A LOOK BACK.

grumpy grizzly

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When TL-14 got their ALF TL didn't they keep the Sutphen in quarters as their spare??
 

*******

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Was assigned to L127 as ff. Was promoted to Lt. 8/69. It was shortly after this that 127 received the first TL in Queens.
 

68jk09

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14 & 119 had the Sutphens  .....after 14s was replaced 119 had both Sutphens 1 as their regular rig & the other as a spare only to be used by them.......a fact about the Sutphens was that they had pumps......the agreement between the City & the Unions was that the pumps would only be used to boost pressure from a line into the TL already being supplied by an ENG.
 

fdny1075k

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68jk09 said:
14 & 119 had the Sutphens  .....after 14s was replaced 119 had both Sutphens 1 as their regular rig & the other as a spare only to be used by them.......a fact about the Sutphens was that they had pumps......the agreement between the City & the Unions was that the pumps would only be used to boost pressure from a line into the TL already being supplied by an ENG.
I think 119 eventually got an ALF 100' tower. If and when they did, what happened to the two Sutphens?
 

nfd2004

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No, I don't think 119 ever got that ALF Rearmount Tower Ladder
 

Atlas

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Both types of Tower Ladders, the two Sutphens & also the two ALF's had pumps in them. One set was 1250 GPM & the other was rated at 1500 GPM. I forget which was which, SORRY!

There was a fire in the South Bronx one evening where the staff chief instructed the dispatcher to special call Ladder 119 to the fire with their Sutphen Tower. L-119 used their pumps & put the fire out. After that incident the other unit who had the same rig started using their pumps too.
 

grumpy grizzly

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Sutphen TL-14 was a 1980 model with a 1250 pump. TL-119, the "Tower of Power" was a 1981 modeil similar to the 1980 model and also had a 1250 pump. Info from "Wheels of the Bravest"
 

68jk09

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Although not Fire service related this is an amazing story that was fwd to me by a friend......it concerns an awesome feat performed in 1943 during WW 2......unfortunately the pictures of the plane after landing did not transfer.....HERE IS THE STORY....A mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, between a B-17 and a German fighter over the Tunis dock area, became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of World War II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went out of control, probably with a wounded pilot then continued its crashing descent into the rear of the fuselage of a Fortress named All American, piloted by Lt. Kendrick R. Bragg, of the 414th Bomb Squadron. When it struck, the fighter broke apart, but left some pieces in the B-17. The left horizontal stabilizer of the Fortress and left elevator were completely torn away. The two right engines were out and one on the left had a serious oil pump leak. The vertical fin and the rudder had been damaged, the fuselage had been cut almost completely through connected only at two small parts of the frame and the radios, electrical and oxygen systems were damaged. There was also a hole in the top that was over 16 feet long and 4 feet wide at its widest and the split in the fuselage went all the way to the top gunners turret.




Although the tail actually bounced and swayed in the wind and twisted when the plane turned and all the control cables were severed, except one single elevator cable still worked, and the aircraft still flew - miraculously! The tail gunner was trapped because there was no floor connecting the tail to the rest of the plane. The waist and tail gunners used parts of the German fighter and their own parachute harnesses in an attempt to keep the tail from ripping off and the two sides of the fuselage from splitting apart. While the crew was trying to keep the bomber from coming apart, the pilot continued on his bomb run and released his bombs over the target.





When the bomb bay doors were opened, the wind turbulence was so great that it blew one of the waist gunners into the broken tail section. It took several minutes and four crew members to pass him ropes from parachutes and haul him back into the forward part of the plane. When they tried to do the same for the tail gunner, the tail began flapping so hard that it began to break off. The weight of the gunner was adding some stability to the tail section, so he went back to his position.

The turn back toward England had to be very slow to keep the tail from twisting off. They actually covered almost 70 miles to make the turn home. The bomber was so badly damaged that it was losing altitude and speed and was soon alone in the sky. For a brief time, two more Me-109 German fighters attacked the All American. Despite the extensive damage, all of the machine gunners were able to respond to these attacks and soon drove off the fighters. The two waist gunners stood up with their heads sticking out through the hole in the top of the fuselage to aim and fire their machine guns. The tail gunner had to shoot in short bursts because the recoil was actually causing the plane to turn.

Allied P-51 fighters intercepted the All American as it crossed over the Channel and took one of the pictures shown. They also radioed to the base describing that the empennage was waving like a fish tail and that the plane would not make it and to send out boats to rescue the crew when they bailed out. The fighters stayed with the Fortress taking hand signals from Lt. Bragg and relaying them to the base. Lt. Bragg signaled that 5 parachutes and the spare had been "used" so five of the crew could not bail out. He made the decision that if they could not bail out safely, then he would stay with the plane and land it.

Two and a half hours after being hit, the aircraft made its final turn to line up with the runway while it was still over 40 miles away. It descended into an emergency landing and a normal roll-out on its landing gear.

When the ambulance pulled alongside, it was waved off because not a single member of the crew had been injured. No one could believe that the aircraft could still fly in such a condition. The Fortress sat placidly until the crew all exited through the door in the fuselage and the tail gunner had climbed down a ladder, at which time the entire rear section of the aircraft collapsed onto the ground. The rugged old bird had done its job.
 

68jk09

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http://flavorwire.com/246318/fascinating-photos-of-a-teen-gang-in-50s-brooklyn#1                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Some '50s BKLYN street shots.....8 th  Ave & 17 St.
 

3511

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68jk...great story on the B17...is there a picture or did I miss it somewhere?
 

grumpy grizzly

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My father was a gunner on a B-17. He flew Schweinfurt and Regensburg Schweinfurt was know as Bloody Thursday 60 bombers of 250+ were shot down. My father said you did not need a navigator to return to England, just follow all the shot down aircraft.
 

68jk09

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3511 said:
68jk...great story on the B17...is there a picture or did I miss it somewhere?
......When i pasted the story the picture links did not take .....once again Thanks to mack for coming thru & posting the 2 photos above (click to enlarge)........show this story to some youngsters......these were the Men who made history.
 

68jk09

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Please take a few moments and pray for the 111 souls lost during the month of May of the forgotten men of our silent service during WW II. These gallant men are now lying entombed inside sunken submarines across the Pacific Ocean and are On The Eternal Patrol.

May 3, 1945 USS Lagarto (ss-371) Lagarto proceeded to the South China Sea for her 2nd patrol and received orders to head for outer waters of the Gulf of Siam. On May 2nd, she exchanged messages with the USS Baya (ss-138). The next day both subs attacked a Japanese convoy passing through the Southern Gulf of Siam. The convoy included one large ship and 1 medium sized ship, fiercely guarded by 2 Japanese escorts, one of which was the minelayer Hatsutaka. USS Baya was driven off by heavy gunfire and radio contact with the Lagarto was lost and she was never heard nor seen again. 85 souls lost. Post-war Japanese records revealed the Hatsutaka located a submerged submarine at 30 fathoms dropping depth charges on her, noting later with longitude and latitude readings. From that moment on, the exact location of the USS Lagarto has not been known, ? until May 0f 2005. A group of private British deep sea divers from the MV Trident, discovered the USS Lagarto, in 230 feet of water, sitting upright and largely intact, but for a large hole in the port bow area, suggesting she suffered a direct hit from an explosive device. Also observed during the dive, was an open outside torpedo door, with an empty torpedo tube sealed behind it, suggesting the possibility that Lagarto fired off a torpedo shortly before her demise. The site is now designated a War Memorial-hands off! Lagarto had received 1 battle star for her WW2 service.

May 23, 1939, USS Squalus (ss-192), Newly built and launched on March 1,1939, she commenced numerous test dives off Portsmouth New Hampshire. After successfully completing 18 dives, she suffered a catastrophic valve failure on the next dive, May 23rd, off the Isle of Shoals. Flooding the aft torpedo room, both engine rooms and the crews quarters , drowning 26 men immediately, including Ensign Joseph H Patterson, star of the 1936 Olympics, US Track team. The sub settled on the bottom at 243 feet with 33 men still alive in the forward sections of the boat. Over the next 13hrs, the US Navy rescued the men on 4 trips, using the new McCann rescue chamber invented by Commander Charles B Momsen. 4 navy divers received the Congressional Medal of Honor for their heroics. On Sept 13th, the Squalus was raised and towed into the Portsmouth Navy Yard and decommissioned Nov 15th. On February 9, 1940 she was renamed the USS Sailfish (ss-192) and went on to perform honorably during 12 war patrols, with 9 battle stars and The Presidential Unit Citation for her WW2 service.

www.oneternalpatrol.com
VIEW MORE AT THIS LINK........ CONTINUED RIP TO ALL.
 
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