Paris, France Major Fire near the Place de L'Opera 11/20/21

raybrag

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Bulldog

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Some good videos especially the interior shots. Compared to FDNY standards I wouldn't call this a huge fire however.
 

CFDMarshal

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Some good videos especially the interior shots. Compared to FDNY standards I wouldn't call this a huge fire however.
Pretty big considering the availability of companies is no where near what is available in NYC. Not to mention access and age of the structure.
 

Micael

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Pretty big considering the availability of companies is no where near what is available in NYC. Not to mention access and age of the structure.
Yeah, I’m not familiar with the details of the construction of these buildings in Paris, but I know that in Stockholm, Sweden, there’s a lot of complications with the large 19th century/early 20th century multiple dwellings. One of these is the inclusion of reeds as a binding agent in the interior plaster/stucco works, it sort of fills a ”rebar” function for it, and fire spreads through them almost like in a matchbox. This both causes flaming pieces to fall down on firefighters doing interior work and spreads the fire into the wooden load bearing structures (which are usually bone dry due to age) in numerous places very rapidly. The wooden load bearing structures can themselves be very complicated with things like decorative towers being supported at a single point where numerous beams come together, causing a quick collapse if the fire reaches them. So a fire in this type of building can quickly get out of hand unless the first due units manages to control it, with very aggressive approaches. And as you say, much fewer resources are available quickly compared to in NYC, coupled with frequent access problems.

Here’s a pretty good video from a few years ago of a Paris fire, a number of rescues including by use of hook ladders, it hints at some of the complications with handling fires in these old buildings:
 

mikeindabronx

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Yeah, I’m not familiar with the details of the construction of these buildings in Paris, but I know that in Stockholm, Sweden, there’s a lot of complications with the large 19th century/early 20th century multiple dwellings. One of these is the inclusion of reeds as a binding agent in the interior plaster/stucco works, it sort of fills a ”rebar” function for it, and fire spreads through them almost like in a matchbox. This both causes flaming pieces to fall down on firefighters doing interior work and spreads the fire into the wooden load bearing structures (which are usually bone dry due to age) in numerous places very rapidly. The wooden load bearing structures can themselves be very complicated with things like decorative towers being supported at a single point where numerous beams come together, causing a quick collapse if the fire reaches them. So a fire in this type of building can quickly get out of hand unless the first due units manages to control it, with very aggressive approaches. And as you say, much fewer resources are available quickly compared to in NYC, coupled with frequent access problems.

Here’s a pretty good video from a few years ago of a Paris fire, a number of rescues including by use of hook ladders, it hints at some of the complications with handling fires in these old buildings:



Thanks for posting the info. about some of the buildings & also the video
 

GeoC

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Yeah, I’m not familiar with the details of the construction of these buildings in Paris, but I know that in Stockholm, Sweden, there’s a lot of complications with the large 19th century/early 20th century multiple dwellings. One of these is the inclusion of reeds as a binding agent in the interior plaster/stucco works, it sort of fills a ”rebar” function for it, and fire spreads through them almost like in a matchbox. This both causes flaming pieces to fall down on firefighters doing interior work and spreads the fire into the wooden load bearing structures (which are usually bone dry due to age) in numerous places very rapidly. The wooden load bearing structures can themselves be very complicated with things like decorative towers being supported at a single point where numerous beams come together, causing a quick collapse if the fire reaches them. So a fire in this type of building can quickly get out of hand unless the first due units manages to control it, with very aggressive approaches. And as you say, much fewer resources are available quickly compared to in NYC, coupled with frequent access problems.

Here’s a pretty good video from a few years ago of a Paris fire, a number of rescues including by use of hook ladders, it hints at some of the complications with handling fires in these old buildings:
Yeah, I’m not familiar with the details of the construction of these buildings in Paris, but I know that in Stockholm, Sweden, there’s a lot of complications with the large 19th century/early 20th century multiple dwellings. One of these is the inclusion of reeds as a binding agent in the interior plaster/stucco works, it sort of fills a ”rebar” function for it, and fire spreads through them almost like in a matchbox. This both causes flaming pieces to fall down on firefighters doing interior work and spreads the fire into the wooden load bearing structures (which are usually bone dry due to age) in numerous places very rapidly. The wooden load bearing structures can themselves be very complicated with things like decorative towers being supported at a single point where numerous beams come together, causing a quick collapse if the fire reaches them. So a fire in this type of building can quickly get out of hand unless the first due units manages to control it, with very aggressive approaches. And as you say, much fewer resources are available quickly compared to in NYC, coupled with frequent access problems.

Here’s a pretty good video from a few years ago of a Paris fire, a number of rescues including by use of hook ladders, it hints at some of the complications with handling fires in these old buildings:
Great video confirms what I felt about Paris Firefighters. I was in Paris a few years back (before Covid) and had the opportunity to speak to some of Paris Bravest. They were more interested in FDNY as I was about them, lol. Very enthusiastic about there fire service.
Paris is much like NYC, old mixed with new with narrow streets etc. Their use of portable ladder with hook ladder in video Is typical evolution for the in parts of city with narrow streets. Like many European cities Aerial Ladders are not as common as NYC. Engine companies are expected to carry everything needed, including ladders etc. Great work shown here in video. Especially like they’re shiny helmets.
p.s. I visited Montreal not long after and found Montreal FFs very rude. They used language as a problem and just handed me off to a Proby who spoke no English. Not so in Paris, English was not a problem and they were very friendly. I guess it’s because they are considered part of the Military. If you visit Paris stop in you will be treated well. As in London and Dublin also.
 
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Micael

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Great video confirms what I felt about Paris Firefighters. I was in Paris a few years back (before Covid) and had the opportunity to speak to some of Paris Bravest. They were more interested in FDNY as I was about them, lol. Very enthusiastic about there fire service.
Paris is much like NYC, old mixed with new with narrow streets etc. Their use of portable ladder with hook ladder in video Is typical evolution for the in parts of city with narrow streets. Like many European cities Aerial Ladders are not as common as NYC. Engine companies are expected to carry everything needed, including ladders etc. Great work shown here in video. Especially like they’re shiny helmets.
p.s. I visited Montreal not long after and found Montreal FFs very rude. They used language as a problem and just handed me off to a Proby who spoke no English. Not so in Paris, English was not a problem and they were very friendly. I guess it’s because they are considered part of the Military. If you visit Paris stop in you will be treated well. As in London and Dublin also.
If you’re interested, here’s another video showings parts of the operations at a more severe Paris fire in 2019:
This one unfortunately claimed ten lives, though firefighters rescued around 40 trapped residents. Some rescues conducted by lowering people with ropes to the ground, which isn’t something all that common. Wikipedia article: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_2019_Paris_fire
 
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