FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1924 GARAGE FIRE - GAS EXPLOSION - ENGINE 21 INJURIES

1924 GARAGE FIRE GAS EXPLOSION.jpg



ENGINE 21 MEMBERS INJURIES:


LT Martin Crowe - head and hand burns
FF George Long - burns
FF Alfred Pfeiffer - burns
FF Ryan Percy - burns
FF Walter Adams - body and hand burns
FF John Kelly - burns
FF. Frederick - body and hand burns - 1st day on job and son of Engineer William Frederick, Engine 21
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1926 BOILER EXPLOSION

1926 BOILER BLAST.jpg


FIRE BUILDING 232 E 40TH STREET

232 E 40 ST.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1945 - 4TH ALARM - BOMBER HITS EMPIRE STATE BUILDING



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1945 Empire State Building B-25 crash

On July 28, 1945, a B-25 Mitchell bomber of the United States Army Air Forces crashed into the Empire State Building in New York City, while flying in thick fog. The accident caused the death of fourteen people (three crewmen and eleven people in the building) and damage estimated at US$1 million (equivalent to about $14M in 2019), although the building's structural integrity was not compromised.

0px-Bomber_Crashed_into_Empire_State_Building_1945.jpg
The plane embedded in the side of the building

On Saturday, July 28, 1945, Lieutenant Colonel William F. Smith Jr. was piloting a B-25 Mitchell bomber on a routine personnel transport mission from Bedford Army Air Field in Massachusetts to Newark Metropolitan Airport in New Jersey. Smith asked for clearance to land, but he was advised of zero visibility. Proceeding anyway, he became disoriented by the fog and turned right instead of left after passing the Chrysler Building.

At 9:40 a.m., the aircraft crashed into the north side of the Empire State Building, between the 78th and 80th floors, making an 18-by-20-foot (5.5 m × 6.1 m) hole in the building into the offices of the War Relief Society and the National Catholic Welfare Council. One engine shot through the south side opposite the impact and flew as far as the next block, dropping 900 feet (270 m) and landing on the roof of a nearby building and causing a fire that destroyed a penthouse art studio. The other engine and part of the landing gear fell down an elevator shaft. The resulting fire was extinguished in 40 minutes. The Empire State Building fire is the only significant fire at such a height[vague] to be brought under control by firefighters.

Between 50 and 60 sightseers were on the 86th floor observation deck when the crash happened. Fourteen people were killed: Colonel Smith, Staff Sergeant Christopher Domitrovich, and Navy Aviation Machinist's Mate Albert Perna, who was hitching a ride, and eleven civilians in the building. Perna's body was not found until two days later, when search crews discovered that it had entered an elevator shaft and fallen to the bottom. The other two crewmen were burned beyond recognition. Elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver was thrown from her elevator car on the 80th floor and suffered severe burns. First aid workers placed her on another elevator car to transport her to the ground floor, but the cables supporting that car had been damaged in the incident, and the car fell 75 stories, ending up in the basement. Oliver survived the fall but had a broken pelvis, back and neck when rescuers found her amongst the rubble. This remains the world record for the longest survived elevator fall.

Despite the damage and loss of life, the building was open for business on many floors on the next Monday morning, less than 48 hours later. The crash spurred the passage of the long-pending Federal Tort Claims Act of 1946, as well as the insertion of retroactive provisions into the law, allowing people to sue the government for the accident.


1945 Empire State Building B-25 crash - Wikipedia



WNYF 1945

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Bomber Crashes into Empire State Building (1945) - YouTube
 
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mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS



1945 - 4TH ALARM - BOMBER HITS EMPIRE STATE BUILDING (CONT)


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AUGUST 1945 - FIRE ENGINEERING

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mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1990 - 4TH ALARM - EMPIRE STATE BUILDING FIRE - 51ST FLOOR



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Fire In Empire State Building Injures 38
JOE UNGARO July 16, 1990

NEW YORK (AP) _ A fire halfway up the Empire State Building on Monday evening sent flames billowing from shattered windows and chased tourists from the observation deck and workers from throughout the building. At least 38 people were injured, most from inhaling smoke.

About 150 firefighters battled the blaze, which was largely confined to four unoccupied offices on the 51st floor, said Don Malva, a Fire Department spokesman. Heavy smoke poured through the middle floors of the 102-story building, and the entire tower was cleared of tourists and late-lingering office workers.

Josephine Danielson of New York, who was visiting the observation deck with five friends from Spain, said they clambered down stairways to the 70th floor, then took an elevator to ground level.

″We started smelling smoke and we saw on the east side of the building dense black smoke coming from below the tower,″ said Ms. Danielson, an airline flight attendant. ″Whoever runs the observation deck is tremendously unorganized. You would think they would have had some kind of recorded announcement.″

The fire was reported at 6:30 p.m., and by 8:45 p.m., the blaze was out and the danger passed, Malva said.

The fire did heavy fire damage on the 51st floor, with water damage on lower floors and smoke damage above, said John Mulligan, another department spokesman. The cause of the blaze wasn’t immediately known, he said.

Thirty-one firefighters and seven civilians were injured, said Mulligan. Twelve of the firefighters were immediately hospitalized, the mot seriously hurt suffering from first and second-degree burns.

Three non-firefighters were treated at the scene by paramedics, and four were hospitalized with smoke inhalation and heat exhaustion.

″Some people said they heard the alarms, others said they didn’t,″ Mulligan said. ″But we get that in every fire. There’s a speaker system and we are investigating to see how well it worked.″

Fire Capt. Charles Kasper said the building underwent a ″brick oven effect,″ heating up quickly. Some windows broke from the heat, and wind surging through fanned the flames, he said.

″It had to be close to a thousand degrees on the fire floor,″ said Kasper. ″The nozzleman I was next to was getting burned. He was screaming in pain but he did not let go of his hose.″

Kasper said the Empire State Building is ″an incredibly well-made building. If this happened in a modern high-rise building, we would have far more problems.″

Building employees brought people down from the deck, 15 at a time, finally clearing the building by 10:20 p.m.

Nabila Al Riyami, a tourist from Oman on the Arabian Sea, was helped out, along with her husband and five children.

″Some people were crying and were having nervous trembling fits,″ she said. Her husband, Said, added: ″We were praying to God that he would help us. We are safe and we thank the Fire Department of the municipality.″

Fire Commissioner Carlos Rivera said flames had billowed out the windows when the fire first broke out, but a short time later only heavy smoke kept pouring out from some of the floors.

The Empire State Building was the world’s tallest tower until 1973 when the World Trade Center was built in Manhattan. The Sears Tower in Chicago is now the tallest building.

Mulligan said he believed the last blaze at the Empire State Building was in 1988.

Fire In Empire State Building Injures 38 (apnews.com)



WNYF 1ST/91

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ENGINE 21 - ASSIGNED ON 10-76

EMPIRE 2.jpg


EMPIRE STATE BUILDING FIRE (2).jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


2016 MANHATTAN BOX 33-0753 - ENGINE 21 1ST DUE



FDNY BATTLING 3RD ALARM FIRE ON 3RD AVENUE IN MURRAY HILL, MANHATTAN, NYC.

"FIREGROUND AUDIO" - FDNY BATTLING 3RD ALARM FIRE ON 3RD AVENUE IN MURRAY HILL, MANHATTAN, NYC. - YouTube



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11/30/16 Manhattan 3rd Alarm Box 0753

Nov 30, 2016

Nov 30, 2016
581 3rd Avenue @ East 38th Street

Fire in a restaurant

All-Hands going to work

2nd alarm transmitted for fire in the rear of a subway restaurant - 1st floor of a 5 story

3rd alarm transmitted

Engine 21 & Tower Ladder 7 First Due

-byFDNYSTATENISLAND


Third Alarm at 00:43
10-41c1 at 00:45

01:11 - FC reports secondaries of the basement and 1st floor are negative. Probably Will Hold Duration: 1 hour 18 mins

01:14 - FC request 2 additional trucks for the staging area

01:37 - 2 Green Tag firefighters transported by 08C

01:39 - (on OEM radio) Watch Command to 623, FD has requested the Dept of Buildings to respond but they will not respond until the fire is under control

All Hands:
E-21, 16, 65, 8
L-7, 2, 24FAST?
B-8, 9
D-3
Sq18, R1

Second Alarm:
E-1?, 14, 54?, 35Comm
L-21, 3, 12(S/C), 18a7(S/C)
B-6, 2, FCB, RB?, SB?
FC, TSU2 (went 10-8 then asked to return at 01:33), OEM623

Third Alarm (Staging at 40 and 3rd):
E-26, 5, 3, 39
L-4, 16, 20(S/C), 11(S/C)
B-4, 58ARC(told to not take off)
MSU
Cars 1C, 12A, 12B, 13B

Relocations:
E229 acting E3
E258 acting E14
E307 acting E26
L18 acting L7
L108 acting L18
L25 acting L4
L138 acting L16
L8 acting L24

- by FDNY793727
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”



FDNY MAP.jpg

FDNY MAP 2.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


MURRAY HILL

Murray Hill is a neighborhood on the east side of Manhattan in New York City. Murray Hill is generally bordered to the east by the East River or Kips Bay and to the west by Midtown Manhattan, though the exact boundaries are highly disputed.

Murray Hill was named after Robert Murray, the head of the Murray family, a mercantile family that settled in the area in the 18th century. The Murray property was located on a steep glacial hill that peaked between Lexington Avenue and Broadway. Through the 19th century, Murray Hill was relatively isolated from the rest of New York City, which at the time was centered in lower Manhattan. Murray Hill became an upscale neighborhood during the 20th century. Today, it contains several cultural institutions, as well as missions and consulates to the nearby United Nations headquarters.

Murray Hill is part of Manhattan Community District 6, and its primary ZIP Codes are 10016 and 10017. It is patrolled by the 17th Precinct of the New York City Police Department.

Diplomatic missions

Due to the proximity of the headquarters of the United Nations and the availability of old mansions, many countries operate diplomatic missions and consulates in Murray Hill, including:

The Consulate-General of Mexico in New York, at 27 East 39th Street (10016).
The Consulate-General of South Africa in New York, at 333 East 38th Street (10016).
The Consulate-General of the Republic of Poland in New York, at 233 Madison Avenue (10016).

Missions to the United Nations in Murray Hill include:

Afghanistan
Armenia
Austria
Benin
China
Cuba
El Salvador
Estonia
Fiji
Guatemala
Guinea
India
Indonesia
Iran
Lesotho
Liechtenstein
Malta
Mauritania
Namibia
Romania


Fire safety

Murray Hill is served by the New York City Fire Department (FDNY)'s Engine Co. 21 fire station, located at 238 East 40th Street.

Murray Hill, Manhattan - Wikipedia


1867 MURRAY HILL MAP


Map of the "Murray Hill Farm," "Ogden Place Farm," Lawrence & Astor, Wiswall & Price, Corporation, Wm. Wright, John Taylor and other property - Seymour B. Durst Old York Library (columbia.edu)



2020 MURRAY HILL NEIGHBORHOOD


MAP MURRAY HILL.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


TURTLE BAY - MIDTOWN EAST

Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. It extends from roughly 43rd Street to 53rd Streets, and eastward from Lexington Avenue to the East River's western branch (facing Roosevelt Island).[4][5][6][7][8] The neighborhood is the site of the headquarters of the United Nations and the Chrysler Building. The Tudor City apartment complex is to the south of Turtle Bay.[9]

Turtle Bay is named after a former cove of the East River, which in turn was named after the Dutch word for "knife". The neighborhood was originally settled as a Dutch farm in the 17th century, and was subsequently developed with tenements, power plants, and slaughterhouses in the 19th century. These industrial structures were largely demolished in the 1940s and 1950s to make way for the United Nations headquarters. Today, Turtle Bay contains multiple missions and consulates to the nearby United Nations headquarters.

Turtle Bay is part of Manhattan Community District 6, and its primary ZIP Codes are 10017 and 10022.[1] It is patrolled by the 17th Precinct of the New York City Police Department.

Turtle Bay, Manhattan - Wikipedia



HISTORY, TURTLE BAY

How the Manhattan neighborhood of Turtle Bay got its name

POSTED ON FRI, JANUARY 26, 2018
BY EMILY NONKO

turtle-bay-historic-e1516990518410.jpg
VIEW PHOTO IN GALLERY

Turtle Bay and Blackwell’s Island around 1840 at the foot of what now is 49th Street, courtesy the Turtle Bay Association

The Manhattan neighborhood of Turtle Bay, a stretch of Midtown East that holds everything from skyscrapers to brownstones, has a history dating back to 1639. Modern-day New Yorkers might envision the area got its name from “hundreds of turtles sunning themselves on the rocks along the East River between 45th and 48th Streets,” as Ephemeral New York puts it. Back then, that’s where an actual bay was once located in Colonial-era Manhattan, surrounded by meadows, hills and a stream that emptied at the foot of today’s 47th Street. Some historians do think actual turtles lent to the neighborhood name, as they were plentiful in Manhattan at the time and were commonly dined on. But another reading of history suggests otherwise.

Turtle_Bay_Manhattan_1853.jpg
Turtle Bay in 1853, via the NYPL Digital Gallery

Turtle Bay, an actual cove of the East River, received its name back in the 17th century by Dutch settlers. As the story goes, the cove was shaped like a knife, so the settlers named it “deutal,” which is Dutch for “a bent blade.”

The neighborhood of Turtle Bay begins in 1639, with a 40-acre land grant given to two Englishmen by the Dutch colonial governor of New Amsterdam. The farm extended roughly from what is now 43rd Street to 48th Street, and from Third Avenue to the river. The Englishmen named the plot “Turtle Bay Farm.” Here’s where historians think the name was more likely a corruption of the Dutch word “deutal” rather than a reference to actual turtles in the bay.

Back then, the area filled with farms, houses and villas surrounding by picturesque hills and streams. But after the street grid system was initiated in Manhattan, the hilly landscape of Turtle Bay Farm was graded to create cross-streets. Between 1840 and 1850, the land was subdivided for more formal residential development.

But the name stuck as the area changed. According to the Turtle Bay Association, from its early days as a settlement through the Revolutionary War, the bay offered sailing ships a safe haven from winter gales and the capricious currents of the East River, making it important to the commerce of Manhattan. Shipbuilders established a thriving business there. And by the time Robert Fulton tested his steamboat on the East River in 1808, the wharf was teeming with breweries, carpentry shops, mills and industrial business.

Development of the neighborhood grew after the streets were gridded, but it really took off after the Civil War. Upon the war ending, the building of brownstones ultimately transformed the scenic landscape. The bay was filled in, and the waterfront became “a commercial sinkhole,” according to the Turtle Bay Association. “By 1868, the beautiful bay was filled in, its charms sullied by slaughterhouses, packing sheds, cattle pens, rotting wharfs, and railroad piers,” the organization says.


turtle-bay-manhattan-how-it-got-name.jpgTurtle Bay today. Photo by Jon Mannion/Flickr

Immigrants flooded the area, tenements were built, and in the 1920s the brownstones were transformed back into fashionable townhouses. Today, the area is bustling with commercial activity, lined with towering skyscrapers, and still retains many of those historic townhouses. And despite the lack of turtles in the former bay, the name of Turtle Bay endured.

How the Manhattan neighborhood of Turtle Bay got its name | 6sqft



TURTLE BAY - MIDTOWN EAST

MAP MIDTOWN EAST.jpg
 
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mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


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P3.jpg

P4.jpg


 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”



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mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


P1.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”



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raybrag

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ENGINE 21 FIREHOUSE 238 E 40TH STREET MIDTOWN EAST MANHATTAN DIVISION 3, BATTALION 8 “THE 21 CLUB”


TURTLE BAY - MIDTOWN EAST

Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. It extends from roughly 43rd Street to 53rd Streets, and eastward from Lexington Avenue to the East River's western branch (facing Roosevelt Island).[4][5][6][7][8] The neighborhood is the site of the headquarters of the United Nations and the Chrysler Building. The Tudor City apartment complex is to the south of Turtle Bay.[9]

Turtle Bay is named after a former cove of the East River, which in turn was named after the Dutch word for "knife". The neighborhood was originally settled as a Dutch farm in the 17th century, and was subsequently developed with tenements, power plants, and slaughterhouses in the 19th century. These industrial structures were largely demolished in the 1940s and 1950s to make way for the United Nations headquarters. Today, Turtle Bay contains multiple missions and consulates to the nearby United Nations headquarters.

Turtle Bay is part of Manhattan Community District 6, and its primary ZIP Codes are 10017 and 10022.[1] It is patrolled by the 17th Precinct of the New York City Police Department.

Turtle Bay, Manhattan - Wikipedia



HISTORY, TURTLE BAY

How the Manhattan neighborhood of Turtle Bay got its name

POSTED ON FRI, JANUARY 26, 2018
BY EMIL

The Manhattan neighborhood of Turtle Bay, a stretch of Midtown East that holds everything from skyscrapers to brownstones, has a history dating back to 1639. Modern-day New Yorkers might envision the area got its name from “hundreds of turtles sunning themselves on the rocks along the East River between 45th and 48th Streets,” as Ephemeral New York puts it. Back then, that’s where an actual bay was once located in Colonial-era Manhattan, surrounded by meadows, hills and a stream that emptied at the foot of today’s 47th Street. Some historians do think actual turtles lent to the neighborhood name, as they were plentiful in Manhattan at the time and were commonly dined on. But another reading of history suggests oth

Turtle Bay, an actual cove of the East River, received its name back in the 17th century by Dutch settlers. As the story goes, the cove was shaped like a knife, so the settlers named it “deutal,” which is Dutch for “a bent blade.”

The neighborhood of Turtle Bay begins in 1639, with a 40-acre land grant given to two Englishmen by the Dutch colonial governor of New Amsterdam. The farm extended roughly from what is now 43rd Street to 48th Street, and from Third Avenue to the river. The Englishmen named the plot “Turtle Bay Farm.” Here’s where historians think the name was more likely a corruption of the Dutch word “deutal” rather than a reference to actual turtles in the bay.

Back then, the area filled with farms, houses and villas surrounding by picturesque hills and streams. But after the street grid system was initiated in Manhattan, the hilly landscape of Turtle Bay Farm was graded to create cross-streets. Between 1840 and 1850, the land was subdivided for more formal residential development.

But the name stuck as the area changed. According to the Turtle Bay Association, from its early days as a settlement through the Revolutionary War, the bay offered sailing ships a safe haven from winter gales and the capricious currents of the East River, making it important to the commerce of Manhattan. Shipbuilders established a thriving business there. And by the time Robert Fulton tested his steamboat on the East River in 1808, the wharf was teeming with breweries, carpentry shops, mills and industrial business.

Development of the neighborhood grew after the streets were gridded, but it really took off after the Civil War. Upon the war ending, the building of brownstones ultimately transformed the scenic landscape. The bay was filled in, and the waterfront became “a commercial sinkhole,” according to the Turtle Bay Association. “By 1868, the beautiful bay was filled in, its charms sullied by slaughterhouses, packing sheds, cattle pens, rotting wharfs, and railroad piers,” the organization says.

And Turtle Bay is the home of that famous ex-cop, lawyer, CIA stringer and man about town Stone Barrington.
 

fdhistorian

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Joined
Sep 25, 2013
Messages
590
Battalion 35 - The Williamsburg battalion. This densely populated neighborhood is rich in cultures, languages, customs and ethnicities. Although the battalion's number has changed as the city has grown, it has always been based in Williamsburg.

Brooklyn Fire Department
District Engineer 5

District Engineer 5Organized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1869with Brooklyn FD Engine 11
District Engineer 5Annexedas Battalion 5 FDNY Brooklyn 1898

FDNY Brooklyn
Battalion 5

Battalion 5 FDNY BrooklynOrganized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1898with Engine 11 FDNY Brooklyn
Battalion 5 FDNY BrooklynRenumberedas Battalion 25 1898

FDNY
Battalion 25

Battalion 25Organized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1898with Engine 11 Brooklyn
Battalion 25Renumberedas Battalion 35 1906

FDNY
Battalion 35

Battalion 35Reorganized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1906with Engine 111
Battalion 35Relocated137 Powers St, Brooklyn 1908with Engine 113
Battalion 35Relocated166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1905with Engine 211
Battalion 35Relocated112 Seigel St, Brooklyn 1927with Ladder 108
Battalion 35New Station187 Union Ave, Brooklyn 1971with Ladder 108
 

fdhistorian

Active member
Joined
Sep 25, 2013
Messages
590
Battalion 35 - The Williamsburg battalion. This densely populated neighborhood is rich in cultures, languages, customs and ethnicities. Although the battalion's number has changed as the city has grown, it has always been based in Williamsburg.

Brooklyn Fire Department
District Engineer 5

District Engineer 5Organized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1869with Brooklyn FD Engine 11
District Engineer 5Annexedas Battalion 5 FDNY Brooklyn 1898

FDNY Brooklyn
Battalion 5

Battalion 5 FDNY BrooklynOrganized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1898with Engine 11 FDNY Brooklyn
Battalion 5 FDNY BrooklynRenumberedas Battalion 25 1898

FDNY
Battalion 25

Battalion 25Organized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1898with Engine 11 Brooklyn
Battalion 25Renumberedas Battalion 35 1906

FDNY
Battalion 35

Battalion 35Reorganized166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1906with Engine 111
Battalion 35Relocated137 Powers St, Brooklyn 1908with Engine 113
Battalion 35Relocated166 Clymer St, Brooklyn 1905with Engine 211
Battalion 35Relocated112 Seigel St, Brooklyn 1927with Ladder 108
Battalion 35New Station187 Union Ave, Brooklyn 1971with Ladder 108

Companies in Battalion 35 Williamsburg

Brooklyn FD
District Engineer 5

1869 - 1885District Engineer 5E11E13L04L05
1872 - 1873District Engineer 5E11E13E16L04L05
1873 - 1885District Engineer 5E11E13L04
1885 - 1887District Engineer 5E11E16E21L04
1887 - 1889District Engineer 5E11E21L04
1889 - 1896District Engineer 5E11E16E21L04
1896 - 1897District Engineer 5E11E13E16E21L04
1897 - 1898District Engineer 5E11E13E16E21CM1L04

FDNY Brooklyn
Battalion 5/25

1898 - 1900Battalion 5/25, BrooklynE11E13E16E21L04
1900 - 1906Battalion 25E111E113E116E121L54

FDNY
Battalion 35

1906 - 1913Battalion 35E111E116E121L54
1913 - 1922Battalion 35E211E216E221L104
1922 - 1937Battalion 35E206E211E213E216E221E237L104L108
1937 - 1941Battalion 35E206E211E213E216E237L108
1941 - 1951Battalion 35E206E213E216E237E291L108L140
1951 - 1959Battalion 35E206E213E216E218E237E271L108L124
1959 - 1969Battalion 35E206E216E218E237E271L108L124
1969 - 1975Battalion 35E206E216E221E237L104L108
1975 - 1975Battalion 35E206E216E218E221E237L104L108
1975 - 1977Battalion 35E216E229E237E238L106L108L146
1977 - 1978Battalion 35E212E216E229E238U1L106L108L146
1978 - 1989Battalion 35E212E216E229E238L106L108L146
1989 - 2003Battalion 35E212E216E221E229L104L108L146
2003 -Battalion 35E216E221E229L104L108L146
 

kidfrmqns

Member
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Jun 4, 2009
Messages
367
So 229/146 are in the 35 but 238/106 are in the 28? I realize this is for administrative duties, but it seems odd that the 28 would need to drive almost past 229/146 to get to 238/106.
 

mack

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Oakland Street is now Guinness Boulevard.

Thanks for the info soda-acid. Many NYC streets changed names and it is difficult to find old locations and addresses. NYC continues to make make name changes to streets and buildings, parks.
 
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