FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


FIREFIGHTER KEITHROY MAYNARD ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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Remembering Keithroy Marcellus Maynard, Devoted Father and Vulcan Society Member


Keithroy Marcellus Maynard is seen dressed in bunker gear as he poses for a photo with a child and an older woman. In an accompanying photo Maynard poses for a photo in a formal FDNY outfit.

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LEFT: KEITHROY MARCELLUS MAYNARD DRESSED IN BUNKER GEAR. RIGHT: MAYNARD IN HIS FDNY DRESS UNIFORM. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE VOICES OF SEPTEMBER 11TH LIVING MEMORIAL PROJECT.

Born on the small Caribbean island of Montserrat, Keithroy Marcellus Maynard moved to New York City when he was 13. Maynard’s father, Captain Reynold White, was a 33-year veteran of the FDNY and a member of the Vulcan Society, the FDNY’s organization of black firefighters. With the mentorship and support of his father and other members of the Vulcan Society, Maynard prepared for the FDNY’s qualifying exams, earning near-perfect scores. He was appointed to the department in 1999.

In an oral history recorded by the 9/11 Memorial Museum, Maynard’s mother, Pearl, remembers her son’s determination to become a firefighter and help people in his community:

“He wanted to have a job where he helped people, be of service to people, whether it’s children, elderly people, or his community. He joined the fire department in 1999. If Keith sets his mind to do something, it’s something he wants to do, he’s gonna move every one of them and get it done, or get it, get to where he wants to be.”

Maynard was assigned to FDNY Engine Company 33 in the East Village neighborhood of New York City, but he hoped to eventually transfer to the firehouse near his home in East Flatbush, Brooklyn. He wanted to serve as a role model for children in his neighborhood, demonstrating that they could become firefighters, too.

Maynard joined the Vulcan Society, as his father had before him. Building on years of experience as a union organizer for the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Maynard quickly rose to leadership and became the Vulcan Society’s Sergeant-At-Arms, making him the group’s youngest officer. While serving in the FDNY, Maynard worked to instill a love and respect for the firefighting profession in his son, Keithroy Jr.

On 9/11, Maynard was on duty at Engine 33, having switched shifts with a coworker so he could attend a meeting at Keithroy Jr.’s school on September 12. Maynard responded to the World Trade Center and was killed in the collapse of the towers, along with nine colleagues from his company. He was 30 years old.

After Maynard’s death, his twin brother, Kevin, joined the Houston Fire Department in his memory. When Kevin graduated from the fire academy, members of his brother’s firehouse travelled to Houston to attend the graduation.

Kirsten Madsen, Assistant Manager of Memorial Exhibition, 9/11 Memorial Museum


https://www.911memorial.org/connect...nard-devoted-father-and-vulcan-society-member



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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-keithroy-maynard/



RIP. Never forget.
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


LIEUTENANT KEVIN PFEIFER ENGINE 33 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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Kevin Pfeifer 'He Was a Quiet Guy Who Made a Difference'

November 18, 2001

On Sept. 11, Joseph Pfeifer ran into his younger brother, Kevin, amid the chaos at the foot of the World Trade Center. It was a welcome surprise for the brothers, New York City firefighters who lived six blocks apart in Middle Village but rarely saw each other on the job. Joseph, chief of the First Battalion in Lower Manhattan, had raced to the scene when he saw the first jet hit the north tower. He was setting up an operations base in front of the towers when he saw Kevin, a lieutenant at Engine Co. 33, who came in response to the second alarm. "We spoke a few words," Joseph said, but time was short. Exchanging concerned looks, they strode into the north tower and got to work. Kevin headed up the stairs, while Joseph directed maneuvers in the lobby. Shortly afterward, the south tower collapsed, plunging the area into darkness. Following orders to evacuate, Kevin gathered his company and began the long trek down. Joseph believes his brother was near the 40th floor at the time of the collapse. "Somewhere around the 10th floor, he realized he had to switch to another stair," he said, because rubble from the first tower blocked the way out. A team of firefighters from Engine Co. 7 who ran into Kevin on their way down the same set of stairs said he told them the right way to get out. "He kept his company together, and he made sure the other firefighters had a way out," said Joseph, who was standing in front of the tower when it fell, engulfing him in a cloud of dust and debris. Engine 7 made it out 30 seconds before the north tower collapsed. His brother did not. Kevin Pfeifer was a hero, but he wouldn't have seen in that way, said his brother. "He was just trying to do his job," Joseph said. That was how he was. "He was quiet," said his mother, Helen Pfeifer of Middle Village, "but not really quiet." An easygoing man with a quick, easy wit, Pfeifer was never one to toot his own horn. He liked to do things well, but he did them with as little fuss as possible. As a lieutenant, he used his unassuming manner to bring out the best in the young firefighters he trained. "He didn't yell or scream," his brother said. Instead, he was the kind of leader who got those he commanded to do things they didn't realize they could do. "He saw in people more than they saw in themselves," he said. "He was a quiet guy who made a difference." Growing up in Middle Village, Kevin was content to let his older brother, an accomplished athlete whose pictures cover the walls of the family home, take the spotlight. "We'd joke about how he got all the glory," said their sister, Mary Ellen Machcinski of Stamford, Conn. But Kevin didn't mind. It wasn't that he was shy or a doormat. He just didn't need the acclaim. "He was just so cool," she said of the little brother who tagged along willingly on his older siblings' adventures. Kevin Pfeifer grew up to become the kind of adventurous man that boys dream of becoming. "I always wanted him to sit at a desk," his mother said. "But he wanted the fire department." He worked as a paramedic before joining the fire department in 1990. A licensed pilot, he loved flying his Cessna to Block Island and Martha's Vineyard. "He was a little more daring than I," said Joseph, who never flew with his brother. Kevin, who never married, doted on his nieces and nephews. During the summer, he would take them sailing on Jamaica Bay in his Hobie catamaran. "He got a kick out of being with the kids," his mother said. He taught them all how to fly on computer flight simulators and displayed an unerring instinct for choosing the perfect gift, like the miniature backpacks he sent his teenage nieces one Christmas. He left a different kind of gift for his mother this holiday season: a photograph of himself snapped on Sept. 8 by Canadian photographer Jean Nichols, who was doing a fashion shoot outside Engine Co. 33 on Great Jones Street. "Kevin was never one to be photographed," his mother said. But he stood still for Nichols, a former firefighter from Montreal. "Three days before the World Trade Center, can you imagine?" his mother said. "Otherwise, we really wouldn't have a decent picture of him." -- Jennifer Smith (Newsday)


http://bravestmemorial.net/html/members_individual/pfeifer_kevin/pfeifer_newsday_article.html



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http://betterangels911.com/lt-kevin-pfeifer/



PFEIFER 3.jpg



RIP. Never forget.
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs

FIREFIGHTER GERARD BAPTISTE LADDER 9 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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ROLL OF HONOR
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Gerard Baptiste
  • Firefighter
  • Fire Department City of New York
  • New York
  • Age: 35
  • Year of Death: 2001
From his mother:
Gerard’s most memorable qualities were his competitiveness‚ he liked challenges and saw them as opportunities to overcome and most of the time did just that. His good sense of humor-he possessed a pronounced and contagious laugh. His philosophy in life- he liked to live life to its fullest and his love for this country and sense of duty which he demonstrated every day of his life.

From his father:
At age 18‚ Gerard joined the National Guard; at 27‚ after attending the Military Academy in New Jersey‚ he became a Second Lieutenant in the Reserve and was stationed in Long Island and then in New York City at the 69th Military Infantry. At 30‚ he graduated from the Fire Academy and became a Firefighter.

Gerard loved sports. He was so very good at baseball‚ that his friends called him Reggy after the famous Reggy Jackson.

Gerard was an animal lover. He often carried treats with him to give to dogs that walked past his ladder 9 firehouse in Great Jones Street located in East Greenwich Village in New York City and strangely enough those dogs became to know Gerard and to look for him when he wasn’t around. That is why at the Firehouse‚ they called him ‘Biscuits’‚ because of the biscuits he carried in his pockets to treat his friends. When that catastrophe happened‚ the dog owners cried when they knew Gerard was missing.

Gerard adored kids‚ even though he didn’t have his own yet. He usually was the first to meet them when they visit the firehouse. He made himself joyfully available to respond to the many questions posed by kids about the Firehouse‚ the Fire trucks‚ the ‘rigs’‚ as they call them and all other equipment around.

I would appreciate‚ if possible‚ to put by his name:

‘Serving the people was his calling in life. He was happy as a soldier serving his country. He was also happy as a Firefighter serving his city.’
We still feel the terrible pain and the profound sadness for the loss of our son Gerard. At the same time‚ as a father I have that sense of pride that Gerard knowing of the danger‚ did not hesitate to reach to the highest point to give comfort and show the way out of this inferno to so many people.







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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-gerard-baptiste/


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US Army Veteran - Persian Gulf


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https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/gerard-baptiste/

http://www.legacy.com/sept11/mpnnow/story.aspx?personid=128844




RIP. Never forget.
 

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mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs



FIREFIGHTER JOHN TIERNEY LADDER 9 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center

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John Tierney, 27, FDNY 'probie' conducted himself like a veteran


By Staten Island Advance
Date of Death 9/11/2001
By Kathryn Carse


STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — John Patrick Tierney was a Fire Department "probie," but he conducted himself like a veteran. His shift at Ladder Co. 9 in the Manhattan's East Village had just ended on Sept. 11 when the call came in to head to the Twin Towers. There was no room on the truck, so he sat on the lap of another firefighter as they rushed to the disaster site.

They entered Tower 1 and had climbed to the 30th floor when the call came to evacuate. He was last seen in the lobby. Five members of his company made it out, but three — including Mr. Tierney — are among the missing. The 27-year-old had been a probationary firefighter for only six weeks, after graduating from the academy in July.

"He had to do a lot of cleaning up," reported his mother, the former Helen Casey, "because he was new. He couldn't sit down until everyone was seated. He had to be the first one up to do the dishes. He had to be busy all the time, and if he wasn't busy he had to look busy. He enjoyed it all and accepted it as a probie."

While they were in training, his class spent time in a firehouse in Elmhurst, Queens, where his action at a fire was captured in a newspaper photo. He wanted the assignment in Manhattan "to be where it's busy and he could learn the job and really get out there," said his mother.

"He would often sit and study in his spare time," Mrs. Tierney added. "It's hard to believe he's not around." His parents said they will remember his quiet, easy-going nature and how devoted and caring he was.

The Oakwood native graduated from St. Joseph by-the-Sea High School, and earned a bachelor of science degree in psychology from St. John's University in 1997. He enjoyed fishing from a friend's boat in Great Kills or while camping in the Catskills. He especially loved to play his guitar, and the music of Bob Dylan and the Beatles were among his favorites. He was taking lessons but had put off performing for his mother because he thought he was "not good enough yet," she recalled.

"John was helpful, kind, fun-loving and a good friend to all of us. He played a big part in our lives and we will never forget him," said his brother, Thomas, and his sisters, Mary Ellen DiGiacomo and Jeanne Neumeyer.

Thomas Tierney, a police lieutenant working out of the 122nd Precinct, helped out with digging at Ground Zero for three days after the disaster.

Mrs. Tierney and the family have been overwhelmed by the kindness of the Fire Department. "We often heard stories that the firefighters are such a tight group, but you have no idea until you have experienced it. Their spirit and generosity, even though they are so disheartened by all that has happened, is remarkable.

"We were invited to see the firehouse where he worked, and we are happy we did that. Now we are able to picture where he was working."

At an information session for firefighters' families at a hotel in Manhattan soon after the attack, a request was made for family members to be able to visit the site of the tragedy. Arrangements were made for boats to transport them from the Brooklyn Navy Yard and the Tierney family went. Although she was reluctant to go, Mrs. Tierney was glad she made the trip.

"It's like a war zone," she said. "At that point, we decided to have the memorial mass. It really helped us to visit the site and to go to the memorial near the site."

John Tierney's friends, too numerous to mention, told his mother that her son was generous and fun to be around.

Surviving, in addition to his mother, Helen, his brother, Thomas, and his two sisters, Mary Ellen and Jeanne, is his father, John.

There will be a memorial mass on Oct. 6 at 11:30 a.m. in St. Charles R.C. Church, Oakwood. The arrangements are being handled by the Colonial Funeral Home, New Dorp.


https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/john_tierney_27_fdny_probie_co.html



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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-john-tierney/


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https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/john-patrick-tierney/



RIP. Never forget.
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


LIEUTENANT JEFFREY WALZ LADDER 9 September 11, 2001

World Trade Center


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Jeffrey Walz, 37, firefighter, in Tower 1 when it collapsed

By Staten Island Advance
Date of Death 9/11/2001
By Alysha Sideman


STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — For 37-year-old Jeffrey Patrick Walz, the best things in life were simple: A bike ride to work. A trip to the Bronx Zoo with his son. Watching a Giants game with his brother. Spending time with his wife.

In the midst of a successful career in engineering, Mr. Walz made a decision to follow in his father's footsteps nine years ago, when he became a firefighter with Ladder 9 in the East Village.

His retiree firefighter father worked in both Manhattan and Staten Island. On the morning of Sept. 11, Ladder 9 went to the World Trade Center shortly after the terrorist attack. A number of his fellow firefighters were able to get out of Tower 1 before it collapsed, but Mr. Walz is one of several men in his unit who are still missing.

Known to his family as a "gentle giant," the Tuckahoe, N.Y., resident and Huguenot native was the kind of man who took time to enjoy life.

He often rode his bike from their home in Westchester County to his East Village firehouse -- a trip his wife, the former Rani Lurie, said took about two hours each way.

"When he came home from the ride I would tell him to go straight past me and into the shower. He really enjoyed the trip, though, and the exercise," said his wife.

"Jeff was such a special person. He was my best friend and partner. He always put a smile on my face when I saw him with our son, Bradley. He cherished those moments and kept them in his heart. I've never known anyone like him," she said. "The only way to describe Jeff is to say he was the most caring, gentle, kind and patient person ever to enter my life. He will forever be in our hearts," Mrs. Walz added.

Mr. Walz enjoyed spending time with his wife and their 3-year-old son, whom he often took to parks, museums, the Bronx Zoo and the movies. Born and raised in Huguenot, Mr. Walz spent several years in Bay Terrace as a young man before moving to Tuckahoe in 1995.

"Jeffrey grew into a very fine young man, not just as a son, but as a brother, husband to his wife, Rani, and most of all, a wonderful father to his son, Bradley," said his parents, Jennie and Raymond Walz.

After graduating from Tottenville High School, he went to Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, where he earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. Following college, he worked for the Navy for five years as an engineer in the Naval Engineering Center, Lakehurst, N.J., before deciding to enter the Fire Department.

Mr. Walz was an avid Mets fan who also enjoyed mountain biking, playing golf and watching football.

"My brother, Jeff, was a gentle, caring man who touched everyone he met with his passive demeanor. We shared discussions on Giants football and shared a strong passion for mountain biking. He was not only a good man but also a great husband and loving father to his son, Bradley," said Raymond Edward Walz.

"The bond between brothers is an extraordinary one that can never be broken. His heroic efforts are a testament to the type of man we can all be proud of. I not only lost a terrific brother, but also my best friend," he added. His sister, Karen Ciaccio, said: "Jeff was the type of guy you could always depend on. He had a warm smile, kind heart and a nice word to say. He was a gentle giant."

She added that his wife and son were his life. "He cherished every moment possible with his family. He was a wonderful husband and father."

"Jeff took pride in being a firefighter," his sister continued. "We are all so very proud of him. I am so fortunate to have Jeff as a brother. He will always be my special angel. He will always be my brother and friend."

A memorial service will be held Saturday at 11 a.m. in Our Lady Star of the Sea R.C. Church, Huguenot.


https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/jeffrey_walz_37_firefighter_in.html




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http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-jeffrey-walz/


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https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/jeffrey-p-walz/



RIP. Never forget.
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


Engine 33/Ladder 9 LODDs


World Trade Center - September 11, 2001



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WTC 5.jpg

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RIP. Never forget.
 
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mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


GREAT JONES STREET


Great Jones Street is a street in New York City's NoHo district in Manhattan, essentially another name for 3rd Street between Broadway and the Bowery.

The street was named for Samuel Jones, a lawyer who became known as "The Father of The New York Bar" due to his work on revising New York State's statutes in 1789 along with Richard Varick, who had a street in SoHo named after him. Jones was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1796 to 1799, and he also served as the state's first Comptroller. He played a key role in convincing the State of New York to ratify the Constitution of the United States.

Samuel_Jones_(New_York_State_Comptroller).png

Jones deeded the site of the street to the city with the stipulation that any street that ran through the property had to be named for him. However, when the street was first created in 1789, the city already

- from Wikipedia
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


THE BOWERY

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The Bowery is a street and neighborhood in the southern portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

The street was known as Bowery Lane prior to 1807. "Bowery" is an anglicization of the Dutch bouwerij, derived from an antiquated Dutch word for "farm": In the 17th century the area contained many large farms.


https://ny.curbed.com/2017/10/4/16413696/bowery-nyc-history-lower-east-side
 

mack

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Engine 33/Ladder 9 (continued)


NOHO

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NoHo, for North of Houston Street (as contrasted with SoHo) is a landmarked, primarily residential upper-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is bounded by Mercer Street to the west and the Bowery to the east, and from East 9th Street in the north to East Houston Street in the south.

The Landmarks Preservation Commission has declared most of the 125-building area a historic district, divided into the NoHo Historic District and the NoHo East Historic District, created in 2003.


 
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