OUR MILITARY.

skiLB

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As a proud member of the Coast Guard my self, I recognize what a great hero you were. Continued Rest In Peace brother, and may the Cutter bearing your name be safe. USCGC Jeffrey Palazzo
Well said Lt.
 

mack

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For anyone interested in a fire service career, many career firefighters began their careers as firefighters in the military:

US Army Firefighters

Army Firefighters (MOS 12M) are comparable to civilian career firefighters - full time, paid, trained, benefits.
The same responsibility of protecting property and lives from fire.
Army Firefighters (MOS 12M) work in a variety of environments.
There is also a need to conduct and supervise firefighting rescue, salvage, and fire protection operations.

US Air Force Firefighters​

Air Force firefighters are called fire protection specialists. Their work assignments are on Air Force bases around the world. The U.S. Air Force explains that they are trained to combat a variety of blazes, from forest fires to rocket-fuel fires. When the need arises, Air Force fire protection specialists may assist civilian agencies to suppress fires. They are also trained in basic first aid and CPR.

US Navy Firefighters​

In the Navy, emergency, fire and rescue specialists conduct rescue operations, extinguish and help prevent fires, provide emergency medical aid, and handle shipboard damage-control functions. They may specialize in the equipment needed to defend against radiological, biological or chemical attacks. Although duty stations can be at naval air stations or ports around the world, many Navy firefighters serve aboard submarines or ships.

US Coast Guard

A damage controlman (DC) assigned to cutters is responsible for watertight integrity, emergency equipment associated with firefighting and flooding, plumbing repairs, welding fabrication and repairs, chemical, biological and nuclear-warfare detection, and decontamination.
 

mack

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mack

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Is this really surprising? I admit I am skeptical about studies to begin with and believe that researchers can frequently achieve the conclusions they want to by using analytics they select. But although I am very concerned and supportive of our Servicemembers and Veterans, doesn't it make sense that a population of young people - Veterans - who have been exposed to all the physical and mental harmful impacts of war, and training for war, should have more serious health issues than the general population who have lived a relatively comfortable and normal life?

If you have spent 5 or 6 years or more with repeated deployments during which you faced bullets, IEDs, unknown threats - if you have seen fellow servicemembers get wounded and killed, if you have seen death often - how can you possibly be healthier than others in your age group who may have only faced the disappointment of not getting their latest IPhone on time?

Honestly, this really makes me angry. I believe the general population of Americans take for granted young people who are dedicated and patriotic enough to risk their lives serving in our military. I have witnessed employers who complain about Veterans preference. I have heard educators making statements which arrogantly demean our military personnel. I have had to help young Veterans who have returned to their former places of employment and were no longer trusted or accepted because of their military experience. I saw politicians fighting to get media publicity when military units departed for overseas duty but then didn't think it was appropriate to welcome those same soldiers and Marines back, or visit them recuperating in military hospitals, or visiting prosthetic and mental health VA clinics.

I feel the same way about firefighters and first responders - honored when popular and convenient but then taken for granted and forgotten. Remember the appreciation and respect after the WTC 21 years ago? Who cares now? Who remembers other than us?

Too bad our society, our media, academia, our politicians and most of the general public don't care. Those of us who do care need to work even harder to raise awareness and demonstrate appreciation for those who selflessly serve performing dangerous duties as soldiers, Marines, sailors, airmen, Coasties, Veterans as well as our brother and sister firefighters, police officers, EMS members and retired personnel.

It should be no surprise if we die sooner, have more suicides, suffer more medical injuries and illnesses, or live with dreams they can't share whith anyone else.

I don't think we can do enough to take care of those who need help. Let's not be surprised. Never forget.
 

skiLB

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
1,799
Is this really surprising? I admit I am skeptical about studies to begin with and believe that researchers can frequently achieve the conclusions they want to by using analytics they select. But although I am very concerned and supportive of our Servicemembers and Veterans, doesn't it make sense that a population of young people - Veterans - who have been exposed to all the physical and mental harmful impacts of war, and training for war, should have more serious health issues than the general population who have lived a relatively comfortable and normal life?

If you have spent 5 or 6 years or more with repeated deployments during which you faced bullets, IEDs, unknown threats - if you have seen fellow servicemembers get wounded and killed, if you have seen death often - how can you possibly be healthier than others in your age group who may have only faced the disappointment of not getting their latest IPhone on time?

Honestly, this really makes me angry. I believe the general population of Americans take for granted young people who are dedicated and patriotic enough to risk their lives serving in our military. I have witnessed employers who complain about Veterans preference. I have heard educators making statements which arrogantly demean our military personnel. I have had to help young Veterans who have returned to their former places of employment and were no longer trusted or accepted because of their military experience. I saw politicians fighting to get media publicity when military units departed for overseas duty but then didn't think it was appropriate to welcome those same soldiers and Marines back, or visit them recuperating in military hospitals, or visiting prosthetic and mental health VA clinics.

I feel the same way about firefighters and first responders - honored when popular and convenient but then taken for granted and forgotten. Remember the appreciation and respect after the WTC 21 years ago? Who cares now? Who remembers other than us?

Too bad our society, our media, academia, our politicians and most of the general public don't care. Those of us who do care need to work even harder to raise awareness and demonstrate appreciation for those who selflessly serve performing dangerous duties as soldiers, Marines, sailors, airmen, Coasties, Veterans as well as our brother and sister firefighters, police officers, EMS members and retired personnel.

It should be no surprise if we die sooner, have more suicides, suffer more medical injuries and illnesses, or live with dreams they can't share whith anyone else.

I don't think we can do enough to take care of those who need help. Let's not be surprised. Never forget.
Well said Mack.
 

mack

Administrator
Joined
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Messages
10,685

FDNY Fire Service Line of Duty Deaths


March 8, 1945 - LODD
Fireman/ PVT. Thomas F. Shortell, 30 - Ladder 157

FDNY. Flatbush - Brooklyn, New York

Fireman/ PVT Shortell served with the 3rd Marine Division in the South Pacific. He made the ultimate sacrifice for his country when he was killed on Iwo Jima on March 8th 1945. He was 6 year veteran of the fire department.


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Pvt Thomas Francis Shortell​


BIRTH1 Dec 1914
Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
DEATH8 Mar 1945 (aged 30)
Iwo Jima, Tokyo Metropolis, Japan


Thomas Francis Shortell (known to friends and family as Tommy or Tom), was the son of a New York City Firefighter. He was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1914. He was appointed to the Fire Department of New York City on June 6, 1938 and was assigned to Engine 316. On January 1st 1941 he was transferred to Ladder Company 157, where he worked until his enlistment in U.S. Marine Corps on June 27th 1944. Tom served with the 3rd Marine Division in the South Pacific. He made the ultimate sacrifice for his country when he was killed on Iwo Jima on March 8th 1945. He was survived by his mother, Helen O'Mara Shortell, his brother John (Jack) Shortell, and four children: Thomas (Tom), Carol, Gerard (Jerry) and Hellen.


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Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander, Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas
said, "Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue."


RIP. Never forget.
 
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