FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 INCIDENTS/FIRES


2009 - 2ND ALARM - TOTONNO'S PIZZA

BOX 3552 BROOKLYN, DIV. 8, 2nd ALARM AT 9:37
address: 1524 Neptune Ave.
between: West 15th St. x West 16th St.

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3552 @ 08:45
Engs. 245, 318, 253
T. Lad. 161, Lad. 166
Batt. 43

10-75 3552 @ 08:50
Ladder 169 is designated as the FAST Truck
Eng. 246
Rescue Co. #5
Squad Co. #1
Batt. 42
Division 8

Fire Building:
1 Story Brick 20 x 60 Taxpayer

All Hands:
75-3552 @ 09:24
Batt. 43 reports: Using All Hands. Fire in the rear kitchen and fire in the walls of a 1 Story Taxpayer used as a restaurant. 2 lines stretched. 1 line in operation.
Trucks are opening up. Primary Searches are negative. Fire is Doubtful.

@ 09:37
Division 8 to Brooklyn, Transmit a 2nd Alarm. We have fire extension into the cockloft.
Special Call 2 additional Battalion Chiefs. 1st Chief in is going to work fire duty.

2nd Alarm:
22-3552 @ 09:37
Eng. 281 act. 254, 243, 330, 276
T. Lad. 153, Lad. 168
Eng. 284 w/Satellite 3
Batt. 33 assigned to work
Batt. 48 Resource Unit Leader
Batt. 41 s/c Safety Officer
Batt. 32 s/c add Chief
Rescue Battalion / Safety Battalion
Fieldcom 1 / Tactical Support Unit #2
Command Tactical Unit
Car 10: Assist. Chief James Esposito

@ 10:04
Car 10: Assist. Chief Esposito reports: 2 lines stretched and in operation. 1 line into the 1st floor, 1 line to the roof. Continuing to open up. All searches are complete and negative. Fire is Probably Will Hold.

@ 10:35
Fieldcom 1: Progress Report for the 2nd Alarm, Box 3552, Division 8 reports:
Fire was in a 1 Story Taxpayer 20x60 with extension into the Cockloft. Fire is Under Control.

Job Duration: 1 hr. / 50 mins.


TOTONNO'S PIZZA

http://ny.eater.com/archives/2013/06/a_visit_to_coney_island_institution_totonnos.php

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2009 - WATER RESCUE

New York City Fire Department (FDNY)
June 3, 2019

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“We heard screaming coming from the pier. Our members made their way until they were able to visually locate the individual about 100 feet from the beach area. I sent Firefighter Jose Rivera and Firefighter Antonio Irizarry into the water where they made contact quickly. They were both tethered, and members from Ladder 166, with help from Engine 318 pulled them back to the beach,” says FDNY Lieutenant Wing Tsang who assisted in a water rescue this morning in Brooklyn. Lt. Tsang says, “We train for this and we are always prepared. The members were great. It’s all about teamwork." The patient was transported to a local hospital by FDNY members from Station 59





2010 - 2ND ALARM - CONEY ISLAND ARCADE FIRE

Suspicious Fire at Coney Island Arcade Building
May 6, 2010 by Tricia


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On the Coney Island Message Board and twitter, witnesses who live in the neighborhood began reporting a two-alarm fire at the Coney Island Arcade Building at West 12th Street and Bowery last night at 8:15 pm. The anonymous contributor who sent us the photo below said there were 7 fire trucks. The cause of the fire is unknown, but the FDNY scanner transcript reads: “20:42 hours – Duration 37 minutes. FieldCom: Transmit a 10-41 code 2 (Suspicious Fire, Vacant Structure), heavy volume of fire on arrival.”
 
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mack

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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 INCIDENTS/FIRES


 

mack

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Joined
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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 INCIDENTS/FIRES


2014 - 3RD ALARM - STILLWELL AVENUE


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Statter911

https://www.statter911.com/2014/12/19/arrival-video-brooklyn-3rd-alarm-coney-island/

Arrival video above from a three-alarm fire yesterday at 2900 Stillwell Avenue in Coney Island, Brooklyn.

“We went in to try to extinguish the fire, there was too much fire,” said FDNY Deputy Asst. Chief Dan Donoghue. “We quickly pulled out and went to exterior operations.”


NYC Firenet rundown

12/18/14 Brooklyn 3rd Alarm Box 3553
2900 Stillwell Ave
4-2-R-Sq due to calls

19:56: E-245 - we got heavy black smoke from far away 10-75 the box unknown address
19:57: Bn-43 All Hands start out an extra Engine & Truck - E-254 & L-172
19:59: E-318 to Brooklyn, 245 has a bad hydrant - 10-70, E-253 water resource unit

19:59: Bn-43 - 2nd Alarm on arrival fire on 2 floors, 2 L/S, 3 story taxpayer on bottom apt's above
20:00: Reports of people trapped

20:01: Bn-43 - 3rd Alarm
20:02: Bn-43 - Heavy fire from 2900 exterior ops only fire blowing out to the street
20:04: CIDS: commercial 3 story 20x65 class 3, floors 2 & 3 guttered with windows boarded up, bungee floors, no landing at bulkhead
20:05: Staging at Mermaid & Neptune
20:06: Bn-43 - 1 TL in operation 2nd being put up, 2 10-45's
20:07: BD to Bn-43 - people trapped in 1402 Mermaid
20:08: SB up from the 5th in Queens, heading to the 3rd in Brooklyn
20:10: 2 TL's in operation, 1 handline from E-245, no FD personnel inside
20:12: Bn-43 - Partial collapse of parapet wall at exposure 4 at 2900 Stillwell
20:14: Changing the staging to Stillwell & Neptune
20:16: Car 4H responding
20:21: Via HT - Charge that 2nd two and a half k
20:21: Via HT - We got fire in the duct work in the rear
20:23: Via HT - 153 to 153 OV bring the bucket down start hitting it in the window
20:26: Via HT - E-242 to ? were in exposure 3 we got fire in the cockloft in the rear k
20:29: Div-8 - 3 handlines & 2 TL's in operation we have extension into exposure 3, all visible fire k/d
20:30: Car 12B responding
20:32: Via HT - E-242 we got fire k/d in exposure 3 still overhauling and washing down
20:40: Car 6 is 10-84
20:49: FC - 10-41 code 1
20:52: FC - Fire in 3 story 20x65, 3 TL's & 2 handlines in operation, 1 handline in exposure 3, all visible fire k/d, fire is doubtful, exposures: 1. street 2. 1 story taxpayer 3. 1 story attached 4. 3 story mixed occupancy
20:57: Via HT - ? to L-157 bucket watch out for that powerline its smoking it was arcing before
20:57: Via HT - ? its lighting up pretty good again right in the middle of the building
21:02: FC - Fire on 2nd & 3rd k/d, 3 TL's & 2 handlines in operation, setting up a multiversal, still have fire on 1st floor
21:05: Via HT - Bn-43 to Command backing the handline out of exposure 3
21:09: Via HT - ? to Command the telephone pole in front of the store is flaring up
21:11: Via HT - We got a pretty good glow on the 1st floor
21:15: Via HT - Command to 157 bucket check out exposure 3 roof, Air Recon Chief just told me he sees something lighting up
21:19: Via HT - Bn-43 to Command exposure 3 is all clear k
21:28: FC - Still have visible fire on 1st floor possibly gas fed, placing fire PWH, duration 1 hour 34 minutes
21:36: Sq-1 & R-5 10-8

All Hands assignment:
E-245,318,253,246,254 s/c
L-161,166,153 FAST,172 s/c
Bn-43,42
Sq-1
R-5
Div-8

2nd Alarm:
E-243,330,284 w/ Sat.
L-149
Bn-40 safety, 48 RUL, 58 FF

3rd Alarm:
E-250,247,242,282,279 communications
L-157,147
Bn-41 staging, 39 Air Recon
MSU-1

Relocations:
L-128 acting 166
E-331 acting 245
Bn-2 acting 42
E-24 acting ?
E-5 acting 247
E-235 acting 253
E-? acting 245
E-210 acting 330
E-248 acting 254
L-131 acting 153
Bn-6 acting 41
E-201 acting 243
E-221 acting 282
L-168 acting 172
L-21 acting 149
L-111 acting 157
  • by firstdue
 

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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 MEMBERS


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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


CONEY ISLAND HISTORY - PUMPING STATION

The Coney Island Pumping Station replaced an older, outdated station in 1937-38. The need for a high pressure water system in this area was dire, as the previous one failed during the Dreamland fire of 1911 and a catastrophic fire along the boardwalk in 1932. The new station, a project of the Works Progress Administration.



Coney Island had one of the city's high pressure water systems. The pumping station was at Neptune Avenue and W 12th St. Upon receipt of alarm, a switch was thrown manually at the pumping station to increase the water pressure to 300 psi. Lines could be stretched from high pressure hydrants and operated directly into fire buildings. The Coney Island system was active until 1979.




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CONEY ISLAND HIGH PRESURE HYDRANT

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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


CONEY ISLAND HISTORY


Coney Island was known for more than its amusement parks, fine hotels, beaches, and hot dogs. During the turn of the century over 250,000 postcards would be mailed to every corner of the globe on any given weekend during the summer season. Because of these postcards, the area became a magnet for people. The area was densely packed with poorly built shanties, with narrow walkways between them. With the high density, cramped condition, Coney Island also attracted the seedier side of life with gambling, saloons and the ladies of the night. This all lead to what Coney Island is also famous for, conflagration on a grand scale.

Coney Island was first settled in the late 1600's by the Dutch. The name "Coney" comes from the Dutch word "Konijn" meaning wild rabbits. As early as 1824, Coney Island was a summer play area for the rich and famous visiting from New York City and Brooklyn. The growth of the area remained the same until the Civil War. After the War, five railroads were built from different parts of Brooklyn and Coney Island began to grow into a resort area and the most densely populated area in Brooklyn. This tightly and poorly built up area would contribute to some of the worst fires to visit New York City.

Coney Island was located in the town of Gravesend, which was annexed, along with the towns of New Utrecht, Flatbush, and Flatlands by the City of Brooklyn on May 3, 1894. This new land more than doubled the size of Brooklyn. When annexed, fire protection would be provided by the volunteers in the area until the City's paid force could be expanded into the newly annexed area. All of the expenses to operate the volunteers would be paid for by the City of Brooklyn.


CONEY ISLAND BEACH

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CONEY ISLAND 1905

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CONEY ISLAND 1930S




CONEY ISLAND 1940S




CONEY ISLAND THEN AND NOW




CONEY ISLAND 1924


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CONEY ISLAND 1951

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CONEY ISLAND 2012

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CONEY ISLAND FIRES

https://www.brooklynpaper.com/a-look-back-on-coney-islands-fiery-history/

https://nyfd.com/history/engine_245_1.html

https://www.theconeyislandblog.com/2015/01/24/the-fires-of-coney-island/



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ENGINE 318/LADDER 166 (CONTINUED)


CONEY ISLAND WALL OF REMEMBERANCE



WALL.jpg


The Brooklyn Wall of Remembrance in KeySpan Park stands as a graceful and beautiful tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice on September 11th, 2001. Three 30 x 12 panels form the Coney Island memorial, containing the laser-engraved images of 346 Firefighters, 37 Port Authority Officers, 23 NYC Police Officers, 3 NYS Officers, 1 Fire Patrol, First responders and 1 K-9 Rescue dog named Sirus. Touched by the magnitude of their sacrifice, Brooklyn-born and raised Sol Moglen conceived of the idea for a memorial commemorating the loss of Brooklyn Firefighters. He also recognized the particular despair of those families whose loved ones were never found. The Wall of Remembrance gives them a place to come, where the Lost are honored and recognized.

Shortly after 9/11, Sol presented his idea of a memorial wall to FDNY Chaplain Rabbi Joseph Potasnik. Over a third of the firefighters lost that day were from Brooklyn, and Brooklyn should honor them, he said. The Rabbi and many others agreed. Peter Kasten of New Hyde Park, L.I.-based U.S. Bronze Sign Co. worked with Sol to come up with the original design. Everyone involved agreed that the images would be placed on the wall according to their companies. "They went in as a team, and we kept them as a team," said Moglen. Sol, along with Peter Kasten and dozens of other volunteers, began raising the more than $140,000 needed. The project has special meaning for Kasten. Firefighter Chris Pickford, killed on Sept. 11, was Kasten's best friend growing up.

On the Wall, their portraits form a powerful, unforgettable testament, eloquently reminding us these are real people behind the names and numbers of September 11.



WALL 2.jpg
 

mack

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MORE CONEY ISLAND FIRE HISTORY

FIRES 1893-1911


1/6/1893 W.8th St. including 3 hotels and bath houses are destroyed


The first fire was fought on the evening of January 6, 1893. The fire started in a drug store on the corner of Surf Avenue and W. 8th Street on a snowy, wind swept night. It burnt a bathing pavilion, the West End Hotel a well-known resort hotel, six stores, a 300 foot observation tower and many smaller building before it ran out of fuel. The fire was fought in a gale wind that blew the fire towards the ocean. The lost was set at $250,000.00. The West End Hotel was a two story wood frame building that measured 200 feet by 200 feet. In it was a bowling alley and billiard rooms in the basement, restaurants and saloons on the first floor and forty sleeping rooms upstairs.
- https://nyfd.com/history/engine_245_1.html

6/17/1893 All building destroyed on Surf Ave. south between W.11th and W.12th

The second fire of 1893 was on June 17th and was smaller but, took out a business block and the life of a fireman. The fire started in Frishman Bakery at 2:15 in the morning. A large pot of fat was spilled, setting fire to the woodwork. The fire spread along Surf Avenue between West 11th and 12th Street, burning out eleven buildings. The loss was set at $43,300.00 with very little of it being insured. Fireman John Madden, along with several other firemen were on the roof of the bakery when an explosion inside of the building, weakened the roof. Everybody ran to the edge of the roof for safety. Fireman Madden tripped and fell to the roof just has the roof collapsed. His body was recovered after the fire was put out. By dawn, the burned out basements were being filled in with sand and new construction began before the embers were cool. Most of the buildings would be ready for business in a weeks time.
- https://nyfd.com/history/engine_245_1.html

The Bowery Fire of 1894

There was rarely a dull moment and Coney Island, and 1894 proved to be no exception. Amid all the political turmoil that was taking place at Coney Island in 1893 and 1894, thanks to John McKane's latest rigging scandal, on April 8, 1894, before the season began, a fire broke out in the Bowery. It destroyed Perry's Glass Pavilion and Connor's Alhambra. Both were cabaret-style concert halls. Other structural casualties were Kenny Sutherland's bar, and two restaurants, Joe's, and Olney's. Reformers were undoubtedly elated by the destruction. Three days later, just about when the embers had ceased smoking, a ferocious gale struck, inflicting significant damage on neighboring Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach.
-https://www.heartofconeyisland.com/bowery-coney-island-history.html

5/16 1895 Four acres burn between Surf Ave, Maiden Lane, Sea Beach Walk, and Arcade Walk


1896 Elephant Hotel and Shaw Channel Chutes Coaster are destroyed

The first fire fought by Brooklyn's Engine 45 was on October 27, 1896. The Coney Island Elephant was built in 1876 and was the first of the famous attractions to burn. The elephant was seven stories high and over 100 feet long. Built of yellow pine and tin, it burnt to the ground in thirty minutes. The first floor had a restaurant and saloon, while the upper floors were used as a hotel. On the top was a howdad (the seat to ride the elephant), which was used as an observation deck, came crashing down in flames soon after the fire started. Also destroyed was Shaw's Toboggan Sled ride, which surrounded the elephant. The total lost was placed at $26,000.00. The elephant was seen in every photograph of Coney Island used in books during the "Gay 90's." It was never a moneymaker for the owners and it was sold several time in its short history. The elephant was located at Surf Avenue and about W. 5th Street. This location would have a repeat performance several years later.
- https://www.bkmag.com/2015/07/06/th...-coney-islands-elephant-hotel-turned-brothel/
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleph...olossus_Burning_1986_Illustrated_American.jpg

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mack

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MORE CONEY ISLAND FIRE HISTORY

FIRES 1893-1911


5/26 1899 Sixty buildings destroyed including Feltman’s, Henderson’s, and Stauch’s.


New York, NY Coney Island Fire, May 1899
Submitted by Linda Horton
New York Fires 1899

CONEY ISLAND FIRE - Destroys Eight Blocks of Buildings---Loss Half Million.

NEW YORK, May 26.---Fire swept Coney Island early this morning. Eight blocks of buildings were destroyed totally in the heart of the resort. The loss is half a million dollars. Fire appeared simultaneously in two distant points. It is therefore believed to be incendiary. It is thought several small small resort keepers who would be injured by the recent Sunday observance order, are at the bottom of it. Brooklyn was called upon for assistance. So rapidly did the fire spread it is feared all the occupants of the buildings did not escape. Half a dozen are injured. Crowds of people are at the scene and most intense excitement prevailed.


Fort Wayne News, Fort Wayne, IN 26 May 1899

CONEY ISLAND DEVASTATED
FIRE SWEEPS AWAY TWO HUNDRED FLIMSY BUILDINGS
THOUGHT TO BE INCENDIARY

Flames Break Out Simultaneously in Two Different Places---Property Loss Placed at a Million.

NEW YORK, May 26.---Coney Island property in the value of nearly one million dollars was destroyed by fire early this morning, twenty acres in the heart of the summer resort section, the district known as "The Bowery," being reduced to ashes.

The two hundred buildings burned were located between the Bowery and the ocean. Tilyou's walk on the west and the old iron pier on the east. These buildings ranged in size and importance from a wabbly bathing pavilion to the handsome five-story Hygen hotel, including theatres, concert halls, dancing pavilions, stores of various kinds, restaurants, and hotels of every grade. The fire made shelterless for a time a native and transient population of about 3,500, including five hundred man and women, classed as comedians and soubrettes employed in the district, and silenced no less than 100 pianos which have for years assisted in merrymaking at Coney Island.

It was nearly 3 a. m. when a policeman discovered a blaze in a cottage near the iron pier. A prompt response of the fire department in answer to an alarm had this trouble disposed of before 3:30 and the engines were about going away when the same policeman discovered another fire in Scheffel's palm pavilion at the Tilyou's walk end of the district. This was the start of the big fire and it spread in a northerly zigzag line toward the Farm theatre on the Bowery, at a frightful rate. Additional alarms followed in quick succession until twenty engines, some from as far away as South Brooklyn, were called. In ten minutes after the second fire started the whole Bowery district was in wild alarm. the thousands immediately threatened rushed out attired as they slept. They were quickly joined by the entire native and over-night population of the island, and ten thousand, whose eager interest hampered the firemen. It was seen that the firemen had determined to make the Bowery the fighting line, and then the last hope of those south of the Bowery that any of their houses might be saved being gone, a pell mell rush for salvage of plunder took place. Scores of thieves broke through the fire lines and entered the district from the ocean side, and their work of looting was wholesale. A crowd carrying off a plane was a sight which taught the police what kind of crooks they had to deal with.

So far as known only four persons were injured or burned, and all will recover. Deputy Battalion Chief Kirkpatrick says he is convinced that the fire is of incendiary origin. He arrives at this conclusion owing to the fact that the flames broke out in two different parts of the island at about the same time, both places being difficult of access so far as fire engines are concerned, and from the fact that upon his arrival he found traces of kerosene oil along the board walks and around both houses where the fires originated.

When the fire department reached the beach front it found a dozen bath houses burning. They were dry as tinder and it was impossible to save them. The flames communicated quickly to the Bowery and destroyed two blocks of it before they were gotten under control.

The rapidity of the fire was not to be wondered at, considering the character of the buildings. In one hour after the first puff of smoke gave warning a large square filled with buildings of all sizes and character utilized for such purposes as photograph galleries, saloons, dining rooms, dance halls, theatres and the like were in ruins.

When it dawned upon the firemen that they had a serious blaze on their hands five alarms were sounded. All the reserve engines came from Flatbush, Fort Hamilton, Bath Beach, Sheepshead Bay and fourteen companies responded from Brooklyn. The police department hurried down the reserves from six precincts. On arriving they at once set about to fight the fire systematically. Hose was stretched in all directions and the firemen told to make every effort to stop the spread of the flames, leaving the structures already on fire to burn themselves out.

There was very little insurance on the property destroyed, the fire rates on frame buildings in Coney Island being almost prohibitive.
- The Nebraska State Journal, Lincoln, NE 27 May 1899
- http://www.gendisasters.com/new-york/5048/new-york,-ny-coney-island-fire,-may-1899


The Bowery Fire of 1899

On May 26, 1899, Coney Island was ravaged again by a fire that raged between the Bowery and the ocean, from Sea Beach Walk, near West 8th Street, to Kensington Walk, about eight blocks to the west. Only one block of the Bowery itself was destroyed, but sixty buildings were destroyed. Among them were Feltman's grand casino and his ornate ballroom, Louis Stauch's restaurant and dance hall, and Henry Henderson's Bathing Pavilion, the largest in Coney Island.
- https://www.heartofconeyisland.com/bowery-coney-island-history.html

The Bowery – Coney Island

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The most famous section of West Brighton was an area known as the Bowery. The Bowery was south of Surf Avenue and extended from Jones Walk, on the west side of Feltman’s, to West 16th Street, on the east side of Steeplechase Park. Its main drag, known as Ocean Avenue until around 1905 and as Bowery Lane thereafter, ran parallel to Surf Ocean and about 65 yards south of it. The Tilyou and Stratton families had leases to much of the land, and they are believed to have originally constructed a boardwalk along this lane, which was later replaced by a paved walk. The original name of Ocean Avenue must have led to some confusion in the Postal Service as there was another Ocean Avenue in nearby Sheepshead Bay.

The Bowery was a raucous area where police frequently looked the other way as drinking, gambling, music and shows took place well into the night. Coney Island's appeal was that anyone could find the type of experience they desired. For those looking for more variety and fun, and less refinement, the Bowery stood head and shoulders above Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach.

The Bowery came into its prime a little later than the rest of West Brighton, Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach. During the 1870s and 1880s, it was overshadowed by the large hotels in these other areas, and offered somewhat seedy and smaller-scale entertainment. By around 1905, it had become a primary destination within West Brighton and Coney Island.
- https://www.heartofconeyisland.com/bowery-coney-island-history.html


11/1/1903 Great Bowery Fire in which 14 square block are destroyed in 4 hours

November 1, 1903 - This fire was started over a woman and destroyed fourteen blocks. Three men were fighting with the owner of the Albatross Hotel over a woman, and they started a fire in the laundry room of the hotel. The fire started at Steeplechase Walk and Bowery Street, then extended to Surf Avenue over to Jones Walk down to the beach, back to Steeplechase Walk. A total of 264 buildings were destroyed for a lost of $1,200,000.00, and 500 were left homeless. A nine year girl was killed by the fire and thirty persons were injured. The three men were arrested for starting the fire. The four alarm fire and four special calls brought a total of sixteen engines and three ladder trucks to the location.
- https://nyfd.com/history/engine_245_1.html

 

mack

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MORE CONEY ISLAND FIRE HISTORY

FIRES 1893-1911

7/28/1907 Steeplechase Park burns down in 18 hours. Lit cigarette thrown in a waste basket at Cave of the Winds ride was the culprit.

No one knows what started the fire that erased 35 acres of this iconic amusement area. But the next day, owner George C. Tilyou put out a sign reading: “Admission to the burning ruins: Ten cents.”

On July 29, 1907, fire visited Tilyou Steeplechase Park without paying admission. Built in 1897, by George C. Tilyou, Steeplechase Park was the first of the well known amusement parks to open. The park was famous for the mechanical horse ride known as the Steeplechase. Other rides were the rolling drums that people tried to walk through, the Spinning Floor ride and through out the park were grates with air jets that blew air up as people walked over them. At the entrance was the wide smiling face of a clown, now used by Engine 245, Ladder 161, and Battalion 43 for their patch.

This fire was started under the stairs of the pavilion, probably by a discarded cigar. The night watch man found the fire around 3:45 in the morning and turned in the alarm. He pulled the master box for the Park but, did not turn the handle inside. The fire burned for twenty seven minutes before the alarm was finally turned in. The fire spread quickly to adjoining buildings. By Coney Island standards this fire was small, only seventy four building were burnt in a four block area, along with Steeplechase Park. Fireman Gottfried Messerli, of Engine 245 was hit in the head by a falling beam. He died on August 2nd has result of the injuries. The four alarm fire was under control in two hours and was fought by twelve engines and four ladder companies. Steeplechase Park would be rebuilt and it was closed in the 1960's.

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7/9/1908 4th Alarm Pabst Loop Hotel, the Vanderveer Hotel and the Culver depot of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit fire

The Pabst Loop Hotel, the Vanderveer Hotel and the Culver depot of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit would be victims of the "Red Devil". The name of Pabst Loop Hotel came from the fact the hotel was curved and the BRT tracks looped around the building to change direction back to Brooklyn. The loss for these three building was set at $200,000.00. Located across the street from Dreamland, on Surf Avenue and W. 5th Street, the firemen had visions of the Island burning again. The new high pressure water system was ordered turn on and several hose lines, hooked to the hydrants were soon operating. The fire was held to these three buildings. The new high pressure system saved the Island from burning. With the new water system the big fires of the past appear to be a distant memory.

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5/27/ 1911 Dreamland Fire which started at Hell Gate dark ride

The morning before opening day, workers were sealing a leak in the Hellgate water ride with tar when several of the light bulbs above them popped. Sparks fell onto the hot pitch and started a blaze that consumed the Hellgate, Dreamland’s towers, the animal arena — and most of the animals.

Dreamland open its doors in 1904 and cost $3.5 million to build. It was located on Surf Avenue between W. 10th and W. 5th Streets to the ocean. A 400 foot long iron pier stretched from the park out over the ocean. The park was laid out with wide walkways and sites, like the Canals of Venice, the waterfalls of Pompeii, and the Tower of Seville. Attractions included the Leap Frog Railway, the Fighting Flame Show, Chariot races and the Hellgate, a cross between the water rides of today and the Tunnel of Love ride. Dreamland also had one of the first "wild animal" park, though be it in cages. On the morning of opening day, May 27, 1911, Dreamland would change forever.

The fire started around 2 A.M., from an explosion of some light bulbs that were near a pail of tar in the Hellgate that was being repaired. Built of pine, paper-mache and freshly painted for the new season, the fire spread very quickly. The high pressure water system was down for repairs. Instead of water pressure being 150 pounds, it was meager 25 pounds. The Tower of Seville, was 80 feet tall and could be seen over ten miles out to sea when the lights were turned on at night, burnt in thirty minutes. The fire spread through out the park trapping the wild animals. Some of the animals had escaped and were driven mad by the flames, were fighting each other before being consumed by the flames. One lion escaped into the streets with its' mane on fire, frightening everybody, including the firemen. The police cornered the frighten lion and pumped him with bullets to no avail. The lion charged the policemen and was hit in the head by an ax, that one of the policemen had borrowed. All of the animals were destroyed in the fire. The fire also spread to the 400 foot long iron pier used by excursion boats from Manhattan. It also had several restaurants and fishing areas on it. Nobody thought of notifying these people of the fire, trapping several fishermen and restaurant workers. They were rescued by a police boat.

By the time the fire was out a total of fourteen acres from W. 5th Street to W. 12th Street, were burnt and destroyed. The only thing to save Coney Island from completely being wiped out was the shift in the wind. It changed direction, blowing the fire toward the ocean and away from the buildings. The fire went to a fifth alarm and two Borough Calls, (a 3rd alarm assignment in another Borough that responded to this fire). As beautiful as Dreamland was it was never a profitable operation and was never rebuilt. The loss was estimated between $3,000,000.00 and $5,000,000.00. The land was turned over to the City and made into a park. Today, the New York Aquarium sits on the famous Dreamland site.
- https://nyfd.com/history/engine_245_1.html

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mack

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MORE CONEY ISLAND FIRE HISTORY

1960s-1970s


ENGINE 244 - 2929 W 15TH STREET - DISBANDED - JULY 23, 1968

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1970s FIRES

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All things Coney Island
The Fires of Coney Island
Posted on January 24, 2015
By Michael Quinn


I vividly remember as a child in the 1970’s sitting in the back seat of my father’s car traveling on the Belt Parkway. Once we reached the Cropsey Avenue exit I would look out into the distance to see the rusted Parachute Jump with it’s cables drooping down hauntingly dancing with the seaside wind. It seems like everyday the skyline of Coney Island was surrounded by black smoke. This was the Coney Island of the 1970’s. A far cry from the Coney Island of today.

Family events like mom’s birthday would be held at Carolina’s Italian Restaurant. The walls of the restaurant were adorned with celebrity visitors like Robert De Niro. On the way out my brother would point out the Terminal Motel which was located across the street. In it’s dilapidated condition my brother would poke fun at the name “Terminal.” He would say things like ” The Terminal would be the last place that I would check in.” Sadly, the over a century old Terminal Motel is the latest casualty of fire.

- https://www.theconeyislandblog.com/2015/01/24/the-fires-of-coney-island/


1970S - MERMAID AVENUE

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SURF AVENUE APARTMENT

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mack

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MORE CONEY ISLAND FIRE HISTORY

FIRES 1980s



1982 ALL HANDS - BOX 75-3543 MERMAID AVENUE & W 22 STREET

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1983 3RD ALARM - BOX 33-3564 SURF AVENUE & W 10TH STREET

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68jk09

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WOW an oldie ...the 2 pictures above ( by Warren Fuchs) were from a job at an old movie Theater in Coney ....it was reported that gang members used the upper rooms as their headquarters / living space .....in the first picture above is Lee Ielpi on the left & LT John Vigiano RIP on the right....the one above that is me sizing up the conditions as we wait for water in a Line we had on the floor....no trapped were found.
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
7,922
WOW an oldie ...the 2 pictures above ( by Warren Fuchs) were from a job at an old movie Theater in Coney ....it was reported that gang members used the upper rooms as their headquarters / living space .....in the first picture above is Lee Ielpi on the left & LT John Vigiano RIP on the right....the one above that is me sizing up the conditions as we wait for water in a Line we had on the floor....no trapped were found.
Chief - another picture from the CI 3rd alarm

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