Reserves vs Spares

Engine13

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Can someone tell me the difference in Reserve units vs Spare units and what their roles are?

Which get used first (i.e. which replaces a front line unit when it's down)?

I have noticed some houses have reserves assigned to them with number markings on them, so where do the spares live?
 

Signal73

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Correct me if I am wrong

Spares are empty when a companies RIG goes OOS they have to transfer equipment from their normally assigned piece into the spare

Reserved Rigs (Engines 500 series Ladders 700 series) All fully equipped for special events. Example the san gennaro feast Engine 501 will be used as standby there.

Hope this helps
 

grumpy grizzly

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Spare is a piece when a unit is down for repairs. Reserve units, numbered 5XX for engines and 7XX for aerials are fully equipped. For use for stand-by's special events and emergencies In addition there is a Haz-Mat @ E206, Field Comm @ E233 and a Squad and Rescue @ SOC Deployment Center.
 

Signal73

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Here’s a write up from the late great Catry that can be found under the General Discussion section title Frequently Asked Questions



Q: What is the difference between a "Spare" and a "Reserve" apparatus?
A: The 25 Reserve Engine companies and 10 Reserve Trucks are fully equipped at all times and are quartered with regular companies citywide. They are put into service on short-term basis when needed and operate as a regular company when in-service. Spare apparatus by contrast are rigs kept at the Shops, not equipped with tools that are assigned to companies when their rigs are at the shops, usually on a long-term basis. When a company receives a spare they must move all their tools over to the spare. Spare units are usually identified by markings in sticker/duct-tape form, or at times not at all. Usually a company will receive a specific type of spare based on their apparatus (i.e. rearmount to rearmount, tower to tower). But at times a Tiller might get a rearmount example L-39 is a Tiller and currently using a rearmount spare
 

skylerfire

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Reserve Rigs can also be used as spares for when a rig is just Out of Service for a day or 2, Instead of switching over everything. Not many Reserves as there was a lot have just turned into spares. (Since there is a spare shortage)
 

JohnnyGage

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It was comical when I was the LCC at L 5, a tiller when we would have to use a RM. Many of the other LCC had no experience diving the much longer wheelbase and jammed themselves up on many corners. Lucky for me, I had experience driving L 112 beforehand as a back up LCC. Imagine someone who drove a sports car, then had to drive a city bus!
 

skiLB

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It was comical when I was the LCC at L 5, a tiller when we would have to use a RM. Many of the other LCC had no experience diving the much longer wheelbase and jammed themselves up on many corners. Lucky for me, I had experience driving L 112 beforehand as a back up LCC. Imagine someone who drove a sports car, then had to drive a city bus!
Lol...very true brother.
 

skiLB

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Reserve Rigs can also be used as spares for when a rig is just Out of Service for a day or 2, Instead of switching over everything. Not many Reserves as there was a lot have just turned into spares. (Since there is a spare shortage)
yes very true.
 

grumpy grizzly

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Are the spare Rescue rigs stocked or do the members have to swap them out completely?
 

skylerfire

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The idea is that the new 2020 rigs they have will be the main truck and the old rigs will be kept fully stocked at each rescue company as a spare...

I believe they will only have to switch over very few things now. Might just be water rescue stuff. And SCBAs, few tools other then that they are ready to go. Still keeping R6 as full Reserve Rig
 

TLTruckie

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Once all the new 2020 Rescue rigs are in service , all of the old rig are being keep FULLY equipped , ready to be deployed as a reserve rescue ,or as a spare for that rescue company .. example : a major incident where numerous rescue companies are operation and may be a very prolonged operation .... a mass text will de sent out from SOC looking for available off duty rescue members and they will be told to what location to report and man that reserve/spare rescue...the maned reserve rescue ...lets say “R-7 “ could be sent to the scene of the major incident to relieve a company or to use to back fill a rescues fire house. Most likely at the discretion of the SOC chief.

When a front line rescue goes OOS for mechanical reasons that company will simply side right into the their old rig and be back in service in no time. So the old rescue rig are basically both a reserve and a spare !
 

skylerfire

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Once all the new 2020 Rescue rigs are in service , all of the old rig are being keep FULLY equipped , ready to be deployed as a reserve rescue ,or as a spare for that rescue company .. example : a major incident where numerous rescue companies are operation and may be a very prolonged operation .... a mass text will de sent out from SOC looking for available off duty rescue members and they will be told to what location to report and man that reserve/spare rescue...the maned reserve rescue ...lets say “R-7 “ could be sent to the scene of the major incident to relieve a company or to use to back fill a rescues fire house. Most likely at the discretion of the SOC chief.

When a front line rescue goes OOS for mechanical reasons that company will simply side right into the their old rig and be back in service in no time. So the old rescue rig are basically both a reserve and a spare !


As long as these New Rescues can stay inservice with all the problems they have....
 

columbusfire

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I would think that using a RM when you are used to a midship would be challenging for spotting the turntable to a window.
No tillermen to tell you to stop or pull up a little, especially with trees or wires in the way.
 

JohnnyGage

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I would think that using a RM when you are used to a midship would be challenging for spotting the turntable to a window.
No tillermen to tell you to stop or pull up a little, especially with trees or wires in the way.
To some degree, I never relied on the tillerman to position me, I was better able to gauge from my view, that was my responsibility as the LCC including noticing overhead obstructions, et al. Although our regs state that the tillerman be a qualfied school chauffeur that was not necessarily the case. One important note, I'd made sure the trailer wheels were straight in line before I'd cut the tillerman loose, just in case I had to pull the rig forward a few feet. Lining up the RM you used the turntable. For a window rescue or to cover the 'scrub' area of a building you lined up the TL bucket instead of the turntable because that gave you a safe angle to exit the bucket from one of the side gates at a window, if the TL was to operate in the "throat" area of a large apartment house, typical of the Bronx, then it was necessary to line up the TL turntable. As a regular LCC you do a size up on every run, it becomes second nature.
 
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columbusfire

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Interesting info. If a RM and engine were first due on a narrow residential street like in Queens or SI, does the ladder lead the way, typically? Or does the engine drive way past the house? What if the first due engine is coming from the opposite way, do they stop way short of the house? As the saying goes, you can stretch hose, but not ladders! Thanks for your input. BTW, the dept. that I retired from had 1000' of 5 inch plastic supply hose on every engine and they typically ''laid in'' to the scene. This sometimes caused issues for the ladders as you can guess.
 

JohnnyGage

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Typically the truck follows the engine, the engine stops just past the address giving the truck the front and a good back step position for the engine. Required amount of hose is stretched from the back step (no crosslays) then engine will proceed to hydrant, in best case scenarios. If any company is coming in the opposite way on a narrow street, they stop before the hydrant the first due engine would use. The second due truck stops at least 20 feet behind the first due ladder in order to deploy ground ladders if necessary.

In the event of first due engine and truck coming in opposite way on a narrow street, the truck stops before hydrant the engine will use and truck guys hoof it to the address. Theory works good as long as chauffeurs are disciplined. If engine gets blocked in, then second due will run a supply line.

Although you can't stretch ladders, it is imperative to get the first line in operation as quickly as possible...that's key!
 

columbusfire

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Thanks for the great info! I am always impressed seeing the trucks occupying the front almost every time at fires in NY.
 
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