FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 MEDAL


CHARLES AMATO FF. ENG. 72 FEB. 1, 1920 1921 TREVOR-WARREN



FF Amato, Engine 72, with FF Tierney and FF Crawley, also Engine 72, saved the lives of three persons at a fire at 67 West 12th Street, Manhattan on February 1, 1920.


MEDAL DAY 1921


MEDAL DAY 1921 BKLYN EAGLE AMATO CRAWLEY.jpg



FIRE BUILDING - 67 W 12 STREET, MANHATTAN


67 W 12 ST.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 MEDAL


MATTHEW J. CRAWLEY FIREMAN, PROBIE ENG. 72 FEB. 1, 1920 1921 SCOTT

FF Crawley, Engine 72, with FF Tierney and FF Amato, also Engine 72, saved the lives of three persons at a fire at 67 West 12th Street, Manhattan on February 1, 1920.



MATTHEW CRAWLEY - CAREER - US ARMY/FDNY

Matthew Crawley joined FDNY in January 1920. While still a Probationary Fireman, he saved the lives of three persons at a fire at 67 West 12th Street, Manhattan and for his heroism received the Walter Scott Medal. For several years, Lieutenant Crawley was aide to his father, Assistant Chief Joseph Crawley at Fire Headquarters. Lieutenant Crawley was a member of the Fire Department Post of the American Legion, the Firemen's Cycle Club, the Lieutenant's Association and the Holy Name Society.



MATTHEW J. CRAWLEY - MILITARY SERVICE

Before joining the Department he served with the 47th Infantry on the Mexican border. During World War I he was a motorcycle dispatch rider with headquarters company of the 27th Division under General John F. O’Ryan.

27th Division - World War One

On July 12th, 1917 President Woodrow Wilson called out the entire National Guard of the United States for service against the Central Powers. The New York State National Guard Division was officially designated the 27th Infantry Division on July 20th, 1917. The division, which initially had nine infantry regiments grouped into three brigades was squared or reorganized into a more simplified four-regiment structure within two brigades. Some regiments were dropped from the unit, while others were renamed and enlarged. The 27th Division was eventually made up of the 53rd Infantry Brigade, consisting of the 105th and 106th Infantry Regiments, and the 54th Infantry Brigade, consisting of the 107th and 108th Infantry Regiments. The 52nd Field Artillery Brigade, which was made up of the 104th, 105th, and 106th Field Artillery Regiments and the 102nd Trench Mortar Battery was assigned as the divisional artillery, though once in Europe it never served with the 27th Division. The initial effective strength of the 27th Division was 991 officers and 27,114 enlisted men.

The newly reorganized division shipped out to Europe on April 20th 1918 and fought within several different British and American army units along with the 30th Infantry Division. The 27th was initially stationed in the East Poperinghe Line, and participated in actions at Dickebusch Lake and Vierstratt Ridge during the late summer of 1918, and then in September the struggle to break the formidable German defenses of the Hindenburg Line. On September 25th, the division participated in the Somme Offensive and provided a break through of the Hindenburg Line itself forcing the Germans into general retreat. After a final confrontation with the retreating Germans at the Le Selle River the Armistice ended the fighting and the division was sent home in February of 1919, to be mustered out several months later.

In the early actions the 27th Division sustained 185 killed 1,086 wounded, and 65 who later died of their wounds. During the Somme offensive and subsequent operations the 27th lost an additional 1,237 killed, 5,328 wounded, and 308 who later died of their wounds for a total of 8,209 assorted casualties throughout the course of the war.

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MATTHEW J. CRAWLEY - FDNY

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FF. CRAWLEY - MARRIES FIRE COMMISSIONER'S SECRETARY

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LT. CRAWLEY - DEATH

CRAWLEY 2.jpg
 
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mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 MEDAL


WALTER P. BRESNAN FF. ENG. 72 OCT. 14, 1949 1950 JOHNSTON

FF Bresnan, Engine 72, was awarded the Johnston Medal for bravery rescuing a NY Fire Patrol member at a fire and collapse at 23 W 17th Street, Manhattan, October 14, 1949.


BRESNAN.jpg


BRESNAN FIRE PATROL.jpg

LODDS:

FRED LEHMANN NEW YORK FIRE PATROL 3 OCTOBER 14, 1949
DANIEL SHEA NEW YORK FIRE PATROL 3 OCTOBER 14, 1949

RIP. NEVER FORGET.


MEDAL DAY 1950


MEDAL DAY 1950 BRESNAN.jpg
 
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mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 MEDAL


WARREN J. SISKO FF. ENG. 72 APR. 26, 1983 1984 STIEFEL

SISKO.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 MEDAL


DANIEL J. CROWE LT. ENG. 72 (ASSIGNED) LAD 58 (DETAILED) AUG. 21, 2006 2007 BROOKMAN


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Appointed to the FDNY on August 3, 1985. Previously assigned to Ladders 61 and 19, Battalion 8 and Engines 16 and 72. Holds a BS degree in Criminal Justice from SUNY at Brockport. Recipient of a Class III, a unit citation and Steuben Association Medal. Resides in Dobbs Ferry, New York, with his wife, Leslie, and sons, Danny, 13, and Matthew, 9.

August 21, 2006, 1618 hours, Box 22-3348, 2475 Southern Boulevard, Bronx

Fires in fireproof multiple dwellings can spread quickly, are extremely hot and, depending on wind conditions and building air flow patterns, can be very difficult to extinguish. In past years, many factors have changed that affect FDNY’s firefighting capabilities. FDNY members no longer fight fires in residential buildings where the fire load is natural fiber-based. With the onset of the chemical age, properties of the average residential furnishings are, for the most part, petroleum-based. As Lieutenant Daniel Crowe experienced firsthand, the fire load has increased tremendously, resulting in higher temperatures and faster-spreading fires.

As Bronx Box 3348 was transmitted for a structural fire, the responding members of Ladder Company 58 instantly began to talk up an operational plan. They recalled the dangers of indiscriminate ventilation, as well as the potential for rapid fire and extensive heavy smoke development on the fire floor and the floors above.

As the first ladder company officer to arrive at the location, Lieutenant Crowe (detailed to Ladder 58) immediately and with purpose led his Firefighters into the building entrance of 2475 Southern Boulevard. Entering on the mezzanine level, Ladder 58 and Engine Company 45 members tried to gain control of the 31-story fireproof multiple dwelling’s elevators by use of the fireman’s service, but the elevators were not responding.

Faced with heavy fire and smoke issuing from two windows on the 12th floor, Lieutenant Crowe was forced to order the members of Ladder 58 to climb the stairs, knowing full well that this would dramatically reduce the members’ strength and stamina once they arrived on the fire floor.

Arriving on the 12th floor, fatigued and out of breath, Lieutenant Crowe took a moment to compose himself while conducting a size-up of the public hallway. His size-up of the 12th-floor hallway revealed that the fire apartment door was open, as evidenced by the high heat and dense black smoke, which banked down to the floor.

Subsequently, FF Walter Powers, the forcible entry Firefighter of Ladder 58, arrived on the 12th-floor stairway landing and also noted the deteriorating conditions. Knowing that an open fire apartment door is one of the leading causes of civilian fatalities, Lieutenant Crowe and FF Powers entered the 12th-floor hallway without the protection of a charged hose-line in an attempt to both locate the fire apartment and minimize this fire’s deadly potential.

In extreme heat conditions, Lieutenant Crowe and FF Powers systematically searched their way down the hallway with a search line in an attempt to find the fire apartment, as well as gain control of the apartment door. During their search, Lieutenant Crowe came upon a small area off the hallway and swept this area, finding a victim on the floor in an unconscious state. Unable to remove the victim by himself, Lieutenant Crowe called FF Powers for assistance and together, they dragged the victim 50 feet back down the hallway to the safe refuge of the stairway.

The fire victim was removed from the building to the street. He was rushed to St. Barnabas Hospital and ultimately moved to the hyperbaric chamber at Jacobi Hospital for burns and smoke inhalation.

In one defining moment, Lieutenant Daniel Crowe showed tremendous stamina, coupled with quick thinking and aggressive search techniques that undoubtedly saved the life of this man. For these reasons, he is recognized with the Henry D. Brookman Medal.


CROWE AUG 21 2006 E 72 ASSIGNED L 58 DET 2007 BROOKMAN.jpg
 

CVILLE7111

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Was E-72's quarters supposed to be something else originally? Its design is so much different than any other house.
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 LODD


FIREFIGHTER GEORGE A. O'CONNOR ENGINE 72 January 10, 1908


This five-alarm fire started around 7 o’clock on the sixth floor of the twelve-story Parker Building. At the height of the blaze, the buildings across 19th Street caught fire. The hotel across the alley had over 200 guests and was evacuated. On the second floor the members of Fire Patrol 1 and 2 were operating. Engines 12, 16, 18 and 72 were operating at different locations on the fifth floor. The steel girders of the eighth floor gave way, crashing into the basement taking parts of the floors with it. The crews of Engines 12, 16, and 18 were rescued right away. On the other side of the building, the members of Engine 72 were operating when the floors collapsed and they were trapped. A ladder bridge was placed between the hotel and the fire building. All the men got out and when they got down to the street it was learned that Firemen Thomas F. Phillips and George A. O’Connor were still missing. Captain Davin stated he had his hand on O’Connor and was dragging him toward the window when something came crashing down and crushed his hand and forced O’Connor away from him. Lacking in strength, Captain Davin had to be rescued by someone else. The members of the Fire Patrol were also trapped in the collapse and Patrolman John Fallon was killed. -from "The Last Alarm"

oconnor parker building 2.jpg

FALLON OCONNOR FIRE.jpg


RIP. NEVER FORGET.
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 LODD


FIREFIGHTER THOMAS F. PHILLIPS ENGINE 72 January 10, 1908

FF Thomas F. Phillips, Engine 72, made the Supreme Sacrifice January 10, 1908, with FF George A. O'Connor, Engine 72, and Fire Patrolman John Fallon, Fire Patrol 8, at a 5-alarm fire and collapse at the Parker Building, 4th Avenue and 19th Street, Manhattan.


PARKER BUILDING

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FUNERAL SERVICES JANUARY 18, 1908

FALLON OCONNOR.jpg


RIP. NEVER FORGET.
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


NYFP LODD


PATROLMAN JOHN FALLON FIRE PATROL 8 January 10, 1908

NYFP Patrolman John Fallon, Fire Patrol 8, made the Supreme Sacrifice January 10, 1908, with FF George A. O'Connor, Engine 72, and FF Thomas F. Phillips, Engine 72, at a 5-alarm fire and collapse at the Parker Building, 4th Avenue and 19th Street, Manhattan.


FALLON WIDOW.jpg


FALLON.jpg


RIP. NEVER FORGET
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


PARKER BUILDING FIRE JANUARY, 10, 1908 - 3 LODDS

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GENERAL DISASTERS.COM

New York, NY Skyscraper Fire, Jan 1908

Submitted by Stu Beitler
New York | Fires | 1908

$6,000,000 BLAZE STRIPS FIREPROOF SKYSCRAPER


Thirteen-Story Parker Building In New York Destroyed.

RARE ART TREASURES BURNED

The Fiercest Fire in Years

“Three Firemen Dead and Many Others Injured “

Many Daring Escapes From Tenth Story.



New York City. -- Flames consumed to its skeleton or iron and brick the supposedly fireproof structure known as the Parker Building, which occupies the northwest segment of the block bound by Fourth avenue, Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets and Irving place.

The flames licked to the bare bones of the thirteen-story structure. The steel girders, with their facing of white stone on the Fourth avenue side and brick on the other sides, threatened to collapse, and because of this peril the police cleared buildings which nestled beneath the burning structure of hundreds of tenants.

The subway runs under Fourth avenue, and because of the menace of falling walls peremptory orders were sent to the officials of the Inter-Met. Railway to stop traffic in the subway immediately. In case of the collapse of the building. Fire Department officials said, it was practically certain that thousands of tons of masonry would crash into the subway. The order to stop traffic was obeyed.

Three lives were lost and scores of firemen were injured.

The dead are: JOHN FALLON, Fire Patrol 3; GEORGE O'CONNOR, Engine 72; THOMAS PHILLIPS, Engine 72.

Seldom have New York firemen had to fight a more stubborn blaze. There were many thrilling rescues, and from time to time rumors went around that some of those fighting the flames had been killed by falling debris. Many of those working in the building when the fire started were saved with difficulty.

The amount of damage done was estimated by Fire Commissioner LANTRY and Assistant Fire Chief BINNS at more than $6,000,000. They said that the disaster proved the inability of the New York Fire Department to cope successfully with flames in the city's skyscrapers at a greater height than the eighth story.

Two score of firemen had miraculous escapes from death when the floors on the fifth story fell, carrying debris downward to the cellar and upon the heads of the men fighting the flames on the second story and in the basement.

The flames spread throughout the building with amazing rapidity, attracting 50,000 spectators. Fire lines were established early, and it is estimated that 20,000 persons were massed in Union Square alone.


http://www.gendisasters.com/new-york/1812/new-york,-ny-skyscraper-fire,-jan-1908


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mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 - MOTORIZED APPARATUS - 1909

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The first motorized apparatus of the FDNY was a 1909 Knox high-pressure hose wagon, shown here in front of Engine Company No. 72 at 22 East 12th Street (today the Cinema Village theater). This hose wagon was one of the first three firefighting vehicles to simultaneously arrive on the scene of the Triangle Shirtwaist fire on March 25, 1911. Photo, Museum of the City of New York Collections.

https://hatchingcatnyc.com/2015/01/24/last-fire-horses-new-york-fire-department/
 

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mack

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Was E-72's quarters supposed to be something else originally? Its design is so much different than any other house.
Good question. I don't know. Firehouse was built 1971-1972.


f2.jpg


Original lettering indicates "Engine 72" and "Ladder".

P5.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 - FIRST DUE - TRIANGLE SHIRTWAIST FACTORY FIRE - MARCH 25, 1911


Triangle Firefighting
(based on the pipenozzle.com essay)
by Barry Roberts Greer



FDNY Engine 72 is now quartered in the Bronx, but on March 25, 1911, Engine 72, the horsedrawn steam pumper and its tender responded from 22 East 12th Street and reached 23 Washington Place one block east of Washington Park in a minute and a half after Box 289 was pulled at 4:45 pm, five minutes, according to the NY Times, after the fire started. The 4:46:30 arrival time is in the court record from October 1911, and the speed of response is confirmed by Damon Campagna, the director of the New York City Fire Museum, who said 72 certainly could and did respond that quickly, both pumper and tender. In fact, Campagna said, fire companies ran hitching drills twice a day each day of the week but Sunday. In 1886, the FDNY record for hitching a team was 3.25 seconds with the chauffeur in the driver’s seat. The slowest time was 11.25 seconds with a department average of 6.7 seconds. Try that with a modern rig. Get out the door in 6.7 seconds from time of alarm. It isn’t done any more.

Nor were they slow with setup at the scene. A youtube.com video shows amateurs operating a Eureka steam pumper and getting a 2 ½ line charged in two and a half minutes, and they were drafting from a tank. Engine 72 arrived at Washington Place and connected to a high pressure
hydrant. Yes, they had high pressure mains then. They had standpipes. And the steamers had evolved technologically near the end of the horse-drawn era so they could generated enough pressure to charge a ten story standpipe or shoot a stream ten stories high.

The first Battalion Chief at the Triangle fire ordered just that--a stream aimed at the cornice over the windows to try to set up a water curtain as some protection for the people in the windows getting ready to jump.

Maybe, just may, Worth hoped as did the other people on the street yelling “Don’t jump” that they wouldn't jump if he got water on them. It was too late and Worth went to the Asch Building lobby to hold survivors inside to keep them from being killed by jumpers hitting the pavement with the force of a five ton truck smashing into a concrete wall at 60 miles an hour.

http://open-archive.rememberthetrianglefire.org//wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Triangle_Essay_OpenArchive.pdf



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The ten-story building, owned by Joseph Asch, of South Norwalk, Conn., had 1,500 machines on three of the floors, and only one fire escape.

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Cornell University - ILR School - The Triangle Factory Fire
 

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t123ken

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


Engine 72 organized 22 E 12th Street Manhattan 1900
Engine 72 disbanded to organize Engine 41-2 1957
Engine 72 reorganized 3929 E Tremont Avenue Bronx 1972

Engine 72-2 organized 22 E 12th Street at Engine 72 1908
Engine 72-2 disbanded 1916
Engine 72-2 reorganized 22 E 12th Street at Engine 72 1917
Engine 72-2 disbanded 1918

Water Tower 2 organized 108 E 13th Street at Ladder 3 1882
Water Tower 2 moved 22 E 12th Street at Engine 72 1928
Water Tower 2 new firehouse 108 E 13th Street w/Ladder 3 1929
Water Tower 2 disbanded 1957

Hydrant Service 2 organized 343 E 5th Street at Engine 19 1936
Hydrant Service 2 moved 22 E 12th Street at Engine 72 1947
Hydrant Service 2 disbanded 1957

Satellite 2 organized 618 E 138th Street at Engine 83 1965
Satellite 2 moved 3929 E Tremont Avenue at Engine 72 1975

Division 7 located 3929 Tremont Avenue at Engine 72 1991-1991

Battalion 20 located 3229 E Tremont Avenue at Engine 72 2016
Wasn't the Bronx Borough Command at Engine 72 for a while?
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 FIRE - 1902

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New York, NY Park Avenue Hotel Fire, Feb 1902 - part 1

Submitted by Stu Beitler
New York, New York
Park Avenue Hotel Fire
February 22, 1902

SIXTEEN PERISH IN PARK AV. HOTEL

Swift Moving Flames Destroy Lives on the Upper Floors.

THRILLING ESCAPES MADE.

Seventy-first Regiment Armory Destroyed by Fire Just Before the Hotel Caught.

SEVERAL KILLED BY JUMPING


Fire Thought to Be Incendiary --- MRS. FOSTER, the Tombs Angel Killed in the Fire.

Sixteen persons lost their lives and about fifty others were injured in a fire in the Park Avenue Hotel, at Park avenue, between Thirty-second and Thirty-third streets, Manhattan, early this morning.

All of the dead and injured were guests of the hotel, many of them from out of town. Most of them had rooms in the upper stories of the hotel, and when the fire, which is of mysterious origin, reached their rooms they were hemmed in by smoke and flame and cut off from escape. One of the dead is MRS. FOSTER, well known as the Tombs' Angel.

The Dead.

PIPER, ALEXANDER A., colonel, U.S.A. Retired.
HORN, THOMAS P., of Denver, Col.
IVISON, WILLIAM, of Denver, Col.
ROBBINS, GASTON A., of Alabama.
WALKER, WILLIAM, of Tennessee.
FOSTER, MRS., known as the “Tombs' Angelâ€
BURNHARDT, W. G., of Chicago.
BURDETT, Colonel CHARLES L., First Infantry, U.S. Vol., Conn.
BENNETT, MRS. CHARLOTTE, of Alabama.
HOVEY, FREDERICK, of Lyons, N. Y.
O'CONNELL, CHARLES UNDERWOOD.
SCHLESINGER, MISS ESTHER, of Chicago.
SPAHN, JACOB, of 34 Concord street, Rochester.
Unknown woman, supposed to be MRS. E. W. McGINNISS.

The Injured.

The following persons are known to have been injured:
BENNETT, HAROLD, face and hands burned; Bellevue Hospital.
BROOKMAN, WILLIAM S., the Rev., Norfolk Conn., burns.
BENNETT, MARAGARET E., 26 years old, Park Avenue Hotel, face and hands burned; Bellevue Hospital.
GOVE, WILLIAM A., 52 years old, Park Avenue Hotel, suffocation and burns, shock; New York Hospital.
GREGORY, CHARLES A., 67 years old, lawyer, Park Avenue Hotel, face and hands burned; Bellevue Hospital.
HALL, CAROLINE I. R., 79 years old, 29 Hill street, Newark, N. J., widow, body burned and shock; New York Hospital.
HALL, ANNA G., 56 years old, single, 29 Hill street, Newark, N. J., body burns and shock; New York Hospital.
HALE, WILLIAM B., Williamsville, Mass., suffocated; New York Hospital.
HEARNE, E. S., 40 years, Atlanta, Ga., burns of body; Bellevue Hospital.
LIVINGSTON, EMILY I., 49 years old, Park Avenue Hotel, guest on fourth floor, burns of face and body; Bellevue Hospital.
PEARSU, JOSEPH, 62 years old, feeble, Park Avenue Hotel, overcome, hysterical; to Bellevue Hospital from home of J. E. GARVIN, 516 Park Avenue, burned about face and hands, not serious.
STEBBINS, WILLIAM, 85 years old, of West Indies, Park Avenue Hotel for five months, hands and face burned.
WOODBURY, LEWIS G., 244 Stanton street, Portland, Oregon, Park Avenue Hotel, burns of hands and face; Bellevue Hospital.
REED. FRANK R., proprietor of the Park Avenue Hotel, burned about the face and hands in carrying his wife to safety from the fourth floor.
REED, MRS. FRANK R., wife of the proprietor, burned about face and hands.
BRIDGEMAN, MR., guest of Park Avenue Hotel, burns.
LYONS, ______, 24 years old, of 145 East Twenty-second street, cut by falling glass while in Thirty-third street.
BARRY, LOUIS, 50 years old, of Portland, Me., shock, was rescued by Policeman TYRALL.
VEACH, MRS. S., guest of the hotel on fourth floor, burned about the face, hands and body.

Seventy-first Regiment Armory, Opposite the Hotel, Destroyed by Flames.

Coincident with the fire that caused such loss of life in the Park Avenue Hotel, another fire razed to the ground the handsome armory of the Seventy-first Regiment on Park avenue, between Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth streets, diagonally across the street from the hotel. There was some talk this morning to the effect that the fire in the hotel was directly due to the fire in the armory and that the former originated in the flames and sparks that filled the air in the neighborhood while the armory was burning. There was a theory that some of these sparks or lighted pieces of wood from the burning armory had lighted on the hotel and started the blaze there.

Hotel Fire Probably Not Due to Armory, but Possibly Incendiary.

It is not likely that such was the case, however. All the indications are that the fire in the hotel was an independent one, and did not originate in the blaze that destroyed the Seventy-first Armory. In fact, Proprietor REID of the Park Avenue Hotel said after the fire was over that he believed it was of incendiary origin. He says the fire started in the cellar near the elevator shaft and shot up through the building, filling it with flames and smoke before the sleeping guests were aware of their danger. This is also the theory of Fire Chief CROKER, who was one of the early arrivals on the scene of the fire.

Lives Were Lost on the Upper Floors.


If is a peculiar fact that most of the people who lost their lives were living in the upper stories of the hotel, a great many of them on the fifth floor, where the greatest damage was done and where the greatest casualties took place.

There were many peculiar features connected with the fire. It is asserted by the people connected with the hotel, by guests who escaped with their lives and by the police and firemen that many of the windows of the hotel were thrown open soon after the fire in the armory across the street by persons anxious to get a view of the spectacle. This was particularly the case in the upper stories of the hotel, yet it was here that most of the people who suffered death in the flames were living. It is regarded as singular that people whose windows were opened evidently by themselves should be caught in the flames.

Flames Swept Through the Hotel at Lightning Speed.

It is explained that in five minutes after the fire started in the hotel the whole elevator shaft and the corridors opening on it were a mass of flames and that little or no opportunity was afforded to the imperiled guests to make their way out.

The first three stories of the hotel were untouched by the fire, but were considerably damaged by water. The upper stories of the hostelry are a wreck.

First Fire Started in the Armory.

The first fire was that in the armory of the Seventy-first Regiment -- started about 1:30 A. M. on the third floor of the building on the Thirty-third street side. This part of the building was occupied by the First Signal Corps. The building was also the headquarters of the Fifth Brigade, the Second Battery and the Seventy-first Regiment Veteran Association. The fire was discovered by a woman, who ran to the headquarters of Battalion Chief ROSS in Thirty-third street near Lexington avenue, and gave the alarm. ROSS hurriedly went to the scene and turned in two other alarms. By the time he got there the whole building was a mass of flames.

Rapid Transit Subway Hampered the Firemen.

To make matters worse the armory is situated right above the excavations for the rapid transit subway and trolley cars pass in front of the Park avenue side of the building. The firemen had the greatest difficulty in making their way through the obstructions in front of the building and meanwhile the armory was burning like a tinder box.

ANDREW PATTERSON, the armorer, lived in the armory with his family, and when the fact became known that there was a fire in the building an Italian engineer, employed on the rapid transit subway, named JOSEPH CACCAVAJO, got out of bed, and, running over to the armory, began to pound on the door with all his might. It was several minutes, however, before he could rouse the armorer and apprise him of his danger. PATTERSON was finally got out of the building with his wife and children safely.

By this time it became evident that with the high wind blowing, the armory was doomed. The entire structure was a mass of flames. Fire Chief CROKER came on the scene and ordered a fourth alarm rung.

Ammunition Stored in the Armory Explodes.

In the headquarters of the Fifth Brigade, on the Thirty-fourth street and Park avenue corner of the armory, there was stored a great quantity of ammunition. It consisted of blank and bullet cartridges. These cartridges began to explode as soon as the fire heated them. Bullets flew and the reports from the cartridges came thick and fast. For a time the firemen were afraid to go too near the building at the corner where the ammunition was stored. Gradually the explosions ceased and the firemen were able to get in to closer fighting range. At this time it was learned that about a thousand pounds of powder was stored, it is said, in the basement of the armory. It was in the sub-cellar, in the southeast corner of the building, near Thirty-third street. At 2:10 o'clock this exploded with a detonation that could be heard for blocks. It shook the entire structure, and then the Thirty-third street wall of the armory fell in.

At this time it was seen that the armory was entirely doomed, and the firemen were directed to turn their attention to the car barns of the Metropolitan Street Railway, directly across the street, south of the armory.

Hotel Did Not Seem to Be in Danger.

At that time it was not thought that the Park Avenue Hotel was seriously menaced, although Proprietor FREDERICK A. READ of the hotel had two score of men on the roof of the structure sweeping off the sparks and burning brands that fell there.

The armory is a complete wreck. Only the four walls of what was once of the finest structures of its kind in the country are left standing as a result of the fire. The interior of the building is a pile of hot, smoking ruins.

Hotel Fire Starts Before Armory Fire Is Over.

The firemen had scarcely got through fighting the fire in the armory when they were compelled to turn their attention to the Park Avenue Hotel, which was seen to be burning. From the windows of the upper floors of the hotel smoke and flames were pouring in dense quantities. Immediately Chief CROKER sent in a fifth alarm.

Many miraculous escapes characterized the fire in the hotel and there were several heroic rescues.


Chief CROKER called Captain KENLON of Engine 72, who was stationed on the Thirty-third street side of the armory, and sent him to the hotel. KENLON took a line of hose and with his men dashed through the main entrance of the hotel, in the center of the block on Park avenue. He found his hose was too short, as most of it was in use in other places. The men of the company dropped their line and were ordered to find a hose inside the hotel which they could couple onto their own and thus do effective work against the rapidly spreading flames.
Firemen Could Find No Hose in the Hotel.

Fire Chief CROKER later said KENLON'S men were unable to find a line of hose on the third, fourth or fifth floors of the house. The search was kept up on the sixth and seventh floors. No better success was had. All this time the fire spread rapidly and the hotel was fast filling with smoke.

The men reported to KENLON their inability to find a line of hose. They were ordered to drop the hose and go to work searching the house to find overcome or burned persons.

continued in part two (below)

New York, NY Park Avenue Hotel Fire, Feb 1902 - part 1 | GenDisasters ... Genealogy in Tragedy, Disasters, Fires, Floods


71ST REGIMENT ARMORY


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PARK AVENUE HOTEL

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New York, NY Park Avenue Hotel Fire, Feb 1902 - part 2

Submitted by Stu Beitler

Inmates of the Hotel Appear at the Window.

At this moment at the windows on the Park avenue side of the hotel appeared seven persons at different places. Of these four were women and three men. Some were fully clad, others only half so.

CLINTON FALLS, an adjutant of the Seventh Regiment, who has lived at the Park Avenue for some time, appeared at a window on the sixth floor. MR. And MRS. BRADLEY, who were to leave to-day on the transport McClellan for Manilla, appeared at a third floor window, at the Thirty-third street corner.

MRS. CHARLOTTE BENNETT and her husband, HAROLD, of Alabama, stood on a ledge on the fifth floor, just over the portico over the main entrance to the hotel. MRS. BENNETT was terror stricken and screamed again and again for some one to rescue her. Her husband grasped her, and from the crowd of thousands gathered in the streets there were shouted warnings not to jump.

Woman Jumps to Her Death From the Fifth Floor.

When it was seen that she was determined to jump, the firemen gathered in a circle and stretched out their arms. With a final desperate effort MRS. BENNETT wrenched herself free from her husband's grasp and with a piercing scream flung herself into the arms of the waiting firemen five stories below. When she jumped from the ledge on which she and her husband had stood the flames were licking out of the window behind her and around her form. The inside of the BENNETT'S rooms was all in flames.

MRS. BENNETT struck in the arms of the firemen. Her weight caused them to sag and the woman struck the pavement. She was terribly burned about the body. She was carried into the hotel by Fireman O'CONNOR and down into the cafe. There the hospital ambulance surgeons, who had been called, were at work. The woman was later taken to the Bellevue Hospital, where she died an hour afterward.

Her husband, when MRS. BENNETT jumped, disappeared back into his room. He was not seen afterward.

Thrilling Escape of MR. And MRS. BRADLEY.

MR. and MRS. BRADLEY appeared at a window on the fifth floor on the Park avenue side of the building, near Thirty-third street. MRS. BRADLEY appeared to be cool; her husband hysterical. MRS. BRADLEY stepped out of her window on an eighteen inch ledge. This ledge was covered with ice and snow.

On this narrow coping, with their bodies pressed close up against the hot walls of the building, MR. And MRS. BRADLEY crept hand in hand for over sixty feet to a point directly above the portico in the midle [sic] of the hotel, upon which a dozen firemen stood and from which they had raised ladders to the fifth floor. Then the two climbed down on the ladders, were helped down on to the portico, and from there down to the street by the aid of two score firemen.

When the couple had ended their dangerous walk along the hotel, and placed their feet upon the ladder, a cheer that was mighty went up from the crowd in the street. It was only equaled when the two were landed safely in the street, without scratch or burn.

Seventh Regiment Officer Calmly Awaits Rescue.

During all this time, twenty minutes having elapsed, Adjutant FALLS, tall and white-haired, stood on the ledge of the window of his room on the sixth floor. He was clad in white pajamas. Although the smoke was pouring out of the window all about him, he never once flinched and waited stoically until it was his turn to be aided down by the firemen. The crowd shouted words of encouragement to him.

Finally his turn came. Fireman O'BRIEN was ordered up from the top of the portico to FALLS' window, directly above, on a scalding ladder. O'BRIEN went to the top of the ladder, reaching to the fifth floor ledge only. From this he threw up the scaling ladder to the ledge on which FALLS stood. Five minutes it took to fasten the ladder. The ledge was icy and the ladder would not stick.

FALLS helped all this time. Finally he jammed the ladder down and it caught on the ledge. FALLS then descended the ladder to the portico, aided by Fireman O'BRIEN. When he was finally taken to the street he was almost overcome from exposure. As he went down the ladder it swayed and FALLS nearly fell. O'BRIEN then carried him down the rest of the way. He was taken into the hotel cafe, where he was treated by the Bellevue ambulance surgeons and later left. He secured some clothing and where he went was not learned.

Eleven Persons Rescued From the Sixth Floor.


Meanwhile Captain DONOHUE of truck No. 7 and a number of firemen had raised an eighty-five foot extension ladder up to the sixth floor on the Thirty-second street end of the hotel. From this ladder they carried down eleven persons, men and women, whose names they did not take, nor did the police secure them.

Three persons whose names are unknown, were rescued from the Thirty-third street end of the building.


Captain DELANEY of the East Thirty-fifth street station, went into the building, where, on the second floor he found an old woman, whose name is said to have been DYEA, almost unconscious from smoke. He picked her up in his arms and carried her to the stret [sic] by way of the main entrance of the hotel.

Gallant Work of the Fire Chaplains.

Chaplain SMITH of the Fire Department found BISHOP LUDDEN of Syracuse in his room on the seventh floor. He helped him to the street. BISHOP LUDDEN told the firemen then that there were, on the fourth floor, a number of other priests, including MONSIGNOR KENNEY, also of Syracuse. The fire chaplain returned into the building. He found his way through the smoke and up the stairs to the fourth floor.
He gathered the priests all together from two adjoining rooms and had them wrap wet towels about their heads. He then guided them down the stairs and through the rotunda into the office.

Chaplain WALKLEY of the Fire Department, at the head of the fifth stairway, stumbled over the body of Colonel ALEXANDER M. PIPER, U. S. A. retired, lying insensible on the carpet.

He found that Colonel PIPER had been overcome by smoke. He picked up the inert body and as best he could staggered down the stairway to the rotunda.

A Policeman Rescues Several Persons.

Policeman HODGINS of the East Twenty-second street station, found a MRS. BAUSCH sitting on the ledge of a window on the sixth floor on the Thirty-third street side. The woman is aged and partially paralyzed. She was clad only in her night clothing. With her was her nurse, AGNES SCHANZ.
HODGINS went through their rooms, pulled the two in from their perilous positions, and carried MRS. BAUSCH down the stairway, showing the nurse the way. He returned to the fourth floor and there found MR. And MS. WELD. Both were partially overcome by the smoke, and he carried them down the stairs. Half way down he met Father CONNOLLY, from Binghamton, who had lost his way, and did not know how to get out. He talked to the priest, telling him how to get out. In the meantime MISS SCHANZ had fainted. Father CONNOLLY turned about, picked up the unconscious form of the nurse and he and the policeman found their way downstairs through the blinding, choking smoke into the rotunda and thence into the street.

DR. ALBERT LEE SELLENINGS of 102 East Thirty-first street, Manhattan, a spectator to the fire, made his way into the hotel and on the third floor, in the hallway, found the form of an unconscious woman. She was carried out by him. The police did not obtain her name.

When MR. READ, the proprietor of the hotel, realized the magnitude of the fire he rushed upstairs to rescue his wife, who was asleep in her apartments on the fourth floor on the Thirty-third street end of the hotel. He made his way through the flames and smoke to get to her room, and when he got there he found the room vacant. He was badly burned about the hands and face. He ran downstairs again. There he made frantic endeavors to find his wife. At last he heard from the housekeeper of the hotel that his wife had been safely taken from her room downstairs.

Colonel BURDETT Killed While Dropping From a Window.

Colonel CHARLES L. BURDETT of the First Connecticut infantry, United States Volunteers, met his death in a terrible manner after making a heroic effort to save his life. His body, with the skull split open, was found shortly after 6 o'clock this morning by Detective Sergeants O'DONOHUE, CAPPER and KEANY. It was lying in the courtyard within the hotel.. BURDETT had fallen at least six stories.

COLONEL BURDETT was a guest on the eighth floor of the hotel. When the alarm of fire reached him escape was cut off. His room faced the court. Apparently he had dragged the mattress from his bed and dropped it to the roof of an extension over the hotel dining room several stories below. Then, by knotting the sheets together, he made a rope and secured it to the window. When his preparations were complete – they must have been finished in a few moments – he lowered himself on the improvised rope and then dropped. His design was to land on the mattress and thus have the frightful fall broken. He miscalculated the distance, went beyond the extension and was instantly killed, his head being crushed against the paved surface of the courtyard.

Brooklyn Eagle New York 1902-02-22

New York, NY Park Avenue Hotel Fire, Feb 1902 - part 2 | GenDisasters ... Genealogy in Tragedy, Disasters, Fires, Floods
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 FIRE - 1902


71ST REGIMENT ARMORY FIRE/PARK AVENUE HOTEL FIRE - FEBRUARY 22,1902

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mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 9/11 MEMORIAL SERVICE 2017


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Engine 72 firehouse holds 9/11 memorial service

News 12 Staff

Sep 11, 2017, 8:51pm EDT

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The Throgs Neck community came together Monday night at a Throgs Neck firehouse to remember those who lost and sacrificed their lives on 9/11.

The annual memorial service at Engine 72’s firehouse hosts a service in front of a 9/11 memorial stone that lists the names of the first responders and civilians from Throgs Neck who lost their lives that day.

A dinner table is set with one empty chair in front of the memorial to symbolize the many lives that have been taken but never forgotten. On the dinner plate is a sprinkle of salt to symbolize the countless tears that have been cried and a slice of lemon to represent the bitter fate that came to fruition in 2001.

“This is a close community,” says organizer Jim McQuade. “If we didn't know the people, we knew the families. We stick together and we protect each other.”

Organizers tell News 12 The Bronx the memorial was installed in 2004, the same year the annual memorial began.

https://westchester.news12.com/engine-72-firehouse-holds-911-memorial-service-36341098
 

mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 FIRE - 2018


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Arrest Made After Firefighter Injured At Alleged Marijuana Grow House

October 15, 2018 at 11:45 pm Filed Under: Daniel Nigro, FDNY, Jenna DeAngelis, Local TV, New York, The Bronx

NEW YORK (CBS New York) — Luis Roman gave a one word apology as he was led out of the 45th precinct Monday. Police say a marijuana grow operation was discovered on the third floor where Roman allegedly lives. CBS2 was there as he was handcuffed in front of the Pelham Bay apartment building where firefighters battled a fire on the third floor Sunday night. Roman is charged with criminal possession of marijuana and assault.

The assault charge is related to the injuries firefighter Thomas Corcoran of Engine 72 sustained after he lost his footing and fell 30 feet from a ladder while fighting the blaze. He suffered fractures to his neck and back around 9 p.m. Sunday while trying to get to the roof of the home on Mayflower Avenue in the Pelham Bay section of the Bronx.

#FDNY Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro gives update on Firefighter injured in the Bronx. Read more:


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FDNY October 15, 2018

“He has back injuries and possible leg injuries. He’s a very lucky individual,” Fire Commission Daniel Nigro said late Sunday night. “This is a 38-year-old firefighter, married, father of three, with 12 years experience in the fire department.”

Corcoran was rushed to Jacobi Hospital with multiple fractures. He was scheduled to have surgery on Monday. Another firefighter suffered a minor leg injury.

“It’s a very dangerous job. I’ve said that over and over at these operations, and sometimes these things happen,” Nigro said.

“It’s so sad. He came to do his job and he fell,” one neighbor added.



FDNY Commissioner: Injured Firefighter ‘A Very Lucky Individual’ After Surviving 30-Foot Fall Off Ladder

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Firefighter Thomas J. Corcoran (Photo: FDNY)

Police were putting up more yellow tape on Monday morning around the three-story home.

“Tons of police vehicles, EMTs, FDNY trucks, like just a lot of people. There was even a Con Ed truck here so I thought it was a gas leak or something that happened. I didn’t know what it was at first,” neighbor Daniel Agosto said.

It’s unclear if anyone was home when the fire broke out. The third floor of the building was apparently being used as a marijuana grow house, much to the surprise of neighbors.

“The only thing I noticed is every so often I’d see people around the building and I just initially thought it was a doctor’s office,” one person told CBS2’s Jenna DeAngelis.

One woman, who asked that CBS2 not show her face, said the idea of the building said lately there has been peculiar activity around the building.

“Here is really quiet,” she said. “That doesn’t really happen. I’ve been here for nine years and lately I’ve seen young people coming and they gather and I smell … you know what the smell is … marijuana.”

“It’s a little surprising, but especially this area is pretty nice. But like I said, it’s the Bronx,” neighbor Ketan Bedmutha added.

Firefighters managed to get the flames under control within an hour. The cause is under investigation.

The fire was similar to the deadly blast that killed a fire chief in the Bronx two years ago. Michael Fahy was responding to a gas leak at a house in Kingsbridge when it suddenly exploded, hitting him with flying debris.

Investigators later found marijuana plants, heaters and fertilizer at the site.


https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2018/10/15/firefighter-survives-fall/
 
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mack

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ENGINE 72/SATELLITE 2 3929 TREMONT AVENUE THROGGS NECK, BRONX DIVISION 7, BATTALION 20 “NEVER A DULL MOMENT”


ENGINE 72 FIRE - 2019


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NYC Fire Wire

March 19, 2019 ·

Bronx *10-75* Box 4049. 2861 Lawton Ave, . Engine Company 72 transmitting the 10-75 for fire on the 2nd floor
Fire Location: 2861 Lawton Ave


Signal73 Rundown

E-72 Gave the 10-75

Fire on the 2nd floor of a PD

E-72,89,64,96
L-50,47,54(Fast)
B-20,18
R-3
Sq-61
Rac-3

B-20 All Hands


Relocations:
Engine 295 Act. Engine 72


Eugene Daly

1304
Disp 150 - Phone Alarm - respond E89, TL50, L47
E64 becomes available replacing E96

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E72 - 10-75 fire second floor of a PD

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BC20 - Primaries negative on the second floor

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BC20 - MBFKD -searches underway
Medical Branch Resources responding

1320
BC20 - PWH

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BC20 - Secondaries negative throughout - Under Control
DC6 is 10-8 on the Under Control
Duration 22 minutes

Additional Relocation
E79/E64
 
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