FDNY Halligan Tool

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fdnylax

Guest
Does anybody have any info on why the halligan tool in this picture is modified with a wider adz end? I was curious as to why Squad 61 would modify the tool.

The picture can be found at:
http://www.nycfire.net/gallery1/FDNY06-58/MG_3104
 

tbendick

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
1,757
We will have to get Nate and find out about it.. He is a Squad guy and should know the facts behind it..
 
N

NDeMarse

Guest
fdnylax said:
Does anybody have any info on why the halligan tool in this picture is modified with a wider adz end? I was curious as to why Squad 61 would modify the tool.

The picture can be found at:
http://www.nycfire.net/gallery1/FDNY06-58/MG_3104

A few companies throughout the job have modified the Halligan to make it a bit more versatile.  The adz on this Halligan is widened to give another inch or more spread when you gap the door with the adz.  When working with the adz end, sometimes all you need is a little more gap and the door will force without using the forks.  It's just one trick that the guys found to make a forcible entry job a little easier.  It works very well, and is especially useful if you don't have a member available right away to hit when you move to the forks.  One of our guys is an outstanding metal worker and does the work himself. 

The Irons halligan is a little bit more refined, shown here:
http://www.nycfire.net/gallery1/FDNY07-03/MG_5701

That's all I have
 
F

fdnylax

Guest
Wow, that's an awesome idea to modify the tool like that. I have one more question though. Does your company assign the tool to a certain position like the OV or ROOF man or are all of your halligans like that? I figured it is probably used for the ROOF postition because they may be working alone and need to pop the bulkhead door and that additional spread would be useful for that.

Thanks
 
N

NDeMarse

Guest
fdnylax said:
Wow, that's an awesome idea to modify the tool like that. I have one more question though. Does your company assign the tool to a certain position like the OV or ROOF man or are all of your halligans like that? I figured it is probably used for the ROOF postition because they may be working alone and need to pop the bulkhead door and that additional spread would be useful for that.

Thanks

Roof & Irons are the only two set up like that.  The other halligans are traditional.
 
E

eng1ine

Guest
Other common "improvements" to the halligan may include:

-Squaring off the rounded shoulder where the forks meet the handle with an angle grinder, allowing the axe to be slid down the handle to strike the forks directly in a tight hallway where it's impossible to swing and strike the head of the tool.  This may also prove to be a safer tactic to employ in heavy smoke conditions.

-Adding "depth gauges" to the sides of the adz and forks.  Basically, measure up 1 3/4 inches from the tip of the adz or forks (on both sides of the tool) and make a mark, then use a hack saw to etch a line into the tool.  This provides an indicator of when to begin "wrapping" the bevel around the door, so the tool isn't driven into the jamb wasting time and effort, and possibly making FE more difficult by splitting a wooden jamb, thus tightening the door.  I also add depth gauges at the neck of the fork (top of the U), to provide a stopping point when setting the tool.  The neck is the thickest part of the fork, and as such, provides the most leverage for forcing the door.  If you wanna be really artsy-craftsy, dip the edge of a paper towel in some safety orange paint, and drop it into your depth gauges to make them easier to see.

-Welding a link of chain to the handle, near the shoulder of the fork provides an attachment point for a caribiner or snap link for rope or webbing, or to link the halligan to a roof hook (also with a link of chain welded to it).  Purpose?  To provide the ability to quickly drop the halligan through windows from an upper floor the roof.  The old rope trick is well known, but often won't provide enough force to break today's energy efficient windows.  Attaching the halligan to a hook creates a midevil-style weapon that will develop a tremendous amount of force!  We keep a small caribiner attached to our roof hooks for this purpose.

-Welding the company identification directly onto the tool prevents "reallocation" by another company.  OK, you're right, it really only discourages tool thievery, but it's more permanant than paint, tape, or decals.

-Adding a grip to the handle... Make basket wrap with solid copper wire (not stranded, it breaks over time and presents a hazard), then cover the wire with a couple layers of black hockey tape (the sticky kind).

I hope this info if helpful, or at least interesting.  Be safe.
Chris
 
F

FDENY

Guest
Nate what material are you guys using to fatten the adz, are you guys adding halligan forks to your metal hooks, and using the left over adzs to widen the halligan, or is it just some type of scrap metal, I am looking into trying this out, but not much of a welder
thanks
 
N

NDeMarse

Guest
To my knowledge it actually the weld itself that is the extra material.  We don't take anything from any other tool to make it up.  We don't have the halligan forks on the roof hooks either.

I personally don't do the welding so I am not sure how they do it, but I think they just keep building it up with weld and grinding it down.

 
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