hooks

truckieL12

New member
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
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10
I am in the process of justifying to my chief to switch up some hooks.  All we have is the traditional pike pole and drywall hook. 

I would like a nice NY Roof Hook.  What are some of the positive points, and negatives, to this hook?  Are there any preference out there besides this?

Thanks
 

Patrick

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Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
9
Pros for NY Roof Hook:
-Larger surfaces to push and pull with than standard Pike Pole
-Steel construction allows for less flex, easier maintenance, and more adaptability than wood or plastic
-Option for chisel/gas shut off/halligan fork ends
-Allows for two points of push and pull when opening up walls

  The important thing to keep in mind is that every style of hook/pole/rake has it's purposes and situations it is best suited for. As far as selling a change over to the Chief try and get him to buy one or two and demo them out in comparison to pike poles. Good Luck with the Chief.
 

truckieL12

New member
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
Messages
10
I am kinda looking for a tool usable in a large amount of tasks.  Kinda sucks to have 3 or 4 tools when you are into having tools, and other guys are lawn ornaments when it comes to the tools.

How is the weight of the hooks?  The chief was quite concerned about the weight if the hook is steel, as opposed to fiberglass?
 

Patrick

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Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
9
The weight difference is negligable when it really comes down to carrying it, but pays dividends when you go to take a window or open up something. Also don't get me wrong the NY Roof Hook is an extremly versitile tool, but my point was and still is, like any tool it is not an end all be all weapon. The Traditional Pike Pole, Boston Rake, etc still have situations where they would be your tool of choice (an example I'm in Massachusetts and with the homes I know have plaster and lathe ceilings the Boston Rake was designed for that and I would be more likely to take it as my hook/rake of choice). That being said the NY Rook Hook is still the primary hook I take into a job and what I have my crew take. Hope this helps.
 

68jk09

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Joined
May 6, 2010
Messages
12,207
^^^^^^^
One of the benefits of a metal Halligan Hook is the head having both a hook & a right angled "adz" type piece....the right angle comes in handy for penetration of a tough ceiling by using a sort of reverse swing...assure that there are no Members in the way as well as any wires or other obstructions then place the head on the floor adz point facing up & use a good sideways swing UP...once you have planted it in the ceiling move toward it prying it vertical .....this often allows you to get a bite & further enlarge the initial hole to get a good start....as said in the previous post inverting the hook can provide an opening also...if you have a chisel end on a metal hook this will give you even more advantage to start a hole as well as other uses like forcing a ferry type expandable window gate while working from a Fire Escape....you can punch the chisel end through the glass & pry the screws while being protected by the window then clear it all out....regardless of what type hook you are using when starting off look at the surrounding area you will be throwing it up from for Members or obstructions then place your feet in one spot & throw or swing it up giving it at least 3 good try's ... if no luck move somewhat either way .. you may be hitting a beam .....by keeping your feet in place you will keep hitting the same spot on the ceiling rather than dancing around & making multiple initial hits..... if you are in a high heat area you can start from a squatting or crouched position & but still remain in the same spot.....regardless of what type hook unless the ceiling is burnt well or there are openings already generally start w/the hook head on the floor & swing or throw it up like you were going to "drive it thru the roof"..... as far as the 20' wooden hook (if you even have one) it of course was designed for high ceilings & is very unwieldy & not a one man job but it has come in handy (mostly before energy efficient windows) to vent 2nd floor windows in a courtyard or rear area that could not be accessed rapidly with a ladder especially by a lone FF....by butting the hook head against a bldg or curb & raising it upside down it could be used to vent windows ....if you were able to raise the head you could easily vent energy efficient's as well & in a emergency a trapped FF could use it to exit a lower fl window....even though it is 20' long it still can be snaked or bent somewhat thru an area a 20' portable may not go like hallways..alleyways...thru a basement ..etc.
 
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