12/6/21 Staten Island 10-77 Box 18

Signal73

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Jan 20, 2014
Messages
12,379
Fire Location: 388 Richmond Terr

Fire on the 5th floor of a 10 story MD 178 X 60

E-155,153,156,152
E-160(C.F.R.D)
E-157(H.R Nozzle)
L-78,79,80(Fast)
L-83,81,87(Vent)
B-22,21,23,42(Safety)
R-5
Sq-8
D-8
Rac-5
RB,SB
FC
M-9
MB
 

STAjo

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Jun 15, 2012
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Relocation Must've been a Challenge w/ Brooklyn AH 2525 Operating at the same time :unsure:

 

skiLB

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Jan 11, 2016
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E155 L78 be working by themselves at this box till 2nd & 3rd due get in, little bit of a ride for 2nd & 3rd due companies.
 

memorymaster

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Nov 2, 2020
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That house is privately owned and the interior nicely restored. The 'apparatus' door was open one night and one could see that the owner has off street parking for his autos. From what I understand, the second and third floors, living quarters, have been elegantly refurbished. Must have cost a bundle to do. Must be a great view of the harbor from the hose tower.
 

skiLB

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Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
1,799
That house is privately owned and the interior nicely restored. The 'apparatus' door was open one night and one could see that the owner has off street parking for his autos. From what I understand, the second and third floors, living quarters, have been elegantly refurbished. Must have cost a bundle to do. Must be a great view of the harbor from the hose tower.
Very cool
 

mack

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Aug 8, 2009
Messages
10,685
The Tompkinsville firehouse was also quarters for Division 8 during the 1940s. There it was convenient to the SI Ferry for visitors, but not located in the best location to cover the Borough of Richmond. It would be a 16-mile run to get to a Tottenville or other South Shore fire - and there were no highways across SI back then.
 

mack

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Messages
10,685
Bobby Thompson was a slugging outfielder for the NY Giants who won the pennant for the Giants in 1951 in a playoff game against the Brooklyn Dodgers at the Polo Grounds in Manhattan:



After leaving the Giants ballpark, Bobby Thompson, an all-star outfielder, took the SI Ferry to SI to celebrate the tremendous win with his brother, an FDNY firefighter and member of Engine 154.

1639125646421.png

This is the story: After the obligatory champagne romp, and the press interviews. After he was called out on the top step of the Giants’ center-field clubhouse for a raucous curtain call before thousands of adoring, grasping fans still in the stands and massed on the field below; after stopping down at 52nd Street, to sing a Chesterfield cigarettes jingle on Perry Como’s TV show for $1,000 — more money than any ballplayer of the day could resist — Bobby Thomson went back to the home he shared with his widowed mother on Staten Island.

Usually, he took the subway down to the ferry, but this evening he treated himself to a cab down the West Side Highway. Then he paid his nickel like anyone else, and sat unnoticed and alone on the ferry’s upper deck, for the 23-minute ride (matching the number on his Giants jersey) across New York Harbor. Once over in Staten Island, he went with his brother — again unrecognized — to meet their mother at a tavern in New Dorp. A crowd of friends and neighbors was already gathered there, and Thomson indulged in a plate of steak and fries and a glass of wine, and was home before eleven o’clock.

The modest ballplayer could not understand all the fuss, reportedly telling friends, "It's just a home run." Bobby had grown up on SI, graduated Curtis HS, and was associated with SI and SI sports and activities through his lifetime. It was believed that if Thompson did not succeed in MLB, he would have become an FDNY firefighter like his brother and later his nephew.


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