engine 92 returned 1259 Morris Avenue w/Ladder 44                        1998

     Ladder 44 organized 1259 Morris Avenue w/Engine 92                       1913
     Ladder 44 moved 1781 Monroe Avenue at Engine 42                         1997
     Ladder 44 returned 1259 Morris Avenue w/Engine 92                        1998       

     Battalion 17 organized 209 Elizabeth Street at Ladder 9                     1903
     Battalion 17 moved 253 Spring Street at Engine 30                           1903
     Battalion 17 disbanded                                                                    1904
     Battalion 17 reorganized 491 E 166th Street at Combined Engine 50   1904 
     Battalion 17 moved 1192 Fulton Avenue at Engine 42                        1904
     Battalion 17 moved 491 E 166th Street at Combined Engine 50          1905 
     Battalion 17 moved 1259 Morris Avenue at Engine 92                        1956
     Battalion 17 moved 453 E 176th Street at Rescue 3                           1997
     Battalion 17 moved 1259 Morris Avenue at Engine 92                        1998
   

1259 Morris Avenue firehouse:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/vuuskc8e3/E_92_model_1910.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vuuskc8e3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/vuuskcntn/e_92_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vuuskcntn/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/al769imyj/E_92_fh_15.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/al769imyj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/j3gmdv16z/E_92_fh_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j3gmdv16z/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/lksdl50iz/E_92_fh_32.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lksdl50iz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/jg80k26m3/E_92_fh_40.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/jg80k26m3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/t0rn6ybdn/E_92_fh_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t0rn6ybdn/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/q6ohtjbsb/E_92_fh_55.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q6ohtjbsb/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/kjs4vjlyz/E_92_fh_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kjs4vjlyz/)


Engine 92:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/l8tyymmvf/E_92_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l8tyymmvf/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/boacbrkor/E_92_MACK.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/boacbrkor/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/7fmkj0m97/E_92_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7fmkj0m97/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fdlkylc4b/E_92_ap_25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fdlkylc4b/)


Ladder 44:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ugm7ffh3v/44_RIG2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ugm7ffh3v/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/eidhpjuob/TL44.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eidhpjuob/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5ncnf1lbf/tl_44_AP_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5ncnf1lbf/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/dtbnmaeaj/L_44_ap_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dtbnmaeaj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/dtbnmb1fv/L_44_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dtbnmb1fv/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/p5o9457kr/L_44_ap_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p5o9457kr/)
     
     (https://s9.postimg.cc/hpozib1uz/L_44_ap_26.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hpozib1uz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5b27hzpsb/L_44_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5b27hzpsb/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/7fmkj36uj/L_44_ap_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7fmkj36uj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/d3sv9ziwr/L_44_ap_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d3sv9ziwr/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/eidhppn0b/tower-ladder-44-south-bronx-paul-walsh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eidhppn0b/)


Engine 92/Ladder 44:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/h5ejtjdhn/E_92_L_344_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h5ejtjdhn/)


Battalion 17:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qkptswye3/Bn_17_ap_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qkptswye3/)


Engine 92/Ladder 44, Battalion 17:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDQYR5VjzWs

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPYAXvjCK6A

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsiZ0OB1nhk

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gZ5HKu_ssc

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcdZ5xutyEc

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMmsZl1yaNY


FDNY Medals - Battalion 17:

     DANIEL A. DEASY BAT. CHIEF BAT. 17 1940 MC ELLIGOTT

          BC Deasy assisted the London Fire Brigade, at extreme personal risk, October 1939-January 1941 during an official visit to England to study war-time firefighting tactics and to assist British fire services.  BC Deasy assisted the London Fire Brigade battle nightly fires while the city was under attack due to incendiary bombs during fire raids. 

     ROBERT F. CHAPMAN FF. BAT. 17 JUN. 4, 1954 TODD

     WILLIAM R. MULCAHEY LT. BAT. 17 L-44 AUG. 16, 1988 BROOKMAN


FDNY Medals - Engine 92:

     BERNARD F. CURRAN FF. ENG. 92 JAN. 30, 1954 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          896 Fox Street, Bronx

     GEORGE E. MULLER FF. ENG. 92 ACT. E307 JAN. 4, 1979 FIRE CHIEFS

          26-12 96th Street, Queens

     ENGINE 92 MAR.4, 1989 ELSASSER

          902 Morris Avenue

          LT Mulcahey, FF Galarza, FF Matthews, FF Scally, FF Schader, FF South

     ROBERT J. BERGIN FF. ENG. 92 NOV. 13, 1989 DOLNEY

         1110 Washington Avenue, Bronx

     ENG. 92 JUN 27, 2006 CURRAN/NY FIREFIGHTERS BURN CENTER

          1161 Sherman Avenue, Bronx

          LT Reginella, FF Maglerle, FF Hollingsworth, FF Ward, FF Falsone, FF Ryan

     VINCENT MCMAHON, LT. ENG. 92 (COV) JAN 24, 2007  KANE
         
          975 Sherman Avenue, Bronx


FDNY Medals - Ladder 44:

     RICHARD H. CODY FF. LAD. 44 DEC. 17, 1968 PRENTICE

          1767 Clay Avenue, Bronx

     GERALD W. CRABTREE FF. LAD. 44 JUN 17, 1968 WAGNER

          1001 Findlay Avenue, Bronx
     
     HERBERT V. ROHLFING LT. LAD. 44 JUL. 6, 1976 LA GUARDIA

          1403 Grand Concourse, Bronx

     GEORGE T. DALEY FF. LAD. 44 SEP. 2, 1978 GOLDENKRANZ

          1340 Nelson Avenue, Bronx

     ALBERT W. SCHNEIDER FF. LAD. 44 MAR. 24, 1978 DOUGHERTY

          1432 University Avenue, Bronx

     MICHAEL E. LAMBERT FF. LAD. 44 SEP. 29, 1983 FIRE CHIEFS

          38 Marcy Place, Bronx

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/aanau9fyz/Lambert.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/aanau9fyz/)

     JOSEPH F. MAHONEY FF. LAD. 44 APR. 3, 1984 DOUGHERTY

          1189 Sheridan Avenue, Bronx

         (https://s9.postimg.cc/4z8e9kwh7/Mahoney.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4z8e9kwh7/)

     JAMES J. GALLAGHER  LT. LAD. 44 DEC. 8, 1984 DELEHANTY

          1325 Walton Avenue, Bronx

         (https://s9.postimg.cc/e70mq8t8r/Gallagher.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e70mq8t8r/)

     JOHN J. CRONLEY FF. LAD. 44 DEC. 8, 1984 FDR

          1325 Walton Avenue, Bronx

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/ig5csdehn/Cronley.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ig5csdehn/)

     ROBERT DI TRANI FF. LAD. 44 APR. 3, 1984 SIGNAL 77

          1189 Sheridan Avenue, Bronx
         
          (https://s9.postimg.cc/3k6tksiij/Di_Trani.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3k6tksiij/)

     JAMES J. GALLAGHER LT. LAD. 44 MAR. 9, 1985 COLUMBIA

          1066 Morris Avenue Avenue, Bronx

         (https://s9.postimg.cc/v7jiywbez/Gallagher_Columbia.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v7jiywbez/)

     JOSEPH F. MAHONEY FF. LAD. 44 MAR. 9, 1985 KANE

          1066 Morris Avenue, Bronx

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/kkpptila3/Mahoney_Kane.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kkpptila3/)

     FRANCIS W. MANNION, JR. FF. LAD. 44 JUN. 14, 1988 STIEFEL

          233 176th Street, Bronx

     JOSEPH D. DI MARTINO FF. LAD. 44 JAN. 1, 1988 FDR

          1350 University Avenue, Bronx

     DOUGLAS M. GEHRT FF. LAD. 44 JUL. 4, 1989 CRIMMINS

          1254 Morris Avenue, Bronx

     DOUGLAS M. GEHRT FF. LAD. 44 NOV. 26, 1990 HONOR LEGION

          1011 Sheridan Avenue, Bronx

     LAD. 44 JUL. 4, 1990 ELSASSER

          1631 Walton Avenue, Bronx

          LT Wasco, FF Alfano (Bn 18), FF Dougherty, FF Kitson, FF Velten, FF Kuhr (L 49)

     ALEXANDER HAGAN CAPT. LAD. 44 (COV.) JAN. 16, 1993 MC ELLIGOTT

          1534 Selywyn Avenue

     RICHARD JOHNSON FF. LAD. 44 DEC. 18, 1993 HISPANIC

          1504 Sheridan Avenue, Bronx

     CHARLES E. MALARA FF. LAD. 44 (L 51) SEP. 13, 1994 BROOKMAN

          3804 Greystone Avenue, Bronx

     JOHN T. CONROY FF. LAD. 44 (R-3) NOV. 25, 1996 CRIMMINS

          30 Hamilton Place, Manhattan

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/8vlq5hhfv/Conroy_Crimmins.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8vlq5hhfv/)

     BRIAN J. MC CARTHY CAPT. LAD. 44 JAN. 28, 1996 KRIDEL

          1368 Webster Avenue, Bronx

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/rb672ziqj/Mc_Carthy_Kridel.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rb672ziqj/)

     JOHN F. SOUTH, FF. LAD. 44 MAY 3, 2000 JAMES GORDON BENNETT/FIRE CHIEFS ASSOCIATION

          288 E 168th Street

          NY Daily News Jun7, 2000  "Firefighter John South of Ladder Company 44 in the Bronx won the James Gordon Bennett Medal, the highest honor, for rescuing a 33-year-old man from the rubble of a collapsed garage last May. The roof had fallen almost completely to the floor - a condition firefighters call a "pancake" collapse. After he and fellow firefighters cleared away the debris, South crawled into the wreckage to free the man. When the first victim was moved to safety, South went back into the rubble to find a second victim, who did not survive. Firefighter Dan Perrella, also of Ladder Company 44, was honored with the Emily Trevor/Mary B. Warren Medal for assisting South. The crowd roared when South stepped up to receive his medal with his wife, Sally, and children John Jr., 18, and Gina, 14. "I am very humbled and honored," South said after the ceremony."

     DANIEL PERRELLA, FF. LAD. 44 MAY 3, 2000 TREVOR

          288 E 168th Street

          Dan Perrella, Ladder Company 44, was honored with the Emily Trevor/Mary B. Warren Medal for assisting  FF South rescue 2 victims from a collapsed structure.

     JAMES W. WATTERSON, FF, LAD 44 MAY 7, 2000 SCOTT

          1560 Grand Concourse Boulevard, Bronx

     BRIAN FOX, FF. LAD. 44  JUL. 19, 2003  BOOKMAN

          1455 Townsend Avenue, Bronx

          "Firehouse"  July 21, 2003   At Least 17 People Injured in Bronx Apartment Building Fire

               "There was a fire in an apartment building in the Bronx on Saturday. At least 17 people were injured, including five firefighters when they braved the flames to save those trapped inside.
The fire had spread into the staircases and hallways. Smoke was everywhere too, forcing families back inside their apartments. An infant baby girl was among those rescued by firefighters.
Deputy Chief Bob Busch, FDNY: "Probably what happened is that they opened the door and the heat was so intense and hot it just blew them backwards...knocked them out. I don't think they had much of a chance."
Firefighter Brian Fox with Ladder 44 was making his way to the sixth floor. He opened a door to find three generations of one family all unconscious, burned in a smoky room.
Firefighter Brian Fox, FDNY Rescue 3: "The baby and mother were on the couch...the grandmother was laying on the ground. They were real lethargic. I tried to communicate to the mother that help would be here shortly...that I would take the baby to safety."
Fox grabbed the 5-month old baby girl and rushed her down six flights of stairs to a waiting ambulance. At the same time, firefighters with Rescue 3 were going inside the apartment from the window.
Firefighter Stuart Keane, FDNY Rescue 3: "I forced the gate into the apartment and found the mother on the couch...and Tommy found the other female in the apartment."
Firefighter Tom Bohn, FDNY Rescue 3: "The grandmother was in the corner of the living room by the T.V. She was unconscious with second to third degree burns...shoulders...arms...back."
Firefighters had to wrap the grandmother in netting so that they could carry her down from the top floor. Five firefighters were hurt battling the blaze and getting everyone out successfully.
Capt. Dennis McCool, FDNY: "Everything worked out great with Brian today...I mean...he did a great job. He had all his skills and tools he used. From what I understand, the baby has been downgraded to stable condition and she's going to make it."
The baby has been upgraded to stable condition and is a Cornell Medical Center. Her mother and grandmother are not doing as well. They have second and third degree burns.
As for the cause of the fire, fire marshals are investigating arson. They believe someone set a third floor couch on fire that was in the hallway."

     THOMAS P. MAXWELL, FF. LAD. 44  MAY 28, 2004 SCOTT

          1269 Sheridan Avenue, Bronx

     LOUIS MANCUSO, FF. LAD.44 MAR. 5, 2005 FIRE CHIEFS ASSOCIATION

          1711 Morris Avenue, Bronx

          "Chief Leader - June 13, 2006

          Among the honorees at last week's Fire Department Medal Day ceremony was Louis Mancuso, an eight-year veteran of the FDNY whose father, Nick, is a former president of the Uniformed Firefighters' Association.
On March 5, 2005, Firefighter Mancuso (who since has been promoted to Lieutenant), teamed with Lieut. John Dooley to pull a 71-year-old woman to safety from a burning apartment at 1711 Morris Ave. in The Bronx. The woman, Christine Brockington, suffered severe burns, but as the FDNY awards program noted, Mr. Mancuso's "courage and selfless actions in a dangerous situation without the protection of a charged hose-line helped save this woman."

     Among those basking in his honor, not surprisingly, was his father, who after retiring from the FDNY spent more than a decade as a top official at Teamsters Local 237 and is currently doing consulting work for the UFA.
The elder Mancuso, who like his son worked out of Ladder Co. 44, stood outside Pace University following the ceremony alongside UFA President Steve Cassidy and said of Louis, "He demonstrates what everybody does every day in the department. We're kinda proud of him."

     "Kinda proud?" Mr. Cassidy teased him. "Very proud," Nick Mancuso amended."

     JOHN DOOLEY, LT. LAD. 44 MAR. 5, 2005 PRENTICE

          1711 Morris Avenue, Bronx

          LT Dooley and FF Mancuso rescued a 71-year-old woman from a burning apartment.

     MICHAEL R. HEFNER, LAD. 44 DEC. 28, 2008 DELEHANTY

          1848 Monroe Avenue, Bronx

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/6471sv0nv/Hef.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

     ANDREW F. MAGENHEIM FF. LAD. 44 FEB. 1, 2014  ROTHMAN

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/c6r1et723/MAGENHEIM.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c6r1et723/)

     JONATHAN A. KAPPEL  FF. LAD. 44 APR. 23, 2016  PRENTICE

          Box 75-2763, Bronx

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/7uq2uli9n/Kappel.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7uq2uli9n/)


Engine 92/Ladder 44 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER JAMES C. FARLEY ENGINE 92 December 16, 1947

          FF Farley suffered a fatal heart attack while operating at an alarm.  He was an 18 year veteran.

     FIREFIGHTER ARTHUR G. HANSON LADDER 44 April 4, 1956

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/u8a6cv8vf/h_ANSON.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u8a6cv8vf/)
   
          On April 4, 1956, six firemen were killed when the marquee and wall of a former movie theater collapsed into the street. Lieutenant Lieutenant John F. Molloy, Firemen Edward J. Carroll and Fred Hellauer of Engine 48, Firemen William Hoolan, and Arthur Hanson of Ladder 44 and Fireman Charles Infosino of the Headquarters Staff were killed while operating at 4063 Third Avenue. The building was being used by an artificial flower concern. At the time it was the second largest lost of life to hit the Fire Department. The four-alarm fire started in the basement and was fed by highly combustible coloring materials. A dozen men were standing under the marquee directing water into the building with three men on a ladder against the wall. The two iron bars holding the marquee melted and it started falling in slow motion, taking the front wall with it. Shouts of warning were heard and firemen started scrambling in all directions. A few men ran into the wall while most ran away. Those who ran into the wall were slightly injured and those who ran away were buried under tons of debris. Firemen Hoolan and Hanson were both on the ladder and were crushed when the wall fell on them. Lieutenant Molloy, Firemen Carroll, Hellauer and Infosino were located under the marquee. Eight other firemen were injured in the collapse. Fireman Carroll’s father, John Carroll, was a member of the Department and made the Supreme Sacrifice on April 28, 1935.

     FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM P. HOOLAN LADDER 44 April 4, 1956

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/7wcdjhp6z/h_OOLAN.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7wcdjhp6z/)

          3rd Ave. Bronx Collapse
          April 4th, 1956 Box 4-4- 2904
          Six killed 13 injured
          Greatest loss of firefighter life in a Bronx collapse
          Occupancy: furniture store and artificial flower factory (It was never a movie theatre)
          Building Construction: One story 125' by 75', ordinary construction.
          Location of fire: Fire started in the cellar and spread up the walls
          Forty pieces of apparatus and 150 firefighters responded
          Cause of fire: unknown
          Cause of collapse: Marquee failed and pulled down parapet wall

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/emsuszwy3/523554_647293105288263_1538104050_n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/emsuszwy3/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/lq0q8mht7/LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lq0q8mht7/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/s3ptbvuez/Engine_48.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s3ptbvuez/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/nul39pyvf/Marque_collapse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nul39pyvf/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/76tl78jjf/Search_rescue.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/76tl78jjf/)

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/d7ra4bdvf/memorial5n-2-web.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d7ra4bdvf/)

          http://nyfd.com/3rd_ave_4-4-56.html

          http://www.firegroundleadership.com/2016/04/04/lessons-from-the-fireground-third-avenue-collapse-fdny-1956/

     FIREFIGHTER DONALD L. FRANKLIN LADDER 44 January 13, 2001

          Died of a heart attack an hour after fighting a fire in a Bronx tenement building.

          On January 13, 2001, a 42-year-old male Fire Fighter responded to a fire in a five-story apartment building. On-scene, wearing full turnout gear and his self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)(not on air), he climbed his aerial ladder, performed roof ventilation, and then entered the fire building to search for fire victims and perform overhaul. After approximately 15 minutes on the fire floor, he returned to ground level where he conversed with crew members, walked to the rehabilitation unit, and rested on his apparatus. At this time he began to feel lightheaded. Crew members administered oxygen while ambulance personnel on the scene were summoned. Just as the paramedic arrived he collapsed. Despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced life support (ALS) administered by crew members, ambulance paramedics, and personnel at the local hospital's emergency department (ED), the victim died. The death certificate, completed by the Medical Examiner's Office listed "hypertensive and arteriosclerotic heart disease" as the immediate cause of death and "smoke inhalation"

          http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/sad-tears-bravest-6-000-mourn-bx-firefighter-article-1.910876

          https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/reports/face200247.html


     RIP.  Never forget.


Concourse, South Bronx:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/volov2gy3/E_92_fh_70.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/volov2gy3/)

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concourse,_Bronx


(https://s9.postimg.cc/53j5zj1q3/E_92_logo.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/53j5zj1q3/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/783j0mb2j/e92.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/783j0mb2j/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/6vc4ug0ij/L_44_logo_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6vc4ug0ij/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/lbifzcddn/3419474433_6381b8b597.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lbifzcddn/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/hf543d03v/3419474971_973bd5a897_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hf543d03v/)

     
     - Thanks to Historian Ed Kelly for Engine 92/Ladder 44 historical information

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 18, 2018, 07:01:27 PM
CAPT Al Hagan - LT Ladder 44 1987-1990

"The Chief" - A Good Fireman’ On His Way Out Reflects On Jobs Well Done

     By SARAH DORSEY Aug 29, 2014
 
     Fire Captain and Uniformed Fire Officers Association President Alexander Hagan is retiring Aug. 30 after 35 years in the field, one year on the union executive board and five years as president. He was described by a board member and other union presidents as a natural leader who is effective because he uses humor and a self-effacing manner to bring people together.

     Alexander Hagan last week had already removed all of his personal photos from his office: the many snaps of his family, but also the one that captured himself in a very different time—in gym shorts as a young man who competed in five marathons when he wasn’t fighting fires.
As he got ready to retire on Aug. 30, the Uniformed Fire Officers Association president and Fire Captain, now 64, looked back fondly on a time when on nice days, he sometimes ran the 13 miles to work.

Smoke Took a Toll

     Those days have slipped past, ended by a bum knee and the chronic bronchitis and cough that have plagued him for more than a decade. The lung problems recently sparked a diagnosis of reactive airway disease, a condition that can result from exposure to noxious substances and that has been called “occupational asthma.” Mr. Hagan said he might have gotten it even if he hadn’t spent months cleaning up at the World Trade Center site after Sept. 11.

‘My Fair Share of Feeds’

     “In the Fire Department, when you get exposed to a lot of smoke, they call it ‘taking a feed,’’’ he said, noting that his 35 years in the field were spent in the South Bronx and Spanish Harlem, two of the city’s busiest areas for fire in the ’70s and ’80s. “I will tell you, I’ve been to many, many fires and I took more than my fair share of feeds. So a little bit of reactive lung disease is not that bad.”

     He came on the job during what firefighters call the “war years”: a decade when 97 percent of the buildings in seven Bronx census tracts were lost to fire or abandonment.
Those conditions may be foreign to new Firefighters today, when the number of structural fires and the fatalities they cause are at all-time lows, but the department then was going through a similar period of diversification.

Started At Turbulent Time

     In 1973, the year Mr. Hagan entered the firehouse, a Federal Judge had just declared that the entrance exam had an adverse impact on blacks and Latinos, was not job-related and needed to be revised. He implemented a three-to-one quota system under which one minority candidate had to be hired for every three white candidates appointed from the list. The percentage of African-Americans in the department was just 3 percent—roughly what it was three years ago when Judge Nicholas Garaufis made the same characterization and went a step further, declaring the FDNY to have intentionally discriminated against people of color for decades and appointing a Federal monitor to oversee hiring.
Hundreds of active and retired firefighters formally objected to Mr. Garaufis’s decision, in writing or in two-minute statements given in the courtroom, and many predicted that with the revision of the test, standards would plummet and the quality of the firefighting force would be compromised.

Doesn’t Fear for Future

     Mr. Hagan said he’s a strong supporter of the merit system—he paraphrased George Washington Plunkitt, the flamboyant leader of the Tammany Hall political machine a century ago, a book of whose sayings Mr. Hagan is fond of handing out to colleagues and reporters as background on the importance of a strong civil service.
“I honestly believe that drink is the greatest curse of the day, except, of course, civil service, and that it has driven more young men to ruin than anything except civil-service examinations,” Mr. Plunkitt once said.
     
     But despite the dire predictions by Judge Garaufis’s detractors who believe his ruling subverts the merit system, Mr. Hagan said of the new diversity effort, “I think that everything will be fine.”

‘Quality, Attitude Great’

     “From what I’ve seen, the quality of the new people is high and the attitude is great, it’s terrific. They want to be firemen. They love the Fire Department as much as or more than anyone else. And that’s what you need.”

     At his first firehouse, Engine 36 in East Harlem, hazing was still the few-holds-barred institution that was discouraged in later years and that former Fire Commissioner Salvatore Cassano formally banned in May 2013.

     “They treated you like a scullery maid,” Mr. Hagan said, likening it to Mr. Miyagi’s treatment of Daniel at the beginning of the “Karate Kid” movie. Probies had to clean the whole firehouse—“they learn to wax on, wax off”—as well as the company’s tools, which Mr. Hagan said helped them identify them and remember where on a rig each piece is stored.

Pranks for the Memories

     Mr. Cassano’s anti-hazing order called for “dignity and respect” for new members; he wrote that “there are no such things as pranks, because somebody may take something a different way than somebody else.”

     The prohibition may not include assigning extra work duties to probies—the Uniformed Firefighters Association at the time complained that its scope was unclear—but it certainly covers a classic prank described by Mr. Hagan in which a probie would be called to the bottom of the fire pole. When he looked up, his colleagues would drop a bucket of water, and then a bucket of flour.
During his stint at Engine 36 in the quota era, Mr. Hagan said one minority probie came in who was initially given “the same hard time they gave me,” only he took “maybe a little more” guff for being a quota hire.

He Grew on Them

     Within weeks, he said, “Whatever initial resentment and trepidation there was melted in the heat. He was willing to be good at his job. He was willing to take the pain.”
Firefighting is a very experience-driven job, he added; no one understands the way a fire moves until she’s seen dozens of them. So for a newbie, “it’s all about heart and willingness.”
Hazing, whatever remnants persist after Mr. Cassano’s ban, can affect people differently when they come from a different neighborhood or gender or ethnicity and don’t have mentors like them who they see are no longer being singled out, Mr. Hagan acknowledged. He said it’s a Captain’s job to set the limits on what’s acceptable—and he believes that the era of surprise showers at the fire pole are over.

‘He’s a Unifier’

     Captain Hagan may have been particularly suited to set such limits and have them be respected. Battalion Chief John Dunne, a former UFOA executive board member who served with Mr. Hagan and four other presidents, called him the kind of leader who “has the ability to get people on the same page that he is on...he always had us pointed in the right direction and you’d see that he was right and you’d get behind him.

     “He had a united executive board,” he added. “And that’s not easy to do, nine guys pulling in the same direction.”
Mr. Hagan was elected by the membership as Captain’s representative in 2008, and then elected president of the 2,700-member union unanimously by his executive board five years in a row. Before he came on board, the union’s governing body was deeply divided, Mr. Dunne said, and part of the change was due to Mr. Hagan’s leadership style.
“We discussed everything,” and often made decisions together, he said. “It was very collaborative.”
Keeping his board informed was the first item Mr. Hagan cited when discussing how he operated as president, and he maintained that his missteps occurred on the occasions when he didn’t follow their advice.  Such modesty seemed to fit with Mr. Dunne’s depiction of him winning over people with his self-effacing nature.

     “And he’s got a great way of articulating that is unique to him,” Mr. Dunne said. “He tells you just like it is, he doesn’t pull any punches.”
He later added, “I think even Bloomberg liked him, I mean personally.”

Weathered Mayor’s Cuts
     
     Much of Mr. Hagan’s energy, of course, was concentrated on fighting the annual defunding of fire companies that former Mayor Michael Bloomberg in each of his last five years in office claimed was necessary due to budget cuts. (The money was restored each year by the City Council, after pressure by the fire unions.) Mr. Hagan invited each City Council member to his local threatened company and educated him on the unique tools and techniques of its members, Mr. Dunne said. But he avoided personal attacks, on either the Mayor or the Fire Commissioner, who he acknowledged was the Mayor’s representative and not an autonomous figure.

     He also, Mr. Dunne said, set a “one-man, one-job” policy at the board, allowing each member to more effectively focus on one goal; began holding popular retiree meetings and ensured that they got the same aid as active firefighters for Hurricane Sandy damage; significantly added to a scholarship fund for the children of active members who die; and boosted the union’s focus on political action.

Got Members Involved

     “Participation by UFOA members in political action increased a lot during Al’s tutelage,” Mr. Dunne said. “We turn out members for literature drops, phone banks—we’ll have hundreds of guys working citywide for the people we endorsed.”

     The board during Mr. Hagan’s term also set up a political education fund, which Mr. Hagan said 98 percent of members contribute to. He is of the mind that a union’s political work should be focused not on general social issues but on matters that directly affect all members: salaries, benefits and working conditions.
According to Mr. Dunne, every elected official they endorsed was first interviewed by the entire board before each election. Those who voted for the reduced pension benefits under Tier 6 in 2012 had a tough time the following interview.

     “We had a term for how they were verbally treated by Al: they were Haganized,” he said, claiming that at least one official left in tears over his questioning.

Cops Among His Fans

     Mr. Hagan is reportedly well-liked among many union officials, and helped solidify an alliance with police superior officer unions into a bargaining coalition.

     Michael J. Palladino, the president of the Detectives' Endowment Association, paid tribute to Mr. Hagan’s famous schedule, adopted during the days he was studying for his promotion exams and woke daily before dawn.

     I’ve always been very impressed by the leadership of the UFOA, Hagan included. I think Al is a very knowledgeable, solid union leader and I am going to miss his wit, his sense of humor and of course, his 5 a.m. e-mails,” he said.

‘A Labor Legend’

     Roy Richter, president of the Captains’ Endowment Association, said, “So you’re doing a piece on a legend, huh? There’s a couple of legends in labor and I think Al Hagan’s one of them.”
He said he admired his ability to get a point across with a mixture of humor and forcefulness, and said he had become “one of the main players in the union business” by forging strong ties with labor umbrella groups including the AFL-CIO and the Municipal Labor Committee.

     “Al Hagan brings a presence to the table that is unmatched in labor circles,” Mr. Richter said.
Mr. Hagan cited as his biggest disappointment that he wasn’t able to negotiate a contract, accusing the Bloomberg administration of bad-faith bargaining.

Mr. Dunne offered perhaps the highest praise.

Honest Al?

     “I said to him, ‘You’re the only man other than my father that I’ve ever said ‘I love you’ to,’ he recalled, later calling Mr. Hagan “a mensch,” “a ball-breaker” and “Lincoln-like.” He added that the company he still officially leads until Aug. 30, Ladder 43, was widely recognized as one of the best in the city, thanks in part to his leadership.

“One of the highest compliments we in the FDNY can pay to another is, ‘He was a good fireman,’” he added.

The UFOA will hold an election the first week of September to choose a replacement from among the executive board.


     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fj0estogb/54009acd77ba0.image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fj0estogb/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdny747 on March 20, 2018, 01:04:06 AM

(https://s9.postimg.cc/vi1lw0z3f/bn17.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vi1lw0z3f/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 20, 2018, 08:35:16 AM

(https://s9.postimg.cc/vi1lw0z3f/bn17.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vi1lw0z3f/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qj9ynex7v/ny_nyc_fdny_retired_battalion_17.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qj9ynex7v/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qkjwgcebv/ny_nyc_fdny_battalion_17.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qkjwgcebv/)


     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HqZX2C6KT8
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on March 20, 2018, 09:09:36 AM
 Thank you mack for that story of "The Chief - A Good Fireman" in reply 157.

 In the 1980s and 90s, I spent a good portion of time in the area of Engine 92, Ladder 44, and Battalion 17 as a buff. I picked that area because during those years those companies would always be in the top five or so busiest companies in the city. I guess little did those guys know that I had them under surveillance because of the kind of work they were doing.

 Going back in those days things were so much different. I remember stopping into the firehouse on Morris Ave right after a serious (fatal) fire down the street around Morris and 164/165 St. A run came in and they took me for the ride. It might have been for ERS no contact. After most of the pull boxes were removed, the neighborhood kids found a new toy to play with. Push the button for a fire on the box and when the dispatcher answers, run away. But that resulted in a response of a single engine company. Like so many other engine companies throughout the city, Engine 92 would be chasing these calls all over the neighborhood. But this was going on as the entire neighborhood was burning up.

 The other companies mentioned, Engine 36 (RIP) and Ladder 43 were very busy as well and I often saw many fires in that Harlem area as well. Getting over to that area from 92/44 wasn't too hard to do.

 I can also say that from what I saw then, during this very busy time, the moral was very high, just as during the so called FDNY War Years.

 As a buff during those days, what a lucky guy I was to be able to see this whole thing. Of course it was certainly a very dangerous time to be a firefighter due to the fact that there was just so many fires.

 As a buff during those days, many times I was invited into the firehouse and they didn't even know who I was. I was always so impressed with the Brotherhood throughout these firehouses. At times it seemed like these were just a bunch of kids having a good time at summer camp. BUT - When it came time to go out that door and do their job - THEY WERE SECOND TO NONE.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: turk132 on March 20, 2018, 11:04:57 AM
Had the pleasure of working on Morris Ave. as a boss, great tradition, great firefighters and fire officers, great times!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdny747 on March 20, 2018, 02:36:06 PM
Amazing house and group of guys on Morris Ave.  I use to live with a bunch of them when I worked for FDNY Fire Communication.  I was at the firehouse this past weekend.  I also own a company that made the 44's on the grill of the Tower Ladder.  We have also made there patches out of wood 3D.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on March 20, 2018, 04:27:24 PM
November 9, 1981:  3rd alarm at 3217 Third Avenue  - Bronx  Box 33-2343:


(https://s9.postimg.cc/xjp9v3qd7/T_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xjp9v3qd7/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/lhtw0zbzv/t_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lhtw0zbzv/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/y9827i8x7/t_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y9827i8x7/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/j0i4tr2e3/t_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j0i4tr2e3/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/5wckh357f/t_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5wckh357f/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/pe77x24q3/t_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pe77x24q3/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/bblai4p2j/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bblai4p2j/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/4hazsem4r/t_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4hazsem4r/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/r606rzb8b/t_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r606rzb8b/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/3rs7g2o63/t_14.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3rs7g2o63/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/7f7ym0m1n/t_16.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7f7ym0m1n/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/osi90wzd7/t_17.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/osi90wzd7/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/pusfjh5bv/t_18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pusfjh5bv/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/fkq0k92ln/t_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fkq0k92ln/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on March 29, 2018, 07:47:33 PM
A LITTLE 108 FH HISTORY....    https://newtownpentacle.com/tag/ladder-108/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on April 04, 2018, 03:08:36 PM
April 4, 1968 - Engine 234 - 1472 Bergen Street - FDNY Command Post

     - Following death of Dr King (note "5-5-5-5" at housewatch under clock) FDNY command post established at Engine 234 for increased fire activity

 
(https://s31.postimg.cc/xodpmj2g7/April_12_Poppie.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xodpmj2g7/)

(https://s31.postimg.cc/ql5u6xcg7/April_12_1968_Command_Post.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ql5u6xcg7/)

(https://s31.postimg.cc/7g2kx6kxj/April_12_1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7g2kx6kxj/)


"New York experienced spasms of looting and arson in Harlem and Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.
The perpetrators smashed windows and stole goods from several grocery, liquor and clothing stores in the early morning hours of April 5.

Times Square also saw an outburst of violence, and minor looting hit Columbus Circle.  In all, some 120 people were arrested in the mayhem. But there was no large-scale riot, no bloody confrontations with police, no raging infernos devouring whole blocks."

     - NY Daily News 

(https://s31.postimg.cc/qsth3jxqf/u1588949.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qsth3jxqf/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on April 04, 2018, 05:22:16 PM
Regarding the above post, those of us who were around 50 years ago, knew there would be trouble. And it happened in many cities across America.

I also would like to mention here, although he didn't say it, I believe the top photo in the above reply is "macks" father.

His father also played a large part in writing and setting up the procedures for companies assigned to various firehouses throughout the city during periods of civil unrest. Companies to respond together as Tactical Control Teams. I don't recall it's title but I believe it was "All Units Circular 138" (?), which contained many pages. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on April 04, 2018, 07:13:31 PM
It is All Units Circular that outlines the Emergency Command Procedures for civil unrest & or other large gatherings...it is still used today.....each team consisted of a BC...a LAD...two ENGs & PD.....the team responds together & for larger Fires more teams respond,
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on April 04, 2018, 07:17:22 PM
In the third photo down in the background you can see the old racks on the wall that held extra lengths of Hose in a FH that did not have a hose tower......these racks in 234s old qtrs remained on the wall until we (R*2) moved there in 1985.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: Disp51 on April 05, 2018, 05:54:54 PM
More photos from Eng. 234 during that week
(https://s18.postimg.cc/gbw7s5bth/Eng_234-1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gbw7s5bth/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/oio7j7u11/Eng234-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oio7j7u11/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/iuhwsd7p1/Eng234-3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iuhwsd7p1/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/z5i0oozmd/Eng234-4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z5i0oozmd/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on April 14, 2018, 12:42:22 AM
Ladder 24:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwzZ-oDswa0
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 06, 2018, 12:04:25 PM
Engine 29/Ladder 10/Battalion1 firehouse 193 Fulton Street 1866-1911:

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/6cssp05xj/E_29_L_10_firehouse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6cssp05xj/)


Ladder 10/Battalion 1 firehouse 193 Fulton Street 1912-1968:

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/8u4jwaczb/L_10_fh_191_Fulton_Street_construction.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8u4jwaczb/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/ycww9bbyv/L_10_members.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ycww9bbyv/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/9jnc8o8dz/L_10_members_chief.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9jnc8o8dz/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/601eivstj/L_10_fh_191_Fulton_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/601eivstj/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/oflvgdeon/L_10_1_Bn.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oflvgdeon/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 811 on May 06, 2018, 01:20:42 PM
Note in the first photo, 10 Truck seems to be hanging draperies on quarters for some celebration.  They are using what in some departments was called a "Bangor Ladder" equipped with tormentor poles to help in raising and stabilizing the ladder.  They usually came in lengths of 40, 45 feet or maybe greater and were made of aluminum in later years.  Does anyone know if FDNY still carries these, or if not how long ago we stopped?

Attached is a pic of a Boston fire with such a ladder beside the man removing a civilian.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 06, 2018, 01:47:18 PM
Note in the first photo, 10 Truck seems to be hanging draperies on quarters for some celebration.  They are using what in some departments was called a "Bangor Ladder" equipped with tormentor poles to help in raising and stabilizing the ladder.  They usually came in lengths of 40, 45 feet or maybe greater and were made of aluminum in later years.  Does anyone know if FDNY still carries these, or if not how long ago we stopped?

Attached is a pic of a Boston fire with such a ladder beside the man removing a civilian.

San Francisco Fire Department still uses wooden ladders and tormentor poles.


     (https://s31.postimg.cc/9nqcgkson/karen_brown_auditorium_raise.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9nqcgkson/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/gqy7w7djr/maxresdefault.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gqy7w7djr/)


SFFD shops builds their own wooden ladders:

     http://sf-fire.org/wooden-ladders

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbu1HVFELog
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 06, 2018, 01:53:10 PM
SFFD wooden ladder drill - 65 foot wooden ladder:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tATfPOWIvpw
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 06, 2018, 03:26:31 PM
Engine 24 firehouse 78 Morton Street 1865-1975

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/logdv2zrr/E_24_78_morton_street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/logdv2zrr/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/rpe2s7rjr/E24_1909.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rpe2s7rjr/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/va9yaxgif/E_24_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/va9yaxgif/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/wpbizp7br/E_24_2nd_alarm.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wpbizp7br/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/j8ekh0k7b/engine_24.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j8ekh0k7b/)

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/wck4tpron/78_morton.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wck4tpron/)


Note:  pre-FDNY original quarters of volunteer "Howard" Engine 34
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: memory master on May 06, 2018, 04:49:34 PM
Adjacent to 10 truck's old quarters you will notice a "Nedicks." The best orange drink and hot dog in a grilled buttered roll. And I think it was only a quarter. ;D
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: raybrag on May 06, 2018, 05:12:57 PM
Adjacent to 10 truck's old quarters you will notice a "Nedicks." The best orange drink and hot dog in a grilled buttered roll. And I think it was only a quarter. ;D

Best orange drink ever.  And they were all over.

(https://recipereminiscing.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/nedicks_02.jpg)

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cb/Nedick%27s-logo-dude.jpg/300px-Nedick%27s-logo-dude.jpg)

They were even at Macys:

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-uQ0CDCRNGqc/Tf6wv-PZc0I/AAAAAAAAH5o/0YeEaFgb8gk/s1600/macys.jpeg)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: t123ken on May 07, 2018, 11:51:17 AM
As I recall, the "grilled buttered roll" was a thick slice of white bread folded around the hot dog.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: memory master on May 07, 2018, 06:26:36 PM
Probably was but it tasted great. Besides, "grilled buttered roll" sounded more elegant when dining at The Orange Room.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 07, 2018, 07:02:14 PM
Engine 244 old Coney Island 2929 W 15th Street was a block away from Nathans:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5im69iy63/E_244_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5im69iy63/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/clu1p365n/E_244_fh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/clu1p365n/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/a4iai1c17/E_244_ap.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a4iai1c17/)


Engine 245/Engine 326/Ladder 161/Battalion 43 old Coney Island 2929 W 8th Street firehouse:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/6vd22qpqz/Eng245_4.gif) (https://postimg.cc/image/6vd22qpqz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ilqzke5rf/E_245.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ilqzke5rf/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/b1xwidmvf/E_245_L_161_Bn_343.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b1xwidmvf/)


Engine 246/Engine 327/Ladder 169 old Sheepshead Bay firehouse 2731 E 23rd Street:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/ujsjycme3/E_246_old.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ujsjycme3/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: johnd248 on May 08, 2018, 09:34:21 AM
That American LaFrance went to E 248 when the dept. made the two companies swap rigs.  Thought was that E 244 needed the covered Mack for more protection.  E 248 ultimately got their Mack back when E 244 was disbanded.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 811 on May 08, 2018, 10:45:56 AM
If not an exact match for Nedick's, the New England hot dog bun would be close.  Anyone know if these can be found in the City?
https://newengland.com/today/food/new-england-made/new-england-style-hot-dog-rolls/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdce54 on May 08, 2018, 11:31:48 AM
If not an exact match for Nedick's, the New England hot dog bun would be close.  Anyone know if these can be found in the City?
https://newengland.com/today/food/new-england-made/new-england-style-hot-dog-rolls/
They sell them in the stores. Pepperidge Farm makes them. They call them top sliced hot dog buns. Probably other brands too. I have never seen them at any vendors I have been too.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: raybrag on May 08, 2018, 03:52:59 PM
You're right, Frank, Pepperidge Farm makes a top sliced bun, but they're not as good as the ones I remember (maybe I just don't have the right toaster).  But they're NOT New England hot dog buns . . . the are the Howard Johnson hot dog buns, also used for the Howard Johnson clam roll (boy they were good).

(http://i.imgur.com/gJFpmCO.jpg)

(https://sites.google.com/site/clevelandwesthigh1962/_/rsrc/1416671441272/nostalgia/afterthegameathowardjohnsons/HoJoClamroll.jpg?height=274&width=400)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: grumpy grizzly on May 08, 2018, 04:01:18 PM
Grew up in Boston but now live in Central Illinois, what I wouldn't do now for a Ho-Jo's clam roll!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 11, 2018, 02:03:49 PM
Engine 234 former firehouse 1472 Bergen Street 1893-1979 and Battalion 38 former firehouse 1948-1977:

     April 12, 1968 command post:
   
          (https://s31.postimg.cc/6t9glfjfb/April_12_Poppie.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6t9glfjfb/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/eyrijma93/April_12_1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eyrijma93/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/88b1a7a8n/537996530.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/88b1a7a8n/)


     Engine 234 1970s:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/650m2bsdj/E_234_1960s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/650m2bsdj/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/n5jib0d4n/E_234_ap_1_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n5jib0d4n/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/bugumjbdj/E_234_ap_66.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bugumjbdj/)


Salvage 1 former firehouse 1979-1985:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/c788st93r/E_234_firehouse_1980s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c788st93r/)


Rescue 2 firehouse 1985-present:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/ikxbw615z/R_2_firehouse_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ikxbw615z/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/q3gh4hnaf/R_2_fh_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q3gh4hnaf/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdce54 on May 11, 2018, 02:26:54 PM
Engine 234 former firehouse 1472 Bergen Street 1893-1979 and Battalion 38 former firehouse 1948-1977:

     April 12, 1968 command post:
   
          (https://s31.postimg.cc/6t9glfjfb/April_12_Poppie.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6t9glfjfb/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/eyrijma93/April_12_1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eyrijma93/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/88b1a7a8n/537996530.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/88b1a7a8n/)


     Engine 234 1970s:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/650m2bsdj/E_234_1960s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/650m2bsdj/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/n5jib0d4n/E_234_ap_1_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n5jib0d4n/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/bugumjbdj/E_234_ap_66.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bugumjbdj/)


Salvage 1 former firehouse 1979-1985:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/c788st93r/E_234_firehouse_1980s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c788st93r/)


Rescue 1 firehouse 1985-present:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/ikxbw615z/R_2_firehouse_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ikxbw615z/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/q3gh4hnaf/R_2_fh_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q3gh4hnaf/)
Rescue 1 firehouse? Joe, that's not going to sit well with the Brooklyn guys........lol.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on May 11, 2018, 03:08:20 PM
Engine 234 former firehouse 1472 Bergen Street 1893-1979 and Battalion 38 former firehouse 1948-1977:

     April 12, 1968 command post:
   
          (https://s31.postimg.cc/6t9glfjfb/April_12_Poppie.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6t9glfjfb/)

 

 I believe the photo above is site member "mack", aka Joe M's, father, who played a large part in writing up a plan for the FDNY to deal with civil unrest which was occurring frequently throughout certain parts of NYC. It was quite an extensive plan with many pages. I've been told that plan is still in use today as FDNYs - All Units Circular # 138 (?).

 Very often firefighters were pelted with rocks and bottles. Even shot at and things like refrigerators thrown from roof tops in an attempt to injure members of the FDNY.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 11, 2018, 04:57:17 PM
Engine 234 former firehouse 1472 Bergen Street 1893-1979 and Battalion 38 former firehouse 1948-1977:

     April 12, 1968 command post:
   
          (https://s31.postimg.cc/6t9glfjfb/April_12_Poppie.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6t9glfjfb/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/eyrijma93/April_12_1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eyrijma93/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/88b1a7a8n/537996530.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/88b1a7a8n/)


     Engine 234 1970s:

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/650m2bsdj/E_234_1960s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/650m2bsdj/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/n5jib0d4n/E_234_ap_1_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n5jib0d4n/)

          (https://s31.postimg.cc/bugumjbdj/E_234_ap_66.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bugumjbdj/)


69 Mets' father, DC Robert E. Lindgren, served in 38th Battalion, 1472 Bergen Street

     (https://s31.postimg.cc/bn2ehxfav/DC_Lindgren.png) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 69 METS on May 15, 2018, 11:41:22 PM
Dad was a BC in the 38th from '68 - '77. Shortly after they moved to St. John's Pl. he was promoted to Provisional DC as there was no list in place. He held that rank until he passed away in April of '78. I spent a lot of time at 1472 Bergen St. between '68 and '77 where I rode with the battalion as well as the engine. Many great memories of that old firehouse, lot's of fires and I got to watch many amazing war years firemen doing what they did best ... battling the 'Red Devil'. I was appointed to E 234 in August of 1981 and was fortunate enough to work with many of the firemen who I rode with before getting on the job. I wish I could do it all over again!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on May 15, 2018, 11:49:32 PM
Good memories for you w/your Dad....& yes i also wish i could do it over again.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 16, 2018, 05:51:22 PM
Dad was a BC in the 38th from '68 - '77. Shortly after they moved to St. John's Pl. he was promoted to Provisional DC as there was no list in place. He held that rank until he passed away in April of '78. I spent a lot of time at 1472 Bergen St. between '68 and '77 where I rode with the battalion as well as the engine. Many great memories of that old firehouse, lot's of fires and I got to watch many amazing war years firemen doing what they did best ... battling the 'Red Devil'. I was appointed to E 234 in August of 1981 and was fortunate enough to work with many of the firemen who I rode with before getting on the job. I wish I could do it all over again!

Thank you - 69 METS

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/onn859c7f/image.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/onn859c7f/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: hosewagon on May 16, 2018, 08:51:03 PM
E234 ifo quarters shot was from a Mack ad used in the early 70's. Very cool era picture.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 69 METS on May 16, 2018, 10:01:17 PM


Thank you - 69 METS




Thank you Mack for posting those photos of the house on Bergen street from back in the late 60's. I enjoy looking back!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on May 17, 2018, 07:29:50 PM
https://newyorkyimby.com/2016/03/the-history-of-little-engine-23-soon-to-be-neighbor-of-billionaires-row-towers.html

The History Of Little Engine 23, At 215 West 58th Street
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on May 17, 2018, 08:09:14 PM
https://www.6sqft.com/5-5m-converted-firehouse-could-be-long-island-citys-most-expensive-sale/?utm_source=6sqft+Daily+List&utm_campaign=96063ea88c-Daily_776&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ac79eda340-96063ea88c-246874161

$5.5M converted firehouse could be Long Island City’s most expensive sale
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on May 17, 2018, 09:13:24 PM
https://www.6sqft.com/5-5m-converted-firehouse-could-be-long-island-citys-most-expensive-sale/?utm_source=6sqft+Daily+List&utm_campaign=96063ea88c-Daily_776&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ac79eda340-96063ea88c-246874161

$5.5M converted firehouse could be Long Island City’s most expensive sale
Former quarters of Long Island City FD Engine 3, FDNY Queens Engine 61, Engine 161, and Engine 261 from 1894 - 1932
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 17, 2018, 10:34:50 PM
https://www.6sqft.com/5-5m-converted-firehouse-could-be-long-island-citys-most-expensive-sale/?utm_source=6sqft+Daily+List&utm_campaign=96063ea88c-Daily_776&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ac79eda340-96063ea88c-246874161

$5.5M converted firehouse could be Long Island City’s most expensive sale
Former quarters of Long Island City FD Engine 3, FDNY Queens Engine 61, Engine 161, and Engine 261 from 1894 - 1932

Engine261 former quarters:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/vivkc7dcr/E_261_38-08_28th_St_fh_Radde_St.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vivkc7dcr/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/soseysdrf/E_261_fh_1a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/soseysdrf/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/iepzzkiqz/E_261_38-08_28th_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iepzzkiqz/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 17, 2018, 10:38:47 PM
Engine 261:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/wxx51547v/E_261_1932_Seagrave_Hose_Wagon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wxx51547v/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/72dehyx97/E_261_ap_2_mack.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/72dehyx97/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/3viuye2jf/E_261_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3viuye2jf/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 18, 2018, 04:13:33 PM
Engine 256's old quarters at 124 Dekalb Avenue in Ft Greene Brooklyn is worth approximately $3M

     http://www.fdnytrucks.com/files/html/brooklyn/e256.htm

     https://www.brownstoner.com/real-estate-market/house-of-the-day/house-of-the-day-124-dekalb-avenue/


     (https://s9.postimg.cc/rd897al4r/E_256.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/rd897al4r/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 19, 2018, 11:06:23 AM
Housewatch:

     Unknown company 1901:
   
          (https://s9.postimg.cc/4mrny18tn/Housewatch_1901_-_note_Box_2385_marked_on_chalkboard.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4mrny18tn/)

     Unknown company 1905:

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/6ekmt954r/Housewatch_1905.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ekmt954r/)

     Ladder 20 1908:

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/y1xc7gl7f/Ladder_20_housewatch_1908.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y1xc7gl7f/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 19, 2018, 11:10:27 AM
Inside quarters - early 1900s:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/wo5pc5ly3/Unknown_firehouse_1905.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wo5pc5ly3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/a0qg5hbdn/Unknown_engine_company_-_steamer_and_tender.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a0qg5hbdn/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/pm7rpi7x7/Water_Tower_Engine_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pm7rpi7x7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/nuesuo1fv/Unknown_engine_and_ladder_1920.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nuesuo1fv/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 19, 2018, 11:29:16 AM
FDNY firehouses under construction:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/e9v67yrl7/Construction_Fulton_Street_firehouse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e9v67yrl7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/mfd865ap7/Bronx_firehouse_construction_1920.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mfd865ap7/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/522xrbhyz/Ladder_42_firehouse_1913.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/522xrbhyz/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qohy8dj4b/E_277_firehouse_under_construction.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qohy8dj4b/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/fc5cqo2qj/Bronx_firehouse_under_construction_1930.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fc5cqo2qj/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/bjlualfez/E_66_fh_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bjlualfez/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/h7s51iu23/E_66_fh_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h7s51iu23/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/w2gqfx8uj/E_326_July_10_1984.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/w2gqfx8uj/)
 
     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5mhyttvq3/R_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5mhyttvq3/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/uh1go3qwr/E_201.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uh1go3qwr/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/sb75ti0a3/R_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sb75ti0a3/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on May 19, 2018, 01:55:13 PM
mack these recent posts # 201..202..& 203 were excellent history photos....Thanks as usual.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 19, 2018, 04:37:36 PM
Battalion Chief office - 1908 - Battalion 3  -  155 Mercer Street, Manhattan:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/5iats10jv/Battalion_Chief_L_20_1908.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5iats10jv/)


Chief and aide - 1908:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/cbb6ns42j/Chief_Worth_3rd_Battalion_1908.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cbb6ns42j/)


Battalion 3 Ladder 20 - 1908:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/6n4vx4zsr/B_3_20_truck.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6n4vx4zsr/)


155 Mercer Street firehouse (later time period):

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/tnbj9hkrv/E_13_fh_Mercer_St.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tnbj9hkrv/)




Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 20, 2018, 08:53:46 AM
May 20, 1986  -  32 years ago today -  Engine 85 DISBANDED

Engine 85  pre-fabricated firehouse  1264 Boston Road South Bronx

     Engine 85 organized 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                     1967
     Engine 85 moved 1264 Boston Road with Tactical Control Unit 712        1971
     Engine 85 disbanded                                                                          1986


1264 Boston Road:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/q4i4ko8ij/E_85_TCU_712_Tin_House_1971.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q4i4ko8ij/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/kgbttsz17/E_85_Tin_House_FH.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kgbttsz17/)


Engine 85:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/qia9srizf/E_85_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qia9srizf/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/szv7r323f/E_85_responding_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/szv7r323f/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/m35ms9d63/E_85_yellow.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/m35ms9d63/)


Engine 85 LODD:

     FF Michael T. Carr, fell from apparatus while responding to Bronx Box 2787, box was false alarm,  September 19, 1969.

          (https://s9.postimg.cc/6f4fm080b/E_85_LODD_Carr.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6f4fm080b/)

     RIP.  Never forget.



(https://s9.postimg.cc/b4uda8omj/dfb69300ac2214c22543681fc8806568.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b4uda8omj/)


(https://s9.postimg.cc/jmguhprm3/e212fbbf9452a833b837419ef3278c70.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jmguhprm3/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 20, 2018, 09:49:40 AM
Engine 85 Runs and Workers

Year Engine Runs Workers
1967     85     2907     1080     Organized July 1 - at Engine 82 1215 Intervale Avenue
1968     85     8386     3759     E 82, E 85, L 31 combined for 26,094 responses 1215 Intervale Avenue *
1969     85     4955     2498
1970     85     5838     3020
1971     85     6443     3126     Moved to 1264 Boston Road
1972     85     6508     3206
1973     85     4617     2800
1974     85     4874     3512
1975     85     4911     3804
1976     85     4809     3798
1977     85     4950     4074
1978     85     4726     3929
1979     85     2668     1825
1980     85     3320     2277
1981     85     2725     1832
1982     85     2680     1829
1983     85     2198     1365
1984     85     2077     1254
1985     85     2258     1345
1986     85       768       453     Disbanded May 20

     * Battalion 3 also located at 1215 Intervale Avenue until February 23, 1968
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 20, 2018, 10:20:24 AM
Tactical Control Unit 712  pre-fabricated firehouse  1264 Boston Road  South Bronx

     Tactical Control Unit 712 organized 1215 Intervale Avenue at Engine 82                  1969
     Tactical Control Unit 712 new firehouse 1264 Boston Road w/Engine 85                   1971
     Tactical Control Unit 712 disbanded to form Ladder 59                                            1972
                         
     Ladder 59 organized 1264 Boston Road at Engine 85                                              1972
     Ladder 59 moved 1901 Sedgewick Avenue at Engine 43                                         1978 


Tactical Control Unit 712 at 1215 Intervale Avenue:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/faegnw18r/TCU_712.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/faegnw18r/)

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/m52jionpn/TCU_712_ap_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m52jionpn/)


1264 Boston Road firehouse:

     (https://s9.postimg.cc/q4i4ko8ij/E_85_TCU_712_Tin_House_1971.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q4i4ko8ij/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on May 21, 2018, 05:29:44 PM
Engine 256's old quarters at 124 Dekalb Avenue in Ft Greene Brooklyn is worth approximately $3M

     http://www.fdnytrucks.com/files/html/brooklyn/e256.htm

     https://www.brownstoner.com/real-estate-market/house-of-the-day/house-of-the-day-124-dekalb-avenue/


     (https://s9.postimg.cc/rd897al4r/E_256.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/rd897al4r/)

Engine 256 quarters 1914 - 1974 (disbanded)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: soda-acid on May 22, 2018, 08:26:37 AM
B.C. Edward Worth, 3rd. Batt. was the first due chief to the Triangle Fire in 1911.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: XPFD3 on May 22, 2018, 11:39:28 AM
There is just something about an Ahrens Fox with the front mount high pressure pump. They were impressive.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: raybrag on May 22, 2018, 12:19:22 PM
There is just something about an Ahrens Fox with the front mount high pressure pump. They were impressive.

There's more than one reason they were called "The Rolls Royce of fire apparatus".  ;)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 28, 2018, 07:37:20 PM
There is just something about an Ahrens Fox with the front mount high pressure pump. They were impressive.

There's more than one reason they were called "The Rolls Royce of fire apparatus".  ;)

Ahrens Fox FDNY history - John Calderone:  http://www.nyfd.com/calderoneA/foxes2.html


Some of FDNY engine companies assigned Ahren Fox pumpers:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4hjjvlgbx/E_56_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4hjjvlgbx/)

Engine 16:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/6d5vneqt9/E_16_AF.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/6d5vneqt9/)

Engine 27:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/k6u8ciokd/E_27_ap_3_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k6u8ciokd/)

Engine 58:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/if19ht04d/E_58_AP_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/if19ht04d/)

Engine 65:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/mfdgr822l/E_65_AF.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/mfdgr822l/)

Engine 71:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/9wrtdlr2l/E_71_A_F.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9wrtdlr2l/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/evfbs6klp/E_71_ap_Ahrens_Fox.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/evfbs6klp/)

Engine 74:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/86ddphgt9/E_74_ap_Ahrens_Fox.gif) (https://postimg.cc/image/86ddphgt9/)

Engine 95:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/nf3b3b7xp/E_95_1915_Ahrens_Fox.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nf3b3b7xp/)

Engine 151:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/pgznmyzz1/E_151.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pgznmyzz1/)

Engine 207:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/7guldb3gt/E_207_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7guldb3gt/)

Engine 222:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/laiy2jbjh/E_222.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/laiy2jbjh/)

Engine 226:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/behv2d319/E_226_app_33_fire.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/behv2d319/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/i4ycbvq7x/E_226_AF_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i4ycbvq7x/)

Engine 239:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/atyp5dly5/E_239_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/atyp5dly5/)

Engine 241:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/8kepp6vst/E_241_apparatus_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8kepp6vst/)

Engine 242:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/7uvxcyl0d/E_242_ap_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7uvxcyl0d/)

Engine 256:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/5jtqe5u0d/E_256_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5jtqe5u0d/)

Engine 264:
 
     (https://s22.postimg.cc/ndp8fii8d/E_264_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ndp8fii8d/)

Engine 266:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/9iqxx0dil/E_266_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9iqxx0dil/)

Engine 270:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/xqfnw9hq5/E_270_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xqfnw9hq5/)

Engine 277:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/kz1hpspyl/E_277_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kz1hpspyl/)

Engine 279:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/st23arahp/E_279_ap_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/st23arahp/)

Engine 285:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/mfd07lsrx/E_285_1933_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mfd07lsrx/)

Engine 290:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/979hkauil/E_290.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/979hkauil/)

Engine 292:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/9rt40maj1/E_292_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9rt40maj1/)

Engine 294:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/sgap4vxgd/E_294_ap_1934.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sgap4vxgd/)

Engine 304:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/frc9qslfx/E_304.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/frc9qslfx/)

Engine 327:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/afxd66etp/E_327.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/afxd66etp/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 28, 2018, 08:00:40 PM
1939 Worlds Fair - Flushing Queens

In September 1938, the FDNY 55th Battalion was formed and stationed at the Worlds Fair. Apparatus included 4 new Ahrens Fox pumpers.  The battalion was staffed by three FDNY Battalion Chiefs, fourteen FDNY company officers, and seventy FDNY firefighters.  The battalion had one double engine company and two single engine companies.  Apparatus was assigned to FDNY engine companies after the Worlds Fair closed.  The battalion responded to 237 alarms.  There were 166 fires, and 4 were multiple alarms.

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/l6kzrh2ml/engine_331_lg.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l6kzrh2ml/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/nnwqyr1yl/Fire_truck_T_P_lg.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nnwqyr1yl/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/z09cgl0dp/engine_332_lg.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z09cgl0dp/)

     http://www.1939nyworldsfair.com/worlds_fair/wf_tour/misc/NYFD_01.htm
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 28, 2018, 09:16:47 PM
1916 Ahrens Fox pumping test prior to FDNY acceptance:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/iqnrrcf2l/1916_Ahrens_Fox_MK4_FDNY_pumping_test.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iqnrrcf2l/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: JOR176 on May 28, 2018, 10:25:30 PM
The Ahrens Fox marked 222 was originally 214s rig when they were on Herkimer St. but when 214 moved in with L111 on Halsey St.  the fox could not fit in the narrow FH with the Truck in there so  222 & 214 swapped rigs.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on May 28, 2018, 11:47:20 PM
Engine 48:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/6vf9rv971/E_48_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6vf9rv971/)

Engine 58:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/v2zuwbpel/E_58_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v2zuwbpel/)

Engine 73:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4hxc0u7ml/E_73_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4hxc0u7ml/)

Engine 152:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/twvuxtqwt/E_152_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/twvuxtqwt/)

Engine 153:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/rfk3qmc65/E_153_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rfk3qmc65/)

Engine 156:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/baxox4dvh/E_156_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/baxox4dvh/)

Engine 157:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/xmvhqisf1/E_157_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xmvhqisf1/)

Engine 253:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/qejv14si5/E_253.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qejv14si5/)

Engine 304:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/g71bowth9/E_304_af.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g71bowth9/)

Engine 305:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/ug0y6uxod/E_305_AF.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ug0y6uxod/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on May 29, 2018, 09:46:55 PM
https://ny.curbed.com/2018/5/29/17405710/far-rockaway-firehouse-police-station-landmarks-nyc

Far Rockaway firehouse, police station are city’s newest landmarks 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 02, 2018, 10:55:47 AM
https://ny.curbed.com/2018/5/29/17405710/far-rockaway-firehouse-police-station-landmarks-nyc

Far Rockaway firehouse, police station are city’s newest landmarks

Engine 228, Engine 83/Ladder 29, Engine 268/Ladder 137, Engine 55, Engine 65, Engine 73/Ladder 47, Engine 23, Engine 46/Ladder 27, Engine 33/Ladder 9, Engine 240/Battalion 48, Squad 41, Engine 305/Ladder 151, Engine 54/Ladder 4, Engine 53/Ladder 43, Engine 258/Ladder 115, Engine 67, Engine 60/Ladder 17, Engine 253, Engine 39/Ladder 16, Engine 36, Engine 84/Ladder 34, Engine 47, Squad 252, Engine 7/Ladder 1, Brooklyn Fire HQ Engine 207/Ladder 110/Ladder 118/Water Tower 6/Battalion 31, Brooklyn Central Office, Engine 31, Engine 289/Ladder135: 

     https://foursquare.com/p/landmarks-preservation-commission/48035203/list/new-york-citys-landmark-firehouses

Engine 228, Engine 240/Battalion 48, Engine 46, Ladder 17, Engine 73/Ladder 42, Engine 268/Ladder 137: 

     http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/downloads/pdf/13-01_Five_FDNY_Houses_Landmarked.pdf

Engine 268/Ladder 137, Engine 46/Ladder 17, Engine 73/Ladder 42, Engine 228, Engine 240: 

     http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/city-firehouses-headed-landmark-status-article-1.1261290

Engine 53: 

     https://www.mnn.org/news/nyc-commission-landmarks-east-harlem-firehouse

Engine 240/Battalion 48: 

     http://www.neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org/db/bb_files/2013-FirehouseEngineCompany40Company21.pdf

Engine 305/Ladder 151:

     http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/downloads/pdf/reports/2522.pdf
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 02, 2018, 11:28:44 AM
Engine 228:

     http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/downloads/pdf/reports/2525.pdf

Engine 83/Ladder 29:

     http://www.neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org/db/bb_files/2012-FirehouseEngineCompany83.pdf
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 02, 2018, 11:30:48 AM
New York Fire Patrol 2:

     http://gvshp.org/blog/2013/08/14/a-surprise-ending-for-fight-to-save-fire-patrol-house-2/


Successful efforts for Landmark Preservation and historical designation.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 02, 2018, 12:54:50 PM
Squad 41, Engine 83/Ladder 29, Engine 304/Ladder 151:

      http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/downloads/pdf/12-06_firehouses.pdf
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: turk132 on June 02, 2018, 06:57:29 PM
Squad 41, Engine 83/Ladder 29, Engine 304/Ladder 151:

      http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/downloads/pdf/12-06_firehouses.pdf


305
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 03, 2018, 10:05:23 AM
NYC Landmark Preservation Commission - what does it mean for historic FDNY firehouses

     "It means your building has special historical, cultural, or aesthetic value to the City of New York, state or nation, is an important part of the City's heritage and that LPC must approve in advance any alteration, reconstruction, demolition, or new construction affecting the designated building."

History:

     "The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) is the largest municipal preservation agency in the nation. It is responsible for protecting New York City's architecturally, historically, and culturally significant buildings and sites by granting them landmark or historic district status, and regulating them after designation.

     The agency is comprised of a panel of 11 commissioners who are appointed by the Mayor and supported by a staff of approximately 80 preservationists, researchers, architects, historians, attorneys, archaeologists, and administrative employees.

There are more than 36,000 landmark properties in New York City, most of which are located in 141 historic districts and historic district extensions in all five boroughs. The total number of protected sites also includes 1,405 individual landmarks, 120 interior landmarks, and 10 scenic landmarks."

     https://www1.nyc.gov/site/lpc/about/about-lpc.page
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 03, 2018, 10:08:52 AM
Squad 288/Hazmat 1 firehouse efforts for Landmark status:

     https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/10/nyregion/seeking-landmark-status-for-a-nondescript-firehouse-that-lost-many-on-sept-11.html

     http://www.queensledger.com/view/full_story/23578469/article-Landmark-proposal-for-century-old-firehouse-in-Maspeth?instance=lead_story_left_column
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 10, 2018, 03:46:12 PM
Ladder 14 firehouse 120 E 125th Street Harlem  11th/12th Bn, 4th/5th Division  "Super Tower"

     Suburban Ladder 14 organized 120 E 125th Street former volunteer firehouse                  1865
     Suburban Ladder 14 became Ladder 14                                                                         1868
     Ladder 14 moved to 209 E 122nd Street                                                                        1888
     Ladder 14 moved to new firehouse 120 E 125th Street                                                    1889
     Ladder 14 moved to 2282 3rd Avenue at Engine 35                                                        1975

     Notes: 

     Engine 36 located at 120 E 125th Street                                                                1975-2003

     Battalion 12 located at 120 E 120th Street                                       1904-1974 and 1990-1995

     Battalion 12-2 located at 120 E 120th Street                                                           1968-1969


Pre-FDNY:
 
     Volunteer Mechanics Ladder 7 new firehouse 120 E 120th Street                              1861-1865


120 E 120th Street firehouse 1861-1888 (Suburban Ladder 14):

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4ysvrij5p/Metropolitan-_Hook-and-_Ladder-_Company-_No-14-in-harlem1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4ysvrij5p/)


120 E 120th Street firehouse built 1188-1189:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/xaj127sf1/L_14_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xaj127sf1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/tcr5yry4t/L_14_fh_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tcr5yry4t/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4jhly9s0t/L_14_fh_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4jhly9s0t/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/lp49ggk19/L_14_fh_13.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lp49ggk19/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/e94zup6ml/IDPlaque.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e94zup6ml/)


2282 3rd Avenue current firehouse w/Engine 35/Battalion 12:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/eokv1hkil/L_14_fh_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eokv1hkil/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/i86src58t/L_14_fh_35.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i86src58t/)


Ladder 14:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/oofrhlljx/L_14.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oofrhlljx/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/jr26whbv1/TL_14.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jr26whbv1/)
 
     (https://s22.postimg.cc/9r7aglg19/TL_14_1980_100_FT_Sutphen_-_quint.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9r7aglg19/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/qua2c7c6l/TL_14_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qua2c7c6l/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/epusv7zal/L_14_ap_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/epusv7zal/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/6ye2wcpwt/L_14.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ye2wcpwt/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/rvab1ayb1/L_14_ap_9.gif) (https://postimg.cc/image/rvab1ayb1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/j1jejz64t/L_14_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j1jejz64t/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/akjw8z1f1/L_14_ap_36.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/akjw8z1f1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/5lwduk7xp/L_14_ap_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5lwduk7xp/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4jm7c4zfx/L_14_ap_37.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4jm7c4zfx/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/46ut61owt/L_14_ap_38.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/46ut61owt/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4wdligf6l/L_14_ap_32.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4wdligf6l/)


Ladder 14:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPnuxHdvldo

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOk4ZvJdSmg

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHOj6cHnUDA

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7Mq2KnkJ4s




Ladder 14 Medals:

     JOHN HUGHES FF. LAD. 14 DEC. 25, 1898 1900 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

     JOHN FREDENBERG FF. LAD. 14 MAY 21, 1899 1900 TREVOR-WARREN

     ANDREW F. FITZGERALD FF. LAD. 14 MAR. 17, 1899 1900 HUGH BONNER
     
     WILLIAM CLARK FF. LAD. 14 MAR. 17, 1899 1900 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/sejzobmt9/Clark.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sejzobmt9/)

          Later - Deputy Chief 4th Division - Career: Appointed 1895 and served in Ladder 10 then on Fulton Street. Made Lieutenant in 1900, Captain the same year, Battalion Chief in 1910, Deputy Chief in 1925. Prior to this he served five years in the US Navy.
          Hotel Windsor Fire: As a Fireman, performed daring rescue at the Hotel Windsor fire on March 17, 1899 which killed 45 victims. The hotel located at Fifth Avenue and Forty-Sixth Street just as the St. Patrick's Day parade was passing. Forty-five guests perished and hundreds of others were severely burned.
          FF Clark working with another firemen made a half dozen rescues with the aid of scaling ladders. They were being urged to rest after the first rescues when a woman and her maid, Mrs. Joseph Howard, Jr and Mrs. Grace Harrison, stranded on the 5th floor and about to jump, called for help. As he was rescuing these two, another woman screamed from an adjoining room and threatened to jump. He worked his way from one sill to another and assisted this woman across, after which the three persons were rescued. For these feats he received the Gordon Bennett medal.

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/4oz5da631/M3_Y46041.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4oz5da631/)

          Chief Clark was cited for bravery a total of seven times during his career. In addition to the 1899 Bennett Medal, he was cited in 1900 when saved his company of men by evacuating them from the Tarrant Drug Store just before it exploded and collapsed; in 1904 for preventing a psychiatric patient from jumping from a window at the Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmary; and for rescuing a number of horses from a stable fire in 1908.

     CHARLES M. LOUTH FF. LAD. 14 MAY 23, 1905 1906 TREVOR-WARREN

     PATRICK R. O'CONNOR FF. LAD. 14 FEB. 20, 1917 1918 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

     GEORGE J. NELSON FF. LAD. 14 FEB. 20, 1917 1918 TREVOR-WARREN

     FERDINAND Z. RIVIELLO FF. LAD. 14 MAY 24, 1926 1927 VAN HEUKELON

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/ivaauv70t/Riviello.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ivaauv70t/)

          LODD - February 20, 1933

     JOHN H. SIEBEL FF. LAD. 14 APR. 22, 1935 1936 SCOTT

     JOHN HALPIN FF. LAD. 14 APR. 22, 1935 1936 CRIMMINS

     RICHARD H. RICHARDSON FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 24, 1952 1953 LA GUARDIA

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/j9bmu5e65/Richardson_1953.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j9bmu5e65/)

     WILLIAM A. GERRIE PROBIE LAD. 14 JAN. 15, 1956 1957 MC ELLIGOTT

     WALLACE R. STORCH FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 15, 1956 1957 LA GUARDIA

     KARL F. F. ERB FF. LAD. 14 JUN. 29, 1956 1957 O'DWYER

     SALVATORE CARDILLO FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 17, 1958 1959 COMMERCE

     WALLACE R. STORCH FF. LAD. 14 JUL. 20, 1958 1959 LA GUARDIA

     JOSEPH G. PERAGINE FF. LAD. 14 DEC. 24, 1960 1961 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

         FF Joseph G. Peragine, Ladder Company 14, received the James Gordon Bennett medal, traditionally the department’s top medal for valor, for rescuing a woman and a child from a fire in the Harlem area on December 24, 1960. and brother-inlaw Lester Gannon. He served in the United States Marines as a radio operator with the 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines Regiment in 2nd Marine Division. Joseph was a New York Fireman, Ladder 14, for 20 years and was a member of The Uniformed Fire Officers Association 25 Group System.

     DAVID D. CROWLEY FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 17, 1963 1964 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/ar26q3ab1/Crowley_1963.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ar26q3ab1/)

     KENNETH RAFRA FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 17, 1963 1964 TREVOR-WARREN

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/8z97v93tp/Rafra_1963.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8z97v93tp/)

     JOHN J. BURNS FF. LAD. 14 NOV. 16, 1963 1964 CONRAN

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/uyfmijkot/Burns_1963.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uyfmijkot/)

     WILLIAM T. TRACY FF. LAD. 14 DEC. 17, 1964 1965 KANE

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/mu7idb5u5/Tracy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mu7idb5u5/)

     AUBREY L. NELSON FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 1, 1964 1965 CRIMMINS

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/uzpkbhoy5/Nelson_1964.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uzpkbhoy5/)

     DAVID D. CROWLEY FF. LAD. 14 JAN. 17, 1963 1966 HARRY M. ARCHER

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/wer509nh9/Crowley_Archer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wer509nh9/)

     WILLIAM D. RICE FF. LAD. 14 DEC. 31, 1972 1973 DELEHANTY

     THOMAS P. COLLINS FF. LAD. 14 APR. 14, 1977 1978 HISPANIC

     WALTER R. MANTHEY FF. LAD. 14 MAY 31, 1977 1978 GOLDENKRANZ

     JAMES M. KIERNAN FF. LAD. 14 DEC. 31, 1979 1980 SCOTT

         (https://s22.postimg.cc/s5meybpfh/Kiernan_Scott.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s5meybpfh/)

     THOMAS K. MARTIN CAPT. LAD. 14 L-34 DEC. 19, 1982 1983 LAUFER

     STEPHEN P. SZAMBEL FF. LAD. 14 APR. 16, 1985 1986 CINELLI

     RICHARD VOLPE FF. LAD. 14 JUL. 31, 1985 1986 THOMPSON

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/55frlnz7x/Volpe_1985.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/55frlnz7x/)

     WILLIAM E. BRUSE FF. LAD. 14 L-30 DEC. 20, 1986 1987 LAUFER

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/ru4yl93r1/Bruse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ru4yl93r1/)

     THOMAS M. MONTGOMERY FF. LAD. 14 MAY 4, 1989 1990 COMPANY OFFICERS

     WILLIAM E. BRUSE FF. LAD. 14 APR. 14, 1993 1994 WILLIAMS

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/hy3vlnvf1/Bruse_Williams.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hy3vlnvf1/)

     ALL MEMBERS LAD. 14 JUN. 30, 1994 1995 ELSASSER

     BRIAN A. NEVILLE FF. LAD. 14 SEP. 1, 1995 1996 POLICE HONOR


Ladder LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER PATRICK CONLIN LADDER 14 JUNE 9, 1895

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/mcljpdq0d/Conlon_L_14.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mcljpdq0d/)

          Fireman Patrick Conlin of Ladder 14 was returning from his meal break when he saw Ladder 14 responding to a fire at 165 East 112th Street. Ladder 14 was responding from their quarters at 120 East 125th Street and was heading down Lexington Avenue to East 115th Street. He tried to jump on the running board of the speeding apparatus but missed and was run over. The truck's rear wheels passed over his body fracturing his thighbone and caused severe injuries to the abdomen. He was taken to Harlem Hospital where he died in the early evening. Conlin was thirty-seven years old and had been in the Department for twelve years. He spent four years with Ladder 14. He was married, but had no children. The fire at 165 East 112th Street was in the cellar in a pile of excelsior and was put out with a pail of water. (From "The Last Alarm")

     FIREFIGHTER MATTHEW J. DUNN LADDER 14 October 14, 1931

         (https://s22.postimg.cc/vlnpzaw9p/Dunn.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vlnpzaw9p/)
 
          Fireman Matthew Dunn, twenty-seven years old, of Ladder 14, died in the Hospital for Joint Diseases from the effects of burns. The day before while fighting a fire at 106 West 123rd Street he was burned by a still that exploded in a garage. He was married and lived with his wife and two children at 2886 Briggs Avenue in the Bronx. (from "The Last Alarm")

     FIREFIGHTER FERDINAND RIVIELLO LADDER 14 February 20, 1933

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/ivaauv70t/Riviello.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ivaauv70t/)

          Fireman Ferdinand Z. Riviello, driver of Hook & Ladder Company 14, collided with a taxicab at East 125th Street and Lenox Avenue while responding to an alarm. Riviello and four other members of Ladder 14 were thrown to the ground. Riviello died almost instantly while the other four received minor injuries. The apparatus continued along Lenox Avenue with nobody driving the front end. The tiller man tried to control the back end but the rig slammed into a lunchroom. The taxi cab driver was intoxicated and was arrested for homicide. (from "The Last Alarm")

     FIREFIGHTER LAWRENCE PERCHUCK LADDER 14 November 27, 1967

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/rcizxadml/Perchuck.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rcizxadml/)

          Firefighter Perchuck, a 30 year veteran assigned to Ladder 14, died as a result of injuries sustained in the performance of his duties.

     FIREFIGHTER GEORGE L. COLLINS BATTALION 12 November 15, 1968

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/moc6tasu5/Collins.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/moc6tasu5/)

          Firefighter Collins died November 15, 1968 as a result of injuries sustained operating at Manhattan Box 1479 on July 8, 1968.  Firefighter Collins suffered an acute heart attack.  He was originally assigned to Engine 35 and was a Battalion 12 aide for 8 years.

     RIP.  Never forget.


Pre-FDNY volunteer history:

          H&L No. 7. - "Mechanics" - Was organized September 7, 1837; located at One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Street and Third Avenue; removed in 1861 to One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street and Third Avenue, and remained there until the camp fires of the Old Department were extinguished. About the time of the organization of No. 7, there was a "road house" at the northwest corner of One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street and Third Avenue, known as "Bradshaw's," a favorite stopping place for fast trotters. Bradshaw was one of the early foreman of No. 7. John Kenyon, postmaster of Harlem for sixteen years, was foreman for a long time, also John Prophet, Samuel Christie, and Henry A. Southerton. Many of the best citizens of Harlem were members. Colwell, the lumber merchant; George W. Thompson, an old settler and businessman, and Frederick Goll, who was the last foreman. When the Metropolitan Department took control, No. 7 was invited to remain; they accepted, and each received at the rate of one thousand dollars per year; served with the New Department about fourteen months, and then passed away. Afterwards the remaining members claimed full pay, and put their claims in the hands of "Tom Fields." He collected the money, and, it is alleged, reimbursed himself the like generous soul he was.  ("Our Firemen, The History of the NY Fire Departments")


Surburban Companies:

     When the paid department was established in 1865, several new areas that had become part of NYC were not yet developed, had poor roads and sparse populations.  Much was famlands. Suburban engine and ladder companies were established to replace volunteer fire companies.  These suburban companies were FDNY units and performed the basic firefighting functions of FDNY companies.  FDNY members appoinited to these units did not work the rigorous hours that members worked in regular companies who only had 3 hours off per day to go home for meals. Suburban members retained their previous jobs, responded to alarms during the day and lived at their firehouses at night. Most were former volunteer members.  Apparatus was hand-drawn and light-duty.  Suburban companies were transitioned to regular FDNY units by 1868. 


Old FDNY sleeve awards: known as "bugs" by FDNY members

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/rhmr6x2x9/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rhmr6x2x9/)



120 E 125th Street firehouse - National Register Historic Places - 2013:

     https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/13000309.htm

     Firehouse was designed by Napoleon LeBrun, official architect of the New York City Fire Department.  When son Pierre joined him the firm became N. LeBrun & Son.  LeBrun produced 42 structures for the fire department.


120 E 125th Street - former firehouse:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/9doc02cn1/L_14_today.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9doc02cn1/)

     https://ny.curbed.com/2014/8/30/10054016/east-harlem-firehouse-to-become-new-cultural-center

     https://ny.curbed.com/2014/9/12/10047934/glimpse-east-harlems-firehouse-turned-cultural-center

     https://www.nycedc.com/project/caribbean-cultural-center-african-diaspora-institute



(https://s22.postimg.cc/riwozz9sd/L_14_patch.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/riwozz9sd/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 10, 2018, 04:08:58 PM
120 E 125th Street Firehouse - Landmark Status Report 1997

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/xaj127sf1/L_14_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xaj127sf1/)

Fire Hook & Ladder Company No. 14
Harlem, Manhattan
 
Summary
 
Fire Hook & Ladder Company No. 14, built in 1888-89, was designed by the architectural firm of N. LeBrun & Sons in the Romanesque Revival style. Between the years of 1880 and 1895, N. LeBrun & Sons helped to define the Fire Department's expression of civic architecture, both functionally and symbolically, in more than 40 buildings. Hook & Ladder No. 14 is characteristic of N. LeBrun & Sons' numerous mid-block firehouses, reflecting the firm's attention to materials, stylistic detail, plan, and setting. Built on the site of an earlier volunteer fire company, and then a professional suburban company, this firehouse also represents nearly 150 years of the New York Fire Department's history. Since 1975, it has been the home of Fire Engine Co. No. 36.
 
The Fire Department of the City of New York
 
The origins of New York's Fire Department date to the city's beginning as the Dutch colony New Amsterdam. Leather fire buckets, first imported from Holland and later manufactured by a cobbler in the colony, were required in every household. Regular chimney inspections and the "rattle watch" patrol helped protect the colony during the Dutch period. By 1731, under English rule, two "engines" were imported from London and housed in wooden sheds in lower Manhattan.
 
The Common Council authorized a volunteer force in 1737, and the Volunteer Fire Department of the City of New York was officially established by an act of the state legislature in 1798. As the city grew, this force was augmented by new volunteer companies. Between 1800 and 1850, seven major fires occurred, leading to the establishment of a building code and the formation of new volunteer fire companies on a regular basis. The number of firemen grew from 600 in 1800 to more than 4,000 by 1865.
 
Intense rivalries among the companies developed, stemming in large part from the Volunteer Fire Department's role as a significant political influence in municipal affairs. The Tammany political machine was especially adept at incorporating the fire department into its ranks. Since the 1820s it was common knowledge that "a success in the fire company was the open sesame to success in politics."
 
During the peak years of Tammany's power, increasingly intense competition among companies began to hinder firefighting, creating public exasperation with the volunteer force. Brawls among firemen at the scene of fires and acts of sabotage among the companies became commonplace. In the 1860s, an alliance between the Republican controlled state legislature (which wanted to impair Tammany Hall's political control) and fire insurance companies (who wanted more efficient firefighting) played on this public sentiment to replace the volunteers with a paid force.
 
On March 30, 1865, the New York State Legislature established the Metropolitan Fire District, comprising New York and Brooklyn. This act abolished New York's Volunteer Fire Department and created the Metropolitan Fire Department, a paid professional force under the jurisdiction of the state. By the end of the year, the city's 124 volunteer companies with more than 4,000 men had retired or disbanded to be replaced by thirty-three engine companies and twelve ladder companies operated by a force of some 500 men.
 
With the creation of a professional Fire Department in 1865, improvements were immediate. Regular service was extended to 106th Street in Manhattan, with suburban companies further north, and its telegraph system was upgraded. Early in 1865 there were only 64 call boxes in New York, none of them located above 14th Street. Within the next year and a half, the number had increased to 187.3 Horse-drawn, steam-powered apparatus were required for all companies.
 
The firehouse crews were standardized at twelve men (as opposed to a total of up to 100 men per firehouse under the volunteer system), and the Department took on a serious, disciplined character.
 
In 1869, "Boss" William Marcy Tweed's candidate for New York State governor was elected, and he quickly regained control of the Fire Department through the Charter of 1870 (commonly known as the "Tweed Charter"). Only three years later, this charter was revoked when Tweed was sentenced to prison for embezzling millions from the city. Permanently under city control after 1870, the Fire Department (separated into a New York Department and a Brooklyn Department) retained its professional status and proceeded to modernize rapidly. While no new buildings were built until 1879-80 (the last one built prior to this was the Fireman's Hall in 18546), the companies continually invested in modern apparatus and new technologies.
 
Firehouse Function and Planning in the LeBrun Era
 
With the creation of the Metropolitan Fire Department in 1865 — and the supposed removal of Tammany control of the companies — the Common Council hoped to filter out remaining Tammany influence by banning any firehouse construction for five years.
 
The ban, for reasons unknown, lasted until 1879, when, under Fire Chief Eli Bates, the department embarked on a major campaign for new firehouse construction throughout the city, but especially in northern sections.
 
N. LeBrun & Sons designed all of the Fire Department's forty-two structures built between 1880 and 1895. It is not clear exactly why the LeBrun firm was commissioned by the Fire Department to serve as its sole architect during these years. Napoleon LeBrun had a personal interest in promoting the use of professional architects rather than contractors for municipal building projects. In 1879, LeBrun was the representative of the American Institute of Architects on the Board of Examiners of the Building Bureau of the Fire Department, a position he held for eighteen years.
 
This position may well have led to the commission by the Fire Department, which ultimately did set a standard for firehouse design in New York.
 
With the professionalization of the firefighting force in 1865, the spatial requirements of the firehouse were established.8 The ground floor functioned primarily as storage for the apparatus, and the second and third floors housed the dormitory, kitchen, and captain's office. While the basic function of the house had not changed by 1880 (and is essentially the same today), LeBrun is credited with standardizing the main program components, while introducing some minor, but important, innovations in the plan.
 
For example, when horses were first introduced into the system, they were stabled outside behind the firehouse. Valuable time was lost in bringing them inside to the apparatus. LeBrun's firehouses included horse stalls inside the building, at the rear of the apparatus floor, and some houses had special features related to the horses' care and feeding.
 
The LeBrun firehouses also neatly accommodated the necessity of drying the cotton hoses after each use, incorporating an interior hose-drying "tower" which ran the height of the building along one wall, thus economizing valuable space in the firehouse.
 
History of Hook & Ladder Company No. 14
 
Because northern Manhattan was sparsely populated in 1865, the Metropolitan Fire Department established suburban companies to serve that area. These companies, both engine and ladder, functioned slightly differently than their counterparts downtown. The suburban firefighters had a lighter work schedule and received less pay, and the companies were assigned hand-drawn apparatus instead of the horse-drawn steamers and trucks assigned to the regular companies. In October 1865, Suburban Ladder No. 14 was established at 120 East 125th Street, inheriting the property and equipment of the volunteer Mechanics No. 7." The city grew rapidly northward, and less than three years later, on January 1, 1868, the Fire Department closed all suburban companies.
 
Hook & Ladder No. 14 replaced Suburban Ladder No. 14. It continued to operate out of the old volunteer firehouse at 120
 
East 125th Street until 1888, when a new building was constructed in response to Harlem's growing population.
 
As reported in the Fire Department's Annual Report of 1889, the department recognized the need to prepare for the encroaching development of the city northward in Manhattan:
 
There is also imperative need of a number of additional companies north of One Hundred and Tenth Street, where no increase in the fire-extinguishing force has been made since the organization of the Department, to keep pace with the large growth in population and buildings.
 
The new structure for Hook & Ladder No. 14, designed by the architectural firm of N. LeBrun & Sons, was erected in 1888-89.13 In the first year in its new home, the company was staffed by twelve firemen and three horses for its hook and ladder truck; it responded to 146 alarms and fought 93 fires.
 
The structure was home to Hook & Ladder Company No. 14 until 1975. No. 14 relocated to 2282 Third Avenue, and Engine Company No. 36 relocated here from 1849 Park Avenue.
 
Built in the middle of the fifteen-year period in which the LeBrun firm designed for the Fire Department, Hook & Ladder No. 14 is representative of the firm's approach to firehouse design during a highly politicized period for the Fire Department and a time of intense urbanization for the city at large. The LeBrun era facade designs reflected the firehouses' surroundings in scale, materials, adherence to the street wall, and stylistically as well. Because the firehouse was home to the firemen, these designs project a certain domesticity within their functional character; this is particularly true for Hook & Ladder No. 14, as expressed in the mansard roof and attic gable.
 
While Hook & Ladder No. 14 reflects its context in scale and composition, but is also distinguished as both a civic and a utilitarian structure. East 125th Street is comprised mainly of commercial buildings built near the end of the nineteenth century.
 
The Queen Anne-Romanesque Revival Mount Morris Bank (Lamb & Rich, 1883-85, 1889-90, designated New York City Landmark) at East 125th Street and Park Avenue is the grandest of these, although it is now in a state of serious neglect. The surrounding residential neighborhood includes numerous rowhouses from the same period, reflecting Harlem's early development as an affluent community. The Hook & Ladder No. 14 is a significant reminder of that period, and along with the Mt. Morris Watch Tower (1855, designated New York City Landmark) and the Harlem Courthouse (Thom & Wilson, 1891-93, designated New York City Landmark), is an important symbol of the city's municipal development in the nineteenth century.
 
N. LeBrun & Sons, Architects
 
Napoleon Eugene Charles LeBrun (1821-1901) was born to French immigrant parents in Philadelphia. At fifteen years of age he was placed in the office of classicist Thomas Ustick Walter (1804-1887), where he remained for six years.
 
LeBrun began his own practice in 1841 in Philadelphia where he had several major commissions — including the Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul (1846-64) and the Academy of Music (1852-57) - before moving to New York in 1864. His Second Empire Masonic Temple competition submission of 1870 did much to establish his reputation in New York. In the same year his son Pierre joined him and the firm became Napoleon LeBrun & Son in 1880. In 1892 the firm became Napoleon LeBrun & Sons in recognition of his youngest son, Michel. All three were active members of the American Institute of Architects.
 
Napoleon LeBrun was first commissioned by the Fire Department of the City of New York in 1880. Until 1895, N. LeBrun & Sons designed more than 40 buildings for the Fire Department throughout Manhattan, including many firehouses, a warehouse, and a fire pier.
 
The firm's fifteen-year building campaign resulted in an average of two to three firehouses each year. In some cases, nearly identical buildings were erected; Hook & Ladder No. 14 has a twin in Engine Company No. 56 at 120 West 83rd Street (1888-89, located in the Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District).
 
Most of the designs used classical detailing and overall symmetry (in part dictated by the large vehicular entrance on a narrow lot), but provided a wide range of aesthetic expression.
 
The firm created two large, elaborate buildings for the Fire Department during this period: the Fire Department Headquarters at 157-159 East 67th Street (now Engine Company No. 39/Ladder Company No. 16, 1884-86) and Engine Company No. 31, 87 Lafayette Street (1895, a designated New York City Landmark). The Headquarters building is a strong expression of the Romanesque Revival style, and in the years following its completion, several smaller houses were designed in a subdued version of the style. Hook & Ladder No. 14 is one example.
 
Engine Company No. 31, the firm's best known firehouse design, is the least representative of its tenure with the Fire Department and marks a transition between the restrained, classical elegance of the majority of its firehouses and the increasingly monumental designs of other architects which followed at the turn of the century.
 
Engine Company No. 31 is a freestanding structure for a triple engine company modeled on sixteenth-century Loire Valley chateaux. It was a distinct departure from the firm's usual "storefront" design and is considered the firm's most impressive civic design. Also of note was the firm's acclaimed Hook & Ladder Company No. 15 at Old Slip (1885, demolished), which was designed in the style reminiscent of a seventeenth-century Dutch house.
 
While they are best known in New York City for the firehouses, the LeBruns designed several churches including the Church of the Epiphany (1870, demolished), Saint John-the-Baptist (1872), 211 West 30th Street, and St. Mary-the-Virgin (1894-95, a designated New York City Landmark), 133-145 West 46th Street. At the turn of the century, N. LeBrun & Sons achieved renown for office building design in Manhattan, most notably the home office of the Metropolitan Life Building at 1 Madison Avenue (1890-92, and annex tower, 1909, designated New York City Landmark) and the Home Life Insurance Company Building, 256-257 Broadway (1892-94, a designated New York City Landmark).
 
Building Description
 
Hook & Ladder Company No. 14 is a four-story brick and stone structure. Through its composition, colors, and subtle texture, the building expresses the Romanesque Revival style.
 
Base: The first story is dominated by the vehicular entrance, which is framed in cast iron and set in the center of a rusticated brownstone surround. Modest fish-scale and flame-shaped motifs ornament the cast-iron piers, transom bars and lintel. The vehicular entrance is a wood-panelled overhead door painted red. The pedestrian entrance is placed within the cast-iron frame on the west side of the building. The house watch window with historic wood sash is symmetrically placed on the east side of the frame. "Engine 36" is painted on the top panel of the cast-iron frame.
 
Upper stories: A brownstone molding separates the base from the upper stories. The second and third floors are faced in brick. Between the second and third stories is the identifying tablet listing the presiding Fire Department Officers and names N. LeBrun & Sons as the building's architects. Curved brownstone edges frame the building above the base, providing the effects of quoins and terminating in carved, knobbed finials at the fourth story gable.
 
At the second and third stories are tripartite windows with transoms; a single arched window is centered in the gable. Small one-over-one windows have been added to the east side of the second and third story to provide light and air for bathrooms. All the windows have historic wood sash.
 
Fourth story: The gable is the most detailed element of the composition, featuring a decorative brownstone gableboard, and a heavily-carved ovolo molding which forms the window's arch. The window has historic multi-pane wood sash. The gable itself is a stepped pattern, trimmed in brownstone and capped with a finial, set into mansard roof with multicolored slate tiles. The wrought-iron jib used for hauling hay to the attic storage room, remains in place above the gable window.
 
Several integral interior features are intact, such as the circular iron staircase, the brass sliding poles, the interior hose drying "tower," and the pressed-tin ceiling. (The interior is not included in this designation.)
 
     - From the 1997 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 10, 2018, 05:28:30 PM
1968 R&Ws - Battalions:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/6ikfki07h/Bn_R_W_1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ikfki07h/)

    Battalion 12       5063 runs
    Battalion 12-2    1858 runs
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 10, 2018, 05:42:02 PM
Ladder 14 Firefighters rescue two people 'ready to jump' from burning Harlem brownstone

By Kerry Burke and John Lauinger   DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS  Feb 01, 2010 | 11:02 PM


    (https://s22.postimg.cc/s7jbo4pi5/L_14_rescue.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/s7jbo4pi5/)
 
 
FDNY was able to save two people who were dangling from the window ledge after a fire broke out at a Harlem brownstone Monday.
 

     Firefighters rescued two people desperately perched on window ledges as fire raged on the top floor of a Harlem brownstone Monday, officials said.

     The stranded man and woman were screaming for help as firefighters arrived at the abandoned five-story brownstone at Madison Ave. and E. 127 St. at about 4:21 p.m. "There were two people hanging from window ledges," said FDNY Deputy Chief Jim Hodgens. "They were ready to jump." Firefighters scurried up a massive tower ladder and plucked the two people from the window ledges as thick, black smoke billowed around them.
 
     "She jumped into my arms as quick as she could," firefighter Artie Kunz, of the FDNY's Ladder 14, said of the rescued woman. "It made me feel great." People who crowded on the street to watch the drama unfold were stunned by the nick-of-time rescue. "When they put up a ladder and pulled her off, a roar went up from the crowd," said Derrick Tate, a retired Corrections Department officer. "It was glorious."

     Firefighter Al Grdovich said the woman thanked God as she was carried to safety.  "I believe God was on her side," Grdovich said.  Firefighters also rescued a woman who had gone into cardiac arrest from inside the building's fifth floor. "They were trying to revive her on the sidewalk out front," Tate recalled. "It didn't look good." Officials said the woman, described as being in her 50s, was taken to Harlem Hospital in critical condition.

     Neighbors said people had been squatting inside the abandoned building. There was a second fire on E. 127 St. near 10th Ave. at roughly the same time Monday afternoon. That blaze was quickly brought under control, and no one was injured, officials said.


     (https://s22.postimg.cc/uddmiq0p9/fire8032645-300x300.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uddmiq0p9/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 10, 2018, 06:22:17 PM
1940s - FDNY - vacant tenement fire:

     https://www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-19931278-stock-footage-firemen-climb-into-a-vacant-tenement-fire-in-new-york-city-in-the-s-s.html
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 10, 2018, 06:28:44 PM
Harlem tenement 4th alarm - 1949:

    https://www.britishpathe.com/video/harlem-fire/query/harlem+fire
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 13, 2018, 05:33:51 PM
Engine 35 firehouse 223 E 119th Street  Harlem  4th/5th Division, 11th/12th Battalion  "Still First"
 
     Engine 35 organized 223 E 119th Street former firehouse volunteer Columbus Engine 35   1868
     Engine 35 moved to 209 E 122nd Street at Suburban Engine 37                                      1889
     Engine 35 moved to new firehouse 223 E 119th Street                                                    1891
     Engine 35 moved to new firehouse 2282 3rd Avenue with Thawing Apparatus 1                1974


Engine 35 - 223 E 119th Street original volunteer firehouse - built 1861:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/w8j014ti5/E_35.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/w8j014ti5/)


223 E 119th Street firehouse - built 1891:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/xnkkq0un1/E_35_fh_119_street_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xnkkq0un1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/xat6jwhj1/E_35_fh_119th_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xat6jwhj1/)


2282 3rd Avenue firehouse - built 1974:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/6cz9iamn1/E_35_fh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6cz9iamn1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/z2m5ezgd9/E_35_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z2m5ezgd9/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/y0bywgczh/E_35_fh_r.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y0bywgczh/)


Engine 35:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/p7zlma4b1/E_35_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p7zlma4b1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/duhnomvz1/E_35_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/duhnomvz1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/qzskh7ij1/E_35_ap_11.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/qzskh7ij1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/exx6n89cd/E_35_ap_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/exx6n89cd/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/gcyrbz5al/E_35_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gcyrbz5al/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/z5amfl49p/E_35_ap_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z5amfl49p/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/4b3dhww31/E_35_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4b3dhww31/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/ufkoqsxrx/E_35_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ufkoqsxrx/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/ki9nxrl19/E_35_ap_51.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ki9nxrl19/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/71cpewxv1/E_35_ap_57.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/71cpewxv1/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/jsqvlgpnh/E_35_ap_55.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jsqvlgpnh/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/mmu0yywzh/E_35_ap_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mmu0yywzh/)

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/fbyimfggt/E_35_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fbyimfggt/)


Engine 35:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgT3wfe5hOo

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnxme4VqWx8

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUarTKD0L6k


Engine 35 Department Medals:

     WILLIAM H. BEHLER FF. ENG. 35 JAN. 13, 1895 1896 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          Fireman William H. Behler, of Engine Company No. 35, is awarded to him for a rescue described as follows in the report for that year:

               “Fireman William H. Behler, of Engine Company No. 35, rescued Mrs. Carmela Amaro and child at the fire No. 409 East One Hundred and Twelfth Street, Station 737, at 8:53 A.M., on the 31st of January, under the following circumstances:  Mrs. Amaro appeared at the fourth-story window, front, shrieking wildly for help, as she clasped a three-month-old child to her breast.  She could not reach the fire-escape from the window at which she stood on account of smoke and heat, and Hook and Ladder Company No. 14 had not yet arrived.  The woman was about to jump to the street when Fireman Behler appeared at the fourth-story window of No. 407 , which is next to where the woman stood.  He leaned out of the window and, while some citizens held him by the legs, reached over to where the woman stood.  She passed her child to him and then swung herself into his arms, and Behler landed both safely on the floor of the adjoining flat.  The chief of the Eleventh Battalion, in reporting the occurrence says: “I consider the prompt action of Fireman Behler prevented serious consequences and was a personal risk, for which I recommend that his name be placed on the Roll of Merit’” - Report of the Fire Department of the City of New York

     RICHARD NITSCH FF. ENG. 35 JAN. 29, 1901 1903 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          Role of Merit – Rescues at Personal Risk in the Line of Duty – By Fireman 1st Grade Richard Nitsch, Engine 35.  At the fire premises No 402 East One Hundred and Eighteenth Street, on the morning of January 29, Fireman Nitsch, at personal risk, rescued Mrs. George Le Piemme, age forty, from a rear room on the second floor, which was so densely charged with heat, smoke and flame that, after discovering her unconscious on the floor, her clothing afire, in order to effect her rescue it was necessary for him to crawl to the stairway, dragging his human burden after him, where, assisted by a comrade, the woman was conveyed to the street, whence, considerably burned, she was removed to Harlem Hospital for treatment. 

     WILLIAM WEBER FF. ENG. 35 MAY 14, 1904 TREVOR-WARREN

          “The names of Fireman first grade William Weber, Engine Company 35, Andrew W. Zwisler, Engine Company 14, and William M. Carter, Hook and Ladder Company 14, were ordered placed on the Roll of Merit, Class A, for meritorious action at fire at No. 2001 Third Avenue, Statin 697, on May 14, 1904.  The fire was found to be rapidly burning in the halls and stairways of the building, and heavily charged with smoke, and occupants of premises hanging out of windows.  Fireman Weber descended a 35 foot ladder to the 4th floor and assisted Mrs. Tessie Klebs and her eighteens-old baby, also George Florre, down the ladder.  While descending the ladder, Fireman Weber was informed by citizens from the street that there was a woman on the third floor.  He entered the room, which was heavily charged with heat and smoke, and, crawling on his hands and knees to the middle of the room, found Mrs. H. Eyl on the floor in an unconscious condition.  He attempted to drag her to window, but being nearly overcome by heat and smoke he was compelled to return to the window, where he met Fireman first grade A. W. Zwisler, who assisted in dragging Mrs Eyl, (who was a very heavy woman) to the window, where she was taken down the ladder to the street.  At the same time, Fireman first grade William M. Carter, Hook and Ladder Company 14, ascended by scaling ladder to fourth floor on Third Avenue side of the building and entered a room where he found Josephine Eyl, aged 18 months, on fire, and carried her to the window and passed her to occupants of adjoining building.  The fire in the meantime had gained considerable headway in all the halls and stairways on the upper three floors, causing great heat and stifling smoke and all means of escape for occupants cut off.”  Report of the Fire Department of the City of New York for the Year 1902.

     FRANK A. TOOMEY LT. ENG. 35 MAR. 5, 1933 1934 DEPARTMENT

     WILLIAM F. MORAN FF. ENG. 35 NOV. 16, 1963 1964 MC ELLIGOTT

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/p30fqkc5p/Moran.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p30fqkc5p/)

     JOHN J. MC CORMICK LT. ENG. 35 OCT. 23, 1964 1965 EMERALD

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/nnyv1vdnh/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nnyv1vdnh/)

     EDMOND CALO, JR. FF. ENG. 35 NOV. 7, 1984 1985 LAUFER

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/ihsb42vu5/Calo.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ihsb42vu5/)


Engine 35 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN DEGNAN ENGINE 35  April 7, 1931

          Fireman John Degnan of Engine 35 was killed and four other firemen were injured while responding to a fire. The accident resulted from efforts to avert a collision with a delivery truck on East 123rd Street. The driver of the truck turned his wheels away from the fire truck and fainted. Engine 35 slammed into the truck, a limousine and an elevated pillar throwing everybody to the street. Captain Martin Tarpey, Firemen John Degnan and John Coddington were on the side that hit the elevated pillar. Captain Tarpey lost his leg, Coddington received a fractured skull and a brain concussion but both recovered from their injuries. Fireman Degnan became a fireman in 1915 and was single. (From "The Last Alarm")

     CAPTAIN WILLIAM J. BRADY ENGINE 35 February 8, 1952

          Capt. William J. Brady - Engine 35 - 16-year veteran died as a result of injuries sustained while operating at a fire on January 30th.

     FIREFIGHTER RICHARD G. SALE  ENGINE 35 June 19, 1986

          (https://s22.postimg.cc/dy6vrbrjx/Sale.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dy6vrbrjx/)


Pre-FDNY volunteer history:

     Columbus Engine 35 - 1807-1865

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/6ajz8vvf1/E_35_Columbus.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ajz8vvf1/)


     (https://s22.postimg.cc/ip6r9bpj1/a1002a902fd15fd9e4eae49dc33cb0a8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ip6r9bpj1/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 13, 2018, 07:14:36 PM
Engine 35 was assigned one of 10 1963 International Harvester pumpers FDNY placed in service:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/duhnomvz1/E_35_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/duhnomvz1/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 15, 2018, 03:52:19 PM
Engine 35 was assigned one of 10 1963 International Harvester pumpers FDNY placed in service:

     (https://s22.postimg.cc/duhnomvz1/E_35_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/duhnomvz1/)

Engine companies assigned 1963 International Harvester 1000 GPM pumpers:  35, 53, 58, 59, 69, 73, 91, 94, 283 and 290.

Those 10 rigs were an experiment to see how well commercial chassis apparatus would hold up in NYC. Four of the 10 would wind up getting destroyed: E283's rig was hit by a heavy truck on Linden Blvd., E91's (and L40's 1963 Seagrave tiller) was crushed in a collapse on 116th St., E94's rig caught fire, and E294's rig caught fire inside quarters. - per Gman


1964 Harlem 5th alarm 116th Street - destroyed Engine 91 and Ladder 40 apparatus:
 
     (https://s33.postimg.cc/9z145b8wb/116th_St_Collapse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9z145b8wb/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 16, 2018, 06:51:00 PM
Chief Edward Franklin Croker - Chief of Department - 1899-1911

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/vcsnqiwzv/Croker_7_2.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/vcsnqiwzv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4eyqotud7/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4eyqotud7/)


“I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a firefighter The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we who know the work which the firefighter has to do believe that his is a noble calling.There is an adage which says that, "Nothing can be destroyed except by fire." We strive to preserve from destruction the wealth of the world which is the product of the industry of men, necessary for the comfort of both the rich and the poor. We are defenders from fires of the art which has beautified the world, the product of the genius of men and the means of refinement of mankind. But, above all; our proudest endeavor is to save lives of men-the work of God Himself. Under the impulse of such thoughts, the nobility of the occupation thrills us and stimulates us to deeds of daring, even at the supreme sacrifice. Such considerations may not strike the average mind, but they are sufficient to fill to the limit our ambition in life and to make us serve the general purpose of human society.” - Chief Croker

“Firemen are going to get killed. When they join the department they face that fact. When a man becomes a fireman his greatest act of bravery has been accomplished. What he does after that is all in the line of work. They were not thinking of getting killed when they went where death lurked. They went there to put the fire out, and got killed. Firefighters do not regard themselves as heroes because they do what the business requires.” - Chief Croker


Edward Franklin Croker - Find-A-Grave Memorial

     It is difficult to sum up the career of Edward Franklin Croker in this limited amount of space. Appointed to the FDNY on June 22, 1884 at the age of twenty-one, he shocked everyone with his promotion to Assistant Foreman (now called Lieutenant) just forty-seven days later and with equal speed to Foreman (today's Captain) on February 25, 1885. This rapid advancement was said to have been for one reason only; that he was the nephew of the most powerful political figure in New York City at the time, Richard Croker, head of Tammany Hall (who served as a fire commissioner 1883-1887.) And while this might be true, the fact was that over the next twenty-seven years, Chief Croker proved himself, time and time again, to be an outstanding firefighter and leader.

     On January 22, 1892 Foreman Croker became Battalion Chief Croker. Being named Chief of Department on May 1, 1899, the specter of nepotism was cast upon him but he went on to fulfill his role with extreme diligence. He was the first Chief of Department who did not serve during the volunteer period. He was also the first Chief to use an automobile to respond to alarms.

     In 1902, Chief Croker returned to work only several days into a two-month vacation. A vacation of such length was unusual but deemed justified for the hard-working Chief. In granting it, Commissioner Thomas Sturgis re-assigned other chiefs within the Department to cover Croker's absence. But when Croker returned to work less than two weeks later and sent the chiefs back to the original assignments, the Commissioner saw it as an overstepping of bounds and a rescinding of the orders of a higher authority. Sturgis relieved Croker of command and preferred formal charges. A two-year court battle ensued with a final decision in Croker's favor resulting in his re-instatement.

     Croker epitomized the dichotomy of the fire service; that is to put their expertise to use in fire prevention. He was an outspoken advocate of improving fire safety throughout the City's commercial and residential buildings. As early as 1894 he testified before the Tenement House Committee that a fatal fire was due, in part, to "the combustible nature of the building and its open construction." The culmination of this was when he used the fatal sweatshop fire in Newark, New Jersey to once again call attention to the threat of such a catastrophe being repeated in New York. Just four months later it did at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company. As a result, he retired and turned over command of the Department on May 1 to Chief John Kenlon. Croker spent the next forty years in the fire prevention business. His company was a leader in the field and exists to today. In 1912 he authored the seminal book, "Fire Prevention."

     His life was both colorful and tumultuous. Family history not withstanding, he was the frequent subject of news coverage as much for his personal life as for his position in the fire department. He went through a contentious separation from his wife in 1908, though they never divorced. In 1914 he built a "completely fire-proof" house in Long Beach, Long Island, said to be the first of its kind in the country. The house warming party he held there was covered in the New York Times.

     Chief Croker was a resident of Amityville, Long Island when he died on February 7, 1951 of chronic myocarditis at Tenderling Nursing Home in Lindenhurst. His body was cremated and his remains were turned over to his estranged wife. Their final disposition of are unknown.

     Chief Croker's maternal great grandfather was Thomas Franklin who was a member of the NYFD beginning in 1783, serving as Chief from 1811 through 1824.

          - https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92869041/edward-franklin-croker


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/xhd0rqw3f/Chief_Croker_1908.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xhd0rqw3f/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/omc6h9263/Croker_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/omc6h9263/)
 

Who Was Edward Croker? - NYC Fire Wire
 
     A search of famous firefighting quotes will turn up Edward F Croker at the top. Croker sure had his way words for the fire service, but who was he?

     Edward Franklin Croker was appointed to the FDNY on June 22nd, 1884. He was only 21 years of age. Just shy of 50 days on the job, Croker was promoted to Assistant Foreman (Lieutenant), and again, another promotion a mear few months later to Foreman (Captain) of Engine 1. Croker's uncle, Richard Croker, was Fire Commissioner from 1883 - 1887, and one of the most powerful political figure in New York City as the head of Tammany Hall. In it's early years, the City was growing as was the need for the Fire Service. Edward Croker proved to be a great firefighter and through his career, a great leader. January 22nd 1892, Croker was promoted to Battalion Chief. May 1, 1899 he was appointed Acting Chief of Department and June 29, 1899 named Chief of Department. Many thought Croker's ties with Tammany Hall was a stepping stone, potentially to Mayor. Croker denied any ambition with the following stirring words:
     “I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a firefighter. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we who know the work which the firefighter has to do believe that his is a noble calling. There is an adage which says that, "Nothing can be destroyed except by fire." We strive to preserve from destruction the wealth of the world which is the product of the industry of men, necessary for the comfort of both the rich and the poor. We are defenders from fires of the art which has beautified the world, the product of the genius of men and the means of refinement of mankind. (But, above all; our proudest endeavor is to save lives of men-the work of God Himself. Under the impulse of such thoughts, the nobility of the occupation thrills us and stimulates us to deeds of daring, even at the supreme sacrifice. Such considerations may not strike the average mind, but they are sufficient to fill to the limit our ambition in life and to make us serve the general purpose of human society.”

     Chief Croker did his best to modernize his department, donating the 1st motorized chief's car and attempted to streamline communications between firemen during emergencies.
He was an outspoken advocate of improving fire safety throughout the city's commercial and residential buildings. He warned that many of the buildings around the city that housed manufacturing operations were disasters waiting to happen. In 1894, he testified before the Tenement House committee that a fatal fire was due in part to "the combustible nature of the building and it's open construction." His unheeded warnings were personified on March 25th 1911 at the Triangle Shirtwaist fire. After the Triangle Waist Factory Fire, suspecting that he could do little to advance his cause within the politicized tangle of government red tape, Croker turned over his command to Deputy Chief John Kenlon at 8:00AM. Edward F. Croker served twelve years the Chief of the New York City Fire Department and for twenty-seven years as an active fireman. Croker’s twenty-seven years of service had seen the administration of twenty-two Commissioners. Croker spent the next 40 years in fire prevention, his company was a leader in Fire Prevention and exists today. (https://www.crokerfiredrill.com/ ). In 1914, Croker built a completely fireproof house in Long Beach which still stands today at 116 Lindell Blvd corner of West Penn Street. This was said to be the 1st of it's kind. His house warming party was covered by the New York Times. According to the Times' story, Croker brought all of his guests to the 2nd floor of his home, where the walls, floors and rafters were made of cement, the doors, trimmings and furniture of metal and interestingly enough, the carpets and furniture coverings of asbestos. He poured a few gallons of gasoline into the room, lit a match then shut the room's metal door and dined with his guests in the next room. The fire was confined to the room and beyond a reported crack in the metal wire of the room's window, the room remained undamaged.

     August 30, 1912- Edward F. Croker,  was elected Generalissimo of the Long Beach Fire Department. Chief Croker stated that he proposed in the near future to call out the men under his command regularly every night for drill. In Long Beach, he had within ten days a fire combination truck, a staff of ten prominent volunteer firefighters, and a uniform of black trousers, blue shirts and red helmets, designed so that wealthy volunteer firemen could wear their uniform to social functions and not have to go home to change in case of a fire.

     February 7, 1951, Chief Croker died at a nursing home in Lindenhurst at the age of 87. 

          -https://www.nycfirewire.net/entry/croker


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/cx86td3ij/chief_croker_fdny_sml.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cx86td3ij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/66rpjxo2j/Chief_Croker_1905_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/66rpjxo2j/)


Chief Croker - Triangle Fire - 1911:

     http://rememberthetrianglefire.org/open-archive/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Triangle_Essay_OpenArchive.pdf


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/do0wyunsr/Chief_Croker_1924.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/do0wyunsr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6xkfpfg2j/Locomobile-_Chief-_Croker-of-_New-_York-_Fire-_Department.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6xkfpfg2j/)


Post FDNY - Croker Fire Drill Company

         https://www.crokerfiredrill.com/about/#tab-2


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5iiv0xzmj/Chief_Croker_1908_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5iiv0xzmj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ufm8hztaz/Croker_Fire.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ufm8hztaz/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 16, 2018, 07:13:23 PM
New York Fire Department March - 1905 piano music dedicated to Chief Croker - by Fireman John J. Kenny, H&L 5
 
     (https://s33.postimg.cc/xl6u84bwb/NYFD_March.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xl6u84bwb/)

     http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/collection/179/096
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 17, 2018, 01:39:21 AM
Chief Smoky Joe Martin - FDNY - 1884-1930

     "Catch your fire early and hit it hard"


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/c4dyjf8xn/SJ_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c4dyjf8xn/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/j7ltz21ij/SJ_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j7ltz21ij/)

1884 - Appointed Fireman
1889 - LT
1892 - CAPT
1900 - BC
1905 - DC
1911 - AC
1930 - Retired


“Smoky Joe Martin - Last of the Breed”  by Kieran O'Leary NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Thursday, May 27, 1999, 12:00 AM

     ON A BITTER winter's night in 1899, the firefighters of Engine Co. 31 in lower Manhattan rushed to a blazing warehouse on West St. The fire had started in the cellar, and the Red Devil was in full fury. Led by their commanding officer, Capt. Joseph Martin, the firemen descended into hell. Facing heavy smoke and roaring flames, they retreated, then mounted a second assault. The blaze quickly went to three alarms. Exhausted, gasping for air, man after man was driven from the unendurable basement. Thirty of them collapsed and had to be carried out. Chief Edward F. Croker arrived to take command and ordered a head count. One man - Capt. Martin - was missing. The firemen plunged back in, desperate to find him, fearing the worst. The conditions remained brutal and Croker ordered everyone out. Then he went back in alone. Crawling on his hands and knees, he found Martin with a line of hose, wedged between two crates of furniture, fighting the fire by himself, barely conscious. Croker grabbed his collar and hauled him to the street. Newspapermen crowded around. "Gentlemen," announced Croker, "this is Smoky Joe Martin, and he certainly does love it."

     The reporters loved it, too. The next day's papers trumpeted the tale of the newly nicknamed hero. A New York City legend was born. JOE MARTIN'S love affair with the Fire Department began when he was a boy. His home on E. 13th St., in the old Gas House District, was back to back with Engine Co. 5 on 14th St., and he regularly ran errands for his fireman pals, and when the bells sounded and the horse-drawn wagons clattered out into the cobblestone streets, young Joe was usually running right behind, and he would watch with awe as the brave firefighters battled the lower East Side infernos and spread out nets to catch people leaping from upper floors. At 18, he tried for a time to work as a clerk, but such a life was just too boring. In January 1884, at age 22, freshly appointed fireman Joseph B. Martin reported for duty at Engine Co. 27 on Franklin St., earning $66 a month. Promotions came quickly - to lieutenant in 1889, captain in 1893, battalion chief in 1900, deputy chief in 1907 and, in 1910, assistant chief, the department's second in command. To many, it was a miracle that Martin had lived to make the climb up the career ladder at all. Fearless and stubborn in the face of danger, he had suffered many broken bones and serious burns on many occasions. He was on the job for 46 years, and over those years he was hauled away from fires in ambulances nearly two dozen times. Told in 1898 that a watchman was trapped inside a burning warehouse on Walker St., he and several comrades rushed in, climbed through licking flames to the fourth floor, kicked through a door and found themselves in a room whose floor already was burning through. "That floor won't hold you, Cap," a fireman warned. But Martin went in anyway. And indeed it did not hold, and neither did the ones below it. Martin plunged in an avalanche of burning debris 65 feet to the basement floor. There was barely a flicker of life in his broken body as he was carried away to the Hudson Street Hospital, still clutching a piece of a brass lamp he had grabbed when the floor beneath him gave way. He came to the next day. "When can I go back to work?" he inquired. The answer was four months later.

     AS ASSISTANT CHIEF, Smoky Joe was a fixture at most every big fire the city ever saw. With his aide, Daredevil Dan Healy, at the wheel, his red car showed up everywhere - at the four-day Standard Oil depot blaze in Greenpoint in September 1919, at the enormous "Greenwich Village Volcano" at Jane and W. 12th Sts. in July 1922. Two firemen died in that explosive warehouse fire, and Martin himself collapsed at the scene after working several days without sleep. A department doctor ordered him home, but Smoky Joe would have none of that. Laid out on a cot at the window of a nearby building, he continued to bark out orders, then arose and charged up to the roof to join his men again. But the fact was that in 1922, Smoky Joe was 60 years old, and modern times were arriving. In December of that year, the City of New York retired its last remaining horse-drawn fire wagon. It fell to Martin to ceremoniously send out the alarm from Brooklyn Borough Hall and call out an Engine 205 steamer pulled by faithful Penrose, Smuggler and Bal Griffin on its last run. Then the horses, the last of their breed, were put out to pasture. Certainly Smoky Joe Martin would not be far behind them.

     BY 1925, young Turks in the Department were tired of waiting for its grizzled veterans to step aside. Chief John Kenlon was a 38-year man, and Joe Martin had 41 years in. A group of aldermen proposed a bill that would force Kenlon, Martin and three dozen other officers to retire. The older men survived this effort to turn them out - but the handwriting was plainly on the wall. Smoky Joe's day of reckoning came on April 14, 1930. Fighting a midtown blaze, he suffered a heart attack. Priests from nearby St. Stephen's Church gave him the last rites, and he was carried home, presumably to die. But he rallied again. "I hadn't changed from my winter woolens," he explained. "It was the sudden change in the weather. I wasn't dressed for it." He spent the spring and summer recuperating, then sought to return to duty, insisting he was fine. Dr. Joseph Smith, the Department's chief medical officer, disagreed. On Oct. 2, Smith ordered Assistant Chief of Department Joseph Martin to retire, declaring him "unfit for duty." The words hurt him more than anything the Red Devil ever had dished out. Like the old firehorses he'd loved, Smoky Joe was through. '

     HE HAS WATCHED the fine, big, intelligent, glossy horses, pets of the engine houses, depart one by one, to be replaced by the flashing, roaring motors," wrote the New York Sun. "He has seen the simple, crude old equipment replaced by the complicated and highly technical modern apparatus of the finest fire department in the world - bar none. He has seen the department made over and for that matter has watched all New York made over - watched it grow from a squat town of brownstone and red brick to the incredible dream city of leaping towers whose pinnacles catch the sunlight a thousand feet above the streets. "Nobody in all New York is more typical of the town than this wise, brave, grizzled warrior with the fighting heart." Smoky Joe's fighting heart gave out for good on Oct. 25, 1941

     - www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/smoky-joe-martin-breed-article-1.828147


          (https://s33.postimg.cc/kzestz80r/S_Joe_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kzestz80r/)


Joseph B. “Smoky” Martin -  Find-A-Grave

     Joseph B. Martin was born in New York City one year after the start of the Civil War. He grew up on East 13th Street. On January 18, 1884 he was appointed to the Fire Department of the City of New York. Amongst his brother firefighters he was unique having attended two years at City College. He studied, took promotional examinations and on November 19, 1889 was made a Lieutenant. Just four years later, he advanced to Captain.

     As Captain of Engine 31, the company responded to a warehouse fire seated in the building's cellar. At a time long before breathing apparatus, Martin and his company fought vigorously with member after member retreating due to the intense smoke and heat. Martin stayed in place at the nozzle. Chief Croker, realizing the futility of the attack, ordered all members out of the building. But Captain Martin did not leave the knob . Croker went in after him and, after forcing him to leave, introduced the Captain to reporters by saying, "Gentlemen, this is "Smokey Joe" Martin." The nickname stuck and, as legend has it, was the basis for naming the mascot of the National Forest Service, "Smokey Bear" who was created by New Yorker and Advertising Council executive Harold Rosenberg in 1944.

     Martin was promoted to Deputy Chief on January 1, 1906 and briefly fulfilled the role of Acting Chief of Department when Chief Croker retired. He was appointed Assistant Chief on January 1, 1919. This was the highest rank he attained.

     Chief Martin was well known for getting into the fray. In 1922 he responded from his Manhattan quarters out to Arverne on the Rockaway peninsula, where the entire summer resort town was in flames. He took the fire to a fifth alarm, often taking the line himself. One of the City's most unusual blazes, known as the "Greenwich Volcano" where Lieutenant John Schoppmeyer made the Supreme Sacrifice. Chief Martin was literally blown through the door of a building by one of the explosions. When Mayor Hylan asked the Chief how he felt, Smoky Joe said, "fine" only to crumble unconscious at the Mayor's feet. He refused Dr. Archer's plea to go home. Instead, he commanded the fire from a stretcher placed in the window of an undertaker's shop across the street

     On April 16, 1930 at the age of sixty-six he was so exhausted at a three-alarm fire on East 33rd Street that he collapsed. Dr. Archer wanted him to go to the hospital but he refused and continued to command the fire from a stretcher. The next day he was designated disabled by Chief Medical Officer Joseph Smith leading to his eventual retirement as of November 1 that year.

     - https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/88461562/joseph-b.-martin


"Smoky Joe" Martin & The "Greenwich Street Volcano" - Firehouse - by Paul Hashagen
October 1, 2004
 
     The morning of July 18, 1922, started as a beautiful day in New York City. The summer sun was just peeking over the top of the Manufacturer’s Transit Company’s seven-story warehouse on Jane Street in Greenwich Village.
 
     A little after 8 A.M., warehouse workers were busy loading wooden cases filled with powdered magnesium into the building’s freight elevator. A number of the cases were stacked on the sidewalk adjacent to the opened elevator. Despite the fact that the air was still relatively cool, the workers were building a good sweat as they moved the heavy crates into the building. The huge warehouse, which ran through to the next block, contained large quantities of combustible materials. Stored in the basement and on the various floors were crates of photographic flashlight powder, bonded whiskey, tons of rubber and quantities of rolled paper.

     For some unknown reason – maybe a spark caused by friction – one of the cases of magnesium powder suddenly exploded, throwing several of the workers across the cobblestone street. Scrambling to their feet, they were horrified to see flames spreading among the stacked wooden crates. Most of the workers ran for their lives, while several brave men dashed back toward the fire and tried to smother the flames with pails of sand. The sand had no effect and the fire spread from the crates on the sidewalk to those in the freight elevator. A second explosion toppled the remaining workers and spread the flames to other parts of the warehouse. A Greenwich Avenue merchant watching the activity from his store across the street decided he’d better call for help. He hurried to the nearest fire alarm box and pulled the handle.

     At 8:15 A.M., the alarm was received in the Manhattan Fire Dispatcher’s Office. The first firemen to arrive found that the flames were already out of control. The wooden crates of magnesium powder were burning briskly on the sidewalk, spewing fountains of white sparks. The fire was roaring up the open elevator shaft of the seven-story building. One after another, fire engines descended on the scene with wailing sirens. The engines stopped at hydrants, where the men quickly connected to the water supply. Hoselines were dragged into position and water quickly filled the hose. The acting chief of the New York City Fire Department, Joseph “Smokey Joe” Martin, arrived on the scene and took command of the firemen. At first, he encouraged his men to bring their fire hoses as close to the flames as possible.

     Heavy streams of water bored into the wall of flames, but whenever the firemen moved the stream to another part of the burning building, the flames returned to the place they had previously doused. Sparks and sheets of white-hot flame continued to pour from the wooden crates on the sidewalk, endangering nearby buildings. At times, the plume of burning magnesium, which resembled pyrotechnics, actually reached over the roofs of the three- and four-story houses fronting on Jane Street. Martin directed his men to hose down nearby buildings. This prevented the fire from spreading, but within the burning warehouse the fire seemed unaffected by the torrents of water that the firemen were pouring into it. With flames bursting through the roof of the warehouse a dense, black, acrid smoke arose and settled on each side of the building until it became so dark on Jane and West 12th Streets that firemen had great difficulty picking their way forward.

     At about 8:45 A.M., Lieutenant John Schoppmeyer of Engine Company 13 led a group of men with a hoseline into the warehouse through a door on the 12th Street side of the building. Suddenly there was an explosion that far exceeded the magnitude of any of the previous blasts. A huge section of the wall, 15 feet wide and extending from the fifth floor to the roof, was blown out, and the entire roof was lifted off by a massive gush of white-flames. Martin found himself slammed against a building across the street, his face burned and the wind knocked out of him. Schoppmeyer and his men were also hurled backward by the explosion. A large section of elevator machinery and roofing, blown into the sky, fell to the street, crushing Schoppmeyer. He was pulled, unconscious, from the debris, but he never regained consciousness, and died several minutes later.

     Martin ordered more manpower and resources to the scene. The detonation had driven cases filled with merchandise through the warehouse windows and walls, littering the street with an eclectic assortment of dolls, toys, fancy electric light bulbs, dried peas and other small items that were quickly washed away by the rivers of firehose water cascading down West 12th and Jane Streets.

     The thick acrid smoke of the Jane Street fire was so dangerous that city officials ordered 2,000 people evacuated from the neighborhood. Despite this precaution, several residents were sickened by the smoke. They were treated at first-aid stations set up around the fire area by the local chapter of the American Red Cross. Scores of firemen and police officers were also overcome by smoke and had to be treated at the Red Cross stations. A battery of six pulmotors (crude resuscitators) were in use at one time at the corner of Greenwich and West 12th Streets, with a score of unconscious and semi-conscious people laid out on the sidewalk. The street resembled a battlefield.

     As Martin’s men held their hoses close to the fire, they were being pelted by hot ejected materials, and they risked being scorched by bursts of flame. To protect his men, Martin ordered them to remove doors from nearby buildings and use them as wooden shields. His men continued fighting the fire in this manner for several hours. The constant eruptions resembled volcanic activity and the fire quickly became known to both firemen and the public as the “Greenwich Street Volcano.” By 2 P.M., the fire had been raging for six hours, but it seemed hotter than ever. Martin and his men were absorbing considerable punishment.

     The building’s contents continued to flare up, showering the area with blossoms of super-heated sparks and flaming debris. Rumbles and explosions from deep within the structure finally caused Martin to rethink the dangerous position he and his men now occupied, so close to the building. “Smokey Joe” decided to change tactics. The breast-works of wooden shields were abandoned and Martin redirected his firefighting efforts to an aerial water assault from the roofs of the surrounding buildings. Additional alarms were sent to bring fresh firemen to replace men suffering from exhaustion, smoke inhalation or wounds. After a number of firemen were injured while operating from the rooftops, Martin pulled his men back farther from the fire.

     At 4 P.M., Martin was standing in the street, wondering what he could possibly do to put out the amazingly persistent fire, when he was joined by Mayor John Hylan. The mayor looked at the exhausted chief. Martin’s face was burned; his eyes were bloodshot and almost closed by swelling; his breathing was labored; his shoulders and arms were limp from exertion. The mayor asked, “How do you feel, Chief?” “I feel fine,” Martin replied, and fainted dead away at the mayor’s feet. Martin was rushed to a first-aid station, where Dr. Harry Archer, the fire department’s honorary chief medical officer, worked on the injured fire chief. When Martin regained consciousness, Archer told him to go home. Martin flatly refused. Archer knew that Martin had recently led an exhausting attack on a conflagration along the Rockaway peninsula. “Listen, Chief,” said Archer, “you’ve been taking an awful beating. You’re still weak from the Arverne fire, and you’re past 60. You’ve got to go home.” Martin stood up and placed his dented leather fire helmet back on his head. “A man don’t get his full strength till he’s past 60,” he told the doctor. “I got work to do!”

     A compromise was reached and Archer let Martin return to the fire under certain conditions. “Smokey Joe” was placed on a cot in a shop window near the fire, and he continued to direct his men’s operations from that location. After a few hours on the cot, Martin came up with another attack strategy. Instead of having his men aim hoses from rooftops, where they were vulnerable to showers of debris from explosions in the burning building, Martin decided to send his men to new positions inside the buildings surrounding the burning warehouse. At 8 P.M., Martin arose from the cot and returned to the streets to redirect the attack. Hose after hose was repositioned under Martin’s direction until water poured from every window and fire escape overlooking the burning building. Eventually, 64 streams of water were directed into the fire from different vantage points. More than 216,000 tons of water were pumped into the burning warehouse – the largest volume of water directed at a single fire in the history of the New York City Fire Department. After a bulging wall fell on the Jane Street side of the building, water could more easily reach the seat of the fire.

     By midnight, the fire was clearly diminishing, although it continued to burn. At that point, over 200 firemen and police officers had been treated for smoke inhalation, and an additional 61 men had been hospitalized with burns, bruises or lacerations. Two firemen had been killed: Schoppmeyer, killed by falling debris, and Fireman James H. Malone, who had fallen from a truck racing toward the fire.

     LT John Schoppmeyer, Engine 13, LODD
     (https://s33.postimg.cc/66059cxqj/Shoppmeyer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/66059cxqj/)

     FF James H. Malone, Engine 219, LODD
     (https://s33.postimg.cc/53pyqu9sb/Malone.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/53pyqu9sb/)

     The fire was declared under control 34 hours after it started, but it continued to burn for five days. Finally, one last eruption of the “Greenwich Street Volcano” occurred on the afternoon of July 23, sending walls crashing outward and destroying two houses. The fire was finally out. “Smokey Joe” Martin recovered and returned to work battling blazes throughout the five boroughs of New York City until he was forced to retire in 1930, when he was in his late 60s, after suffering a heart attack at a fire and collapsing in the street.

     Martin passed away on Oct. 25, 1945 – 15 years after he ended his 46-year fire career. His legend transcended the New York City Fire Department, and his moniker became immortal in 1945 when the U.S. Forest Service named its fire prevention mascot “Smokey the Bear” in honor of “Smokey Joe” Martin.

     Paul Hashagen, a Firehouse® contributing editor, is a retired FDNY firefighter who was assigned to Rescue Company 1 in Manhattan.

     - https://www.firehouse.com/home/news/10508916/smokey-joe-martin-the-greenwich-street-volcano


Chief Martin briefing NYC Mayor 1914:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/rd3vxgi4b/SJ_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rd3vxgi4b/)


Chief Martin wishing LT happy birthday:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ujyfgrxbv/SJ_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ujyfgrxbv/)


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: nfd2004 on June 17, 2018, 08:04:13 PM
 Going back to Reply #225, the video "FDNY Unique American LaFrance Tower Ladder 14", I have "no idea" how the chaffers of that rig got it through some of those tight Harlem streets, often with double parked cars. Plus the large overhang in front with the bucket.

 Then once they got it there setting that rig up had to be another difficult chore. The spread distance of the out riggers, plus the size of the truck, was beyond my belief. But somehow those guys did it.

 Any member who drove that rig sure deserves a pat on the back. "You did an amazing job". Same as well to the members who operated the other ALF tower ladder - Ladder 163. 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on June 18, 2018, 06:00:56 PM
  Traveling under the EL structures on Roosevelt Ave. and Queens Blvd. must have been a thrill-ride for TL163.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: memory master on June 18, 2018, 06:17:06 PM
  Traveling under the EL structures on Roosevelt Ave. and Queens Blvd. must have been a thrill-ride for TL163.
The sidewalk opposite their quarters also took a beating.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 06:46:05 PM
  Traveling under the EL structures on Roosevelt Ave. and Queens Blvd. must have been a thrill-ride for TL163.

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3q9uzmh3v/L_163_ap_1a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3q9uzmh3v/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/v2540uj8r/L_163_1984_alf_100_ft_TL.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v2540uj8r/)



     (https://s33.postimg.cc/81ygo6dln/Roosevelt-_Ave.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/81ygo6dln/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 06:55:08 PM
  Traveling under the EL structures on Roosevelt Ave. and Queens Blvd. must have been a thrill-ride for TL163.
The sidewalk opposite their quarters also took a beating.


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3stqmbfkr/L_163_Firehouse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3stqmbfkr/)


Quarters when built:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/57vbb7w57/E_325_fh_1939_wpa_wps.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/57vbb7w57/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:12:21 PM
Ladder 14:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/aaqfb2wob/L_14_ap_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/aaqfb2wob/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/cs26icw0b/L_14_ap_63.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cs26icw0b/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:14:37 PM
1957 - Rescue 5 - 3rd alarm - Richmond (Staten Island) - Victory Boulevard:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/oh666ca4b/R_5_SI_1957.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oh666ca4b/)


Rescue 5 was staffed by Ladder 78 members.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:21:46 PM
Engine 224 - July 1, 1992:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7fF5C2W1vg&t=65s


Brooklyn All-Hands - January 16, 1992:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjLRKLbb_zs&t=23s


Brooklyn 2nd Alarm - lumberyard - July 2, 1989

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XTo1dInJaE&t=43s


Brooklyn 3rd Alarm - February 17, 1990:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSIBPaNSOkY
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:28:00 PM
Brooklyn 2nd Alarm - supermarket - July 15, 1992:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ajWYiiY_yA&t=39s


Brooklyn 5th Alarm - Scholes St - Williamsburg  -  July 16, 1993:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4ANeC0DoSQ


Brooklyn - Squad 1  January 28, 1995:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0TB1OWpxiE


Brooklyn - Rescue 2 - 2nd Alarm - July 15, 1992:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9gO9Pbq0HM&t=27s
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:37:47 PM
Brooklyn - 10-75 - Ladder 111 - July 4, 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pw0F7Oz1_Co


Brooklyn - Person hit by car - Engine 214/Ladder 111 - July 4, 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cOrfp3sZ3I


Brooklyn - Engine 207 - January 26, 1995

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0p-U2h5FUuw&t=6s


Fire Academy - Lime green Mack spare - 1995

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OF68EppniPk
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:42:17 PM
Brooklyn - Rescue 2 - July 18, 1993

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrPwCYkT5n4&t=41s


Queens - Rescue 4 - February 1, 1995

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvngPst3RIc


Brooklyn - Bn 44 - January 27, 1995

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcZNpkpP4vk
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 18, 2018, 11:47:50 PM
Manhattan - TL 22 Bn 11 response - July 20, 1993

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgg5ydpuUvM

Manhattan - Bn 11 response - July 19, 1993

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UezfP_HGovs


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 12:00:42 AM
Brooklyn  All Hands - Ladder 111 - Bed Sty - July 4, 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT2FfBQmKJo


Brooklyn Dispatchers - July 4, 1992

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJH1RN89yBg


Brooklyn 2nd Alarm - July 3, 1989

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfp6Ggapp0Y


Brooklyn 2nd Alarm - Nostrand & Flushing - August 11, 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZ4nXHYmoIs


Queens 4th Alarm Broadway & Whitney - November 27, 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMCJn9S4NgM

     
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 12:07:07 AM
Brooklyn  5th Alarm - Engine 224 Ladder 124 - July 7, 1992

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cGW1_ULXOg


Brooklyn July 4, 1991

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5g1QiMq93Zw


Brooklyn 3rd Alarm - 10th Ave & 37th St - 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaWWCdmKpeU
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 12:10:10 AM
Brooklyn - 5th Alarm, Utica Ave, Flatbush, Brooklyn, July 18, 1993.

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMfbH8ImdL0


Bronx  Engine 75  July 4, 1994

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxWYuiEDSx0


Man/Bronx - Rescue 3 1990

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYfZTO1Csfs
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 12:17:30 AM
Bronx All hands  183rd & Jerome Ave - September 22, 1987

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHm-olHRgtA


Bronx - 5 ALARM FIRE, 2438 MORRIS AVE, BRONX, FORDHAM HEIGHTS - 1989

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYYvAWUr55A&t=1s


Bronx  ALL HANDS FIRE, 182 STREET & WALTON AVE, BRONX, WEST BRONX - 1989

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlOiyQ5bZRU


Queens  ALL HANDS FIRE, 30 AV & 36 STREET, QUEENS - 1988

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVNCk013lMo
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 12:22:14 AM
Bronx  Taxpayer Fire 1992

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0j63L-ng9E


Manhattan  St. Nicolas Ave, Harlem, January 30, 1995

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtH68-u58js
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 12:32:01 AM
Queens All Hands Rescue Co. 4 February 1, 1995

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkbH1Y-15fI

Manhattan  10-75 Park Ave / 18th St., January 25, 1995

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owJ8lXZlZUs


Queens 1980s:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7PNu8wbiTw
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on June 19, 2018, 06:11:58 PM
Brooklyn Ladder 124 Tonka Truck  1994

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA5ZTmsI_2o



Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 02, 2018, 02:10:19 PM
Engine 307 1953 Ward LaFrance 750 GPM Pumper w/250 gallon tank

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4pptr7qiz/E_307_ap_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4pptr7qiz/)



Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 05, 2018, 01:43:47 PM
Engine 258/Ladder 115 firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue  Long Island City, Queens 14th Division, 45th Battalion

     Engine 1 LICFD organized 12-17 Jackson Avenue w/Ladder 1 LICFD                             1891
     Engine 1 LICFD became Engine 1 FDNY                                                                      1898
     Engine 1 FDNY became Engine 158                                                                            1899
     Engine 158 new firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue w/Ladder 65                                          1904
     Engine 158 became Engine 258                                                                                 1913
     Engine 258 moved 33-51 Greenpoint Avenue at Engine 259                                         1999
     Engine 258 returned 10-40 47th Avenue w/Ladder 115                                                2000

     Ladder 1 LICFD organized 12-16 47th Road former volunteer firehouse                         1891
     Ladder 1 LICFD became Ladder 1 FDNY                                                                      1898
     Ladder 1 became Ladder 65                                                                                       1899
     Ladder 65 new firehouse 10-42 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                          1904
     Ladder 65 became Ladder 115                                                                                   1913
     Ladder 115 moved 11-15 37th Avenue at Engine 260                                                  1999
     Ladder 115 returned 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 258                                                2000

     Search Light 4 Queens organized 10-42 47th Avenue at Engine 258                              1930
     Search Light 4 Queens moved 64-18 Queens Boulevard at Engine 292                          1938
     Search Light 4 Queens moved 56-29 68th Street at Engine 288                                    1966
     Search Light 4 Queens disbanded                                                                               1968

     Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Ladder 115                     1942
     Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens disbanded                                                                      1945

     Battalion 15 organized 12-17 Jackson Avenue at Engine 1                                            1898
     Battalion 15 became Battalion 35                                                                               1898
     Battalion 35 new firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                       1904
     Battalion 35 disbanded (reorganized in Brooklyn at Engine 111)                                   1906

     Battalion 45 organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Engine 158                                            1906
     Battalion 45 moved 33-51 Greenpoint Avenue at Engine 259                                       1979


Long Island City History:

     Long Island City (LIC) was formerly a city, created in 1870, from the merger of the Long Island village of Astoria and the hamlets of Ravenswood, Hunters Point, Blissville, Sunnyside, Dutch Kills, Steinway, Bowery Bay and Middleton in Newtown Township. It was a separate city until it became part of New York City in 1898.   

     Long Island City 1873 map:
                                 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/1873_Beers_Map_of_Astoria_and_Long_Island_City,_Queens,_New_York_-_Geographicus_-_LongIslandCity-beers-1873.jpg (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/1873_Beers_Map_of_Astoria_and_Long_Island_City,_Queens,_New_York_-_Geographicus_-_LongIslandCity-beers-1873.jpg)

          - Note: Blackwells Island (became Welfare Island, then Roosevelt Island); separate Ward's Island and Randall's Island; and ferries to Manhattan.


Long Island City - Volunteer fire department history:

     There were over 20 volunteer fire companies that protected L.I. City, many of which were in service since the 1860s.  All were disbanded by January 1, 1891 when a professional fire department, Long Island City Fire Department (LICFD) was put in place, .
                               
     (http://s14.postimg.cc/irh5iuood/LICFD_1890.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/irh5iuood/)
 
     “Live Oak Truck No. 2”, a volunteer company of Hunter’s Point, was located at a wood-frame shed at Vernon & Borden Avenues.  This became the initial quarters of Ladder 1, LICFD.  In August 1893, Ladder Co. 1 occupied a leased 2-story brick firehouse at 178 7th Street (now 12-16 47th Rd) which was the rear of Engine Co. 1’s quarters that fronted on Jackson Avenue, which became Ladder 115.


Long Island City Fire Department (LICFD):
     
     LICFD was a paid fire department which protected Long Island City in the 1890s before it became part of New York City in 1898.  LICFD companies entered FDNY in 1989 and were renumbered in 1898 and later in 1913.
 
          (http://s22.postimg.cc/pfcicd0z1/LICFD_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/pfcicd0z1/)

          (http://s8.postimg.cc/xb74mvfgh/LICFD_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/xb74mvfgh/)

     LICFD companies 1898:

          (http://s8.postimg.cc/zb120bzm9/LICFD_1897_Brooklyn_Eagle.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/zb120bzm9/)
     

12-17 Jackson Avenue firehouse:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/dflzpkhx7/E_258_fh_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dflzpkhx7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/84734v3kb/E_258_fh_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/84734v3kb/)


12-16 47th Road firehouse:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/sbkix6o6z/L_115_LIFD_L_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sbkix6o6z/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/9x9zsmbq3/E_258_fh_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9x9zsmbq3/)


10-40 47th Avenue firehouse:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/moo5zb8p7/E_258_fh_Ladder_65.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/moo5zb8p7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6nwzvyzjv/E_258_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6nwzvyzjv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/jhtmfp3or/SL-0723-_VS-_X3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jhtmfp3or/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/vfriijq7f/E_158_fh_3.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/vfriijq7f/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/d44jcge8b/E_258_fh.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d44jcge8b/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/vwgeg1xrv/E_258_fh_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vwgeg1xrv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/8uztabdjv/E_258_fh_62.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8uztabdjv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/tf4n8tggb/E_258_fh_61.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tf4n8tggb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3wcavt4m3/E_258_fh_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3wcavt4m3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/l9mlao7mz/E_258_fh_51.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l9mlao7mz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/7fy8lmuh7/E_258_fh_52.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7fy8lmuh7/)


Engine 258:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/f9v5w0vcb/e_258_AP_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f9v5w0vcb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/rapc4rsu3/E_258_ap_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rapc4rsu3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3jpymrniz/E_258_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3jpymrniz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5bixhp9gr/E_258_ap_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5bixhp9gr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5bixhph6j/E_258_5th_alarm_sep_3_1948.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5bixhph6j/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/j57a6sk2j/E_258_ap_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j57a6sk2j/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/rapc4zawb/E_258_ap_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rapc4zawb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/bp80l6jkb/E_258_ap_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bp80l6jkb/)


Ladder 115:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/z4pxq0g0r/L_115_ap_38.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z4pxq0g0r/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m0kddcb4b/L_115_ap_39.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m0kddcb4b/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/9yozj79ln/L_115_ap_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9yozj79ln/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/j6h7zww3f/L_115.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j6h7zww3f/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5pk9h2ocr/L_115_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5pk9h2ocr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/juq2j7i23/L_115_ap_42.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/juq2j7i23/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mdbrjn3pn/L_115_ap_41.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mdbrjn3pn/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ohw4kqshn/L_115_ap_28.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ohw4kqshn/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/diax95p7v/L_115_ap_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/diax95p7v/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/d5jj30oyj/L_115_ap_43.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d5jj30oyj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/bqhyebb0r/L_115_ap_63.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bqhyebb0r/)


CPC 115:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/gxcfyftmz/CPC_115.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gxcfyftmz/)


Engine 258/Ladder 115:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoKcym528_4

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJ_qwtkAJU0

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYqHaHb07bs

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUUVtsxtKc4


Engine 258/Ladder 115 FDNY Medals:

     VICTOR VAN ISEGHEM LT. ENG. 258 FEB. 24, 1947 1948 STIEFEL

     WILLIAM C. RINSDALE FF. ENG. 258 OCT. 2, 1957 1958 HUGH BONNER

           LODD BC William C. Rinsdale, August 1, 1971

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/sxssewfrv/LODD_Rinsdale.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sxssewfrv/)

     THOMAS J. LUCAS FF. LAD. 115 OCT. 13, 1913 1914 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          Rescued 2 y/o William O’Donnell at fire 97 Jackson Avenue, October 13, 1913.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/nd2iyvcpn/Lucas_1913.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nd2iyvcpn/)

     SASHA W. BURAK FF. LAD. 115 FEB. 24, 1947 1948 FDR
     
          Later a Deputy Chief.

     GREGORY PIROZZI FF. LAD. 115 OCT. 26, 1962 1963 KANE

          Firefighter Gregory Pirozzi, Ladder 115, received a medal for saving the life of Lt. Walter Pollack of his company. The officer was one of nearly 20 firefighters who were trapped and injured in a collapse while operating at the fire.  6 firefighters were killed at this Maspeth factory fire, the Sefu Soap and Fat Co.

          http://www.junipercivic.com/historyArticle.asp?nid=95 (http://www.junipercivic.com/historyArticle.asp?nid=95)


Engine 258/Ladder 115 LODDs:

     FIREMAN PATRICK LENNON (Detailed from Engine 160) Engine 158 (258) December 1, 1904 injured November 26, 1904 Box 99-44 Queens Co. Court House, Jackson Avenue

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/cbb85f257/LODD_Lennon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cbb85f257/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/byjtzc71n/Lennon_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/byjtzc71n/)

          Fireman Patrick Lennon was burned while working on the roof of the Queens Co. Court House. The fire started around noon in the third floor kitchen, and spread up through the mansard roof by a strong North wind. Working on the roof at the time of the fire there was twenty one workers who entered through a skylight and became trapped by the flames. An aerial ladder was raised and all twenty one workers came down without any injuries. Fireman Lennon who was detailed to Engine 158 was ordered up to the roof with other members. Lennon was up the ladder first and when he stepped onto the roof, flames enveloped him. Other firemen removed him from the roof and he was removed to a hospital. He had inhaled flames and was badly burnt. While in the hospital, his condition started to improve but took a turn for the worse and died on December 1st.

     FIREMAN EDWARD J. KNAPP Engine 258  July 7, 1927 Box 44-153  43-51 Purvis Street

          Fireman Edward Knapp of Engine 258 was overcome by gas and died on the way to St. John's Hospital. He had reported to duty for his day tour and went to the fire with the rest of the crew to relieve the night tour, who had been fighting the four-alarm fire for five hours. He was operating at the ruins of the Manhattan Steam Bakery Co. at 43-51 Purvis Street. He died from carbon monoxide gas, having been created by the action of water on the hot ovens and the debris strewn about. Dr. Archer declared that Fireman Knapp's death was very unusual.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/ip0b8uesr/Knapp_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ip0b8uesr/)

     LIEUTENANT JAMES A. O'BRIEN (Detailed from L116) Engine 258 April 19, 1930 injured March 17, 1930 in the quarters of Engine 258

          Lieutenant James O'Brien of Hook & Ladder 116 died as the result of injuries he received at Engine 258's quarters. On March 17, while detailed to Engine 258, he suffered burns to the eyes and the face when he fell carrying a pail of water containing caustic soda. He died at his home from pneumonia resulting from his injuries.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/q4zkurs97/O_Brien_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q4zkurs97/)

LIEUTENANT JOHN W. SMITH Ladder 115 June 18, 1933  (Injured May 19, 1933) Box 7209  25-19 Borden Avenue

          Lieutenant John W. Smith was injured when he fell from the first floor to the basement after forcing a door to search for the fire.  Other members of Ladder 115 heard him cry for help and ran to his aid.  He suffered cuts about the head and possibly a fractured skull.  He stayed in the hospital until June 16th at which time he went home.  He had a relapse and returned to the hospital and died.  He was 57 years and a veteran of thirty years on the job.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/q4zkuy7qj/Smith_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q4zkuy7qj/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/etwx60vkb/Smith_2_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/etwx60vkb/)


     FIREMAN MICHAEL BERENZ Engine 258 October 22, 1957 (Injured January 26, 1957) Box 7369 38th Avenue & 10th Street

               At 11:20 pm after returning from a fire at 38-25 9th Street, Fireman Michael Berenz of Engine 258 complained of severe pains in the chest. Rescue 4 and a public ambulance were called to quarters and administered oxygen. Fireman Berenz was removed by ambulance to St. John's hospital. Doctor Hania in attendance diagnosis possible Coronary Thrombosis. He died 10 months later from a fatal heart attack.

     FIREMAN FRANCIS X. EGAN Ladder 115 October 26, 1962 Box 7027  56th Rd. & 48th Street

          Firemen Richard Andrews, James Marino, Captain William Russell of Engine 325, Firemen Richard Gifford, George Zahn of Engine 238, and Fireman Francis Egan of Ladder 115, were killed by a falling wall during a fourth-alarm.  At least seven other firemen were injured.  The dead and injured firemen were trapped on the first floor of the factory, the Sefu Soap and Fat Co. at 44-15 56th Road in Maspeth.  The men were buried In 6 feet of debris as the wall and ceiling of the two story brick building fell.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/z1acygy8b/Eagan_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z1acygy8b/)

          On October 26, 1962 a building collapse took the lives of six firemen at 44-15 56th Street. The five-alarm fire started around 9:30 at night at the Sefu Soap & Fat Company. It was placed under control at 10:30 and five minutes later a twenty-foot section of metal roofing over the loading dock came crashing down. The collapse took out the brick wall of the two-story building and buried twenty men. Heavy equipment was rushed in to assist in the digging for the buried men. Fourteen men were quickly dug out with various injuries and taken to area hospitals. The six that were killed were buried under six feet of debris. A worker started the fire during the day, using an acetylene torch to cut up old machinery. He had started two fires and put them out himself without calling the fire department. Killed in the fire were Captain William F. Russell, Fireman James M. Marino and Probationary Fireman Richard Andrews of Engine 325, Firemen Richard P. Gifford and George J. Zahn of Engine 238 and Fireman Francis X. Egan of Ladder 115. Captain Russell was forty-three years old while the others were all in their twenties.

          (http://s29.postimg.cc/644r2xio3/sefu.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/644r2xio3/)

     FIREMAN GERARD T. GANLEY (Detailed to E297) Engine 258 July 13, 1978 Box 4553 20th Avenue & 120th Street

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/ybrkmcq1n/Ganley_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ybrkmcq1n/)
     
         Fireman Gerard T. Ganley of E258, was detailed to E297 pending transfer to that unit. E297 was special called to a brush fire at 20th Avenue. While assisting in the stretching of a line, Fireman Ganley was stricken with a heart attack. He was removed to Parsons Hospital but was dead on arrival. He had 18 years of service in the fire department.


L.I.C. Volunteer FIREMAN MICHAEL RIGNEY Jackson Hose No. 5 July 17, 1888 Vernon Boulevard, Ravenswood

     “The new factory of the New York Architectural Terra-Cotta Company was only in business since April before it was wiped out by fire.  On Saturday, the workers had left the building around four o’clock in the afternoon and the night watchman was making his rounds around 10:30 that night when he discovered a fire on the top floor near the flues for the kilns.  He tried to put the fire out but could not.  The delayed alarm was sent out and the volunteer fire department responded.  The three engines, six hose, and three ladder companies were soon hard at work.  The closest hydrant was 1,000 feet away and hose lines were stretched to the fire.  Somebody cut the hose line at the hydrant and it had to be replaced with a new line of hose.  Fireman Michael Rigney of Jackson Hose 5 was on the west side of the boiler house directing a hose line when the wall fell on him and another fireman.  Both men were quickly pulled from the rubble.  Fireman Rigney suffered a hole in his head from a brick and a broken collarbone.  The skin on his right hand was ripped off and the right side of his body was badly burned from the hip down.  He was taken home and treated.  He died from his injuries on July 31, 1888.  The second fireman was from Hunter Engine 4 and only received a burned hand and a cut on his head.”

     RIP.  Never forget.


10-40 47th Avenue firehouse history:

     Queenswalk: The Firehouse in Hunter’s Point: Engine Co. 258 and Ladder Co. 115

     Brooklyn and Manhattan had fire companies that were established long before Queens’ were. Long Island City, because it is so close to Manhattan and was the center of Queens’ government, was the first part of Queens to get a professional fire company. That was in 1891. By comparison, independent cities like Manhattan and Brooklyn had professional companies mandated by state charter in 1865.

     Before 1890, the separate towns that made up LIC had 12 volunteer fire departments. When the law authorizing paid departments in Queens was passed that year, all of the volunteer departments were disbanded, and five new houses were built for the new companies. When the city consolidated in 1898, these companies were brought under the control of a central New York City fire department.

     In 1899, the city announced that they were authorizing the building of new fire houses in Brooklyn and Queens. The fire house on Jackson Avenue that contained Engine 258 was considered one of the worst and most dangerous in the city, “a danger to life and limb,” according to the Brooklyn Eagle. The new fire house would be built on land purchased by the city at 10-40 47th Avenue, between Vernon Avenue and 11th Street.

     The building was begun in 1902 and completed in 1904. It was built to accommodate Engine Co. 258, Ladder Co. 115, and headquarters for the battalion chief. It was close to the old fire house, but more importantly, close to Borough Hall and two important factories: the Pratt & Lambert Varnish Factory and an oil refinery for Standard Oil. The rest of the immediate neighborhood held schools, small businesses and a sizable residential area full of attached wood framed houses.

     Over in Manhattan, the city had commissioned just one architect to design that city’s firehouses: Napoleon LeBrun. Between 1879 and 1894 he, and later with his sons, designed over 40 fire houses. Many still remain, and are gorgeous examples of civic architecture, and indeed worthy of Manhattan.

     In Brooklyn, prior to 1898, that city had hired several of the best residential and commercial architects in that city to design firehouses. Peter J. Lauritzen, who designed my old Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood’s firehouse on Madison Street was among them, as were the Parfitt Brothers, Frank Freeman, Frank J. Helmle and others. Their firehouses are also masterful and imaginative examples of fine civic architecture. Today, many of the fine fire houses of the LeBrun’s and the Brooklyn architects are protected by landmarking.

     By 1900, the expanded Greater City of New York began hiring some new architects, and the most prominent of those was Ernest Flagg and Bradford Lee Gilbert. The two only designed three firehouses, but they were all masterful. Flagg’s were in Manhattan, and the architect of Engine Co. 258 was Bradford Lee Gilbert. A graduate of Yale University, he trained in the offices of Josiah C. Cady, a major talent who was the architect of the southern wing of the Museum of Natural History, as well as the old Metropolitan Opera House and the New York Presbyterian Hospital. Cady also designed 15 buildings on Yale’s campus, including the Peabody Museum, so no doubt that Yale connection was a plus.

     In 1876, Gilbert was appointed architect for the New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad. He designed buildings for them that can still be found throughout the eastern half of North America, including Detroit, Chicago, Ottawa and Halifax. He based his practice in Manhattan, and is credited as the architect of the first New York City skyscraper, the Tower Building, completed in 1899. It was located at 50 Broadway, and at eleven stories, was one of the first steel framed buildings in Manhattan. Gilbert was quite proud of this one, and maintained his office on the top floor of the building until his death in 1911.

     Most of Gilbert’s designs were in the Romanesque Revival style, but for the new firehouse, he decided to reference New York City’s Dutch roots. The step gabled roofline is a classic feature of Dutch building, dating back as far as the late 14th century. This feature was especially popular on canal houses and row houses, where small lots necessitated multi-story buildings. The step gables used on Engine 258 are called “proto-Baroque” by experts on Dutch building styles.

     In any case, Gilbert was not the first to design Dutch Renaissance Revival firehouses. Napoleon LeBrun had designed one for the old Manhattan Engine Co. 15, now demolished. In Brooklyn, the Parfitt Brothers designed Engine Co. 253, which is in Bensonhurst, and landmarked. Both were before Gilberts’ Long Island City firehouse. Gilbert himself alter designed more than a few building in this style, suggesting he really liked it, as the buildings are as far flung as a train station in Mexico, a YMCA in Harlem, a hospital complex in Staten Island, and a group of row houses in Manhattan.

     Engine Co. 258 and Ladder Co. 115’s new building opened with great fanfare, in 1904. It’s a magnificent building, quite visually striking and a prominent part of the streetscape. The top part of the roof is five stories tall, putting it at least a story above the rest of the block. His use of materials creates a powerful contrast between the light colored quoins, the key surrounds on the windows and the ornament, and the darker burnt brick.

     The building is 50 feet wide, built to accommodate both the engine and ladder trucks. The size of the building, and the bays themselves, predated our large fire trucks of today, but the building was built large enough to make housing them possible.

     The tall structure could also accommodate hanging space for the hoses, which needed to be hung up lengthwise to dry properly when not in use. The firehouse also needed to have enough room to have a dormitory for the men, who at the time, worked 24-hour, six-day shifts before a day off. There were offices for the battalion commander, and the chief, as well as bathroom facilities, a day room and a kitchen/eating area.

     Today, the firehouse is still in use, and a prominent landmark in the community. It’s been mentioned in every edition of the AIA Guide to New York City, and was called a “gem” in Jeffrey Kroessler and Nina S. Rappaport’s book Historic Preservation in Queens. The building was also cited by the Queens Historical Society as a “Queensmark,” a building with architectural, historic or cultural significance.

     It may also be recognized as the firehouse serving as the headquarters for the firefighters and EMTs in the television series Third Watch, which aired from 1999-2005. The firehouse was landmarked in 2006.

         https://www.brownstoner.com/queens/long-island-city/queenswalk-the-firehouse-in-hunters-point-engine-co-258-and-ladder-co-115/


Engine 258/Ladder 115 neighborhood:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/d2mbuag2z/E_258_neighborhood.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d2mbuag2z/)

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2007/08/hunters-point-queens/



     (https://s33.postimg.cc/npg4zutez/Patch_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/npg4zutez/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/wkgzaf07v/Patch.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wkgzaf07v/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 05, 2018, 02:05:48 PM
Fire Engine Company No. 258, Hook and Ladder Company No. 115

(https://s33.postimg.cc/m2vis6bu3/7-_Fire-_Engine-_Co_-258-1000x685.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m2vis6bu3/)

10-40 47th Avenue
Bradford Lee Gilbert  1902-04


Today considered to be one of the most dignified firehouses in New York City, this Dutch Renaissance Revival style structure commands a strong presence with its 4˝ stories and 53-foot width along 47th Avenue. Its architect, Bradford Lee Gilbert, designed only this one firehouse over the course of his career. A pioneer in steel frame construction, Gilbert gained prominence across the country for the design of railroad structures and is known locally for his design of the Tower Building in Lower Manhattan, considered New York’s first skyscraper with a steel skeleton, constructed in 1887-89 (demolished in 1913). As an important political and industrial center, Long Island City was the first part of Queens to have a professional fire department, enabled by an act of the state legislature in 1890. In 1898, after the consolidation of the boroughs, the Long Island City and Brooklyn departments merged with the Fire Department of the City of New York. Upon consolidation, officials planned an expanded fire department to accommodate a growing population and improve working conditions for firefighters. This building was one of the more ambitious firehouse projects undertaken by the department due to its size and level of architectural detail, and was built for the same company that laid claim to being the borough’s first professional fire department. Although its numbering system changed over time, the company’s first name was Engine Company No. 1 and Hook & Ladder Company No. 1, which was established in 1891. The brick structure with granite and limestone trim is a rare example of the Dutch Renaissance Revival style, which was likely employed by Gilbert in homage to New York City’s Dutch roots

http://6tocelebrate.org/site/fire-engine-company-no-258-hook-and-ladder-company-no-115/
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 05, 2018, 04:04:24 PM
Engine 258 (then 158) operating at fire - note individual in background working on telephone or electrical line:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/f9v5w0vcb/e_258_AP_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f9v5w0vcb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/xgn5ocaej/GAHS0672-_X3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xgn5ocaej/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 05, 2018, 06:04:49 PM
     Ladder 1 LICFD organized 12-16 47th Road former volunteer firehouse                         1891
     Ladder 1 LICFD became Ladder 1 FDNY                                                                      1898
     Ladder 1 became Ladder 65                                                                                       1899
     Ladder 65 new firehouse 10-42 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                          1904
     Ladder 65 became Ladder 115                                                                                   1913
     Ladder 115 moved 11-15 37th Avenue at Engine 260                                                  1999
     Ladder 115 returned 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 258                                                2000
Long Island City Ladder 1 initially became Ladder 15 FDNY for approximately 6 months in 1899, before being renumbered as Ladder 65 later in 1899, and then being renumbered as Ladder 115 in 1913.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 05, 2018, 06:13:55 PM
In mack's reply # 258 above mention is made of a "Relay Hose Wagon"...   ("Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Ladder 115 in 1942  &   Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens disbanded  in 1945")                                            ..... during WW2 Relay Hose Wagons were organized & equipped to carry large amounts of Hose in case water mains here in NYC were bombed ....i don't know about this particular Rig # 4 but i have seen a picture of one (#?) that was built on a Hook & Ladder chassis complete with a Tillerman....maybe someone can dig up a picture of one of these interesting Rigs......( not sure but i think i remember it being painted gray or white in the picture ?).
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 05, 2018, 06:21:51 PM
     Battalion 15 organized 12-17 Jackson Avenue at Engine 1                                            1898
     Battalion 15 became Battalion 35                                                                               1898
     Battalion 35 new firehouse 10-40 47th Avenue w/Engine 158                                       1904
     Battalion 35 disbanded (reorganized in Brooklyn at Engine 111)                                   1906

     Battalion 45 organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Engine 158                                            1906
     Battalion 45 moved 33-51 Greenpoint Avenue at Engine 259                                       1979

Long Island City FD Battalion 1 became Battalion 15 FDNY in 1898, then was renumbered as Battalion 35 later in 1898, then renumbered as Battalion 45 in 1906.

Brooklyn FD District Engineer 5 became Battalion 25 FDNY in 1898, then was renumbered as Battalion 35 in 1906.

Both the Brooklyn and the Long Island City battalions pre existed the merger with FDNY, thus Queens BC35 gave up their number to become BC45, while Brooklyn BC25 gave up their number to become BC35, and BC25 was used again in Manhattan in 1907.

Queens and Brooklyn both had a BC35, but their timelines are simultaneous and separate.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 05, 2018, 09:28:47 PM
In mack's reply # 258 above mention is made of a "Relay Hose Wagon"...   ("Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens organized 10-40 47th Avenue at Ladder 115 in 1942  &   Relay Hose Wagon 4 Queens disbanded  in 1945")                                            ..... during WW2 Relay Hose Wagons were organized & equipped to carry large amounts of Hose in case water mains here in NYC were bombed ....i don't know about this particular Rig # 4 but i have seen a picture of one (#?) that was built on a Hook & Ladder chassis complete with a Tillerman....maybe someone can dig up a picture of one of these interesting Rigs......( not sure but i think i remember it being painted gray or white in the picture ?).

Thanks Chief.  Rigs were painted gray and had blacked out headlights.

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/r8k7dlobf/Relay_Hose.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r8k7dlobf/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 05, 2018, 09:34:57 PM
Searchlight 4 located at Engine 258 1930-1938   
1929 Packard:


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4l4y74o3f/ny_nyc_fdny_retired_searchlight_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4l4y74o3f/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 05, 2018, 11:03:44 PM
Members of LICFD 1889:


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5jpwnle2z/LICFD_1889.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5jpwnle2z/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 06, 2018, 02:09:25 AM
As far as reply # 264 above.....mack Thanks ...Yes that is the photo....i did not want to put you on the spot to find it but when i asked if somebody might i thought you would be the one to find & post it....some good History.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 07, 2018, 09:08:55 AM
FDNY "24 hours in the FDNY firehouse that never sleeps"

     By NJ Burkett with exclusive access at one of New York City's busiest fire houses.

     Monday, February 12, 2018  FLATBUSH, Brooklyn (WABC) --


          http://abc7ny.com/24-hours-in-the-firehouse-that-never-sleeps/3072654/


"It's long past midnight in Flatbush, Brooklyn, and firefighter Mark Merrell of Engine 255 is explaining to me why medals aren't important and being called a hero doesn't matter all that much.

"What you try to achieve is for somebody to say, 'you're a good fireman.' That's probably the biggest compliment you can get," he says. "And that don't come easy."

The firehouse kitchen erupts in laughter. Mark smiles, because it's a tough crowd and he knows I know that. But I'm spending twenty-four hours with the firefighters of Engine Company 255 and Ladder Company 157 -- one of the busiest firehouses in New York - and I'm ready for pretty much anything.

The FDNY granted us total access and even provided a chase car with lights, siren and a driver.

Eyewitness News photographer Josh Hartmann and I followed them on virtually every run. There was just one restriction: Don't show the cooking. Why? "It's corny," they told me. (But the chicken marsala was excellent, I have to say.)

No, we didn't sleep at all. It's hard to do that when the alarms go off all night. And we learned pretty quickly that if you're not out the door in 52 seconds, tower ladder chauffeur Dean Montesani will leave you in the dust.

I don't think we ever had more than two hours between runs, and it was often much less than that. I've covered just about every major fire in New York City since Happy Land, and I was amazed at how much I had yet to learn.

Did you know the turnout gear can weigh as much as 100 pounds? (Which amounts to about two-thirds of my body weight.) And it's not like in the movies--when you're running into a fire you often can't see anything. You're groping your way through the smoke to find the fire and any victims who may have been unconscious or trapped.

These firefighters were among the first on the scene in Midwood in March of 2015, when seven children died in a raging house fire.

Pat Rooney of Ladder 157 stood at the scene with me, and tried to put it into words.

"The whole first floor was on fire," he told me. "To be honest, you get reports of people trapped all the time, and they're not there. One neighbor is like, 'There's seven kids in there.' And no way there's seven kids there. I put my ladder up to the bedroom window and went in and there's a kid laying on the floor. You don't think there's gonna be anybody, so when you find one it's a surprise. And when you find out there were seven, it's brutal. I thought about this fire for over a year. Every day, every single day."

"When it's successful," Mark Merrell told me, "there's nothing better. When it's tragedy, you have to deal with it and move on."

That's hard, of course, and they don't really like to talk about it.

Sitting around the kitchen, camera rolling, I ask a serious question. "What's the hardest part of this job?" The answer, almost in unison, "When a reporter wants to hang out in the firehouse." More laughter. Yes, it's a tough crowd.

But you won't find a more upbeat, dedicated group of firefighters anywhere in America. I hope they'll invite me back for dinner some night soon."


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mmu24towb/E_255_FH.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mmu24towb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/oen0zt0kb/E_255_fh_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oen0zt0kb/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 07, 2018, 09:29:39 AM
Engine 255/Ladder 157  firehouse  1367 Rogers Avenue  Flatbush, Brooklyn 15th Division, 41st Battalion  "The Jolly Rogers"

     Engine 55 BFD organized 1367 Rogers Avenue w/Ladder 25 BFD                            1897
     Engine 55 BFD became Engine 55 FDNY                                                               1898
     Engine 55 became Combination Engine Company 55                                             1898
     CEC 55 became CEC 155                                                                                    1899
     CEC 155 became CEC 255                                                                                  1913
     CEC 255 became Engine 255                                                                              1927

     Ladder 25 BFD organized 1367 Rogers Avenue w/Engine 55 BFD                           1897
     Ladder 25 BFD became Ladder 25 FDNY                                                              1898
     Ladder 25 disbanded (Engine 55 became CEC 55)                                                1899

     Ladder 157 organized 1367 Rogers Avenue at Engine 255                                     1927


1367 Rogers Avenue 1897:

     (http://s9.postimg.cc/fjzv6phu3/E_255_fh_1a.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/fjzv6phu3/)

     (http://s29.postimg.cc/9v61o9yz7/E_255_fh_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/9v61o9yz7/)


1367 Rogers Avenue 1940s:

     (https://i.postimg.cc/mhr3cFkx/E-255-fh-5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/mhr3cFkx)


1367 Rogers Avenue 1980s:

     (http://s30.postimg.cc/3qkd69kp9/zxzx.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/3qkd69kp9/)


1367 Rogers Avenue:

     (http://s29.postimg.cc/b8t35u8ur/E_255_fh_4.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/b8t35u8ur/)

     (http://s2.postimg.cc/p410zk411/E_255_fh_3.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/p410zk411/)

     (http://s22.postimg.cc/vro5r6ood/E_255_fh_6.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/vro5r6ood/)

     (http://s10.postimg.cc/6ijksngid/zz_E_255_fh_door_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/6ijksngid/)

     (http://s24.postimg.cc/y6mxearlt/zz_E_255_fh_door.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/y6mxearlt/)


Engine 255/Ladder 157:

     (http://s30.postimg.cc/tec75ty8d/E_255_L_157_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/tec75ty8d/)


Engine 255:

     (http://s4.postimg.cc/x7p0qzard/E_255_ap_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/x7p0qzard/)

     (http://s27.postimg.cc/ma9wwh4fz/E_255_ap_5.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ma9wwh4fz/)

     (http://s7.postimg.cc/bmve1z507/E_255_ap_6.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/bmve1z507/)

     (http://s7.postimg.cc/9883vae53/E_255_ap_4.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/9883vae53/)


Ladder 157:

     (http://s27.postimg.cc/rk745y18f/XX_L_157.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/rk745y18f/)

     (http://s10.postimg.cc/6t0a3h9w5/L_157_ap_6.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/6t0a3h9w5/)

     (http://s21.postimg.cc/vr0848deb/L_157_ap4.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/vr0848deb/)

     (http://s3.postimg.cc/zdximh27j/L_157_ap_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/zdximh27j/)


Engine 255/Ladder 157:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntk14Gsu8AA

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hn8GpDmSOgM

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWKZxpuVSAw


Engine 255/Ladder 157 100 years:

     http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_255/engine_255_history.html (http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_255/engine_255_history.html)


Flatbush Fire Department volunteer companies:

     (http://s28.postimg.cc/pqdxicnc9/E_255_Volunteer_flatbush.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/pqdxicnc9/)


Engine 255/Ladder 157 Medals:

     CAPT. JOHN T. ROKEE DEC. 16, 1962 1963 PRENTICE ASSIGNED TO DIV. 12 AND DETAILED TO LAD. 157

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/dltawwkyz/Rokee.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dltawwkyz/)

          Captain John T. Rokee, Covering in Ladder 157, 12th Division, received the John H. Prentice Medal for assisting in rescuing the trapped occupants of 1391 Flatbush Avenue on December 16, 1962. Captain Rokee helped the remaining people that Fireman Fraker had brought down out of the hallway. He then went upstairs to the 2nd and 3rd floor and found another group of people trapped, and brought them down to safety. Between Fireman Fraker and Captain Rokee they rescued six adults and eight children.

     FF. LAWRENCE J. FRAKER DEC. 16, 1962 1963 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/yvgx7pyor/Fraker.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yvgx7pyor/)

          Fireman 1st grade Lawrence J. Fraker Ladder 157, received the Brooklyn Citizens Medal for rescuing the occupants of 1391 Flatbush Avenue on December 16, 1962. Fireman Fraker found twelve occupants on the 2nd floor landing refusing to move due to the heat coming up the stairwell. Pushing, carrying, he forced them down the stairs only to be blocked by fire coming from the store on the first floor. He placed himself between the fire and their escape and six managed to get out before his clothing caught fire. Seeing this, the members of Engine 255 put a charged hose line on Fireman Fraker. Before being taken to the hospital he notified his officer that there were more people trapped in the hallway

     FF. ROBERT L. TYRRELL APR. 24, 1968 1969 HISPANIC

          Fireman 1st grade Robert L. Tyrrell Ladder 157, received the Hispanic Society Memorial Medal for rescuing a woman and child from a third floor bedroom at 1094 New York Avenue on April 24, 1968. He made a search of the fire apartment and found Barbara Beckwick unconscious. He dragged the unconscious form to the window and handed the woman to other members of Ladder 157, Going back into the burning bedroom he found Dawn Grier, 10 months old in a burning crib. Scooping up the child he raced to the front door as other members of Ladder 157 were breaking down the door. He handed the child to Lieutenant Spitz before collapsing and had to be carried out of the building himself. Mrs. Beckwick was placed on the critical list but, the child died in the hospital. All this was done before any water was placed on the fire.

     FF. ROBERT L. TYRRELL APR. 24, 1971 1972 CONRAN

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          Firefighter 1st grade Robert L. Tyrrell Ladder 157, received his second medal, the William F. Conran Medal for rescuing two children from a bedroom at 2525 Bedford Avenue on April 24, 1971. He entered the fire floor via the rear fire escape and found one child just inside the bedroom window. He handed the child to waiting members outside of the window and entered the room for a second search. Fireman Tyrrell was taking a terrible beating from the heat and smoke but found the second child between the bed and wall. He carried this child to the window and safety. He then entered a third time to search a crib in the bedroom but found no additional children. After the third search Fireman Tyrrell had to be assisted out of the fire building because of exhaustion. Both children recovered in the hospital.

     FF. ROBERT A. BRILL FEB. 25, 1975 1976 PULASKI

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          Fireman 1st Grade Robert A. Brill Ladder 157, received the Pulaski Association Medal for rescuing a little girl from a smoke filled room at 2323 Newkirk Avenue on February 25, 1975. Fireman Brill entered the window of a first floor apartment upon hearing that a child was trapped in the building. The fire had taken possession of three rooms on the fire floor. He worked his way toward the rear bedrooms looking for this child. In the last room he found the girl, unconscious. He protected the little girl with his coat and found his way back to the window, giving the little girl new lease on life. All this was done without the use of a mask or a charged hose line.

     FF. ROBERT L. TYRRELL MAR. 12, 1976 1977 LANE

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          Fireman 1st grade Robert L. Tyrrell Ladder 157, received the Captain Denis W. Lane Memorial Medal for rescuing two people from a third floor apartment at 800 E. 14th Street on March 12, 1976. Firemen Tyrrell drove the company’s tower ladder to the front of the building. As he was raising th bucket it stopped and froze in place and would not budge. He then went for a 35’ ladder and placed it at the third floor window. The flames were pushing out of the first and second floor windows as Fireman Tyrrell went up the ladder to rescue a man from the third floor. Shielding the man from the flames he brought him down to safety. The man said that a bedridden woman was still on the third floor. Going back up the ladder and passing the flames Fireman Tyrrell found the 78 year old woman and dragged her to the window. During this time the tower ladder had been fixed and moved to the window. Both Tyrrell and the woman enter the safety of the bucket.

     FF. LAWRENCE MURPHY SEP. 12, 1981 1982 DOLNEY

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          Fireman 1st Grade Lawrence T. Murphy Ladder 157, received the Lt. Robert R. Dolney Medal for rescuing a woman from a burning apartment at 596 Argyle Road on September 12, 1981. Fireman Murphy entered the fire apartment on his hands and knees. Beside pushing through the heat of the fire Murphy had to fight his way through a "Collier mansion." He had to climb over, around and under the junk that blocked his way. He found Ermine Harkins collapsed behind the bathroom door, blocking it from opening. Murphy forced the door open and dragged the unconscious woman to a safe place. She was not breathing and burned over 20 percent of her body. Fireman Murphy along with other firemen brought her back to life. She recovered fully after a long hospital stay.

     CAPT. STANLEY FONER, JAN. 8, 1984 1985 UFOA

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          Captain Stanley Foner Ladder 157, received the Uniformed Fire Officers Association Medal for rescuing a woman from 1921 Avenue "I" on January 8, 1984. Upon arriving at the fire building tenants told the Captain that a woman was trapped in the building. Captain Foner forced the door of the fire apartment and made a search while other members of Ladder 157 donned their mask. He entered the apartment and started his search only to be forced back by the heat. Hearing the woman was still missing, he entered the apartment once again and this time went deeper into the burning apartment. In the rear bedroom he found the woman unconscious and covered with a blanket. Completely covering her with the blanket he dragged her through two rooms of fire to the public hallway. Ann Feslowick survived the fire due to the determination of Captain Foner.

     FF. HARVEY L. HARRELL MAR. 12, 1986 1987 THIRD ALARM

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          Fireman 1st grade Harvey L. Harrell Ladder 157, received the Third Alarm Association Medal for rescuing a man from a fire at 1400 E. 52nd Street on March 12, 1986. Fireman Harrell performed his duty as the outside ventilation man, then went to the rear of the fire building to survey conditions. He forced entry through the rear door into the kitchen and began his search with the living room being fully involved in fire. Entering the bedroom Harvey located a lifeless form partially under the bed. Knowing he could not return through the kitchen because of the fire he tried to get out a window only to be trapped by window bars. Knowing he had only a short time before the room flashed over he retraced his steps back through the kitchen. He dragged the victim under the roaring fire overhead to the outside. The 72 year old man had been burned so severely that he died several hours later.

     FF. GARETH S. NIESEN APR. 5, 1991 1992 THOMPSON

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          Fireman 1st grade Gareth S. Nielsen Ladder 157, received the Commissioner Edward Thompson Medal for rescuing a woman from a burning second floor apartment in a private dwelling at 2421 Avenue "L" on April 5, 1991. Fireman Nielsen was told that people were trapped in the fire apartment. As he was placing a ladder in the rear a woman appeared on the porch yelling her mother was in the fire apartment. Notifying the chief that he was going into the apartment to rescue the woman. He went through the window and started his search. Halfway through he heard a moan to his left and went toward the sound giving up the safety of the wall. With the heat building up in the room and a flashover happening at any moment he found Rosalie Steiner, 80 years old in the hallway and bedroom. Kneeling he dragged, and half carried her to the bedroom window where he lifted her out and on to the porch. She was burnt over forty percent of her body but did surveyed.

     LT. JEREMIAH P. COLLINS SEP. 25, 1991 1992 FIRE CHIEFS

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          Lieutenant Jeremiah P. Collins Ladder 157, received the Fire Chiefs Association Memorial Medal for attempting the rescuing of a man in a basement bedroom at 625 Westminster Road on September 25, 1991. Lt. Collins going down the basement stairs yelled out "Is anyone down here?" and heard someone say "Help me." Going deeper into the basement he found Bruce Donelon in the fire room. Crawling under the fire he tried to pull the 300 pound man out. Another firefighter joined in trying to get the man out. The room suddenly burst into flames and the three men were taking a terrible beating. The protective fire gear protected the two firemen somewhat but all three were burning. Just in time the engine put water on the fire and the three were pulled out. Unfortunately the heat and fire were to much for the 35 year old man and he died in the hospital.

     FF. DANIEL J. DEMPSEY APR. 16, 1992 1993 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          Fireman 1st grade Daniel J. Dempsey Ladder 157, received the Brooklyn Citizens Medal for rescuing a 4 year old child from 799 E. 8th Street on April 16, 1992. Ladder 157 arrived in front of a three story wood frame house with heavy black smoke pushing from the second floor windows and cockloft. The first due engine transmitted a 10-70, a delay in getting water on the fire. Fireman Dempsey was told that children were trapped on the fire floor. Without hesitation he placed a portable ladder to the second floor and entered the smoke filled hallway. He crawled on his belly to the front bedroom and found the door locked. Breaking the door down he located the limp form of young Yisroel Frank. Not breathing Fireman Dempsey took off his mask and placed it on the young child. Crawling back into the hallway he dragged the young child to the stairs and down to safety.

     LT. ROBERT BOLKER OCT. 24, 1992 1993 MC ELLIGOTT

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          Lieutenant Robert Bolker Ladder 157, received the Chief John J. McElligott Medal for the attempted rescue of a little girl from a fire at 179 Linden Boulevard on October 24, 1992. Ladder 157 arrived first at six story apartment building with smoke pushing out the first floor apartment windows. A mother was screaming that her child was in the rear bedroom. Lieutenant Bolker did not hesitate, pass the fire in the living room knowing the hydrant was not working. Once in the bedroom he started his search and found little 2 year old Itye Whyte wedged between the wall and the bed. Protecting the child as best as he could, he crawled down the hall, passing the fire in the living room that was growing. Once outside Lieutenant Bolker started CPR on the little girl until relieved by Engine 249. Despite the heroic effort made by the members of Ladder 157, the child received burns over 50% of her body and died in the hospital.

     LT. JOHN J. PRITCHARD MAR. 27, 1992 1993 LA GUARDIA

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          Lieutenant John J. Pritchard Ladder 157, received the Mayor LaGuardia Medal for the attempted rescue of a 70 year old man at 1188 E. 34th Street on March 27, 1992. Ladder 157 arrived several minutes after Engine 255 arrival and were told that a man was trapped in the fire. Lieutenant James Greco, was being carried out after trying to rescue the trapped man. Lieutenant Pritchard entered the fire building and encountered heavy smoke and high heat. He stay low as he made his way to the bedroom, which was burning along with the living room. Once in the living room Lieutenant Pritchard found Joseph O’Leary on the bed with his clothing on fire. He pulled him from the bed, extinguished the burning clothes. The fire intensified as he was dragging the victim to safety. All during this time Lieutenant Pritchard was receiving serious burns to his neck and face. Mr. O’Leary was removed to Coney Island Hospital and succumbed to his injuries. Lieutenant Pritchard spent over two months on medical leave recovering from his burns.

     LT. JAMES M. AMATO JAN. 29, 1993 1994 FIRE BELL CLUB ASSIGNED TO B-58 AND DETAILED TO LAD. 157

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          Lieutenant James M. Amato, assigned to Battalion 58 and covering in Ladder 157, received the Fire Bell Club Medal for rescuing Maryann Shapiro, age 90 years old, from 5455 Kings Highway on January 29, 1993. Ladder 157 was assigned as an additional truck to the box. Information was relayed to Lieutenant Amato that a woman was trapped on the fourth floor. Lieutenant Amato and his forcible entry team went to the fire floor and saw two apartments on fire. The doors to the two apartment were left open and a 45 mile per hour wind was blowing the fire out the doors like a blow torch. Lieutenant Amato crawled down the hallway passed the fire to apartment 4J where the woman was found semi-conscious. Two engine companies had entered the hallway and drove the fire back into the two apartments and Lieutenant Amato removed the victim down the interior stairway. The fire would burn out that floor and two other floors. If it wasn’t for Lieutenant Amato bravery Maryann Shapiro would have perished in the fire.

     Captain James M. Amato, LODD, September 11, 2001, Squad 1 

     FF. THOMAS J. GARDNER NOV. 7, 1993 1994 GOLDMAN

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          Fireman 1st grade Thomas J. Gardner Ladder 157, received the Edith B. Goldman Medal for rescuing a woman from a basement apartment at 729 E. 26th Street on November 7, 1993. When Ladder 157 arrived people were screaming that a woman was trapped in the basement apartment. Part of the forcible entry team, Tom entered the hallway that leads to the basement and 1st floor. The door blocked the basement stairs and prevented the placement of a hoseline into the basement. Knowing this Tom went down into the basement to look for the woman. The fire was in the small kitchen across the room. Because of the limited ventilation and low ceilings the heat was building up and conditions were becoming unbearable. Continuing passed the kitchen on his belly he found the bedroom and entered it looking for the victim. He found 45 year old Jacqueline Vital, unconscious on the bed. He dragged her through the bedroom and kitchen, up the stairs and to safety. She was admitted to the hospital and would recover.

     FF. THOMAS E. CLAIR III OCT. 14, 1994 1995 THIRD ALARM

          Fireman 1st grade Thomas E. Clair III, received the Third Alarm Association Medal for rescuing a 35 year old man from 734 E. 8th Street on October 13, 1994. While enroute the company was given reports that people were trapped in the building. Smelling the fire several blocks away, Ladder 157 could not believe what they saw when pulling up in front of the fire building. A two story wood frame private dwelling that had fire coming out every window on both floors. With little time left the forcible entry team went up the partially burnt staircase to the second floor. The fire had total control of the rear bedrooms moving down the hallway to the front bedrooms. Tom raced the fire to one of the front bedroom and started his search. He located a mattress on the floor and found Eric Penzola not responding lying on it. Knowing he could not retreat back through the hallway because of the advancing fire Tom called for a ladder to carry what seemed at the time a dead man. Before a ladder could be placed against the window an engine company was putting water on the fire in the hallway. Without a second thought Tom carried the man down the hallway and down the stairs to safety. Eric would spend a long time in the hospital before recovering and getting on with his life.

     LT. ROBERT J. BOLKER DEC. 13, 1994 1995 DOUGHERTY

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          Lieutenant Robert J. Bolker Ladder 157, received the Thomas F. Dougherty Medal for rescuing five people from a fire at 371 E. 32nd Street on December 13, 1994. Lt. Bolker received over the radio that people were trapped in the fire building. Racing in with the forcible entry team they found the fire was in the basement even though the smoke only coming out of the second floor windows. The roofman radioed that he could see some people in the rear top bedroom. Lt. Bloker worked his way to the rear bedroom were he found a 3 month boy and a 13 day old boy along with three women in their thirty’s. One by one the five victims were handed out to the members of Ladder 147. All five were overcome by smoke and after a short stay in the hospital all recovered.

     FF. ANTHONY ROCCO, JR. OCT. 8, 1990 1991 LAUFER

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          Fireman Anthony Rocco, Jr. Engine 255 detailed to Ladder 157, received the Arthur J. Laufer Memorial Medal for rescuing an 88 year old lady from a fire at 1006 E. 36th Street on October 8, 1990. The first run of the night found the company responding to a report of fire in a second floor apartment. Once on the scene it was learnd that two elderly sisters were still in the fire apartment. Anthony being the can man went to the fire apartment and used his extinguisher to keep the flames in check inside the fire apartment. He entered the apartment to look for the two ladies only to be blocked by their collection of newspapers and other treasures that the ladies collected. Once through the obstacle course he located 88 year old Mary Greenhill, unconscious in the rear bedroom. Anthony could see Engine 255 in position with the hose line to attack the fire when they backed out without putting water on the fire due to a burst hose line. Knowing he did not have much time left he looked for another way out and could not find one so he closed the bedroom door to buy some extra time. Only when he heard water hitting the fire did he open the door and carry the woman out of the building and to safety.

     FF. DOMINICK M. MUSCHELLO, NOVEMBER 19, 2014, BROOKLYN BOX 22-2446,  BKLYN CITIZENS/FF LOUIS VALENTINO AWARD

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     FF. MICHAEL RYSETNYK, DECEMBEL 11, 2015, BROOKLYN BOX 75-2441, BKLYN CITIZENS/FF LOUIS VALENTINO AWARD

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Ladder 157 LODD:

     FF Thomas F Shortell, US Marine Corps KIA, Iwo Jima, March 8, 1945

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          Thomas Francis Shortell (known to friends and family as Tommy or Tom), was the son of a New York City Firefighter. He was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1914. He was appointed to the Fire Department of New York City on June 6, 1938 and was assigned to Engine 316. On January 1st 1941 he was transferred to Ladder Company 157, where he worked until his enlistment in U.S. Marine Corps on June 27th 1944. Tom served with the 3rd Marine Division in the South Pacific. He made the ultimate sacrifice for his country when he was killed on Iwo Jima on March 8th 1945. He was survived by his mother, Helen O'Mara Shortell, his brother John (Jack) Shortell, and four children: Thomas (Tom), Carol, Gerard (Jerry) and Hellen.


Flatbush:

     

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Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 07, 2018, 10:06:37 AM
From NYFD.com:


100 YEARS OF THE JOLLY ROGERS IN FLATBUSH ENGINE 255 & LADDER 157

One hundred years ago in a section of Brooklyn known as Vanderveer Park, two new fire companies were placed in service. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 were organized in a new house on December 15, 1897. These two companies, along with Engines 51 and 57 were also placed in service on the same day, Engine 51 in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Engine 57 in Canarsie. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 would serve only seventeen days with the City of Brooklyn before being taken over by the City of New York. In the past century many things have changed besides the annexation of Brooklyn, horse drawn, two tone green colored apparatus, and name changes.

Vanderveer Park was the northern most part of the Town of Flatlands, which was annexed along with the Towns of Flatbush, New Utrecht and Gravesend in 1894. Today Vanderveer Park lives only in name at the Vanderveer Park Houses on Foster, to Newkirk Avenues between Nostrand and Brooklyn Avenues. Other than the housing projects the name is lost in history and the area is now the junction of Flatbush, Farragut and Midwood.

The fire protection in these four towns were provided by volunteer companies. These companies would continue to provide the protection until the City of Brooklyn could replace the volunteers with paid companies. Each of the volunteer departments would receive $1000 a year for the upkeep and maintenance of the department. The Town of Flatlands was the last department to have its volunteers replaced. Before Engine 55 and Ladder 25 were established, Brooklyn’s Engines 48 (248), 49 (249), 50 (250) and Ladders 22 (at Engine 48), 23 (now Ladder 113), & 20 (at Engine 50) would cover this area.

Located at 1367 Rogers Avenue, the new firehouse is near Farragut Road and the center of Vanderveer Park. It was built on a lot purchased from the Germania Real Estate & Improvement Company for $800 on January 20, 1887. The lot is 40 feet x 102 feet deep. The two story firehouse was built by the Leonard Brothers who had been building firehouses in Brooklyn for the past several years. The front of the building consists of limestone and Harvard brick, while the foundation is of granite. Above the three apparatus doors are three large rounded windows with an iron balcony across the center window. The first floor has room for a steam engine, hose wagon, and a ladder truck along with stables for six horses. In the rear of the apparatus floor was a circular staircase to the second floor. On one of the walls were racks that could dry up to 500 feet of wet hose. The second floor had room for the officer in the front along with a room for lounging between alarms which included a library room. In the center was a dormitory that contained sixteen beds and wood lockers. In the rear was room for the assistant foreman, and a large, well-lighted bathroom. All the wood through the building was of North Carolina pine that was highly polished.

At 8 AM on December 15, 1897, three officers and fourteen firemen placed Engine 55 and Ladder 25 in service. The officers assigned from other Brooklyn companies were; Foreman Charles E. Rikel (Engine 26), Asst. Foremen, Charles Heath (Engine 31) & Alexander Johnston (Engine 35). The rest of the first crew were; Joseph J. Mahoney, Daniel W. Warner, John H. Kraft, Henry Van Houten, Charles F. Tederiman, Henry J. Foster. Arthur Morrall, William Thomas, Samuel Collins, George Miller, Charles Merk, Julius H. Bokenkamp, Peter L. Bullwinkel, and John Kraft. The fourteen man crew were picked from the former members of the Flatlands Volunteer Fire Department. Only sixty of the 200 members applied for these positions.

The working conditions of the fire department 100 years ago was hard compared to todays standard, but back then it was a good job. The work week was six, 24 hour days in a row with one day off. Each fireman went home for meals twice a day for 2 hours at a time. A fireman could be detailed to another fire house for a day to cover somebody’s day off. A salary of $900 a year was considered excellent for that time. Most other jobs were working five and half days a week, 12 to 14 hours a day, for less money.

The first run for the companies was on December 18 at 9:10 in the evening. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 responded to Box 617, Vernon Avenue and Prospect Street (now Tilden Avenue & Veronia Place). The fire was in the rear of 120 Vernon Avenue in a 2 story frame building occupied as a stable and owned by James Hackett. Engine 55 was third due and ordered returned to quarters by the Chief. Total time out of quarters was 30 minutes. Ladder 25 responded with four men and removed hay and straw from the barn. Ladder 25 was placed back in service at 10:11 that night.

The second and last run for 1897 was the next afternoon. It was back to Box 617, Vernon Avenue and Prospect Street for a one story tool shed in the rear of a new building on the corner. The cause of the fire was an overheated stove. Like the first run, the engine was returned without doing any work and the ladder overhauled the shed. The total time out of quarters 38 minutes. Ladder 25 responded with only an assistant foremen and two men, the engine responded with the foreman and five members.

The first real working fire for both companies was on January 4, 1898 and it was the first run of the new year. The Box was 798, Flatbush Avenue near Kings Highway and took both companies 4 minutes to hitch the horses and arrive at the location. The fire was in a barn and wagon house, a 1 story frame building the cause was unknown and the building was destroyed. The 35 gallon chemical tank of the ladder was used and it was recharged twelve times to extinguish the fire. The engine operated five hours and nine minutes while the truck operated five hours and forty minutes.

Some other runs included Ladder 25 being special call back to Box 798 the next night to put water on some of the smoldering remains of the barn fire. On January 8th both companies responded to Ryder Lane and Kings Highway for four barns burning. It took the companies ten minutes to arrive at the fire. The next run was on January 17 to E. 72nd Street and Avenue U, taking twenty minutes to arrive. Both companies were ordered to return to quarters without doing any work. It was also on this run that the first member was injured. Fireman Kraft had his foot step on by one of the truck horses, smashing the big toe and tearing the nail off. He was tended to and when back at quarters was placed on sick leave.

The first multiple alarm fire was on January 19, 1898. The company responded to East Broadway near Neefus Lane (Church Avenue & E. 40th St.reet). The engine took seven minutes to arrive at the hydrant at East Broadway and E. 40th Street, standing fast. The truck was having some problems with one of the horses. It took eight minutes to get the horses out the door and responding. The ladder truck went only as far as Clove Road and East Broadway (now Nostrand Avenue & Church Avenue) and stopped, the horses refusing to go any further. They never made it to the fire and when the horses decided to move the company was ordered to return back to quarters.

On January 1, 1898, New York City, which included the Bronx, and the Cities of Brooklyn, Long Island City, parts of western Queens county and Staten Island would merge into the Greater City of New York. Engine 55 and Ladder 25 along with the rest of the Brooklyn Fire Department, would merge with the F.D.N.Y. on January 28, 1898. On October 1, 1899, Engine 55 became Engine 155 to avoid confusion with Engine 55 in Manhattan. Engine 155 would be renumbered again on January 1, 1913, to Engine 255.

Ladder 25 lost its identity on April 15, 1898, when along with eleven other truck companies were taken out of service. These truck companies were located in the newly annexed areas of Brooklyn. The truck was kept and assigned to Engine 55 making it a combination company. Both apparatus responded together or the ladder truck could respond by itself and it would be known as Ladder 55 on the assignment cards only. The members could be assigned to either rig on any given day.

On February 1, 1927, Engine 255 was reorganized as a single company and the ladder truck was reorganized as Ladder 157. The first members of Ladder 157 were mostly from Engine 255. The first officers were Captain Maurice Foley #1 of Engine 209, and Lieutenant James F. Rice Ladder 153. The chauffeurs were Firemen Chas. Kratochvil, Robert E. Cook, William J. Gallagher #2, Thomas E. Hurley all of Engine 255. The other firemen were Patrick Falvey, Timothy F. Kelly, Benjamin J. Barling, Hugh Gallen, Alfred E. Johnson (Engine 240), Joseph Friel (Ladder 131), and Frank Gehlbach (Ladder 147). The first apparatus was a used 1913 American LaFrance 65 foot aerial truck.

As the apparatus kept getting wider and larger, the apparatus doors of many fire houses had to be remodeled. Engine 255 and Ladder 157 had two of the three doors replaced with a single door in 1925. The contract was awarded during the year of 1925 for a cost of $4,090.00 to replace the doors. Along with Engine 255’s quarters alterations were contracted for Engine 242, 244, and 248. For some unknown reason the four contracts were not completed and were rebid for in 1926. It cost another $2,313.00 to complete the remodeling of the front of quarters.

In one hundred years, Engine 255 and Ladder 157 has been serving the public of the Vanderveer Park section of Brooklyn faithfully regardless of what the company has been called, Engine 55, Ladder 25, Combination Company 255 or Ladder 157. As the community changed from being rural to densely packed the dedication of the members in the fire house on Rogers Avenue has never changed. No matter what the need is, air in a biycle, a safe haven for child, a cut finger or a battle with "Red Devil" Engine 255 and Ladder 157 can be and will be counted on to serve with pride and dedication.

Engine 55 first apparatus was an 1897 LaFrance 4th size steamer which Brooklyn had purchased for the company. The hose wagon was a used 1886 Woodhouse that came from Engine 5, now 205. Ladder 25 received a new 1897 Gleason & Bailey city service ladder truck with a 50 gallon chemical tank. Combination Engine 155 kept this rig until 1904 at which time it was turned over to the Woodhaven Volunteers in Queens. Engine 155 then received a used 1897 Holloway combination chemical, 50’ city service ladder truck. The next two rigs the company received were two used hose wagons. The first was in 1909 and it was an 1893 Marlbourgh hose wagon from Engine 251. The other was in 1912 from Engine 237 and a 1896 P.J. Barrett hose wagon.

Motorization came to Rogers Avenue on April 6, 1915, when Engine 255 received a new 1915 Mack/Boyd hose wagon. Its not known when Engine 255 lost it’s steamer or when they received a motorized pumper. The first motor driven apparatus was again used an 1898 American with a 1915 tractor added to it. This time it came from Engine 257 on December 12, 1923. Since the Department was totally motorized in December of 1922, the horses had to have been replaced earlier. The first modern pumper was 1925 American LaFrance 700 gpm pumper that they received on December 12, 1925.

The rest of Engine 255’s fleet consisted of a 1946 Ward LaFrance and a 1959 Mack. Both of these unites were new and could pump 750 gallons per minutes each. The next four rigs were all Macks which pump 1000 gallons per minute. They were an 1970, 1978, 1979 and 1984 models. The 1984 Mack had its body built by Ward 79 instead of Mack. The current rig is a 1994 Seagrave 1000 gallons per minute pumper. They received it on July 13, 1894.

Engine 255 was a Combination Engine from April of 1898 until February 1, 1927. After that time the truck was taken away from the engine and replaced with Ladder 157. The 1897 Holloway city service ladder truck was replaced on October 14, 1921 with a used 1918 Van Blerk/Combination Ladder city service ladder that came from Engine 5 in Manhattan. November 14, 1924, the Van Blerk was replaced with another used truck. Its not known where it came from but it was a 1921 White/Pirsch city service truck. Once Engine 255 was done with it went to City Island and Ladder 53 on October 30, 1926.

Replacing this unit was a spare 1913 American LaFrance 65 foot aerial. All the other trucks up until this time carried only ground ladders and no aerials. It was with this truck that Ladder 157 was placed in service with on February 1, 1927. Knowing this was a spare apparatus Ladder 157 received a new 1927 FWD tractor pulling an used 1914 American LaFrance 75 foot aerial on November 1, 1927. The first all new apparatus was a 1938 FWD 85 foot aerial on October 12, 1938 which they kept until August 29, 1963. On that date the company received it first metal aerial in a 1956 American LaFrance 85 foot aerial from Ladder 107. On April 16, 1973 Ladder 153 received its first 75 foot tower ladder, 1973 Mack. The next two rigs were both 1981 Mack 75 foot tower ladders The first one was new and assigned to the company on June 18, 1982. The second rig was received used on March 5, 1992 and came from Ladder 85. Today Ladder 157 responds with a 1994 FWD/Baker 75 foot tower ladder they received on August 16, 1994.
ENGINE 255 APPARATUS:

1897 LaFrance 4th size #390 12-15-1897
1886 Woodhouse 2nd size hose wagon #5B 12-15-1897
1897 Holloway Combination chemical, 50’ city service aerial # 11B 12-15-1897
1890 Hayes/LaFrance 75’ aerial #103 8-12-1903?
1893 Marlbourgh hose wagon #17B 1909-1912
1896 P.J. Barrett hose wagon #47B 1912-1915
1915 Mack/Boyd hose wagon #76 4-6-1915
1898 American/1915 tractor (9-3-1915) #2617 12-1915
1918 Van Blerk/Combination Ladder city service ladder 10-14-1921 to 11-14-1924
1921 White/Pirsch city service ladder #195 10-30-26?
1925 Alfco 700 gpm #5291 12-12-25
1946 WLF 750 gpm #2191 9-6-46
1959 Mack 750 gpm #1094 7-3-59
1970 Mack 1000 gpm #MP7055 5-8-1970
1978 Mack 1000 gpm #MP7809 4-13-1979
1979 Mack 1000 gpm #MP7979 11-26-1980
1984 Mack/Ward 1000 gpm #MP8414 12-18-85
1994 Seagrave 1000 gpm #SP9409 7-13-94


LADDER 155 APPARATUS:

1913 Alfco 65’ #121 before 12-8-21
1914 Alfco/1927 FWD tractor 75’ #140 11-1-1927
1938 FWD 85’ #340 10-12-1938
1956 Alfco 85’ metal aerial #412 8-29-1963
1973 Mack 75’ TL MP7303 4-16-1973
1981 Mack 75’ TL MP8103 6-18-1982
1981 Mack 75’ TL MP8107 3-5-1992
1994 FWD/Baker 75’ TL SP9401 8-16-1994
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 08, 2018, 01:56:35 AM
Early FDNY Hook and Ladder companies:

1895:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6atnqe19n/FDNY_hook_and_ladder_-_1895.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6atnqe19n/)

1903:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/hn69899zf/Hook_and_Ladder_1903.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hn69899zf/)

1905:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/7eds22qyz/H_L_1905_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7eds22qyz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6c3ljkxvv/H_L_1905_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6c3ljkxvv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5zc7dh7x7/Hook_and_Ladder_1905_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zc7dh7x7/)

1910:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/tqbkvnspn/Hook_and_Ladder_1910.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tqbkvnspn/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ncmhsfayz/H_L_1910.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ncmhsfayz/)

H&L 2:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6es2kdoez/Ladder_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6es2kdoez/)

H&L 3:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5zc7dq7zv/L_3_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zc7dq7zv/)

H&L 5:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ohl5bos0b/L_5_1866.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ohl5bos0b/)

H&L 7:

    (https://s33.postimg.cc/uh4b1di7f/L_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uh4b1di7f/)

H&L 8:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6ddjcuuiz/L_8_ap_1_aa_1892.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ddjcuuiz/)

H&L 10:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qywwiqm4r/Ladder_10_fulton_Street.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qywwiqm4r/)

H&L 11:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6q4xj4zyz/L_11_ap_1_aa.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6q4xj4zyz/)

H&L 26:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3kox6nz0r/L_26_ap_1919.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3kox6nz0r/)

H&L 27:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/yq913riyj/L_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yq913riyj/)

H&L 31:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/d7sfgpztn/L_31_ap_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d7sfgpztn/)

H&L 35:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/q9e4620x7/L_35.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q9e4620x7/)

H&L 43:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/utvp7m5mz/L_43_ap_1_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/utvp7m5mz/)

H&L 67 (117):

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/vkt0r4hyj/L_67_L_117_1905.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vkt0r4hyj/)

H&L 101 (76):

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ap6qfu3qz/L_76_L101.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ap6qfu3qz/)

BFD H&L 8 (108):

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qopdz1zp7/1_L_8_BFD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qopdz1zp7/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 08, 2018, 11:26:06 AM
Engine 291/Ladder 140  firehouse  56-07 Metropolitan Avenue  Ridgewood, Queens  14th Division, 45th Battalion  "Ridgewood Border Patrol"


     Engine 291 organized 56-07 Metropolitan Avenue w/Ladder 140                      1915

     Ladder 140 organized 56-07 Metropolitan Avenue w/Engine 291                      1915


Pre-FDNY:

     Ridgewood was protected by Metropolitan Engine Company 12 located on Metropolitan Avenue.  Engine 12 was part of the Newtown Fire Department.   

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/u6x91ffe3/Metropolitan_Engine_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u6x91ffe3/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/jwuu27kdn/Metro_Engine_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jwuu27kdn/)

          http://www.newtownhistorical.org/maspeth-history/the-legacy-of-herman-ringe


56-07 Metropolitan Avenue:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/pz2gsbba3/E_291_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pz2gsbba3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/lpxqqn0gb/E_291_fh_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lpxqqn0gb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/kaw61xmij/E_291_fh_26.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kaw61xmij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m2p4wvg63/E_291_fh_21.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m2p4wvg63/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mw1qpih23/E_291_fh_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mw1qpih23/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/nzlv0y6or/E_291_fh_28.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nzlv0y6or/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mxboifiqj/E_291_fh_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mxboifiqj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/b87ouh77f/E_291_fh_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b87ouh77f/)


Engine 291:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/jrr2snne3/E_291_ap_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jrr2snne3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6nlifzq7f/E_291_ap_22.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6nlifzq7f/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/a8hdz2pkb/E_291_ap_52.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a8hdz2pkb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/al8s5a2p7/E_291_ap_49.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/al8s5a2p7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/xpifoy7sr/E_291_ap_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xpifoy7sr/)


Ladder 140:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/k8gvsdie3/ladder_140-1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k8gvsdie3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/rbor81szf/L_140_ap_15.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rbor81szf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/b0onbtgij/L_140_ap_50.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b0onbtgij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/md18tp4nv/L_140_ap_34.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/md18tp4nv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/wzv1z6por/L_140_ap_52.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wzv1z6por/)



Engine 291/Ladder 140:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeob2gbvGGg

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJtmMCikarc


Engine 291/Ladder 140 Centennial:

     http://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/news/2015/09/29/ridgewood-fire-house-celebrates-100-years-of-service.html

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/i90a11gdn/E_291_c_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i90a11gdn/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/xuhll3fi3/E_291_100.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xuhll3fi3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3pt4zs057/E_291_c_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3pt4zs057/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/hjhhouvbf/E_291_c_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hjhhouvbf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/q1qxt24d7/E_291_centennial.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q1qxt24d7/)


Engine 291 LODD:

     LIEUTENANT JOHN MAYER ENGINE 291 May 24, 1929

     Lieutenant John Mayer suffered a fractured skull when he plunged down a flight of stairs in the quarters of Engine 291. He died the following morning at his home. A physician was summoned to his home when he failed to respond to calls. When he fell down the stairs in the engine house, other members of Engine 291 found him unconscious. He regained consciousness quickly and said he received no injuries. He went home and was found dead in his bed the next morning.

     RIP.  Never forget.


FF Albert E. Guinness Ladder 140 - Founder FDNY Uniformed Firemen's Association:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/eqoa4u2or/Albert_G.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eqoa4u2or/)

     Albert E. Guinness is the epitome of the expression, "one man can make a difference." Born in 1875 and joining the FDNY in September 1905, Guinness was the driving force behind the formation of the Uniformed Firemen's Association and its affiliation with the powerful American Federation of Labor. And while lauded by the rank and file, he was not only vilified, he was targeted by the administration.

     Guinness was a firefighter in Ladder Company 140 near his home in Long Island City. In 1918, one year after establishment of the UFA, he was given an un-requested transfer to Ladder 24 in Manhattan in retaliation – according to newspaper reports – for leading firefighters in the Labor Day Parade on Fifth Avenue. In 1922 he was again transferred, this time to Engine Company 70 on City Island, virtually an impossible three-hour commute for someone then living in Brooklyn. This later transfer occurred after his lobbying for back pay due to veterans of the First World War as required under legislation passed the previous year. Three years later he received a transfer to Engine Company 235 that finally brought him closer to his home.

     Some of his accomplishments to improve the lives of his brother firefighters included a twenty-seven percent salary increase in 1920 bringing annual pay up to $1,900 per year. In 1922 the two-platoon system was initiated bringing working hours down from 151 per week to 84. One of Guinness' major goals was to bring about legislative action making death of a firefighter from heart disease a job-related event. That finally happened in 1969.

     Not long after his retirement the same year, Albert E. Guinness died on March 12, 1927 from appendicitis at Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn. He is interred in an unmarked grave Greenwood Cemetery. Annual memorial services were held for him by the UFA for many years after his death. A window to the memory of Albert Guinness was donated by the UFA at the Central Methodist Church in Flatbush, Brooklyn.

     The UFA (now the Uniformed Firefighters Association) continues to represent the uniformed force as its bargaining unit.

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6mg605dpn/Fire_Protestion_Service_Vol_83.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6mg605dpn/)
         
          - "Fire Protection Service" Volume 83  1925

         


Ridgewood History:

     https://ny.curbed.com/2016/5/24/11755562/how-bushwick-and-ridgewood-once-entwined-became-distinct-neighborhoods

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2005/07/ridgewood-queens/


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/smwiglom3/Patch.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/smwiglom3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/b236jacyj/E_291_logo_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b236jacyj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/w6ig6hjmz/Patch_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/w6ig6hjmz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/bz50e8jln/Patch_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bz50e8jln/)


    (https://s33.postimg.cc/dqxz8y0bv/E_291_fh_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dqxz8y0bv/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 08, 2018, 11:54:32 PM
Engine 25 firehouse 342 E 5th Street East Village, Manhattan     DISBANDED

     Engine 25 organized  342 E 5th Street former volunteer firehouse                   1865
     Engine 25 disbanded                                                                                   1947

     Ladder 11 located at 342 E 5th Street at Engine 25                                        1883 


Pre-FDNY:

     Jefferson Engine 26 organized                                               1803
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved Henry & Rutgers Streets               1813
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved Madison & Rutgers Streets            1832
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved Rutgers Street                             1836
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved 205 Madison Street                      1836
     Jefferson Engine 26 moved 6 3rd Street                                 1851
     Jefferson Engine 26 new firehouse 342 E 5th Street                 1852


Jefferson Engine 26:                       

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5y36mgw5n/Jefferson_Engine_26.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5y36mgw5n/)


Engine 25 Metropolitan Fire Department 1865:

     Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 25, (with horses) -- JOHN ALLEN, foreman, No. 342 East Fifth-street.

     Note - Foreman (Captain) pay $800 per year; Asst Foreman (Lieutenant) pay $750 per year; firemen pay $700 per year


Engine 25 FDNY:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/tp2k4ngy3/E_25.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/tp2k4ngy3/)


Engine 25 Roll of Merit:

     Foreman Peter Weir, on August 17, 1871, went through smoke and flames to the 6th floor at 15 Forsyth Street, to rescue a woman and child.

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qaoz2e8e3/Weir.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qaoz2e8e3/)
 

Engine 25 disbanded January 1, 1947:

     On the evening of December 31, 1946, Engine 25 was 3rd due at a multiple alarm fire, Box 396, in a 7 story, 25x100, non-fire proof loft building at 749 Broadway.  All Engine 25 members narrowly escaped a collapse which took the lives of two firefighters, BC William Hogan Battalion 5 and FF Winfield Walsh Ladder 9.  Engine 25  continued to work at the multiple alarm after midnight when the company had been disbanded.           


Volunteer history:

     Our Firemen, The History of the NY Fire Departments
     Chapter 35, Part I

     No. 26. - -Jefferson.--("Blue Boys"). -- The company was organized in 1803. The first record of its location is when she lay in Henry Street near the Presbyterian Church, in Rutgers Street in 1813. During the year 1832 No. 26 moved to Madison Street, near Rutgers, in a frame building on the side of the brick building afterwards used by the company, and after 1845 by Oceana Hose Company No. 36. When the brick house at 205 Madison Street was finished, the company commenced to run the Blue Box Engine, calling themselves the "Blue Boys," with the rallying cry of "True Blue Never Fades." This engine was one of the handsomest, and at the same time the best geared, the lightest running and fastest engine of its day. Joseph Perkins, Elijah King (who afterwards kept the St. mark's Place Hotel, and, later on, the Fire island House) and Ethan L. Blanck were the foremen in those days, and in their little disputes with the "skivers" crowd (No. 39 Engine Company) Dave Phillips, and Jim or Puss Adams, were among the foremost in delivering striking arguments to their opponents. Jamieson Cox, chief engineer of the Department in 1824-28, was appointed an assistant engineer from this company. At the time of the Lorillard fire in Chatham Street, about where Leggett's Hotel now stands, Cox, then a member of 26 Engine, was on a three story ladder that was resting on the front of the building having 26's pipe. Some of the members noticed that the wall was shaking and called to Cox to come down. He had himself recognized the danger of his situation, and by a sudden and powerful effort jumped the ladder from the front of the building over to the front of the next on just as the wall fell in with a crash. Had he not moved the ladder over as he did, nothing could have saved him.

     About May, 1836, the men were having some repairs done to their house in Madison Street, and ran from a little wooden shanty on the north side of Rutgers Street, one door from Madison Street. While in this temporary location the building was discovered to be on fire one day, and on Mr. Charles J. Harris, one of the members, and Thomas Coger, a volunteer, arriving at the house and opening the doors, they were unable to draw the engine from the house, the machine having either been fastened to the floor, or the wheels so chocked that the engine could not be moved. The engine, which was a very handsome one with polished iron work, and a great deal of elaborate carving on it, was partially destroyed. It was a comparatively new machine, having been in use but about three years. this did not prevent the company from continuing their fire duty. They immediately applied for and obtained the engine that had been turned in by Hudson Engine Company No. 1, and commenced to run from their house in Madison Street.
At the fire in the Tribune building which occurred February 5, 1845, during a heavy snow storm which had lasted twenty-four hours, the streets being impassable for their engine, the members of 26 Engine Company put their hose on a wood sled belonging to Hecker, the flour merchant, and drew it to the fire, Zophar Mills and Charles Forrester being on the rope going down. The members then went and helped Engine Company No. 23 across the City Hall Park, they not having yet reached the fire from Anthony Street.

     On the occasion of the obsequies of ex-President Andrew Jackson in New York, June 24, 1845, a great many of the New York fire companies turned out without their apparatus, and among others were Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 26. They had just reached the City Hall, where they were to be dismissed, then the Hall bell struck for the fifth district. Both companies started after their engines, and on reaching Chatham Square No. 26 Engine could be seen coming down East Broadway, and No. 2 Engine coming down Division Street. After a little parley about "going out first," No. 2 engine started over toward Oliver Street, and John Harden, foreman of No. 26 Engine, headed his company over to Mott Street. This "skinned" No. 2 engine's rope, and the fun began. Both companies were halted at Chatham and Chambers Streets, where some lively hitting out was indulged in until stopped by Chief Anderson, and both companies sent home. They went back side by side, stopping a few moments before the Chatham Theater to exchange compliments, and as No. 2 engine men hooted at No. 26. As they separated at Chatham Square, they were obliged to continue hostilities in front of old Johnny Pease's candy store in Division Street, which ended in No. 2 engine being tied up to a lamp post, corner of Rutgers and Henry Streets.

     On the night of July 16, 1845, there were several alarms struck and one of them was for the fire in the old Dispensary, corner of White and Centre Streets. On their way home, when in Walker Street near Eldridge Street, and about opposite the old Sawdust House, kept by "Yankee" Sullivan, No. 2 Engine ran into No. 26 Engine and they struck out right and left. The companies were ordered out run in "tongue first," and the next night their houses were locked up, neither company being present at the great fire which took place down town shortly afterwards. The Blue Engine which No. 26 ran was taken away, but is said to still be in existence. It had a plate on the back of it of Jefferson writing the Declaration of Independence. The company was disbanded on September 22, 1845. A company bearing the same number and name, organized on December 2, 1851, by the company formerly known as Hose Company No. 32, was stationed at No. 6 third Street, and later in Fifth Street near First Avenue. It went out of service in 1865.


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 09, 2018, 11:58:58 PM
Engine 31  87 Lafayette Street  DISBANDED

(https://s33.postimg.cc/6o5q45por/E_31_WNYF_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6o5q45por/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/i0iblzo3v/E_31_wnyf_b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i0iblzo3v/)

http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2010/05/napoleon-le-bruns-fantastic-french.html


(https://s33.postimg.cc/akj209spn/E_31_fh_1_aa.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/akj209spn/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/oe7epdqgr/E_31_fh_6.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/oe7epdqgr/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/dem7dsuwr/E_31_fh_1_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dem7dsuwr/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/5lvjlujsr/E_31_fh_3a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5lvjlujsr/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/urwhss0jf/E_31_fh_1a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/urwhss0jf/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/fx7we212z/E_31_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fx7we212z/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/q60dkecff/E_31_ap.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q60dkecff/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/sbuoek0cr/E_31_fh_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sbuoek0cr/)

https://www.newyorkitecture.com/engine-company-31/

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on July 10, 2018, 01:04:09 AM
Mack,

You're an absolute wonder!

Hope you don't mind a suggestion, but keep an eye out so these gems won't be lost to the "ethernet" like "Section 1" was.

History as recorded by you, guitarman314, memorymaster and so many other site members (down to the up-to-the-minute box alarm assignments from so many dedicated people) is absolutely critical not only for FDNY but for the City itself, for future generations of Firefighters, schoolchildren, doctoral candidates, potential recruits and historians. Do you think there is there any way the Fire Museum or some other FDNY or City component might want to archive your work?  In fact, might the Museum, FDNY, WNYF or City be interested in archiving the extraordinary history, training hints and other issues presented on NYCFIRE.NET?  And would our members from Eire, the UK and other EU nations, South America (and Uncle Willy's northern suburbs, of course) and other areas be interested in formally inviting aboard their Professional and Volunteer Departments?

These things are much too important to be left to hope. There's too much precious history on this site to be left to luck.

Thanks for all your extraordinary work.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 10, 2018, 01:39:10 AM
^^^ This was a question i had posed on here awhile back ....what is archived ?....i know on another FDNY site much (especially pictures that were time consuming to post) suddenly were lost ?.....how can this loss of History be avoided ?
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on July 10, 2018, 01:45:13 AM
Sorry, Chief,

I'm embarassed - I should have mentioned you, Bill D. and numerous other members as Most Valuable Contributors.

Please forgive the oversight.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 10, 2018, 02:35:59 AM
Sorry, Chief,

I'm embarassed - I should have mentioned you, Bill D. and numerous other members as Most Valuable Contributors.

Please forgive the oversight.
You do not need to be embarrassed about anything on here ...you do more behind the scenes than most know especially for Veterans....Thank YOU !
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 11, 2018, 05:31:53 PM
Engine 203 - 1912 Mack high pressure hose wagon:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/n3aq16pij/E_203_tender.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n3aq16pij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/7520bcst7/E_203_ap_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7520bcst7/)

High pressure engine companies were established in Manhattan and Brooklyn to use the new high pressure water pumping systems.  The plan was to take lines off high pressure hydrants without the use of steamers.  High pressure companies initially were viewed as successful holding greater alarms at lower alarm assignments and eliminating the requirement of multiple section engine companies.  The limitations, however, were that high pressure companies without steamers could not respond outside their limited high pressure pumping system response area and relocations into high pressure areas was also limited.  High pressure engine companies were phased out but the high pressure pumping systems remained in operation in parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn into the 1970s.

 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 11, 2018, 08:26:14 PM
FDNY High Pressure System 1905:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qn5uit73f/img-1.jpg.scale.LARGE.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qn5uit73f/)

     https://www.fireengineering.com/articles/print/volume-38/issue-18/features/test-of-high-pressure-fire-system-at-coney-island.html

     https://www.fireengineering.com/articles/print/volume-90/issue-9/features/high-pressure-pumping-station-completed-for-coney-island-area.html

     https://books.google.com/books?id=yRTYfl5m99QC&pg=PA25&lpg=PA25&dq=south+brooklyn+high+pressure+pumping+system&source=bl&ots=jOJocrUUsJ&sig=0MCw6V6SqUu6eY5DHbahBXeToZM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjvgvO8qZjcAhVug-AKHackCmgQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=south%20brooklyn%20high%20pressure%20pumping%20system&f=false


A.P. Smith O'Brien High Pressure Hydrants - "Stubbies"

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5di87nta3/0134.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5di87nta3/)

     http://www.firehydrant.org/pictures/nyc2.html

     https://www.nytimes.com/1997/09/09/nyregion/dormant-fire-hydrants-fading-into-city-history.html
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 11, 2018, 09:03:35 PM
High pressure hydrant in use - Coney Island Dreamland fire - 1911:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/42agz5fnv/Coney-_Island-_Dreamland-_Fire-_Disaster-1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/42agz5fnv/)

     https://www.westland.net/coneyisland/articles/dreamlandfire.htm

     http://www.gendisasters.com/new-york/8052/coney-island-ny-disastrous-fire-may-1911

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/8bf71iljv/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8bf71iljv/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 11, 2018, 11:18:14 PM
Chief John Kenlon  -  Chief of Department  -  1911-1931

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/pou2u3qt7/JK_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pou2u3qt7/)

John Kenlon was born in County Louth, Ireland on August 25, 1861, near the seaport village of Annagassan. One day while working the field of a local estate, he abandoned his mule and plough, headed for boat races and never turned back. At the age of thirteen he signed on as a hand on the topsail schooner Margaret and Peggy and spent the next fourteen years at sea. He chronicled his experiences in his autobiography, Fourteen Years A Sailor, published in 1923.

During a visit to New York City in 1884 he attended a Broadway show. Toward the end of the third act someone in the crowd yelled, "Fire!" and pandemonium ensued as they all clamored toward the main entrance. Kenlon realized that nobody was using the numerous side exits from the theater, so he went that route. Before escaping, he witnessed the arrival of the firefighters who quickly extinguished the growing blaze on the raised curtain. In his account of this incident, he said that the combination of realizing the safety and ease with which the theater could have been evacuated and his intent interest of watching the firefighters work, made up his mind to leave his life at sea and become a New York City firefighter, which he did on April 2, 1887.

His original assignment was with Engine 24. He formed and became first Battalion Chief in charge of the Marine Division in 1905. An examination for promotion to the rank of Deputy Chief of the Marine Division was ordered, a requirement of which was for applicants to hold Pilot's and Master's licenses. Chief Kenlon was the only Chief of Battalion who could qualify and, after passing the examination, he was promoted to this specific title by Special Order No. 45, of April 12, 1909, being the only officer ever promoted to be Deputy Chief of the Marine Division. Two years later, although the junior among the Deputy Chiefs, he was first on the list for Chief of Department and became head of the uniformed force on August 1, 1911. Under his command the FDNY fought one of the most difficult structure fires of the time, the Equitable Building fire in 1912. In 1913, Chief Kenlon penned an authoritative book on firefighting entitled, Fires and Firefighting.

Upon his retirement from the FDNY on March 4, 1931, Chief Kenlon moved to Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

     - from "Find-A-Grave"


     Deputy Chief Marine Division:

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/m5854do4b/JK_New_Yorker.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m5854do4b/)


     Chief of Department:

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/pou2u3qt7/JK_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pou2u3qt7/)
         
          (https://s33.postimg.cc/svomdtqpn/JK_3.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/svomdtqpn/)


     Equitable Building Fire 1912:

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/rtefvanbv/JK_Equitable_Fire_w_Mayor.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rtefvanbv/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/4f6gje09n/JK_7_w_commissioner.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4f6gje09n/)


          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQEy9V61ldE


          (https://s33.postimg.cc/n7ibmzriz/JK_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n7ibmzriz/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 14, 2018, 05:22:04 PM
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

     Brush Fire Patrol 38 organized 3446 Eastchester Road at Engine 38                                                         1963
 
Notes:

     Ladder 15 located at 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38                                                            1874-1881

     Battalion 10 located at 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38                                                         1903-1904

     Battalion 13 located at 1907 Amsterdam Avenue at Engine 38                                       1898-1903, 1904-1916


Engine 38/Ladder 15 1907 Amsterdam Avenue:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/nw3mi740r/E_38_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nw3mi740r/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/a2f9t66aj/E_38_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a2f9t66aj/)


Engine 38/Ladder 51 3446 Eastchester Road:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/wr4gsuqa3/E_51_fh_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wr4gsuqa3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/lervb4mqz/E_38_fh_5.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/lervb4mqz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/u9splp19n/E_38_fh_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u9splp19n/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/dyslpg1nf/E_38_fh_4.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/dyslpg1nf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/dttftijq3/E_38_1980s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dttftijq3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/jbhg33rzf/E_30_fh_42.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jbhg33rzf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3q04j5vgr/E_38_fh_43.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3q04j5vgr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/sj9ojttwr/E_38_fh_44.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sj9ojttwr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mmaeh3x4b/E_38_fh_90.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mmaeh3x4b/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3v3vsz08r/E_38_fh_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3v3vsz08r/)


Engine 38:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/nw3mi740r/E_38_fh_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nw3mi740r/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6k39wnv2z/E_38_ap_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6k39wnv2z/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/v0lfr6t9n/E_38_ap_37.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v0lfr6t9n/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5ukhkdf4r/E_38_ap_40.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/5ukhkdf4r/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/cddbxbm6z/E_38_ap_70.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/cddbxbm6z/)


Ladder 51:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/c89knowwb/L_51_ap_29.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c89knowwb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/42ripjvsr/L_51_ap_18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/42ripjvsr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/vq483nop7/L_51_ap_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vq483nop7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/8bw8rr9cr/L_51_ap_32.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8bw8rr9cr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/bvi6hm9ij/L_51_ap_25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bvi6hm9ij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6wuo33suz/L_51_ap_33.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6wuo33suz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/nxdkbsdm3/L_51_ap_42.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nxdkbsdm3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qrgpp9anf/L_51_members_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qrgpp9anf/)


Engine 38/Ladder 51:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Alc3vQ6WJ0w

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63XyjL-NGQA

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcygWQgh31g

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lggiJvqrOkg&list=UUGgPC7jXVNMDhl7UU1mPUpA&index=53


FDNY Medals:

     CRAIG S. MC LOUGHLIN FF. ENG. 38 SEP. 29, 1995 1996 WYLIE

     LAWRENCE V. ROMANO LT. LAD. 51 FEB. 27, 1966 1967 COLUMBIA

     ANTHONY R. MAZZA FF. LAD. 51 SEP. 10, 1973 1974 HISPANIC


Engine 38/Ladder 51 LODDs:

     CAPTAIN MICHAEL SNYDER ENGINE 38 APRIL 16, 1868

          Captain Michael Snyder died as a result of injuries he sustained March 18th, when he was trampled by the horses in quarters while responding to an alarm in Westchester County. The horses were not entirely hitched to the steamer when the front doors of the firehouse were opened. Foreman Snyder attempted to stop the horses when he was trampled. The run ended up being a false alarm.

     FIREFIGHTER SAMUEL LILLY ENGINE 38 March 30, 1905 Box 874 – W 167 St & Broadway

          FF Lilly was washing down a fire that was burning for days in the subway tunnel.  The members were lowered into the tunnel and started flowing water in the line when bricks and cement began to fall in large quantities. Lilly was struck in the abdomen. As other members tried to rescue members, the top of the tunnel continued to collapse. All members except Lilly were rescued. The IRT Section boss got a rescue crew together and after hard work, located Lilly’s lifeless body. Lilly left behind 3 children.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/gio8jj9rv/Lilly.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/gio8jj9rv/)

     FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY P. LONGA ENGINE 38 March 31, 1957  Limited Service Squad

          He died as a result of injuries he sustained in the line of duty.


WTC Death:

     FF Terence Lorino Ladder 51 May 14, 2018

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/mxn9frli3/L51_members_FF_Terence_Lorino.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mxn9frli3/)

          FF Terence Michael Lorino was a longtime member of FDNY Engine 38 Ladder 51, "Da Dawg House" in Bronx, NY. He also was a U.S. Navy Veteran.


     RIP.  Never forget.


Williamsbridge, Bronx:

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williamsbridge,_Bronx


(https://s33.postimg.cc/tpdoj2kwr/Patch_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tpdoj2kwr/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/xyiel93ln/Patch_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xyiel93ln/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/8shgefpgr/Patch_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8shgefpgr/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 14, 2018, 06:15:05 PM
Engine 38 1969 Mack R model 1000GPM:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6dyrl33aj/E_38_ap_Mack_R_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6dyrl33aj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5bol2mzxn/E_38_Mack_R_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5bol2mzxn/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 14, 2018, 07:22:48 PM
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

Engine 38 is one of the handful of companies that have served in two Boros - in Manhattan until 1918, and in the Bronx ten years later in 1928.

Technically, the same is true for Ladder 51 but in a different way.  Ladder 51 was in Brooklyn from 1899 to 1913 when they were renumbered as Ladder 101, and then Ladder 51 was a new company in the Bronx in 1928.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on July 15, 2018, 01:19:50 AM
  Manhattan Engine 38 was disbanded on Sept. 12, 1918, seven years after E84/L34 firehouse was placed in operation nearby on Aug. 1, 1907.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 15, 2018, 02:44:19 PM
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

Engine 38 is one of the handful of companies that have served in two Boros - in Manhattan until 1918, and in the Bronx ten years later in 1928.

Technically, the same is true for Ladder 51 but in a different way.  Ladder 51 was in Brooklyn from 1899 to 1913 when they were renumbered as Ladder 101, and then Ladder 51 was a new company in the Bronx in 1928.


Engine 47 was organized in the Bronx in 1881, disbanded and reorganized in Manhattan in 1882.

Engine 72 was a Manhattan engine company until 1957 and later reorganized in the Bronx in 1972.

Engine 251 was a Brooklyn engine company, organized in 1897, disbanded in 1946, and reorganized in Queens in 1952

Squad 1 was in Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

Squad 5 was in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Satellite 1 was in Brooklyn and Manhatan.

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 15, 2018, 03:11:24 PM
Captain John Vigiano - Ladder 103, Rescue 2, Ladder 176

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/yfw3kqcwr/JV_12.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yfw3kqcwr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/50qfbssyj/JV_R2_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/50qfbssyj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/p83v3tnsb/JV_R_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p83v3tnsb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/rpfmbin8r/JV_R2_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rpfmbin8r/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m2j9dk7q3/JV_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m2j9dk7q3/)

Awards (-posted by Chief K)

Thomas F. Dougherty Medal awarded to:

Fireman 1st Grade John T. Vigiano Ladder Co. 103
Fire at 468 Berriman Street, Brooklyn. Box 7-5-1918, 2251 hours
December 28, 1968. 2 story Brick, 20 x 40 Class 3 P.D. (Building 3 stories in Rear)

0n arrival of L103, the cellar was fully involved, with an extremely heavy smoke and heat condition throughout the remainder of the building. After the initial size up, the officer in command of L103 requested a full first alarm assignment. Civilians at the scene reported a woman was in the 2nd floor of the building.
Fr. Vigiano had gained access to the roof of the fire building via an adjacent building and had completed preliminary roof ventilation, and was proceeding to ventilate at the rear While carrying out this task he heard a moan from within the building. He immediately lowered himself to the fire escape balcony with a short piece of rope he had been carrying with him. He forced a door to a rear bedroom and made a search, being forced to his hands and knees by the extreme conditions. Approximately 10 feet into the room he found a 65 year old woman in a semi-conscious state lying on the floor near a bed. He removed her to the rear balcony an started mouth to mouth resuscitation. While rendering this aid. Fr. Vigiano collapsed. Subsequently, both he and the victim were removed to the hospital. After initial treatment Fr. Vigiano was released. After returning to quarters to rest, he experienced chest pains, nausea and severe headaches. He was returned to the hospital where he remained overnight for observation It was later disclosed that the victim had a history of tuberculosis and Fr. Vigiano is now being watched to protect him from any possibility of contracting the disease.
This rescue was made under heavy smoke and heat conditions, prior to the use of handlines, and without the protection of a mask. In addition the woman was very heavy, and great exertion was required to effect her rescue by Fr. Vigiano. He showed initiative and determination under arduous circumstances and his aggressiveness undoubtedly saved the life of this person. He acted in the finest traditions of this great department.

..........................................................................
1972 Medal Day Book:
Albert S. Johnston Medal awarded to:

Fireman 1st Grade John T. Vigiano Ladder Co. 103 (now Rescue 2)
Fire at 420 Williams Avenue, Brooklyn. Box 7-5-1720, 2115 hours,
April 9, 1971. 4 story N.F.P., Multiple Dwelling.

Upon arrival at the fire building, members of L103 set out performing their assigned duties. Fire had originated on the 2nd floor and had communicated to 3rd floor via ceiling and flooring. Flames were shooting out of 2nd floor windows and enveloping the fire escape on south side of building. Units attempting to gain access via interior were encountering difficulties due to intense heat and heavy volumes of smoke. No lines had been able-to penetrate and get above the fire. Members on roof were unable to descend fire escape due to flames, heat and smoke.
At this stage, Fireman Vigiano, the chauffeur of L103 and the last to leave the apparatus, noticed a woman at the 3rd floor window in an alley on the south side of the building. He immediately returned to the apparatus and removed a 35' portable ladder, and with the assistance of an auxiliary fireman raised it and placed it alongside the fire escape at the 3rd floor. By this time the woman had disappeared from the window. He quickly climbed the ladder to the 3rd floor balcony where he dashed aver the railing through the smoke and flame and entered the open window where he had seen the woman. Dropping on his stomach he began to crawl through the apartment searching for the woman. He located her in a hallway off the bathroom, in a highly emotional and disoriented state. Dragging and carrying her, he returned to the window. Using his body as a shield from the heat and flames, he got her on the ladder and guided her down to the street. There she told him that her brother was still in the apartment. Although near exhaustion from exertion and the effects of the heat and smoke, Vigianao again climbed to the 3rd floor and despite the worsened conditions, re-entered the apartment to search for the brother.
Crawling through the apartment he finally located the brother in a hallway leading to the interior of the building. He then dragged him through the intense heat and smoke, back to the window. There be carried him out the window to the ladder and then down to the street, again using his body and protective clothing to protect the boy from the heat.
As a result of his actions Fireman Vigiano was later hospitalized and treated for Carbon Monoxide poisoning. His unbelievable courage, in singlehandedly rescuing these two people who were trapped in their apartment, is deserving of the highest praise. His unselfish devotion to duty was of the highest order and in the best traditions of this department.
.........................................................................


1979 Medal Day Book:
Thomas A. Kenny Memorial Medal awarded to:

Lieutenant JOHN T. VlGlANO Rescue Company 2
Fire at 70 Clermont Avenue, Brooklyn
Box 75-385,0100 hours, October 27, 1978
Four story, 20'x40’, Frame Private Dwelling

Arriving at the fire scene, Lieutenant John T. Vigiano and members of R2 observed that fire had full possession of the front bedroom and hall of the 4th floor. Occupants of the dwelling yelled to Lieutenant Vigiano that an elderly woman was trapped upstairs at the attic floor level. R2 members were ordered by the lieutenant to assume the duties of the first arriving ladder company and ascended the stairs to the third floor. He also tried to determine in which room the victim was located. Informed there was no fire escape in the rear of the building, Lieutenant Vigiano requested, via. Handi-Talki, that a roof rope be taken to the roof for an attempted rescue from that point. Moving to the top of the attic stairs with the can man, they encountered severe heat. The door to the fire room had been burnt away. At this moment, Fireman Sullivan dragged a victim to the stairs. Assisting them down the stairs, Fireman Sullivan informed Lieutenant Vigiano that there was another victim in the room.
A second extinguisher was brought up to the fire floor. Lieutenant Vigiano crawled into the back room under the protection of the second extinguisher. Crawling on his stomach, he made his way across the bedroom to the window on the far side. There he discovered the unconscious victim, wedged between the bed and the wall. The room was crowded with furniture, therefore it was difficult to maneuver around the bed. Lieutenant Vigiano was forced to pull the lifeless body up onto the bed and drag her across it onto the floor. Fire had full possession of the front room, interior hall, and was burning across the ceiling of the rear bedroom. Burning paint was I dropping and igniting the mattress in the room.
Lieutenant Vigiano dragged the unconscious and non-breathing, severely burned victim to the stairs. Then other members assisted them down to the third floor. He immediately began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until a resuscitator was placed in operation.
Lieutenant Vigiano acted in a manner which is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Fire Department. If not for his courageous act, this victim would have perished

...
1981 Medal Day Book:
Thomas A. Kenny Memorial Medal awarded to:

Lieutenant JOHN T. VlGlANO Rescue Company 2

Brooklyn's R2 was returning to its quarters after operating at a fire when the dispatcher announced via the Department radio, that an alarm of fire was being transmitted for a 4 story brick apartment house at 713 Lafayette Avenue. The dispatcher finished his message advising that a full first alarm assignment (3 engines and 2 ladders) would be rolling in to the scene due to the numerous phone calls received at the Communications Center. As he signed off announcing the time at 2125 hrs., Lieutenant John T. Vigiano radioed his units availability since he was only two blocks from the fire scene. "Take it in" came the terse reply. As R2 rolled into the block, members observed a heavy fire condition on the third floor with possible extension to the fourth floor. Instructing his unit to function as the first arriving ladder company, Lieutenant Vigiano raced to the third floor, where a dazed resident informed the rescue officer that people were trapped on the fourth floor.
Fire was now showing at 4 front windows, the roof had not been vented, and without any engine company's at the scene affording the luxury of a hose line to back up his rescue efforts, Lieutenant Vigiano knew he had to act quickly to reach any victims. While donning the facepiece to his mask, he reached the fourth floor landing, where intense smoke and heat drove him to a crawling position. Upon entering the apartment, he crawled down a long hallway, stopping occasionally to listen for cries of help. Half way down the hall, he heard the anguished pleas for rescue. Temporary renovations to the apartment slowed the rescue attempt. After doubling back from the kitchen, he found the opening to the front bedroom just as the victim, Lincoln Dawkins, cried out one more time. Near exhaustion from searching four other rooms prior to locating the victim, Vigiano now had to remove the semi-conscious victim. While dragging him from the apartment, he stopped a few times to administer air from his own mask.
At one point, the victim, barely audible, informed the rescue officer that his mother was in the front of the bedroom. Vigiano took Dawkins to the hallway and headed back to the bedroom in search of the mother. Fire had gained complete control of the thud floor and blew in the windows of the bedroom on the fourth floor, cutting the lieutenant. Fire now was spreading in his locale and an urgent message from Chief James Duffy (B57) advised him that all residents had been accounted for, and ordered a hasty retreat. Fire was now gaining headway on the fourth floor and as Lieutenant Vigiano made his exit, members of Engine Companies 209 and 217 were moving a hoseline into position to extinguish the blaze.
For Mr. Dawkins and the residents on the fourth floor, it was fortunate indeed that R2 was in such close proximity to the building as the fire broke out.
R2 has a long and glorious history of heroism. Lieutenant Vigiano added another remarkable feat to its already outstanding record. It is interesting to note that Lieutenant Vigiano's son, Joseph, was recently awarded one of the Boy Scouts of America highest awards for heroism. The youngster saved three lives last summer in Clearwater, Florida. As young Joseph looks on today, he will watch his father honored for his valiant actions. Whoever first called New York's Firefighters-"The Bravest"-had to be thinking of men like Lieutenant John T. Vigiano of R2.
..................................................John had received the Thomas A. Kenny on two separate Medal Days.



     (https://s33.postimg.cc/pm573qd4b/JV_11.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pm573qd4b/)



CAPTAIN JOHN T. VIGIANO (NYFD site)

John T. Vigiano is a retired Captain of the New York City Fire Department, with over 38 years of service. 

His career started in 1962 with Ladder Company 103 in the East New York - Brownsville section of Brooklyn.
He transferred to Rescue Company 2 for a short period but returned to Ladder 103 until his promotion to Lieutenant in 1976.
After a 6-month period of covering in Far Rockaway, he returned to Brooklyn and to Ladder Company 132 where he stayed
until his transfer to Rescue Company 2 in 1977.  He remained in Rescue Company 2 until his promotion to Captain in 1988.
 Upon promotion, he was assigned to the Rescue Liaison Unit for nearly a year until his assignment to
 Ladder Company 176, "The Tin-House Truck" where is he retired as the Company Commander in May of 1998.

John is a graduate of John Jay College with a Bachelors Degree in Fire Science.

He is also a Certified New York State Instructor who was an Adjunct Instructor to the New York State First Line Supervisors Training Program.
He was also an adjunct instructor for the Captains Management - Training Program for the New York City Fire Department.

In addition to his full time fire career, John also worked for the Suffolk County Fire Training Academy for over 14 years.
Where he designed and wrote the Heavy Rescue Program. He retired from the County in 1998.

He has authored many articles for the various trade magazines such as Firehouse, Fire Engineering and Fire Command.
He has lectured at the Firehouse Conference in Baltimore in 1998 and FDIC in Indiana this year.

John has been lecturing to many departments for over twenty years.
 He is the director of Fire Mark Consultants; a company that specializes in fire related seminars.


Subject: Accountibility
By: Captain John Vigiano (Ret)

There is a riding list.  The officer on duty writes this up at the
start of each tour (shift).  It lists the following info:
a) Members riding position, eg. where he/she is seated on the apparatus.
b) Members assignment, eg. forcible entry, roor, chauffeur, etc.
c) Members group #. eg., the assigned group on the units roster
d) The SCBA assigned to that member for the tour.

This list is approx 3" x 4" and is made out in duplicate.  The original
is placed on the dash board of the apparatus and the duplicate is carried
by the officer.

In the event of a disaster (building collapse, flash over, etc) where members are lost
or unaccounted for the Inicident Commander will have each officer conduct a roll call to
account for his/her members, using his copy of the riding list.  This is important,
since there are times when the officer does not know the members he/she is
working with. It could be an officer just assigned for the tour.

If however, the officer is one of the missing, then the list is removed
from that members apparatus, and the roll call conducted....hence the two
copies.
Captain John Vigiano Ladder 176 (Ret.)


Subject: Rapid Intervention Crews ( F. A. S. T. TRUCK )
By: Captain John Vigiano (Ret)


I was asked to send you some info on Rapid Intervention Crews.  Here in NYC,
 we refer to them as F. A. S. T.  units.  (firefighter assist search team).
 Other areas of the New York, the term used is Rapid Intervention Teams.  They
 are all the same and have the same purpose; to aide fire units or fire
 personnel in trouble.

I have recently reitired (May 1998) from the New York City Fire Department. I
 spent the last 36 years doing what I loved....riding a fire truck and going to
 fires.

A few years ago, the FDNY, went through a tough time.  Too many members were
 injured and killed in a short periord of time.  The think tank went into
 overdrive and soem pretty smart people came up with ideas to curb this
 problem. 

Being a firefighter, you know, we can not change fate, but we can make
 adjustments to training and education to ensure our people have help when they
 need it.  Hence, the F.A.S.T. concept was initiated.

Here is a copy of my former units policy concerning the F.A.S.T. TRUCK
(Firefighter Assist and Search Team)

LADDER COMPANY 176 POLICY


This unit is an additional ladder company above the ladder companies assigned
 on the second alarm.

Upon arrival, the FAST truck will report to the Incident Commander at the
 Command Post;  advise the IC that "they are the FAST TRUCK", and follow his
 direction.

As per the AUC 273 addendum #155 and ABC 5-88, all members will be equipped as
 follows:

  SCBA WITH PASS ALARMS
  SEARCH ROPE
  LIFESAVING ROPE  / LIFE BELT
  RABBIT TOOL WITH FORCIBLE ENTRY TOOLS
  "NORMAL" TOOL ASSIGNMENT WITH ROOF SAW.

GENERAL DUTIES:

  Listen to HT (Hand held portable radio) transmissions while responding and
 walking to the CP.
  Look at the fire conditions, and discuss what you  see.
  Anticipate where we would go and how we would get there....ladders, fire-
  escapes, breaching a wall....if the situation turns to s_ _ t
  Take note of the units working ; their unit numbers; they may be re-located
  units.
 Check  out what apparatus we would place our equipment if call to work as a
 relief unit or if equipment is not necessary for operation.

ANTICIPATE PROBLEMS - HAVE A REACTION PLAN

SPECIFIC DUTIES: 
(Note: FDNY we have a minimum of an Officer and 5 members)

A.      INSIDE TEAM: ( Officer / Can / Forcible Entry)

FIRE ESCAPES:
  Are they overcrowded ?
  Will interior units be using them  ?
  Will that be the way to get into the building quickly ?

PORTABLE LADDERS:
  Are they in place ?
  Are additional ladders necessary ?

B       CHAUFFEUR:     

  Go to the Aerial / Tower ladder in front of  fire building  and check it
 out.
  Get familiar with the controls, and make sure it is ready to be used.
  Stay at the turntable if the assigned chauffeur is not there.
  If assigned chauffeur is there, stay at the pedestal in case the assigned
 chauffeur is called into the building by his officer.

C.      OUTSIDE TEAM  (OVM / ROOFMAN)

  Check out the perimeter of the building....
  Take note of any shafts, fences  or fire-escapes
  Note any obstacles or problems the unit may encounter.
  Report back to Unit Officer in front of building or at CP
  REMEMBER THIS IS A SIZE UP ONLY.

ANTICIPATE PROBLEMS  - HAVE A REACTION PLAN

THIS IS A UNIT OPERATION, NOT AN INDIVIDUAL ONE


     (https://s33.postimg.cc/53aayebyz/JV_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/53aayebyz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/cw0yqg2jf/JV_9.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/cw0yqg2jf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/huoh508x7/JV_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/huoh508x7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qfhswcquz/JV_9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qfhswcquz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m3t77771n/JV_13.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m3t77771n/)


     RIP.


(https://s33.postimg.cc/f1v9kuqjf/Marine.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/f1v9kuqjf/)   (https://s33.postimg.cc/ual6yykbf/FDNY.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ual6yykbf/)   (https://s33.postimg.cc/wrwy68jnf/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wrwy68jnf/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 15, 2018, 04:10:38 PM
Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse  3446 Eastchester Road  Williamsbridge, Bronx  7th Division, 15th Battalion  "Da Dawgs House"

     Engine 38 organized Amsterdam Avenue & W 155th Street former Suburban Engine 40 firehouse                 1868
     Engine 38 new firehouse 1907 Amsterdam Avenue                                                                                   1874
     Engine 38 became Combination Engine Company 38                                                                                 1881
     Combination Engine Company 38 became Engine 38                                                                                1898
     Engine 38 disbanded                                                                                                                             1918
     Engine 38 reorganized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Ladder 51                                                 1928

     Ladder 51 organized new firehouse 3446 Eastchester Road w/Engine 38                                                    1928

Engine 38 is one of the handful of companies that have served in two Boros - in Manhattan until 1918, and in the Bronx ten years later in 1928.

Technically, the same is true for Ladder 51 but in a different way.  Ladder 51 was in Brooklyn from 1899 to 1913 when they were renumbered as Ladder 101, and then Ladder 51 was a new company in the Bronx in 1928.


Engine 47 was organized in the Bronx in 1881, disbanded and reorganized in Manhattan in 1882.

Engine 72 was a Manhattan engine company until 1957 and later reorganized in the Bronx in 1972.

Engine 251 was a Brooklyn engine company, organized in 1897, disbanded in 1946, and reorganized in Queens in 1952

Squad 1 was in Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

Squad 5 was in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Satellite 1 was in Brooklyn and Manhatan.

A few more:

Engine 43 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1875-1903 and berthed in Bronx 1904
Engine 51 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1883-1908, berthed in Staten Island 1908-1916, berthed in Brooklyn 1916-1922, and back to Staten Island 1922-1959
Engine 66 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1898-1959, land engine in Bronx 1974
Engine 77 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1903-1904, berthed in Brooklyn 1904-1911, berthed in Manhattan again 1911-1922, finally berthed in Staten Island 1922
Engine 85 Fireboat berthed in Manhattan 1908-1959, land engine in Bronx 1967-1986
Engine 69 in Bronx 1899-1916, then in Manhattan 1917
Engine 89 in Manhattan 1909-1916, then in Bronx 1926
Engine 326 in Brooklyn 1939-1952, then in Queens 1984
Engine 332 in Queens 1938-1941, then in Brooklyn 1970
Engines 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157 were organized in Brooklyn, numbers assigned to Staten Island companies in 1913
Engines 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168 were organized in Queens, numbers assigned to Staten Island companies in 1913
Engines 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 were organized in Staten Island, numbers assigned to Brooklyn companies in 1913

Ladder 18 in Bronx 1874-1882, then in Manhattan in 1887
Ladder 36 in Bronx 1908-1913, then Manhattan in 1915
Ladder 39 in Manhattan 1909-1916, then in Bronx in 1916
Ladders 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 61 were organized in Brooklyn (1899-1913),  numbers assigned to Bronx companies in 1928 (51, 52, 53), 1966 (54), 1968 (55, 56), 1972 (58, 59), 1974 (61)
Ladders 76, 77, 78, 79, 80 were organized in Queens (1907-1913), numbers assigned to  Staten Island companies in 1913

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on July 16, 2018, 01:43:00 AM
  You left out L57 with E72 that actually had their rig numbered and in quarters but didn't get organized. ;)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 16, 2018, 02:08:55 AM
"Signal 9-2" - 1950s FDNY film:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJDo6NO5CHg&t=303s
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on July 16, 2018, 02:36:28 AM
I can't be absolutely positive, but I think I remember seeing this video at the old Fire Museum on Duane Street one of the times  my Mom took me there back in the 1960's.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 16, 2018, 12:46:08 PM
  You left out L57 with E72 that actually had their rig numbered and in quarters but didn't get organized. ;)

That's an interesting story to be told.

A few other mystery moves:

 L58 instead of L60
 E290/L103 instead of E296/L145

E287-2 - the only second section organized in its own station (not with the first section)

Great history puzzles.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 16, 2018, 04:23:22 PM
  You left out L57 with E72 that actually had their rig numbered and in quarters but didn't get organized. ;)

That's an interesting story to be told.

A few other mystery moves:

 L58 instead of L60
 E290/L103 instead of E296/L145

E287-2 - the only second section organized in its own station (not with the first section)

Great history puzzles.


Divisions have also crossed borough locations frequently:

DIVISION 1 MANHATTAN
 
DIVISION 2 MANHATTAN
 
DIVISION 3 MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN
 
DIVISION 4 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX   
 
DIVISION 5 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, QUEENS, MANHATTAN, QUEENS
 
DIVISION 6 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX
 
DIVISION 7 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX 

DIVISION 8 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND
 
DIVISION 9 BROOKLYN, BRONX
 
DIVISION 10 STATEN ISLAND, BROOKLYN 
 
DIVISION 11 BROOKLYN 
 
DIVISION 12 BROOKLYN
 
DIVISION 13 BROOKLYN, QUEENS
 
DIVISION 14 QUEENS
 
DIVISION 15 BROOKLYN
 
DIVISION 16 QUEENS 

DIVISION 17 BROOKLYN

MARINE DIVISION  MANHATTAN, BROOKLYN
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 16, 2018, 04:46:10 PM
One bay of 206s old Qtrs was lettered for LAD*133 when the FH was built but it never existed there & in 1998 the number was used when 133 was organized at ENG*275.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 16, 2018, 05:42:46 PM
One bay of 206s old Qtrs was lettered for LAD*133 when the FH was built but it never existed there & in 1998 the number was used when 133 was organized at ENG*275.

No ladder was ever organized at E206 either.

One bay at E310 was lettered for L160 in 1927.  Never happened.  L174 wound up in that bay in 1966.  L160 organized later in 1984 at E326.

L138 was scheduled for E288's house and L139 scheduled for E289's house.  Instead L138 organized at E289 and L139 never happened.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 16, 2018, 06:33:24 PM

Divisions have also crossed borough locations frequently:

DIVISION 1 MANHATTAN
DIVISION 2 MANHATTAN
DIVISION 3 MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN
DIVISION 4 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX   
DIVISION 5 BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, MANHATTAN, QUEENS, MANHATTAN, QUEENS
DIVISION 6 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, MANHATTAN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX
DIVISION 7 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX, BROOKLYN, BRONX 
DIVISION 8 BROOKLYN, STATEN ISLAND
DIVISION 9 BROOKLYN, BRONX
DIVISION 10 STATEN ISLAND, BROOKLYN 
DIVISION 11 BROOKLYN 
DIVISION 12 BROOKLYN
DIVISION 13 BROOKLYN, QUEENS
DIVISION 14 QUEENS
DIVISION 15 BROOKLYN
DIVISION 16 QUEENS 
DIVISION 17 BROOKLYN

MARINE DIVISION  MANHATTAN, BROOKLYN

Do to the usual historical moves and due to the renumbering of divisions, some houses have hosted multiple divisions.

185 Lafayette St, Manhattan             DC1, DC2
115 W 33rd St, Manhattan                DC2, DC3
155 Mercer St, Manhattan                 DC2, DC1
243 Lafayette St, Manhattan             DC2, DC1
205 W 77th St, Manhattan                DC3, DC4, DC2
221 E 75th St, Manhattan                 DC3, DC5, DC4
3134 Park Ave, Bronx                        DC4, DC5, DC6, DC7
503 E 139th St, Manhattan               DC5, DC6
720 Melrose Ave, Bronx                     DC6, DC3
2417 Webster Ave, Bronx                 DC7, DC4
2504 Webster Ave, Bronx                 DC7, DC9
617 Central Ave, Brooklyn                 DC9, DC13, DC15, DC17
1189 Castleton Ave, Staten Island   DC10, DC6, DC7, DC8
365 Jay St, Brooklyn                          DC10, DC6
127 N 1st St, Brooklyn                      DC11, DC7
172 Tillary St, Brooklyn                     DC11, DC6
530 11th St, Brooklyn                      DC12, DC8
108-01 Horace Harding Expwy, Queens   DC14, DC5
885 Howard Ave, Brooklyn               DC15, DC7
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 16, 2018, 11:43:24 PM
Engine 17/Ladder 18/Squad 5/Engine 15/Battalion 4 - Broome Street and Ft Pitt firehouses:


     Old Broome St firehouse - designates E 17/L 18/4th Bn  (Squad 5 operated from here 1966-1969):

          (http://s22.postimg.cc/634dx2pel/aaaa.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/634dx2pel/)


     New firehouse built for Engine 17/Ladder 18/Squad 5/Bn 4 1973:

          (http://s24.postimg.cc/43l0xf1gx/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/43l0xf1gx/)

          Firehouse built for 3 companies but Squad 5 operated at 55 E Broadway and then moved to the Bronx in 1974


     Squad 5 moved to Bronx 1974:

          (http://s23.postimg.cc/o8murmc6f/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/o8murmc6f/)


     Engine 18 disbanded 1998:

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/t1pi7ui3f/ladder_18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t1pi7ui3f/)


     Engine 15 relocated to Pitt Street 2001:

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/lkgash7y3/E_15_L_18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lkgash7y3/)


Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 16, 2018, 11:52:27 PM
Engine 6  firehouse  49 Beckman Street Financial District, Manhattan Division 1, Battalion 1 “Tigers”

     Engine 6 organized 100 Cedar Street former volunteer firehouse           1865
     Engine 6 moved Battery Place & West Street                                       1882
     Engine 6 new firehouse 100 Cedar Street                                            1882
     Engine 6 new firehouse 113 Liberty Street                                           1905
     Engine 6 moved 49 Beekman Street                                                    1970
     Engine 6 moved 42 South Street at Engine 4                                        2004
     Engine 6 returned 49 Beekman Street                                                 2005

Notes:
 
     Ladder 15 located 113 Liberty Street at Engine 6                                 1961

     Battalion 1 located 113 Liberty Street at Engine 6    1907- 1912,  1936-1937, 1948-1949


 Pre-FDNY volunteer history:

    Washington Engine 20 located at 100 Cedar Street                           1861-1866

    Washington Engine 20 organized 1792.  FF James McNulty, Engine 20 LODD at Jennings fire. Engine 20 disbanded 1865.  Engine 6 FDNY organized in former quarters at 100 Cedar Street.


Engine 6 1880s located 100 Cedar Street:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6vn0ynqwb/E_6_fh_1a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6vn0ynqwb/)


Engine 6 1909 located 113 Liberty Street:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3oshf2917/E_6_ap_1909_combination_ladder_hose_wagon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3oshf2917/)


49 Beekman Street firehouse:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4sclqvgrv/E_6_fh_0.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4sclqvgrv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/pzypxwke3/E_6_fh_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pzypxwke3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/so1hu2qcb/E_6_fh_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/so1hu2qcb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6k5klv7vf/E_6_fh_23.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6k5klv7vf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/qerm80pnv/E_6_Landmark_engine-6-firehouse-downtown-manhattan-new-york-city.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qerm80pnv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/rtt6wt3mj/E_32_fh_49_Beckman_1980s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rtt6wt3mj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/y7ia03it7/E_32_fh_current_engine_6_a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y7ia03it7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/5vwq2igqz/E_6_fh_26.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5vwq2igqz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/blcyn4kfv/E_6_members.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/blcyn4kfv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/gvhxe5p6j/E_6_fh_door.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gvhxe5p6j/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/x6i1ahwjf/E_6_FH_68.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/x6i1ahwjf/)

     Note:  Engine 7 located at 49 Beekman Street 1903-1905; Engine 32 located at 49 Beekman Street 1905-1972


Engine 6:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/kf3v457dn/E_6_ap_5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kf3v457dn/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/b7bmni5h7/E_6_ap_8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b7bmni5h7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/9finsmwez/E_6_fh_31.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9finsmwez/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/7npoxrv2j/E_6_ap_20.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7npoxrv2j/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/3rcd1v2e3/E_6_ap_68.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3rcd1v2e3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mwfmboei3/E_6_ap_45.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mwfmboei3/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/yljlzo81n/E_6_ap_63.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yljlzo81n/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/kf3v4gkbv/E_6_ap_62.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kf3v4gkbv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/wtqn4ttuj/E_6_ap_60.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wtqn4ttuj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4i5378ccr/E_6_ap_40.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4i5378ccr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/syn91qfob/E_6_ap_43.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/syn91qfob/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/ya25mg9gr/E_6_ap_65.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ya25mg9gr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/8r9t9j5d7/E_6_fh_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8r9t9j5d7/)


Engine 6:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n7h9-v38mE

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZLoc81awyI

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCv6lNXmBvQ

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lg4u7JIgLWo


FDNY Medals:

     JOSEPH MC GOWAN FF. ENG. 6 APR. 14, 1876 1877 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/7q9kkp6gr/Mc_Gowan.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7q9kkp6gr/)

          FF Joseph McGowan on April 14, 1876 at a fire at 15 Thomas Street, assistwed by FF Thomas Keenan, learned on arrival that Mary Molony, Julia Roach and four children were trapped on the third floor.  FF McGowan entered the burning building and through an attic window, passed three children to Keenan, who was on the cornice of an adjoining building.  He then rescued the women and the remaining child by guiding them to the roof and then to safety.  All were exhausted with terror and inhaled smoke.   

     CHARLEY H. PERELEY CAPT. ENG. 6 1896 1897 STEPHENSON

          Awarded to the captain maintaining the most efficient and best disciplined company in the Department.

     PETER J. MCKENZIE FF. ENG. 6 MAY 8, 1911 1912 STRONG

          1911 Medal winners w/Mayor and Commissioner:

               (https://s33.postimg.cc/iy0sbc6e3/1911_medal_winners_with_mayor_and_commissioner.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iy0sbc6e3/)

          FF Peter Strong attempted to rescue a child from the 5th floor of a building on 189 Greenwich Street on the morning of may 8, 1911.

     WALTER T. CLARKE CAPT. ENG. 6 1944 1945 STEPHENSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/46nmurtff/Clarke_1947_Medal.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/46nmurtff/)

          Awarded to the captain maintaining the most efficient and best disciplined company in the Department.

          LODD October 1944.

     ALFRED W. SANTASIRO LT. ENG. 6  OCT. 31, 1951 1952 DELEHANTY

     ANIELLO J. BOVINO FF. ENG. 6 OFF-DUTY OCT. 1, 1962 1963 LA GUARDIA

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/yo3hmhojv/Bovino.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yo3hmhojv/)

     JAMES J. GUNNING LT. ENG. 6 AUG. 23, 1996 1997 LANE

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/6b7zw25ej/Gunning.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6b7zw25ej/)


Engine 6 LODDs:

     CAPTAIN JAMES WHALEN ENGINE 6 OCTOBER 6, 1869

          Foreman James Whalen, Engine 6, was responding to a fire 11:32 PM at 278 Pearl Street.  Engine 6 was responding on Cedar Street, east of Broadway, when the team of horses struck a piece of timber planted in the street for derrick purposes for the Equitable Building.  Foreman Whalen was bounced from his seat.  He fell under the engine and was dragged a considerable distance.  He was dead when found.

     FIREFIGHTER CHARLES J. CONNOLLY ENGINE 6 MARCH 14, 1878

          Discovered at 1:20 in the morning, the fire spread throughout the building in no time due to its contents of paints and varnishes. While placing a hose line in operation on the roof of 176 Fulton Street, Fireman Charles J. Connolly fell through the skylight on the roof of the fire building. The fall was caused by heavy smoke that obscured the roof making it impossible to see the leeward side of the fire. Fireman Connolly fell 15 feet, striking his head and fracturing the base of his skull. When Connolly’s body struck the floor, the members of Ladder 8 who were working on the floor below heard the crash. They went to the floor above to discover Connolly lying in a pool of blood and in an unconscious condition. He was carried out of the building and taken to Bellevue Hospital were he died. He was married and twenty-five years old. He was appointed to the Department on May 1, 1875.

     FIREFIGHTER JOHN O'ROURKE ENGINE 6  JANUARY 25, 1880

          While backing the hose line of Engine 6 off the roof of 220 Pearl Street, Fireman (Private) John J. O’Rourke fell from the hayloft to the fifth floor. The fall was only nine feet but Fireman O’Rourke suffered a concussion of the brain and contusion of the left side of the face. He was taken to Chambers Street Hospital by ambulance where he died.

     FIREFIGHTER TIMOTHY COTTER ENGINE 6 June 6, 1910

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/nps841cqj/LODD_Cotter.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nps841cqj/)

          Over a dozen firemen who went up ladders to the top floor of the fire building were caught in a backdraft, injuring many. The trapped men were rendered unconscious by the heavy smoke and had to be rescued by other firemen. Fireman Timothy Cotter along with other members of Engine 6 went up to rescue the trapped men. One by one, the downed firemen were brought to safety. Once the two-alarm fire was under control, the men entered the fourth floor to find Cotter lying face down and dead. The smoke overcame him. Fireman William F. Healy lost his life while working under orders on the same floor as Cotter. Healey had been sent to relieve the nozzleman. He was the last to obey the order to retreat and became confused in the dense smoke, apparently mistaking his direction. He was also overcome by smoke. Healey thirty-five years old, was married and left five children behind. Cotter was thirty years old. He lived with his aunt, Mrs.Nora Willman, who died upon learning of her nephew’s death. A joint requiem mass and burial were held for them

     CAPTAIN WALTER T. CLARKE ENGINE 6 October 25, 1944

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/lxz993j2z/LODD_Clarke.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lxz993j2z/)
     
          Captain Walter T. Clarke, white-haired after forty-three years with the Fire Department, died as he often expressed he wanted. He wished to die fighting a fire. Captain Clarke, sixty-five years old, had been in action for nearly five hours when he staggered from the structure at 9:30 a.m. and collapsed in the street. He died an hour later from carbon monoxide poisoning. The four-alarm blaze was fed by drums of olive oil and destroyed the six-story building. He left two sons; one was the Captain of Ladder 7, while the second one was serving in the military

     FIREFIGHTER PAUL BEYER ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/fx1kbuop7/Beyer_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fx1kbuop7/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/ehzzn531n/Beyer_4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ehzzn531n/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/jtew84k23/LODD_Beyer.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          FF Paul Beyer was killed at the World Trade Center.

          https://www.silive.com/september-11/index.ssf/2010/09/paul_beyer_37_fdny_worked_on_c.html

     FIREFIGHTER THOMAS HOLOHAN ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/3v66hsn7f/LODD_Holohan.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3v66hsn7f/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/tjp91a4q3/holohan_lg.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tjp91a4q3/)

          FF Thomas Holoran was killed at the World Trade Center.

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=99725
 
     FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM JOHNSTON ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/6r68lu7or/159-_Johnston-fb.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6r68lu7or/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/j72yf0nzv/116-_Johnston.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j72yf0nzv/)

          FF William Johnston was killed at the World Trade Center.

          http://heroportraits.org/Gallery/default.aspx?id=116

     LIEUTENANT THOMAS O’HAGEN ENGINE 6 September 11, 2001

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/647bvvft7/LODD_ohagan.thomas.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/647bvvft7/)

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/cq70some3/LODD_Tommy_O_Hagan-_Lt._Eng._6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cq70some3/)

          Lieutenant Thomas O’Hagen was killed at the World Trade Center.

          https://nypost.com/2001/10/15/goodbye-to-a-man-of-taste-pals-remember-firefighter-who-loved-to-cook/


          Engine 6 World Trade Center September 11, 2001:

               https://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=90282&page=1


Engine 6 World Trade Center Illness-Related Death:

     Lieutenant Steven Sorger, Engine Company 6 March 11, 2017

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/n8k1ksb6j/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n8k1ksb6j/)

          https://www.newsday.com/long-island/nassau/former-fdny-lieutenant-from-north-bellmore-honored-posthumously-1.14569898


     RIP.  Never forget.


Financial District (FiDi):

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_District,_Manhattan

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/90pringwb/e_6_MAP_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/90pringwb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/zaau1gajf/E_6_map_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zaau1gajf/)


(https://s33.postimg.cc/3l39c7su3/patch-241_large.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3l39c7su3/)

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 17, 2018, 12:11:20 AM
Engine 32 at 49 Beekman Street:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4p5r7jc9n/E_32_ap_hose_wagon_32_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4p5r7jc9n/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m2g1mfa5n/E_32_1929_seagrave_hose_wagon.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m2g1mfa5n/)



1972 - Engine 32  DISBANDED
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 12:44:56 AM
Engine 218  firehouse  650 Hart Street    Bushwick, Brooklyn  11th Division, 28th Battalion  "Bushwick Bomberos"

     Engine 18 BFD organized 112 Seigel Street                                                     1877
     Engine 18 BFD new firehouse 650 Hart Street                                                 1887
     Engine 18 BFD became Engine 18 FDNY                                                         1898
     Engine 18 became Engine 118                                                                       1899
     Engine 118 became Engine 218                                                                     1913
     Engine 218 disbanded  (July 2)                                                                      1975
     Engine 218 reorganized (July 4)                                                                     1975

     Engineer 7 BFD organized 112 Seigel Street                                                   1885
     Engineer 7 BFD moved 55 Morgan Street at Engine 37 BFD                             1896
     Engineer 7 BFD became Battalion 7 FDNY                                                      1898
     Battalion 7 moved to 650 Hart Street at Engine 18                                         1898
     Battalion 7 became Battalion 27                                                                   1898
     Battalion 27 disbanded                                                                                1906

     Battalion 37 organized and operated at 650 Hart Street at Engine 118 (218)  1906-1949

     Battalion 60 organized 650 Hart Street at Engine 218                                     1970
     Battalion 60 disbanded                                                                                 1975

          Note:  Battalion 60 was organized to respond to alarms only and had no administrative responsibilities.  It could be relocated where needed.


Engine 18 BFD at 112 Seigel Street:
     
     (http://s24.postimg.cc/kdwum82ch/E_218_1a.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/kdwum82ch/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/8wey5mhaj/E_218_BFD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8wey5mhaj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/lb1q60dyj/E_18_New_FH_1.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/lb1q60dyj/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m0kiieh2z/New_Firehouse.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m0kiieh2z/)

          Note:  Elm Street renamed Hart Street.


650 Hart Street:
     
     (http://s15.postimg.cc/9jlpajmhj/E_218_fh_1980s.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/9jlpajmhj/)

     (http://s15.postimg.cc/bpklisfbr/E_218_fh_15.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/bpklisfbr/)

     (http://s29.postimg.cc/7af9pocmr/E_218_fh_14.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/7af9pocmr/)

     (http://s23.postimg.cc/uk5hsimav/E_218_fh_10_650_Hart_Street.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/uk5hsimav/)

     (http://s17.postimg.cc/3zyg3y0t7/E_218_fh_13.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/3zyg3y0t7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/kmsvmw7h7/E_218_fh_75.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kmsvmw7h7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/thtpxfbp7/E_218_fh_77.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/thtpxfbp7/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/thtpxjm0r/E_218_fh_80.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/thtpxjm0r/)


Engine 218 1936 Mack pumper:

     (http://s10.postimg.cc/h8osdtagl/E_218_ap_3_1936_Mack_pumper.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/h8osdtagl/)


Engine 218 Mack CF pumper early 1970s:
 
     (http://s10.postimg.cc/knbk7ov91/E_218.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/knbk7ov91/)


Engine 218:

     (http://s13.postimg.cc/9qghlt73n/E_218_ap_3.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/9qghlt73n/)

     (http://s30.postimg.cc/tv7m9g1f1/E_218_ap_7.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/tv7m9g1f1/)

     (http://s9.postimg.cc/wnvghopcb/E_218_fh_ap.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/wnvghopcb/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/yn446f0sr/E_218_ap_70.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yn446f0sr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/tbp7lujwr/E_218_ap_71.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tbp7lujwr/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/6zreshfnv/E_218_ap_72.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6zreshfnv/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/7cisyol2z/E_218_ap_73.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7cisyol2z/)


Engine 218:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsTjqRLhA3A

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lD57e8BlTSU


Engine 218 members:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/u2hxre1mz/E_218_members_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u2hxre1mz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/t07r8v5yz/E_218_members_3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t07r8v5yz/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4wgzklanf/E_218_members_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4wgzklanf/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/glkz8kh1n/Maher.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/glkz8kh1n/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/k56wydz6z/E_218_members_6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/k56wydz6z/)


Engine 218 Medals:

     JOHN E. MAHER FF. ENG. 218  JAN. 17, 1972 1973 JOHNSTON

     JAMES F. KEENAGHAN FF. ENG. 218 DEC. 11, 1972 1973 WAGNER


Engine 218 LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM MAURER ENGINE 218  November 2, 1912

          FF William Maurer, Engine 113's driver, died responding to a fire when he fell from steamer.

          (http://s21.postimg.cc/mmakjukoj/E_218_Lodd.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/mmakjukoj/)

          (http://s24.postimg.cc/b8apn4ush/E_218_LODD_William_Mauer.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/b8apn4ush/)

     CAPTAIN WILLIAM L. CASEY ENGINE 218 February 9, 1955

          Capt. William L. Casey, 15-year veteran, died as a result of injuries sustained while operating at a fire on February 1st.

     FIREFIGHTER GEORGE P. LINNEMANN ENGINE 218 February 18, 1968 1968 - BROOKLYN, NY

          FF George P. Linnemann, 25-year veteran, died as a result of injuries sustained while operating at a Brooklyn 4th alarm fire.


     RIP.  Never forget.


Engine 218 neighborhood:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/m9r9zknzv/E_218_map_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m9r9zknzv/)

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bushwick,_Brooklyn



(https://s33.postimg.cc/nosuo8rmz/E_218_Boxes.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nosuo8rmz/)

(http://s2.postimg.cc/drkate98l/E_218_logo_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/drkate98l/)

(https://s33.postimg.cc/l7h3h27rf/patch_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l7h3h27rf/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 12:52:14 AM
Bushwick - 1970s:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4PuIy0pf2A

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1UKaV5VkoE

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgnpbW-6zI8


Bushwick - 1980s:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYMzmCsyTN8

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yBxdcOZunE

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBwCixGoRCQ


Bushwick - 1990s:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li87Mw8m0A8
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 18, 2018, 01:59:11 AM
^^^^^ Prior to BN*28 being organized at 271 (from BN*37-2 at 222) 218 was in BN*35....BN*60 rotated every third night from 1800 to 2400 hrs between BNs 35...44 & ?? acting as another Section (some great BCs & BN*FFs in the Unit) ...during the remaining hrs they were in Qtrs w/218 & responded at the Dispatchers discretion.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 18, 2018, 02:55:11 AM
^^^^^^^ There was a photo in the Chicago Tribune of a Community Protest outside 218 during the "supposed fiscal crisis" in 1975 when they were threatened with closing...not sure if the photo was on here or ?
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 10:54:58 AM
^^^^^ Prior to BN*28 being organized at 271 (from BN*37-2 at 222) 218 was in BN*35....BN*60 rotated every third night from 1800 to 2400 hrs between BNs 35...44 & ?? acting as another Section (some great BCs & BN*FFs in the Unit) ...during the remaining hrs they were in Qtrs w/218 & responded at the Dispatchers discretion.

FDNY Battalions had very high response activity in the 1960s and 1970s.

In 1968, Bn 44-1 and Bn 44-2 responded to 11,598 combined runs.

In 1971, the NY Times reported that Bn 44 responded to over 10,000 runs.  Bn 44 aide Seymour Schenker reported over the Department Radio, “The 44 Battalion has just completed its 10,000th run” (to which the dispatcher replied) – “Congratulations Bn 44, now take in number 10,001!”.  (http://watkinsst.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/battalion-44-history-complete1.pdf) 

In 1971, 43 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs, many doing more than 5000 or 6000 runs.

In 1973, 46 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs or more, Bn 56 responded 7123 times.

It was not uncommon for dispatchers to ask on the radio - "Is there an available chief for a working fire?"


FDNY created second sections in several battalions:

     Bn 3-2      E 94     1968-69     BX
     Bn 12-2    L 14     1968-69     MN
     Bn 14-2    E 60     1968-69     BX
     Bn 18-2    E 45     1968-69     BX
     Bn 37-2    E 222   1968-69     BK
     Bn 39-2    E 236   1968-69     BK
     Bn 44-2    E 231   1968-69     BK


FDNY created new battalions:

     Bn 25      E 58     1969      MN
     Bn 26      E 60     1969      MN
     Bn 27      E 82     1969      BX
     Bn 55      E 73     1969      BX
     Bn 56      L 27     1969      BX
     Bn 57      E 235   1969      BK
     Bn 58      E 231   1969      BK
     Bn 59      E 275   1970      QN
     Bn 60      E 218   1970      BK  (relocated nights where needed)

To reduce workloads, in the 1970s FDNY changed battalion locations, reassigned boxes, reduced units assigned for administration, introduced Adaptive Response, introduced Discretionary Response boxes and introduced ERS fire alarm boxes.


     - Thanks Gman


   
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 11:15:12 AM
Fireman's Hall - former firehouse - 155 Mercer Street  Lower Manhattan

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/f9cz5b4qj/155.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/f9cz5b4qj/)

     "If these walls could talk- there are many buildings that have been around since before the paid Fire Department of the City of New York was organized that are still being used today. Then, there are some, no longer firehouses but still hold it's history inside the 4 walls. 1 building in particular at 155 Mercer Street, still shows signs of what it once was, 'Fireman's Hall'.
Present day 155 Mercer Street is a clothing store with bright lights, but if you look beyond that, on the front facade, you can still see 'Fireman's Hall' carved into the building, spelling out it's rich history. January 6th, 1854, construction contracts were signed to build a new Fireman's Hall to replace the old building. A box was placed into the cornerstone containing the history of the New York Fire Department since 1816, a history of the old Fireman's Hall, a bible, a copy of the US Constitution & a score of other documents including copies of the local newspaper. The ground floor would house New York Hose Company 5 & Ladder Company 6 of the Volunteer Department. Each company is to have 15x90ft, which will be divided in 3 rooms. The front room for the apparatus, the center room for their meetings & the room in the rear for sitting & reading.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/48d8mb2gr/MN_fire_HQ.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/48d8mb2gr/)

     The 2nd floor would contain a large meeting room, 38x71ft for meetings of the representatives, engineers & foremen, & the Exempt Firemen's Association. The 3rd floor held an identical sized room used as a library & reading room & smaller rooms for the librarian & committees.     The front of the building is to be Connecticut brownstone, cut in the best manner. The style of architecture is Italian, or composition of Greek & Roman details applied by the Italians to modern buildings. An over-the-top example of Victorian exuberance, Field & Correja's Fireman's Hall exploded with decoration. Fireman's Hall was carved above the central 2nd floor window. The pilasters flanking the centered entrance were adorned with "emblems of the fire department, such as hook & ladders, torches, axes, trumpets, etc & tops of these antaes are to be surmounted with a fire hydrant". The architects salvaged an old fireman statue from the old fireman's hall. "On the top of the cornice is to be a blocking course with 3 pedestals. The 2 side ones surmounted with a cluster of torches & the center one with the full size statue of a firemen-- the same one that has stood sentry so many years in front of the old hall." A tympanum above the entrance doors contained bas-relief carvings of Protection & Benevolence & on it's keystone was carved a full-sized fire helmet.

     The volunteer fire companies were manned by locals called 'laddies.'. The companies gained a reputation as rowdy, boisterous gangs whose fire houses were essentially social clubs. Despite their elegant new surroundings, the men of New York Hose Company 5 & the Lafayette Hook & Ladder Company 6 were no different. When the Civil War erupted, Colonel Elmer E Ellsworth, a close friend of Abraham Lincoln, organized the 11th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment known popularly as the Firemen's Regiment. The troops were in DC when insurgents attempted to burn down Willard's Hotel in DC on May 8th, 1861. Colonel Ellsworth, fusterated by a laddie's handling of the trumpet, snatched it. "With this he marshaled his forces". Less than 2 weeks later, on May 25th, it was reported that Colonel Ellsworth has been assasinated. His murder was fearfully & speedily revenged. His memory will be revered, his name respected & long after the rebellion shall have become a matter of history, his death will be regarded as martyrdom." That night, the board of Engineers & Foremen of the New York Fire Department met at Firemen's Hall to discuss participation in the Colonel's funeral.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/6poztloy3/Manhattan_fir_HQ.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/6poztloy3/)

     January 1865, there was a bill introduced in the State Senate to establish a paid professional Fire Department. A meeting of the Board of Representatives at Firemen's Hall resulted in a unanimous resolution to use "every honorable means to defeat the bill for a paid Fire Department". Their efforts failed. July 6th, 1865, the board met 'for the purpose of making a final close of their business". 2 weeks later the Commissioner of the new Metropolitan Fire Department met in Fireman's Hall to arrange for the transfer of property from the old volunteer companies to the new department. Fireman's Hall will be used as a Fire Department Headquarters. One of the 1st steps to modernize & consolidate the department was the installation of the 'Fire Alarm Telegraph' boxes, the predecessor of today's ERS boxes. The Central Station was located in Fireman's Hall.

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/kw4qova3v/E_13_L_20.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/kw4qova3v/)

     In 1887, Fire Department Headquarters moved to it's new building on West 67th Street. Fireman's Hall continued to operate as a firehouse. Ladder 20 organized March 30th 1889 here. Ladder 20-2 organized March 1st, 1900 until June 1905, then reorganized December 1905 until July 1939. Division 1 moved in January 30th 1894 until March 1, 1900. Division 2 was here from December 1914 until June 1917. Battalion 3 was here January 1894 on and off until 1922. Battalion 5 was here April 1959 until April 1974. Engine 13 moved in November 1948 until April 1974, when both Engine 13 & Ladder 20 both left for their new firehouse on Lafayette Street. At this time, the Victorian facade had been shaved flat, leaving only side quoins as any indication of the 1854 design. The fireman statue was salvaged."

     - https://nycfirewire.net/entry/firemanshall



Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 12:37:23 PM
^^^^^^^ There was a photo in the Chicago Tribune of a Community Protest outside 218 during the "supposed fiscal crisis" in 1975 when they were threatened with closing...not sure if the photo was on here or ?

1975 Engine 218 planned closure:

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS  Friday, November 8, 2002, 12:00 AM

"At 12:01 a.m., the order came over emergency squawk boxes - 2,127 firefighters would be laid off by midnight. The city's Bravest protested by calling out sick at 10 times the normal rate. And when the ghettos began to burn, 14 firefighters at Engine Co. 218 in Bushwick, Brooklyn, could not respond. They were being held hostage by a neighborhood mob. "We weren't unhappy about it," said retired Lt. Eugene Welischar, whose men were held during the first three days of July 1975. "The neighborhood wanted to save the firehouse. We agreed with them.
" It worked. Twenty-five other firehouses were closed by the city in the 1970s fiscal crisis. But the city spared Engine 218 to win the release of the crew. With another round of FDNY cuts on the way, community activists are readying for battle again, and firefighters are quietly talking about sickouts. A top official said that if engine companies are closed, the city is "almost guaranteed" to come after the ones it did before. Engine companies that share houses with ladder companies are the most likely targets. When City Hall was looking to close firehouses in 1991, it relied on a computer to determine which companies could be shut. Engine Co. 218 was on the list. So was Engine 212 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn - the scene of another protest in 1975. Angry neighbors lived in Engine 212's firehouse for 16 months to force the city to reverse its decision to shutter it. "We'd be ready and willing to fight again," said Albina Jackanin, a member of The People's Firehouse, a group that grew out of 1975 protest. This time around, the nonprofit organization believes another nearby firehouse - Engine 229 - is in jeopardy. "If they don't remember what a bad idea it was to close firehouses before, the community is ready to remind them," said Daniel Rivera, executive director of The People's Firehouse."

     - http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/75-vets-set-fight-article-1.498182
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 12:54:50 PM
^^^^^^^ There was a photo in the Chicago Tribune of a Community Protest outside 218 during the "supposed fiscal crisis" in 1975 when they were threatened with closing...not sure if the photo was on here or ?

Engine 218 - July 4, 1975

"Fire Aide Taken as Hostage by Crowd"  NY Times  By DAVID BIRD   JULY 4, 1975

     An assistant Fire Department commissioner went out yesterday to plead with angry residents of an area of Brooklyn's Bushwick section for the release of the 14 firemen they were holding hostage in protest against the shutting down of their neighborhood firehouse. Instead of winning their release, he succeeded only in being taken hostage himself. As many as 500 residents in the rundown area around Engine Company 218 at 650 Hart Street, had been blockading the front door of the century‐old firehouse since Monday, refusing to allow firemen to leave or equipment to he removed.

Return to Active Duty

     The assistant commissioner, Vincent Collymore, went to the firehouse yesterday to remedy the situation. After conferring by telephone with Fire Commissioner John T. O'Hagan, he even gave the residents handwritten letter on Fire Department stationery promising help. The letter read: “Fire Commissioner John T. O'Hagan states that when the first monies are received that Engine Company 218 will be the first firehouse to he put back on active duty.” Twenty‐give other firehouses were also closed in the city's budget squeeze. The letter also said that Mr. Collymore would go personally with two members of the community to talk to Commissioner O'Hagan and then Mr. Collymore would return with the two to the firehouse.
Continue reading the main story

     After Mr. Collymore returned to the firehouse, Commissioner O'Hagan said late yesterday afternoon that the restoration of Engine Company 218 “is our first priority.”
But he said no force would be used to remove the firemen. “There's enough friction in the city now,” he said. Just before 6 P.M. yesterday Mr. Collymore was called to the telephone in the firehouse. After talking on the phone he came out to announce to the crowd ??? “on approval of City Hall, Engine Company 218 will be restored to active duty at 0900 tomorrow.”

     There was wild cheering in the street. The civil defense siren was touched off atop the firehouse and someone came down the street blowing a bugle. But the blockade continued.
A spokesmen for the protesters said the hostages would be let out at 9 A.M., when the firehouse was actually returned to active duty."
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on July 18, 2018, 01:33:12 PM
^^^^^ Prior to BN*28 being organized at 271 (from BN*37-2 at 222) 218 was in BN*35....BN*60 rotated every third night from 1800 to 2400 hrs between BNs 35...44 & ?? acting as another Section (some great BCs & BN*FFs in the Unit) ...during the remaining hrs they were in Qtrs w/218 & responded at the Dispatchers discretion.

FDNY Battalions had very high response activity in the 1960s and 1970s.

In 1968, Bn 44-1 and Bn 44-2 responded to 11,598 combined runs.

In 1971, the NY Times reported that Bn 44 responded to over 10,000 runs.  Bn 44 aide Seymour Schenker reported over the Department Radio, “The 44 Battalion has just completed its 10,000th run” (to which the dispatcher replied) – “Congratulations Bn 44, now take in number 10,001!”.  (http://watkinsst.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/battalion-44-history-complete1.pdf) 

In 1971, 43 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs, many doing more than 5000 or 6000 runs.

In 1973, 46 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs or more, Bn 56 responded 7123 times.

It was not uncommon for dispatchers to ask on the radio - "Is there an available chief for a working fire?"


FDNY created second sections in several battalions:

     Bn 3-2      E 94     1968-69     BX
     Bn 12-2    L 14     1968-69     MN
     Bn 14-2    E 60     1968-69     BX
     Bn 18-2    E 45     1968-69     BX
     Bn 37-2    E 222   1968-69     BK
     Bn 39-2    E 236   1968-69     BK
     Bn 44-2    E 231   1968-69     BK

FDNY created new battalions:

     Bn 27      E 82     1969      BX
     Bn 55      E 73     1969      BX
     Bn 56      L 27     1969      BX
     Bn 57      E 235   1969      BK
     Bn 58      E 231   1969      BK
     Bn 59      E 275   1970      QN
     Bn 60      E 218   1970      BK  (relocated nights where needed)

To reduce workloads, in the 1970s FDNY changed battalion locations, reassigned boxes, reduced units assigned for administration, introduced Adaptive Response, introduced Discretionary Response boxes and introduced ERS fire alarm boxes.


 
  You left out Bn's 25 & 26 that were formerly Bn's 12-2 & 14-2, respectively.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 18, 2018, 05:04:49 PM
^^^^^ Prior to BN*28 being organized at 271 (from BN*37-2 at 222) 218 was in BN*35....BN*60 rotated every third night from 1800 to 2400 hrs between BNs 35...44 & ?? acting as another Section (some great BCs & BN*FFs in the Unit) ...during the remaining hrs they were in Qtrs w/218 & responded at the Dispatchers discretion.

FDNY Battalions had very high response activity in the 1960s and 1970s.

In 1968, Bn 44-1 and Bn 44-2 responded to 11,598 combined runs.

In 1971, the NY Times reported that Bn 44 responded to over 10,000 runs.  Bn 44 aide Seymour Schenker reported over the Department Radio, “The 44 Battalion has just completed its 10,000th run” (to which the dispatcher replied) – “Congratulations Bn 44, now take in number 10,001!”.  (http://watkinsst.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/battalion-44-history-complete1.pdf) 

In 1971, 43 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs, many doing more than 5000 or 6000 runs.

In 1973, 46 FDNY battalions responded to 3100 runs or more, Bn 56 responded 7123 times.

It was not uncommon for dispatchers to ask on the radio - "Is there an available chief for a working fire?"


FDNY created second sections in several battalions:

     Bn 3-2      E 94     1968-69     BX
     Bn 12-2    L 14     1968-69     MN
     Bn 14-2    E 60     1968-69     BX
     Bn 18-2    E 45     1968-69     BX
     Bn 37-2    E 222   1968-69     BK
     Bn 39-2    E 236   1968-69     BK
     Bn 44-2    E 231   1968-69     BK

FDNY created new battalions:

     Bn 27      E 82     1969      BX
     Bn 55      E 73     1969      BX
     Bn 56      L 27     1969      BX
     Bn 57      E 235   1969      BK
     Bn 58      E 231   1969      BK
     Bn 59      E 275   1970      QN
     Bn 60      E 218   1970      BK  (relocated nights where needed)

To reduce workloads, in the 1970s FDNY changed battalion locations, reassigned boxes, reduced units assigned for administration, introduced Adaptive Response, introduced Discretionary Response boxes and introduced ERS fire alarm boxes.


 
  You left out Bn's 25 & 26 that were formerly Bn's 12-2 & 14-2, respectively.

Battalion   3-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 27
Battalion 12-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 25
Battalion 14-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 26
Battalion 18-2      1965 to 1967   became Battalion 56
Battalion 44-2      1965 to 1969   became Battalion 58
Battalion 37-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 28
Battalion 39-2      1968 to 1969   became Battalion 29
Battalion 55          1969 to 1988
Battalion 57          1969
Battalion 59          1970 to 1989
Battalion 60          1970 to 1975

Battalions 18-2 and 44-2 were organized earlier than the others, in 1965

Bn 25      E 58         1969 to 1989   MN  from Battalion 12-2
Bn 26      E 60         1969                MN  from Battalion 14-2
Bn 27      E 82         1969                BX  from Battalion 3-2
Bn 28      E 222       1969                BK  from Battalion 37-2
Bn 29      E 236       1969 to 1975   BK  from Battalion 39-2
Bn 55      E 73         1969 to 1988   BX
Bn 56      L 27         1969 to 1989   BX  from Battalion 18-2
Bn 57      E 235       1969                BK
Bn 58      E 231       1969                BK  from Battalion 44-2
Bn 59      E 275       1970 to 1989   QN
Bn 60      E 218       1970 to 1975   BK  (relocated nights where needed)

Battalions 25, 29, 55, 56, 59, and 60 have been disbanded
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: 68jk09 on July 18, 2018, 05:19:19 PM
^^^^^^BN*59 was originally in 275 to help BNs*50 & 54.....after they left 275 BN*51 was moved from 294 East to 308......& in 1984 when the Springfield Blvd FH was built & 326/160 were organized there BN*53 was moved South from 306 to 326 to help BN*54.....  BN*59 was later at 319 with the idea of helping BNs*28 & 46 but this did not really do much as they were in the slower area of both BNs.....at the height of BN*46s high running years the Job took a number of the 46s Boxes & gave them to BN*52.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: jkal on July 18, 2018, 06:26:39 PM
I believe the comment from the 44 Aide, Seymore Schenker, was directed to TL-120.    120 was the Only individual company to do over 10,000 runs in 1 year, in 1971.  There were many 2nd sections But, only 1 company has that distinction.

Capt JC (ret)
FDNY
TL-120
Brownsville,  Brooklyn
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 06:57:00 PM
I believe the comment from the 44 Aide, Seymore Schenker, was directed to TL-120.    120 was the Only individual company to do over 10,000 runs in 1 year, in 1971.  There were many 2nd sections But, only 1 company has that distinction.

Capt JC (ret)
TL-120 FDNY
Brownsville,  brooklyn


Capt - You are correct.  TL 120 had 10,989 runs in 1971.


 
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: guitarman314 on July 18, 2018, 08:43:26 PM
Engine 27 History from NYC Fire Wire: https://nycfirewire.net/entry/engine27
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 09:26:48 PM
Engine 27 History from NYC Fire Wire: https://nycfirewire.net/entry/engine27


Picture of FDNY Engine 27 steamer pumping water into building next to a NY Fire Patrol steamer pumping water out of the building.

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mevzzkfyz/engine_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mevzzkfyz/)
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: turk132 on July 18, 2018, 09:55:23 PM
I think BN25 was in with E91 not  E58
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 18, 2018, 10:21:56 PM
I think BN25 was in with E91 not  E58


turk132 - you are right - Bn 25 was located from 1969 through 1989 at Engine 91 but it looks like it was initially re-organized at Engine 58 in July 1969 for a short period of time and then relocated to Engine 91 a few months later in December 1969.
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: manhattan on July 18, 2018, 10:54:43 PM
Engine 27 History from NYC Fire Wire: https://nycfirewire.net/entry/engine27


Picture of FDNY Engine 27 steamer pumping water into building next to a NY Fire Patrol steamer pumping water out of the building.

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/mevzzkfyz/engine_27.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mevzzkfyz/)

Magnificent!
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 19, 2018, 09:10:49 PM
Engine 231/Ladder 120/Battalion 44  firehouse  107 Watkins Street  Brownsville, Brooklyn   Division 15, Battalion 44  "The Tradition Continues"

     Engine 31 BFD organized 1772 Pitkin Ave                                     1892
     Engine 31 BFD became Engine 31 FDNY                                       1898
     Engine 31 became Engine 131                                                     1899
     Engine 131 new firehouse 107 Watkins St w/Bn 34                       1905     
     Engine 131 became Engine 231                                                   1913
     Engine 231 moved to 423 Ralph Ave at Engine 227                       1995
     Engine 231 moved to 107 Watkins St w/Ladder 120/Bn 44             1996

     Ladder 70 organized 107 Watkins St at Engine 131                       1905
     Ladder 70 became Ladder 120                                                     1913
     Ladder 120 moved to 855 Howard St at Engine 283                      1995
     Ladder 120 moved to 107 Watkins St w/E 231/Bn44                     1996

     Battalion 34 organized 107 Watkins St at Engine 131                    1905
     Battalion 34 became Battalion 44                                                 1913
     Battalion 44 moved to 855 Howard St at Engine 283                      1995
     Battalion 44 moved to 107 Watkins St w/E 231/L 120                    1996
   
     Squad 4 organized 107 Watkins St at Engine 231                          1955
     Squad 4 moved to 214 Bristol Street at Engine 283                        1956

     Battalion 44-2 organized 107 Watkins St at Engine 231                  1965
     Battalion 44-2 became Battalion 58                                               1969
     Battalion 58 moved to 5105 Snyder Ave at Engine 310                    1971
     Battalion 58 moved to 1361 Rockaway parkway at Engine 257         1995
     
     Engine 232 organized at 107 Watkins St at Engine 231                    1966
     Engine 232 moved to 266 Rockaway Ave "Tinhouse" w/TCU 732       1971

                           
107 Watkins Street - early 1900's:

    (http://s9.postimage.org/n2xxkr5rv/E_231.jpg)


Early Battalion 44:

     (http://s8.postimage.org/8d9s7za01/E_231_Unk.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/n2xxkr5rv/)


Engine 231/Ladder 120:

     (http://s1.postimage.org/ylusc09bv/E_2321_5.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/ylusc09bv/)

     (http://s2.postimage.org/gzzoygxwl/L_103.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/gzzoygxwl/)


Ladder 120 - 1920's:

     (http://s2.postimage.org/s3jb42j6t/E_231_L_103.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/s3jb42j6t/)


Ladder 120 - 1924:

     (http://s7.postimage.org/4nf46qjpj/ladder_120_1924.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/4nf46qjpj/)


1928:

     (http://s2.postimage.org/wahxommxx/E_231_1928.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/wahxommxx/)


1933:

     (http://s14.postimage.org/9x7rk4jx9/E_231_1933.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/9x7rk4jx9/)


Ladder 120 - 1930s:

     (http://s13.postimage.org/7h6x2mbfn/ladder_120_1930s.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/7h6x2mbfn/)


Watkins Street looking towards Pitkin - 1940's:

     (http://s8.postimage.org/yelmjogv5/E_231_1945.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/yelmjogv5/)
   
     (https://s33.postimg.cc/iwypbdu17/Watkins_Street_1940s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iwypbdu17/)


Ladder 120 - 1953:

     (http://s1.postimage.org/3zz2a8vgb/L_120_1953.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/3zz2a8vgb/)


Squad 4 - 1955-1956:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/48wzr9l23/Squad_4_fdny.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/48wzr9l23/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/lm7a653ij/Squad_4_in_service.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lm7a653ij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/4yfs3nggr/Sq_4_1950s.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4yfs3nggr/)


Housewatch (dates unknown):

     (http://s2.postimage.org/8j6nubqud/E_231_8.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/8j6nubqud/)

     (http://s8.postimage.org/v5kksk4ip/1161115541.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/v5kksk4ip/)

     (http://s1.postimage.org/fd0xdlzqz/1161118649.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/fd0xdlzqz/)


Ladder 120 - 1960s:

     (http://s2.postimage.org/wfapouw85/1161127746.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/wfapouw85/)


1967:

     (http://s7.postimage.org/ic73vn0hz/1970s.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/ic73vn0hz/)


1970's

     (http://s2.postimage.org/x3zleczad/E_231_1960s.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/x3zleczad/)


Ladder 120 - 1995:

     (http://s27.postimg.cc/ggs61upzj/L_120_1995.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ggs61upzj/)
 

107 Watkins Street current:

     (http://s29.postimg.cc/jmtq1daub/231.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/jmtq1daub/)

     (http://s2.postimage.org/sc33orrtx/E_231_2.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/sc33orrtx/)


Homepage: 

     http://watkinsst.com/


Centennial Celebration 2006:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQvvMLgA800#


Engine 231/Ladder 120/Battalion 44:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pzMMyMWa18

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ta3_XCJh6P8#ws

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66JZQZIq4kM#


Battalion 44:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcZNpkpP4vk#

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xURXoSAoR8#ws

Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 19, 2018, 09:19:35 PM
Engine 231 Medals:

     EDWARD W. STIEHLER FF. ENG. 231 JAN. 30, 1922 1923 KENNY

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/uyu35dinf/Stiehler.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uyu35dinf/)

         On January. 30th, 1922 – FF Steihler was hung by his ankles by his comrades “pendulum style” from a cornice of a 3 story building at 251 Christopher Ave. to effect the rescue of 5 people who were not within reach of ladders, had no fire escape, and were ready to jump if not for his quick actions.

     EDWARD F. GROSS LT. ENG. 231 AUG. 22, 1924 1925 CRIMMINS

          On August 22nd, 1924 Lt. Edward F. Gross rescued a young girl at 2:43AM at 319 Osbourne Street. He carried the girl out via portable ladder without a hoseline in place.

     BENJAMIN LEVY CAPT. ENG. 231 1936 1937 STEPHENSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/57n04lhaj/Levy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/57n04lhaj/)

          The Stephenson Medal was awarded to Captain Levy in 1936 for having maintained the best disciplined and most highly efficient company in the Department. Captain Levy would command E231 for an astonishing 27 years!

     EMANUEL FRIED LT. ENG. 231 DEC. 11, 1946 1947 FDR

          Awarded for his participation in the removal of a woman from the ruins of a fire and a building collapse at 489 W 184th Street at 11:59PM on December 11, 1946.

      EDWARD V. WETZEL LT. ENG. 231 NOV. 4, 1965 1966 STIEFEL

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/uncms8k3f/Wetzel_1966.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uncms8k3f/)

          On November 4th, 1965 Lt. Wetzel had a confirmed report of children trapped at 712 Stone Ave at 7:20PM. He crawled on his belly under the flames and past the fire to the rear bedroom where he found two children. Shielding them with his own body, he crawled once again past the fire and handed their limp bodies to his awaiting men. The children would survive the harrowing ordeal thanks to Lt. Wetzel’s quick instincts which were done without a mask and before a hoseline was in place.

     JOSEPH A. CONIGLIO CAPT. ENG. 231 MAY 14, 1989 1990 CONNELL

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/egk4hlc57/Coniglio.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/egk4hlc57/)

          On May 14th1989 ,E 231, under the command of Capt Coniglio, responded to a project fire at 251 Osbourne Street. The job would turn out to be a long stretch to the 5th floor as the Captain entered the apartment well before a hoseline was in place. He was informed that 3 people were trapped in the rearmost bedroom. He quickly made the last room where he physically pulled a woman back in who was on the edge ready to jump. As he awaited water, he would share his air with the three occupants thereby preventing them from further panic and sure certain death.


Ladder 120 Medals:

     JAMES J. MOONEY CAPT. LAD. 120    1917 STEPHENSON

          Captain James F. Mooney in was awarded the Stephenson Medal for having the best disciplined company in 1916.

     FRANCIS P. J. DONLON FF. LAD. 120 DEC. 21, 1929 1930 DEPARTMENT

          Four days before Christmas, Firemen Francis P. J. Donlon and Charles T. Leary, Jr. rescued a mother and her four children from 445 Watkins Street

     CHARLES T. LEARY, JR. FF. LAD. 120 DEC. 21, 1929 1930 DEPARTMENT

          FF Charles T. Leary rescued a mother and her four children from 445 Watkins Street

     AUGUSTUS KETTLER FF. LAD. 120 AUG. 7, 1929 1930 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/p9dul49x7/Kettler.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/p9dul49x7/)

          On August 7, 1929 Fireman Augustus Kettler received the Brooklyn Citizen Medal for rescuing a couple from a fire at 136 Thatford Avenue

     HENRY ROHRBACH LT. LAD. 120 AUG. 7, 1929 1930 DEPARTMENT

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/jmhhnh7cr/Rohrbach.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jmhhnh7cr/)

          On August 7, 1929, Lieutenant Henry Rohrbach received a Department Medal for rescuing a couple from a fire at 136 Thatford Avenue

     FRANK R. MAGAN FF. LAD. 120 MAR. 17, 1930 1931 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/xg5ucepmj/Magan_1931.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/xg5ucepmj/)

          St. Patrick's Day 1930, Fireman Frank H. Magan rescued a father and his two children from 277 Watkins Street.

     CHARLES H. SMITH FF. LAD. 120 NOV. 3, 1933 1934 TREVOR-WARREN

          On November 3, 1934 two members of Ladder 120 rescued two people at 361 Bristol Street. The Emily Trevor-Mary B. Warren Medal was awarded to Fireman Charles H. Smith.

     ROLAND G. CHURBUCK FF. LAD. 120 NOV. 3, 1933 1934 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          Roland G. Churbuck rescued two people at 361 Bristol Street.

    VICTOR F. ROSSI FF. LAD. 120 OCT. 21, 1950 1951 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/qcxywyryj/Rossi_Bennett.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qcxywyryj/)

          Fireman Victor F. Rossi on October 21, 1950 rescued two women from 162 Glenmore Avenue. Fireman Rossi earned the James Gordon Bennett Medal, the oldest medal awarded for bravery each year.

     VICTOR F. ROSSI FF. LAD. 120 OCT. 31, 1952 1953 HUGH BONNER

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/qppd35pnv/Rossi.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qppd35pnv/)

          On October 31, 1952 Fireman Rossi earned the Hugh Bonner Medal for capturing a culprit who was trying to steal the 44th Battalion’s car from in front of quarters

     VICTOR F. ROSSI FF. LAD. 120 OCT. 21, 1950 1954 HARRY M. ARCHER

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/c6i81pm8b/Rossi_Archer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/c6i81pm8b/)

          Fireman Victor F. Rossi on October 21, 1950 rescued two women from 162 Glenmore Avenue. Fireman Rossi earned the James Gordon Bennett Medal. It was also the best rescue in a three year period and he earned the Doctor Harry M. Archer Medal in 1954. This medal is given only to a James Gordon Bennett Medal winner once every three years.

     JOHN F. FINNEGAN LT. LAD. 120 JUN. 4, 1958 1959 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/ty7ml98bf/Finnigan.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ty7ml98bf/)

          Lieutenant John F. Finnegan rescued a little girl from her burning apartment at 99 Belmont Street on June 4, 1958

     CURT A. LANDGREBE LT. LAD. 120 DEC. 5, 1963 1964 DOUGHERTY

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/knhqcsyor/Landgrabbe_1963.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          Lieutenant Curt A. Landgrebe rescued an eight year old boy from his burning apartment at 29 Hinsdale Street on December 5, 1963.

     CURT A. LANDGREBE LT. LAD. 120 MAY 10, 1965 1966 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/knhqcte4b/Landgrebe_1966.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/knhqcte4b/)

          On May 10, 1965, Lieutenant Curt A. Landgrebe rescued a woman from 426 Snediker Avenue.

     DANIEL J. TRACY FF. LAD. 120 MAR. 25, 1965 1966 THOMPSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/f0ldfatl7/Tracy_1965.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          Fireman Daniel J. Tracy earned three medals in three years. The first medal, the Commissioner Edward Thompson Medal was awarded on March 25, 1965 for rescuing five children from an apartment fire at 593 Howard Avenue.

     EUGENE P. TIMMONS LT. LAD. 120 NOV. 4, 1965 1966 KANE

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/z7yt7k1cb/Timmons_1966.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/z7yt7k1cb/)

          For his heroic work at 712 Stone Avenue on November 4, 1965, Lieutenant Eugene P. Timmons received the Vincent J. Kane Medal for rescuing a small boy from a burning apartment.

     DANIEL J. TRACY FF. LAD. 120 APR. 23, 1966 1967 BRUMMER

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/4drk9xivv/Tracy_1966.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4drk9xivv/)

          FF Tracy rescued two people from 273 Amboy Street on April 23, 1966.

     DANIEL J. TRACY FF. LAD. 120 JUL. 21, 1967 1968 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/5st4ynzej/Tracy_1967_BC.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5st4ynzej/)

          FF Tracy rescued a child from 1586 St. Marks Avenue on July 21, 1967 at extreme personal risk.

     JOHN J. CONNOLLY  FF. LAD. 120 JUN. 22, 1968 1969 EMERALD

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/ms23dmkt7/Connolly_1968.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ms23dmkt7/)


          On June 22, 1968 Fireman John J. Connolly rescued a mother and her two children from 358 Hinsdale Street. The Emerald Society Medal was awarded Fireman Connolly for this rescue.

     RUDOLPH A. GRECO FF. LAD. 120 APR. 3, 1970 1971 MC ELLIGOTT

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/t5r6h0fgb/Greco.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t5r6h0fgb/)

          On April 3, 1970 FF Rudy Greco rescued an elderly man from the 3rd floor at 1961 Bergen Street. For his actions he was awarded John J. McElligott Medal

     THOMAS J. CHERRY FF. LAD. 120 SEP. 22, 1972 1973 BROOKMAN

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/fou7xws7f/Cherry_1972.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          Fireman Thomas J. Cherry rescued a child from a burning window sill at 705 Saratoga Avenue on September 22, 1972. He swung pendulum fashion across an eight foot gap between the adjoining fire escape and window to rescue the child.

     LOUIS MONTELEONE FF. LAD. 120 JAN. 15, 1978 1979 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/huoisjt4r/Montelone.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/huoisjt4r/)

          Fireman Louis Monteleone for rescuing three unconscious people from a burning apartment at 298 Sumpter Street on January 15, 1978.

     ROBERT L. SCHERIFF FF. LAD. 120 OFF-DUTY DEC. 22, 1979 1980 AMERICAN LEGION

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/u9baszfiz/Scheriff_1979.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/u9baszfiz/)

          On December 22, 1979 Fireman Robert L. Scheriff, off duty, rescued three people from a four car accident on the Interboro Parkway. In true Hollywood tradition the cars exploded in a fireball just as Scheriff pulled the last person from the wreck. He received the American Legion Fire Department Post No. 930 Mark M Wohlfeld Memorial Medal for this rescue.

     MICHAEL P. HARRINGTON FF. LAD. 120 JUL. 25, 1980 1981 CONRAN

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/5ersywuor/Harrington.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5ersywuor/)

          Firefighter Michael P. Harrington made a rope rescue from a seventh floor window at 375 Blake Avenue on July 25, 1980.

     KEVIN D. HEANEY FF. LAD. 120 SEP. 4, 1982 1983 JOHNSTON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/bjx3h313v/Heaney.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bjx3h313v/)

          Firefighter Kevin D. Heaney rescued a resident and fellow firefighter from a burning fire apartment on September 4, 1982 at 1912 Bergen Street. He received the Albert S. Johnston Medal for his daring rescue.

     PAUL J. MC FADDEN FF. LAD. 120 JUN. 24, 1983 1984 KENNY

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/oxwe84vzf/Mc_Fadden_1983.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oxwe84vzf/)

          Firefighter Paul J. McFadden rescued five people from 354 Chauncy Street on June 24, 1983.

     DENNIS FARRELL FF. LAD. 120 MAR. 18, 1988 1989 MARTIN

          Firefighter Dennis Farrell received the Chief Joseph R. Martin Medal for rescuing a three year old boy from his crib in the fire apartment on March 18, 1988.

     MICHAEL T. KELLY FF. LAD. 120 MAY 29, 1992 1993 THOMPSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/tiikn9aln/Kelly.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/tiikn9aln/)

          Firefighter Michael T. Kelly with only nine months on the job rescued a nine year old boy from his burning apartment at 1965 Bergen Street on May 29, 1992. He received the Commissioner Edward Thompson Medal for this extraordinary rescue.

     MICHAEL P. CUMMINGS FF LAD. 120 JUL. 30, 2000 2001 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/htekz3wfv/Cummings_2000.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/htekz3wfv/)

          On July 30, 2000 two members of Ladder 120 rescued a family of five from a thirteenth floor apartment at 315 Lavonia Avenue. Fireman Michael P. Cummings received the Brooklyn Citizen Medal. Trapped in the bedroom of the fire apartment FF Cummings gave up his mask to the barely conscious children until the fire was knocked down in the living room and kitchen.

     DENNIS GORDON LT. LAD 120 JUL. 30, 2000 2001 BONNER

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/o73o2ftmz/Gordon_2000.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o73o2ftmz/)

          On July 30, 2000 two members of Ladder 120 rescued a family of five from a thirteenth floor apartment at 315 Lavonia Avenue. Lieutenant Dennis Gordon received the Hugh Bonner Medal. Trapped in the bedroom of the fire apartment Lt Gordon gave up his mask to the barely conscious children until the fire was knocked down in the living room and kitchen.

     LAWRENCE E. TOMPKINS LT. LAD. 120 MAY 5, 2005 2006 JOHNSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/h55qgd0cr/Tompkins.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h55qgd0cr/)

          Lt. Lawrence E. Tompkins was awarded the Albert S. Johnston Medal for the successful rescue of a senior citizen who happened to also be an amputee from a fire on the second floor at 393 Powell Street.

     GLEN J. MERKITCH FF. LAD. 120 DEC. 11, 2006 2007 CRIMMONS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/5g1qs7m6z/Merkitch_2007.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5g1qs7m6z/)

          FF Glen J. Merkitch rescued a civilian on the floor above at a 2nd floor job at 2132A Fulton Street/Rockaway Ave. He found Theodore Dinkins wedged between a bed and the wall and proceeded to drag him to the front of the building to the window where L120′s bucket was in position to carry the occupant to the street. For his actions, FF Merkitch was awarded the Thomas E. Crimmons Medal

     LARRY D. SCHNEDKENBURGER, FF. LAD. 120 MAR. 20, 2006 2007 PULASKI

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/btqtvlojv/Schneckenburger_2006.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/btqtvlojv/)

          FF Larry D. Schneckenburger was awarded the Pulaski Association Medal in 2007 for his quick thinking actions in front of quarters on March 20th, 2006. FF Schneckenburger witnessed a gunfight at the same time children were being dismissed from the adjacent school and immediately put himself in harm’s way. He ushered many kids to safety while a total of 17 shots were fired and one teacher was struck twice in the leg

     JOHN P. DREW FF LAD. 120 DEC 7, 2005 2006 MARTIN

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/iixdbhzkb/Drew_2006.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/iixdbhzkb/)

          FF John P. Drew was awarded the Chief Joseph B. Martin Medal in 2007 for his actions at a fire at 348 Chester Street on December 27th, 2005. As any FF from Watkins St can attest, a box at the "Marcus Garvey" buildings presents many unique challenges and variations. FF Drew rescued Mary Patterson (a relative of former heavyweight boxer Floyd Patterson) from the top floor

     PETER E. CARROLL FF LAD. 120 AUG. 5, 2011 2012 JOHNSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/ahmwz4igr/Carroll.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ahmwz4igr/)

          FF Peter E. Carroll made a daring rescue of a 40 year old woman on the floor above of a lightweight construction duplex apartment at 340 Marion Street on August 25, 2011. (which occurred as signal 10-70 was transmitted for water delivery problems).

     MICHAEL P. RICHARDSON FF LAD. 120  OCT. 7, 2012 2013 COLUMBIA SOCIETY

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/5st4yf71n/Richardson_2012.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5st4yf71n/)

          FF Michael P. Richardson was awarded the 2013 Columbia Society Medal for operating above the fire in deteriorating conditions and rescuing a 55 year old man who was unconscious in his bed at Box 1636 which was transmitted for a heavy fire in the store of a 2 story brick adjacent to E 283 quarters on the night of October 7, 2012.

     CHRISTOPHER G. EYSSER CAPT. LAD. 120 JUL. 6, 2013 2014 JOHNSON

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/t5r6gyi0b/Eysser.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t5r6gyi0b/)

          Captain Christopher G. Eysser rescued  2 unconscious children in the rear bedroom at a 3 story LRFPMD at 373 Blake Ave on July 6, 2013.

     MICHAEL MEYER FF. LAD. 120 DEC. 14, 2016 2017 TREVOR/WARREN

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/r1u8vqy63/Meyer.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r1u8vqy63/)

          On December 14th 2016 FF Meyer had the most coveted position in the FDNY, Ladder 120- Irons. Ladder 120 responded to Box 77-1675 only a few blocks from quarters and the company effected the rescue of seven 10-45s from the top floor apartment of a project building. FF Meyer acted decisively under extreme stress and fire conditions.

     MICHAEL THOMPSON CAPT. LAD. 120 DEC. 14, 2016 2017 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/fphndz4wr/Thompson_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fphndz4wr/)
         
          Capt. Mike Thomson received the 2017 FDNY Brooklyn Citizens award for actions at Box 77-1675 at address 260 Stone Ave. Captain Thomson reacted decisively and showed steadfast leadership under extreme conditions. Captain Thomson acted selflessly and under the greatest traditions of Watkins Street and the FDNY.

     BRIAN CROSS FF. LAD. 120 DEC. 14, 2016 2017 HOLY NAME SOCIETY

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/m36qh8hij/Cross_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m36qh8hij/)

          FF Brian Cross was pivotal in saving the lives of multiple people in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn at Box 77-1675 at address 260 Stone Ave. Using his body as a shield he carried A young boy past the flames to the stairwell where he handed him off and turned back for others. In all seven victims, one of whom ultimately expired, were rescued at this fire.


Battalion 44 Medals:

     THOMAS YASVIN, JR. FF. BAT. 44 FEB. 6, 1949 1950 PRENTICE

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/8betyvva3/Yasvin.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8betyvva3/)

          Firefighter Thomas Yasvin, Battalion 44 Aide, rescued a woman from a burning 4th floor tenement apartment upon arrival and carried her to safety.

     FRANK T. TUTTLEMONDO BAT. CHIEF BAT. 44 AUG. 13, 1980 1981 CRIMMINS - POSTHUMOUS

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/4f1i2txez/Tuttlemundo.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/4f1i2txez/)

          Chief Frank Tuttlemondo sacrificed his own life to shelter firefighters from Engine 227 in collapsing building at Box 1672, 124 Osborn Street on August 13, 1980.


LODDs:

     FIREFIGHTER MORTIMER A. ROBERTS ENGINE 231 February 6, 1901

          FF Roberts was 34 and had a wife and 5 children.  FF Roberts' widow was awarded $10000 due to negligence of construction workers who left debris in street without warnings.  Engine 231 responded over dirt piles left in road and FF Roberts was thrown from apparatus. 
 
          (http://s29.postimg.cc/g3hzgvhgz/PPPPPP.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/g3hzgvhgz/)
     
     FIREFIGHTER HENRY J. KAISER ENGINE 231 April 6, 1912

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/owmgew9mz/Kaiser_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/owmgew9mz/)

          Four firemen from Engine 131 (now Engine 231) were working on a second floor fire escape when they were hit by a backdraft. The four fell in a heap on the ground and three of the four sprang up and went back to work. The fourth was Fireman Henry J. Kaiser of Engine 131, who lay white and inert. He failed to respond when first aid was given. He was placed in an ambulance unconscious and taken to the Bradford Street Hospital where he died three days later. He was only thirty years old, a member of the Department for two years and was married with two small children. The fire was in a four-story factory at Livonia and William Avenues and was one of the fieriest to visit the Brownsville section of Brooklyn for many years. The fire ate the core out of the brick factory and was valued at $60,000.

     FIREFIGHTER FREDERICK V. ERB ENGINE 231 July 23, 1934

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/t5r6gxn57/Erb_LODD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t5r6gxn57/)

          Answering a false alarm at 8:30 in the morning, Fireman Frederick Erb, was killed when the car of Battalion Chief Herbert Downward collided with a taxicab on East New York Avenue and Rockaway Parkway. Erb, who was thirty-nine years old and lived at 104-19 107th Street, Richmond Hill, Queens, struck his head against a curbstone when he was pitched from behind the steering wheel. His skull was fractured. He was attached to Engine 231 and was detailed to drive the Chief.

     BATTALION CHIEF EUGENE G. DOWD BATTALION 44 January 27, 1955

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/chzoeepsr/Dowd.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          On May 4, 1949 Battalion Chief Eugene G. Dowd operated at a fire on Pitkin and Saratoga Avenues [on May 4, 1949]. He wrote in his own Fire Report that he was not feeling well after the fire. He went on Medical Leave and later returned to light duty until his retirement on a three-quarters disability pension on March 1, 1954. Chief Dowd died on January 27, 1955 of a heart attack. On February 9, 1956 the Board of Trustees of the Fire Department Pension Fund determined his death to have been in the line of duty. Chief Dowd joined the Department on November 1, 1928 and was assigned to Engine 224. He served in Engine 227 as a Fireman and in Engines 240 and 231 as a Lieutenant. He was appointed Captain on August 23, 1943 and assigned to Engine 214 where he served until June 17, 1948. He was promoted to Battalion Chief on June 16, 1948 and assigned to the 44th Battalion. Chief Dowd was fifty-four years old at the time of his death

     FIREFIGHTER ROBERT A. MEILL LADDER 120  July 1, 1961

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/5f5l3ztnf/Meill.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

          FF Meill, a 3rd grade FF died on July 1st, 1961 when, as he was operating, the roof collapsed during a 4 alarm fire at 196 Junius Street. FF Meill was survived by his wife, Eleanor.

     BATTALION CHIEF FRANK T. TUTTLEMONDO BATTALION 44 August 13, 1980

          (https://s33.postimg.cc/zeqafsu17/Tuttlemondo_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zeqafsu17/)

          BC Tuttlemondo died while operating at 124 Osbourne Street during a fire in a 3 story vacant which he correctly assumed had squatters inside at 4:30AM. The Chief heroically would use his own body to shield a fellow FF during a collapse which would in fact save the members’ life. He was survived by his wife Jenny and 2 kids, Thomas and Katherine.


Brownsville:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/tqwur5j17/E_231_map.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/tqwur5j17/)

     http://forgotten-ny.com/2005/06/brownsville-and-east-new-york-brooklyn/ (http://forgotten-ny.com/2005/06/brownsville-and-east-new-york-brooklyn/)

     http://www.oldnycphotos.com/brownsville.html (http://www.oldnycphotos.com/brownsville.html)

     http://lightbox.time.com/2012/01/31/brownsville-brooklyn/#1 (http://lightbox.time.com/2012/01/31/brownsville-brooklyn/#1)



     (http://s2.postimage.org/6gfj8dig5/logo.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/6gfj8dig5/)

     (http://s28.postimg.cc/ylqgvh7op/ppppp.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ylqgvh7op/)



     Note - respects to Engine 231/Ladder 120/Battalion 44 excellent website - http://watkinsst.com/ - visit for additional information
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: mack on July 19, 2018, 10:31:30 PM
Brownsville 2nd alarm - 1988:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE9_Mv4e63g&list=PLrciE2qoF8oYM7N8oqcHhGvWJIXMQfcgT&index=130
Title: Re: FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section
Post by: fdhistorian on July 20, 2018, 12:16:21 AM
Engine 203 - 1912 Mack high pressure hose wagon:

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/n3aq16pij/E_203_tender.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n3aq16pij/)

     (https://s33.postimg.cc/7520bcst7/E_203_ap_7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7520bcst7/)

High pressure engine companies were established in Manhattan and Brooklyn to use the new high pressure water pumping systems.  The plan was to take lines off high pressure hydrants without the use of steamers.  High pressure companies initially were viewed as successful holding greater alarms at lower alarm assignments and eliminating the requirement of multiple secti