FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 medals


MATTHEW M. CASSIDY FF. LAD. 9 MAR. 26, 2015 2016 JOHNSTON


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FF Cassidy was awarded the Johnston Medal in 2016 for heroism at Manhattan Box 77-436 on March 26, 2016. FF Cassidy completed a search for possible trapped victims on the top floor with deteriorating fire conditions and then rescued a firefighter trapped on the roof of an exposure.


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Jurors shown dramatic pics of firefighters battling deadly East Village blaze

By Rebecca Rosenberg September 10, 2019 | 8:40pm


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Dramatic photos of FDNY firefighters battling the 2015 East Village gas explosion were shown to jurors in Manhattan on Tuesday.

Photos show the smokeeaters barely escaping moments before the blaze reduced a row of historic buildings to rubble.

FDNY Lt. Matthew Cassidy can be seen climbing from a bucket onto the 5th-floor fire escape of 121 Second Ave., according to the shots, which were taken by a New York Post photographer.

Cassidy testified Tuesday that he entered the top-floor apartment through the window, as prosecutors displayed pictures of the heroic effort at the manslaughter trial of three people charged in the blast that killed two and injured 13.

The lieutenant told Manhattan Supreme Court jurors that he used his hand to feel his way along the wall of the smoke-filled room looking for victims when he heard an alarming rumble.

“It sounded like a collapse going on,” he testified of the March 26 conflagration. “I heard the floor moving and went to the fire escape and jumped out into the tower bucket.”

That’s when he noticed another firefighter, Richard Resto, with his arms outstretched on the roof of 123 Second Ave. poking out of massive plumes of black smoke. Resto was trapped.

With only seconds to spare, Cassidy moved the bucket toward the overpowering heat emanating from the adjoining buildings, which were almost completely engulfed in flames, and hauled Resto to safety.

Moments later flames shot through the roof stretching 50 feet into the sky, and 123 Second Ave. crumbled into oblivion as the two men remained suspended in the air inside the tower bucket.

FDNY Deputy Chief Michael McPartland was watching the scene unfold from the street and said, “It was something out of a Hollywood movie. As soon as he [Resto] dove in, the whole place blew up.”


https://nypost.com/2019/09/10/juror...efighters-battling-deadly-east-village-blaze/
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 medals



BERTRAM J. SPRINGSTEAD FF. LAD. 9 MAR. 26, 2015 2016 CONNELL


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Firefighter and Staten Islander Bertram Springstead of Ladder Company 9 in Manhattan helped save two firefighters battling flames after a natural gas explosion at an East Village building on March 26, 2015. As chauffeur, he was able to position the bucket to make sure two firefighters got down before the explosion caused the building to collapse. He also noticed an adjoining building was about to come down and managed to move his apparatus before it could be hit by a falling iron beam. Springstead was awarded the Dr. John F. Connell Medal.


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https://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/05/...man-bertram-springstead-ladder-company-9.html
 
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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 medals


ERIC LEON FF. LAD. 9 DEC. 15, 2017 2018 TROIANO


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FDNY Ladder Co. 9 Firefighter Eric J. Leon

When a phone alarm for a fire in an occupied building comes in at night or early in the morning there is the possibility that people may be trapped by the smoke and heat of a fire. On December 15, 2017 at 2111 hours, Tower Ladder 9 responded as the first due truck for a fire in an old law tenement at 80 East 3rd Street in Manhattan. Upon arrival, the inside team of Ladder Co. 9, including FF. Eric Leon, the irons firefighter, made their way to the third floor, which was where the fire was reported to be. As the inside team was ascending the stairs, LT. Ralph Holguin of Ladder 9 was informed by civilians on the second floor that there was a fire on the third floor. Once on the third floor, LT. Aviles of Engine Co. 28 advised LT. Holguin that the fire could be in apartment 9. The truck officer touched the door with the back of his gloved hand and felt extreme heat. LT. Holguin determined the door was locked and ordered FF. Leon to force it, which was quickly accomplished. After the door was forced, the members were met with heavy black smoke and a large volume of fire coming from the apartment into the hallway. LT. Holguin transmitted the 10-75.

FF. Leon controlled the fire apartment door and advised LT. Holguin that while forcing the door he felt it stop abruptly, meaning that someone could be behind it. FF. Leon, without hesitation or regard for his own safety, entered the fire apartment to search for life. He did this without the protection of a charged and operating hoseline and with heavy fire rolling over his head. After entering the fully involved apartment, FF. Leon con-ducted a left-handed search and immediately checked behind the door and found an unconscious male on the floor about three feet in. LT. Holguin immediately radioed Battalion Chief Quinn of the 6th Battalion to inform him of the 10-45. FF. Leon proceeded to drag the victim to the doorway where they were met by FF. Gentile of Engine Co. 5 who was working in Ladder Co. 9 for the tour. The two firefighters removed the victim from the doorway of the fire apartment into the public hallway and then passed him off to members of Engine Co. 55. The victim was then removed from the fire building and passed off to EMS for additional medical care.

FF. Leon and FF. Gentile reentered the fire apartment and met up with LT. Holguin to resume their duties as the first due truck inside team. They continued their primary search for additional victims and guided LT. Aviles and the members of Engine Co. 28’s nozzle team to the remaining fire in the apartment. After Engine Co. 28 extinguished the heavy fire, the members of 9 Truck overhauled to check for any fire extension.

For his brave and determined actions that saved a man’s life, FF. Eric Leon of Ladder Co. 9, one half of Bowery U, is being honored tonight.


https://bravest.com/project/fdny-ladder-co-9-firefighter-eric-j-leon/



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mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 incidents/events:



1882 - Engine 33 new firehouse 15 Great Jones Street

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1908 - coal fire


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1908 - buffs

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1909 - Chief of Department Croker smells a fire - Engine 33 responds with Chief

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1910 - Chief Croker car fire in quarters

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1922 - Engine 33 saves dog

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1947 - WNYF Views of the Blues - narrowest escape

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


2018 - NY Giants visit Engine 33/Ladder 9


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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER JAMES G. CORBETT LADDER 9 January 19, 1903


4th alarm – factory - 394-396 Bowery


FF James G. Corbett, Ladder 9, died from injuries in the line of duty at a 4 alarm factory fire. FF Corbett was hit by bales of wood-soaked wood chips that fell from an upper floor with terrific impact pinning FF Corbett in the fire building.


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RIP. Never forget.
 
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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


CAPTAIN WILLIAM J. WEILAND LADDER 9 April 25, 1905

5th alarm – furniture store – Grand & Orchard Street


Acting Battalion Chief Weiland was killed at a 5 alarm furniture store fire when he was climbing a ladder and it slipped dropping ABC Weiland to the street. He died from internal injuries sustained in the fall. The 5 alarm blaze completely destroyed the furniture store located at Grand and Orchard Streets.


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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER STEVE A. WILLIAMSON ENGINE 33 February 22, 1927

Theater detail – E 14th Street


Fireman Stephen A. Williamson of Engine 33 was on theater detail at The Academy of Music on East 14th Street. He lost his footing and fell down the stairs, fracturing his skull and lacerating his brain. He was thirty-five years old and not married. Back in 1866 Captain David B. Waters and Fireman Peter H. Walsh of Engine 5 lost their lives fighting a fire in the same building. - from "The Last Alarm"


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Academy of Music 126 E 14th Street

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER JAMES H. MURPHY LADDER 9 June 20, 1929

2nd alarm - cellar fire – tenement – 91 Allen Street


Fireman James H. Murphy of Ladder 9 was overcome by smoke while rescuing several children from the second floor landing of a five-story tenement. The six children and four women made it down from the top floors but were trapped by the smoke on the second floor. Fireman Murphy, a nineteen-year veteran, went to their aid only to be overcome by smoke and gas. He was revived shortly after reaching the street and ordered back to quarters. Once there he collapsed and was taken to Bellevue Hospital where he died. - from "The Last Alarm"


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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER FRANK C. MURRAY ENGINE 33 March 2, 1930


2nd alarm – collision - responding


Fireman Frank C. Murray of Engine 33 was killed when Engine 33 rammed into the company’s hose wagon at East 33rd Street and Park Avenue while responding to a two-alarm fire. The collision that led to the injury occurred when the hose wagon stopped suddenly when an elderly man darted in front of the wagon. The engine was following closely behind the hose wagon and crashed into it. The four men on the back step of the hose wagon were pinned. Fireman Murray had both legs severed at the knees. -from "The Last Alarm"


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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


CAPTAIN FREDERICK J. TREFCER LADDER 9 May 17, 1932

3rd alarm – cellar fire – loft - 457-459 Broome Street


Captain Frederick J. Trefcer of Ladder 9 collapsed two hours after fighting a three-alarm blaze at 457 to 459 Broome Street. The fire started around 10:00 p.m. in the old D’Orcy building on the corner of Broome and Mercer Streets. Nineteen firemen were overcome by gas and smoke while fighting this blaze. Captain Trefcer was working in the subcellar and appeared to have been slightly affected by the smoke. He was treated at the scene and returned to quarters. He had been with the Fire Department for twenty-seven years. He was married and the father of four children. - from "The Last Alarm"


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RIP. Never forget.
 
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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER WINFIELD A. WALSH LADDER 9 January 4, 1947

4th alarm – 7 story loft - Manhattan Box 44-396


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Fireman Winfield A. Walsh of Ladder 9 and Battalion Chief William P. Hogan of Battalion 9, acting as Deputy Chief of the 2nd Division, were trapped in a collapse of a seven-story loft. Along with ten other men, they were trapped when the roof fell in, followed a few minutes later by three floors falling in. Fireman Walsh died on January 4 at four o’clock in the morning from multiple injuries and pneumonia. He was found on the second floor of the building. He was born in Brooklyn on August 28, 1912 and appointed to the Fire Department on September 1, 1937. Battalion Chief William P. Hogan suffered numerous injuries and died on January 9. He was born on February 17, 1891 in Greenwich Village and became a fireman on January 1, 1914 and Battalion Chief on May 1, 1937. He was married and the father of five sons. The fire started in on the fourth floor, which stored slippers. Over thirty-one men were treated for various injuries at this four-alarm fire. - from "The Last Alarm”


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FF Winfield Walsh - World War II veteran

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January 4, 1947 - LODD - Fireman Winfield A. Walsh, 34 - Ladder 9

FDNY. Manhattan, New York

Fireman Walsh and Battalion Chief William P. Hogan acting as Deputy Chief of the 2nd Division, were trapped in a collapse of a seven-story loft. Along with ten other men, they were trapped when the roof fell in, followed a few minutes later by three floors falling in. Fireman Walsh died on January 4 at four o’clock in the morning from multiple injuries and pneumonia. He was found on the second floor of the building. Battalion Chief William P. Hogan suffered numerous injuries and died on January 9th. The fire started on the fourth floor, which stored slippers. Over thirty-one men were treated for various injuries at this four-alarm fire.



Acting Deputy Chief William P. Hogan, 2nd Division, January 9, 1947


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RIP. Never forget.
 
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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs - HQ Staff (located 42 Great Jones Street)


CHARLES J. INFOSINO, HQ STAFF, April 4, 1956

4th alarm – furniture store - Bronx - collapse



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On April 4, 1956, six firemen were killed when the marquee and wall of a former movie theater collapsed into the street. Lieutenant John F. Malloy, Firemen Edward J. Carroll and Fred Hellauer of Engine 48, Firemen William Hoolan, and Arthur Hanson of Ladder 44 and Fireman Charles Infosino of the Headquarters Staff were killed while operating at 4063 Third Avenue. The building was being used by an artificial flower concern. At the time it was the second largest lost of life to hit the Fire Department. The four-alarm fire started in the basement and was fed by highly combustible coloring materials. A dozen men were standing under the marquee directing water into the building with three men on a ladder against the wall. The two iron bars holding the marquee melted and it started falling in slow motion, taking the front wall with it. Shouts of warning were heard and firemen started scrambling in all directions. A few men ran into the wall while most ran away. Those who ran into the wall were slightly injured and those who ran away were buried under tons of debris. Firemen Hoolan and Hanson were both on the ladder and were crushed when the wall fell on them. Lieutenant Malloy, Firemen Carroll, Hellauer and Infosino were located under the marquee. Eight other firemen were injured in the collapse. Fireman Carroll’s father, John Carroll, was a member of the Department and made the Supreme Sacrifice on April 28, 1935. - from "The Last Alarm"


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3rd Ave. Bronx Collapse

April 4th, 1956 Box 4-4- 2904

Killed in the line of duty:

Lieutenant John Molloy, Engine 48
Firefighter Edward Carroll, Engine 48
Firefighter Arthur Hanson Ladder 44
Firefighter Frederick Hellauer Engine 48
Firefighter William Hoolan Ladder 44
Firefighter Charles Infosino Assistant Chief's Aide Headquarters Staff


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Six killed 13 injured


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Greatest loss of firefighter life in a Bronx collapse

Occupancy: furniture store and artificial flower factory (It was never a movie theatre)

Building Construction: One story 125' by 75', ordinary construction.

Location of fire: Fire started in the cellar and spread up the walls

Forty pieces of apparatus and 150 firefighters responded

Cause of fire: unknown

Cause of collapse: Marquee failed and pulled down parapet wall

Summary by: Kevin J. Reilly, Ridgewood New Jersey Fire Lieutenant, (Grandson of Lieutenant John Molloy, Engine 48)

For further reading: W N Y F, July, 1956 /vol.17 No.3


https://nyfd.com/3rd_ave_4-4-56.html


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RIP. Never forget.
 
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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER RUBY NATURMAN LADDER 9 October 13, 1956

Limited Service Squad



FF Naturman died as a result of injuries sustained in the performance of his duties.


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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


CHARLES J. FRANCK ENGINE 33 April 14, 1965

Apartment fire – 235 E 9th Street - Manhattan Box 448


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Lieutenant Charles J. Franck fought a smoky fire in a top floor apartment at 235 East Ninth Street. The fire was quickly extinguished and Lieutenant Franck removed his mask upon returning to the street. He took a couple of gasps of air and collapsed. He was worked on for over an hour before being pronounced dead. He had served twenty-three years in the Department and was forty-six years old. He was married and the father of four children. - from "The Last Alarm"



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RIP. Never forget.
 

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER DAVID ARCE ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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David Arce World Trade Center

STRAY CATS, DOGS, KIDS

When Margaret Arce opened up her son's apartment in Stuyvesant Town, she found remnants of his generosity, letters to Santa Claus from poor children. David Arce, a firefighter, would answer them by delivering wished-for toys, year after year.

"He has always been like that, always bringing home stray cats, stray dogs, stray kids," she said. "Growing up, it was the same thing; he was always bringing someone home to me who needed a meal, or who needed a coat."

On Sept. 11, he jumped on the fire truck, Engine Company 33, on Great Jones Street, even though his shift had ended.

She described her son, 36, as a bit of a fatalist. "He always had this belief that destiny was waiting there," she said.

Firefighter Arce, whose nickname was Buddha, was an enthusiastic fan of Joseph Campbell and would have long discussions at the firehouse about the writer's research into myth and religion. "I think what resonated was the overall belief that in the bottom line, everybody's religion is the same," she said. "Everybody is the same. It just comes down to one being. No matter who you are and what you are, we're all underneath the same sky."

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 22, 2001.


http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=128838



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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-david-arce/


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mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER BRIAN BILCHER ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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911 Always Remember

Brian Bilcher
36 years old New York Fire Department, firefighter
New York NY
World Trade Center

ALWAYS TO THE RESCUE


Captain America. That’s what Tina Bilcher called her husband, Brian, a firefighter at Squad Company 1 in Brooklyn.

Firefighter Bilcher, 37, was a lot like the patriotic comic book superhero: calm, reasonable, good-looking and quick to the rescue of anyone who needed help.

Car stuck on the side of the road? There was Firefighter Bilcher. Feeling sick? Like a flash, Firefighter Bilcher was at your bedside. The man liked his adrenaline rushes, said his wife. “He once jumped off a lighthouse into the ocean,” said Mrs. Bilcher. He even got her to jump with him.

She says now that she did it for love — “I wanted to impress him.”

A strapping 6 feet, 240 pounds, Firefighter Bilcher was working part-time as a bouncer at Coaches Cafe in Staten Island six years ago when Tina, two weeks shy of 21, showed up. He refused to let her in. He told her to come back in two weeks. She did. They talked. They were married June 4, 2000, in Staten Island. The wedding pictures show the twin towers in the background.

Grant James Bilcher was born Aug. 29. The couple named him Grant because he was a grant from God. “Brian always wanted a boy,” his wife said.

On Aug. 29, 2001, Firefighter Brian Bilcher and his wife, the former Tina Sollazzi, joyfully welcomed their first child, Grant, a healthy 8-pound, 3-ounce boy. Throughout a difficult delivery, the strapping South Beach resident was by his wife’s side, reassuring her, as he anxiously waited to learn whether their baby would be a son or daughter.

“He was ecstatic, he was so proud,” said Mrs. Bilcher, who explained that it was important for her husband to have a boy to carry on the family name.

On the Sunday before the attack, Mr. Bilcher, a former high school football star, took advantage of the warm and sunny weather and worked on his prized 1976 Stingray Corvette before joining his wife and son on their first family outing — to a car show in Sunnyside. The idyllic day would be capped off with camaraderie and laughter at a friend’s barbecue.

The next evening, Mr. Bilcher returned to work for a night tour at his Squad 1 firehouse in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn.

The devoted husband and doting father called home Monday evening to check on his family and say that he had been asked to work overtime. The prospect of extra hours made the couple happy, because it meant Mrs. Bilcher could afford to stay home longer on maternity leave with their son.

“We couldn’t have been more in love that night,” said Mrs. Bilcher of her last conversation with her husband.

Brian E. Bilcher‚ 38‚ firefighter‚ FDNY‚ Squad 1. Known affectionately as Tugboat because of his girth‚ Bilcher was a 10-year FDNY veteran. He enjoyed riding his motorcycle‚ pulling practical jokes‚ and playing guard on the FDNY football team. He is survived by his wife and their young son.


https://911alwaysremember.wordpress.com/2018/07/28/327-brian-bilcher-wtc-180-firefighter/


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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-brian-bilcher/


https://911alwaysremember.wordpress.com/2018/07/28/327-brian-bilcher-wtc-180-firefighter/


https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/brian-e-bilcher/


RIP. Never forget.
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER MICHAEL BOYLE ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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ROLL OF HONOR

Michael Boyle
Firefighter
Fire Department City of New York
New York
Age: 37
Year of Death: 2001

Firefighter Michael Boyle‚ Engine 33‚ lost his life on September 11‚ 2001 while heroically saving others in the World Trade Center. Michael’s lifetime dream was to be a firefighter‚ following his father. Michael also served in Ladder 35 and Engine 226.

Michael was a proud and successful firefighter who might one day have followed his father as President of the Uniformed Firefighters Association (UFA). He was also employed part time for the UFA‚ where he was able to be involved‚ contribute to and support his fellow firefighters. It was very important to him to assure that everyone was as safe as they could possibly be given the dangers and risks their job involved. He worked independently on numerous projects focusing on the safety of the firefighters‚ and often attended local city council meetings and political events where he could communicate with the public and keep them informed. He worked at numerous UFA events and never accepted his day’s pay because to him it was an honor to be able to give his time and effort to those such as Widows and Children of Fallen Firefighters‚ at their annual Christmas party.

Michael had a unique way of touching the lives of everyone. He always tried to make a difference‚ and he never failed to be there for anyone who needed him. All who knew him were honored to have one of the most true‚ loyal and genuine friends. He and his best friend‚ Rosemary‚ had just begun to make plans for their future together.

Michael was a champion marathon runner and excellent softball player. He was the son of James and Barbara Boyle and is survived by his brothers James‚ a Sergeant in the NYPD‚ and Peter; his sisters‚ Mary Lynch and Jeanne; and his intended‚ Rosemary Kenny.

Michael will be deeply missed but forever remembered. God bless you‚ Michael.


https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/michael-boyle/



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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-michael-boyle/


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mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER ROBERT EVANS ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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Up-110

October 2, 2018
FF Robert Evans
FDNY Engine 33

Firefighter Robert Evans was born in Mineola‚ New York on April 27‚ 1965. He was 36 years old and unmarried. He served on the New York City Fire Department for seven years with great pride and to fulfill a desire to help people and serve the community. In his youth‚ his avid interests included magic‚ fishing‚ and dancing. Later on‚ Robert had a great passion for playing hand ball which helped to fulfill his need for individual competition and an outlet for his boundless energy. Here he dispensed advice‚ some wit and wisdom to younger players which was appreciated. His energetic personality led him to compete in the 1986 New York Golden Gloves where he was voted ‘Fighter of the Night’ after winning his second fight in the featherweight division. His teammate was Kevin Kelly who went on to win the WBA Featherweight Championship.

Years later‚ Robert‚ as a New York City Firefighter‚ visited Kevin at his training camp where Kevin presented him with an autographed photo which was inscribed ‘To Rob‚ Always Stand Tall.’ Little did Kevin realize how tall Robert would eventually stand.

In addition‚ Robert tried skydiving which he loved but was convinced by his mom and sister that he would get sufficient excitement by being a New York City Fireman‚ and‚ so as a result‚ he turned toward a surprising but no less enjoyable passion‚ to improve his culinary ability in taking his turn to feed his brother firemen. He was successful by virtue of his gaining 30 pounds in less than a year.

From early childhood‚ his endearing quality of a keen sense of humor carried on into his career in the Fire Department to the extent he was nicknamed the ‘Jerry Lewis’ of Engine 33.

Last‚ but not least‚ Robert will always be remembered by a striking dimpled smile. His greeting upon meeting him‚ or upon saying goodbye‚ and that proved to be most prophetic was‚ ‘If there is anything I can do for you‚ please let me know.’ His desire to help others was fulfilled tragically on 9/11/01 along with 342 brave comrades.

He was loved much and will be greatly missed. Robert is survived by his mother Christina‚ his father Edward‚ and his sister Jeanne.

Last alarm box 8087 WTC

September 11, 2001

"Still heading up"






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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-robert-evans/



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mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER ROBERT KING JR ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001


World Trade Center


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KING 2.jpg San Diego 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb


September 5, 2019 ·

Tonight we share the story of Robert King, Jr. Thank you Robert for your dedication and service. Please share with us if you have ever climbed in his honor or plan to do so this year.

Robert King, Jr.
Firefighter, FDNY, Engine 33, Bellerose Terrace, NY

Robert C. King Jr. was married on a Saturday and had to be back at the Fire Academy nine days later. On their honeymoon, the couple read academy manuals and practiced tying emergency knots. "For the nine years he was on the job, he always came home happy," Theresa King said. Firefighter King, 36, was an avid woodworker. His company, Engine 33 in the East Village, eats off a trestle table he made that seats more than 20. Expanding the wood shop in the firehouse basement, he made a table for the watch room, and cabinets for some firefighter friends who had helped him work on his house in Bellerose Terrace, on Long Island. At home, there were the bunk beds for his two boys, and paneling and more cabinets. Theresa King's favorite piece is a waist-high oak Quaker table for her vestibule. His sister Joann DeTommaso's favorite is a wooden dump truck he made for her son. His mother, Audrey, loves a jewelry box he fashioned and Adirondack chairs, big and child-size. His children are Thomas, Elizabeth, and Stephen.



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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-robert-king-jr/


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RIP. Never forget.
 
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