FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1945 - FDNY UNIT LOCATION CHART

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1948 - OLT FIRE - COLUMBIA STREET

1948 - 2ND ALARM - OLT.jpg


FIRE BUILDING - 100 COLUMBIA STREET

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mack

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I've always heard so much that back in the old days the members assigned to a company were "neighborhood guys".
From the rosters of Engines 15, 17, and Ladder 18, I could only see at most seven "neighborhood guys". I would have thought there'd be more.

I thought so too. Commutes had to be made by subway or trolley - no cars or busses. Long hours working in the firehouse with limited time off. FFs were even disciplined for regulation infractions with transfers to make their commutes longer. Living the dream was a challenge.
 

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1954 - RUNS & WORKERS - ENGINE 17, ENGINE 15, LADDER 18

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RUNS & WORKERS - ENGINE 17, ENGINE 15, LADDER 18

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1958 - BOX 22-210 - SCALING LADDER USED TO REACH TRAPPED BATTALION 4 AIDE

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1958 - 4TH ALARM - ALPHABET CITY - HEAVY SNOWSTORM


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4th alarm occurred during the Wooster Street Fire with collapse and 2 FDNY/4NYFP LODDs.


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WOOSTER STREET FIRE FEBRUARY 14, 1958


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REMEMBERING THE FDNY AND FIRE PATROL OF NEW YORK LODD’S-FEB 14, 1958

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FDNY Firefighters venting the roof, and 4 member of NY Fire Patrol # 1 placing salvage covers were buried alive when all floors and the roof suddenly collapsed in a Manhattan fire. It was on Wooster Street in a burning 6 story, 80 x 100 foot, heavy timber construction, loft building in “Hells’ hundred acres” lower Manhattan. The fire occurred at 2215 hours in the baled paper storage building.

KILLED IN THE LINE OF DUTY WERE:
Fire Patrol # 1, Sergeant Michael McGee-FPNY
Fire Patrol # 1, Patrolman Louis Brusati-FPNY
Fire Patrol # 1, Patrolman James Devine-FPNY
Fire Patrol # 1, Patrolman Michael Tracy-FPNY
Ladder Co. # 10, FF Bernard Blumenthal-FDNY
Ladder Co. # 1, William Schimd-FDNY

A Fifth Alarm as well as special calls for additional manpower were utilized in the search and rescue operations to recover the 6 members, At the time, there was 9 inches of snow as well as temperatures in the single digits. RIP.

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Main-admin – Page 2 – Fire Chiefs Association (nyshfca.org)



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RIP. NEVER FORGET.
 
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memorymaster

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I thought so too. Commutes had to be made by subway or trolley - no cars or busses. Long hours working in the firehouse with limited time off. FFs were even disciplined for regulation infractions with transfers to make their commutes longer. Living the dream was a challenge.
Many years ago I was told this story by my dad. There was a Firefighter who lived and worked in the North Bronx. I don't know what company. Anyway, he supposedly got on the wrong side of a Deputy Chief, or higher, and lo and behold he was involuntarily transferred to Staten Island. This man did not have a car, which would have been a trip and a half anyway, so he had to take bus, subway, ferry and second bus to get to work and vice versa on the trip home. (No 24's back then or Verrazano Bridge.) Now, he's getting things together in his new assignment and buys a home in Staten Island and all is well until somehow his nemesis gets wind of it and voila he's transferred back to da Bronx. Can't say if it's a fable or not, but somehow I believe it.
 

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FF Albert Guinness, founder and 1st president of the UFA, was transferred twice for apparent retaliation to successful labor actions for pay increases and war veterans' back pay.

1918 - transferred from H&L 40, LIC Queens, near his home, to H&L 24, Manhattan.
1922 - transferred to City Island


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scoobyd

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Especially bad considering the North Bronx was a huge two-fare zone for those who remember.

I've heard stories that back in the 20's and 30's the UFA/City relationship was highly contentious and the UFA was much more activist compared to today. Being transferred a boro or two away as punishment was not usual from what I remember hearing. Transfers to Harlem were also a "punishment" then.
 

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1972 - SERVICE RATINGS


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1974 - TENEMENT FIRE - ALPHBET CITY - 4 FATALITIES

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FIRE BUILDING - 545 E 5TH STREET

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1983 – 3RD ALARM - CHINATOWN

38 East Broadway
33-302
May 6, 1983

Verbal Alarm

1st Alarm Assignment - Engine 55, Engine 6, Engine 15, Engine 10, Ladder 6, Ladder 1, Rescue 1, Battalion 1 (1st due Engine 9 - at rubbish fire)

There were 19 people removed from 38 and 40 East Broadway. Nine people received CPR on the sidewalk. Eventually, six people succumbed to their
injuries. All the deceased died from smoke inhalation.

Engine 15 stretched a 2 ½ inch hand line to the 2nd floor of exposure 4. In addition to the extending fire, they had to overcome the exploding fireworks that were stored there.

Engine 17 - 2nd alarm company.

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http://fdnysbravest.com/Div7NewsletterDecember2018.pdf
 

mack

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Especially bad considering the North Bronx was a huge two-fare zone for those who remember.

I've heard stories that back in the 20's and 30's the UFA/City relationship was highly contentious and the UFA was much more activist compared to today. Being transferred a boro or two away as punishment was not usual from what I remember hearing. Transfers to Harlem were also a "punishment" then.

A transfer to SI, or officially the Borough of Richmond, in the days before members owned cars, was also a difficult burden, especially if you lived in the Bronx. 5 lieutenants were fortunate to meet with the commissioner, retract statements made as union representatives, and have their transfers rescinded.

But not as fortunate was a UFA VP, FF John Crane. He was transferred to SI - and he lived in the Bronx. I hope he liked riding the SI Ferry and NYC subways.

TRANSFERS 1944.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


1989 – 4TH ALARM EAST VILLAGE

4 ALARM FIRE
13TH STREET & 1ST AVE, MANHATTAN, EAST VILLAGE




1992 - RETIRED 4TH BATTALION BC ARTWORK
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Death WHITNEY, JAMES J.
Sept. 19, 2004

WHITNEY--James J., age 88, passed away September 9, 2004, at home in Peoria, Arizona. Born and raised in New York City, Jim was a US Army Lieutenant during WWII. He built a home in Dobbs Ferry, NY, and worked for 30 years in the NYC Fire Department. He was assigned to Ladder 42, Ladder 19, Rescue 3 where he served as Captain, and retired in 1978 as Chief of Battalion 4 in lower Manhattan. Jim garnered numerous citations throughout his career for bravery in the line of duty. He was a generous and loving person, a true believer in adventure, compassion and the goodness of human spirit. He is survived by his son James Scott Whitney, his daughter Ada Whitney, his companion Marion Cano, Jon Vesey and his grandchildren, Henry, Jordan and Kristen. His spirit, humor and guidance will be greatly missed by us all.




2006 – USAF VISITS FORT PITT

September 11, 2006 - With the Heroes

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2006 – FORMER ENGINE 17 CAPTAIN'S BOOK – THE BRAVE

George Pickett served for more than four years in the United States Marine Corps prior to joining New York City's Fire Department in 1969. He served in some of the busiest units in FDNY's history, and worked extensively in Manhattan's lower east side. Assignments included working in the ranks of firefighter, engineer, lieutenant, captain, and acting battalion chief. George worked in Engine 17 for a short period when they responded to almost 10,000 calls in one year. He became the captain of Engine 17, located in the "Fort Pitt" fire station, an area that saw tremendous structural fire duty. He was decorated five times for life-saving acts, and was injured over a dozen times during performance of his duties.

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PICS
 
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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


2006-2018 – BC SAVASTANO 4TH BATTALION


ORK FIRE NEWS
By JASON THOMAS
OCTOBER 22, 20073:14 PM

FDNY – 4TH BATTALION CHIEF DIES SUDDENLY OF HEART ATTACK

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James J. Savastano died suddenly of a heart attack on October 9, 2007. I remember him, on a day I covered a small fire on Grand Street a few months ago. On the way home I thought, what a real gentleman that chief was… Having a press photographer hovering about, gathering the images which tell the story is not a big priority for those who must protect the community by stopping fire from growing from a small incident into a major disaster. He tolerated my being where I had to be — albeit I am always careful to stay out of the way of the work … he answered those questions he could and in short, was a gentleman.

His distinguished career with the Fire Department of the City of New York spanned 29 years. At the time of his death, he was a Battalion Chief / 4th Battalion Commander. He leaves behind a wife Lorraine and children Janine, Karen, James & Laura, and sisters Regina Keenan, Patricia Tschacher, Kathleen Woodworth, and brothers Edward, Roy and Richard. He will be missed by many colleagues, friends and the people of Downtown New York, who he protected until his unexpected loss.

Most of all, we will all be thankful that this gentleman risked everything for us, every day of his working life.

FDNY – 4th Battalion Chief Dies Suddenly of Heart Attack – Firefighter Spot


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The Villager

James Savastano, Fire Department battalion chief

Posted on November 6, 2007

Battalion Chief James J. Savastano, commander of the Fourth Battalion, died suddenly of a heart attack on Oct. 9. He was 54. He was off duty and was running when he was stricken, according to a Fire Department spokesperson.

A Brooklyn resident, Savastano was based at the Pitt St. firehouse a.k.a. “Fort Pitt,” home of Engine 5 and Ladder 18, on the Lower East Side by the Williamsburg Bridge.

His career with the New York City Fire Department spanned 29 years. He was assigned to Battalion 4 in November 2001.

On 9/11, he was one of the chiefs directing efforts to battle the raging fire that eventually brought down 7 World Trade Center.

President Bush and Laura Bush visited the Pitt St. firehouse on Sept. 11, 2006, for a memorial service marking the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 attack. After the ceremony Savastano told The Villager how he had discussed jogging with the president, since Savastano was a jogger and he knew the president was, too.

He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; children, Janine, Karen, James and Laura; sisters, Regina Keenan, Patricia Tschacher, Kathleen Woodworth; and brothers, Edward, Roy and Richard.

Savastano’s funeral mass was in Marine Park, Brooklyn, at Good Shepherd Church.

James Savastano, Fire Department battalion chief | amNewYork (amny.com)


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The Villager

Battalion Chief Savastano remembered at ‘Fort Pitt’


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Posted on October 21, 2008

By Lorcan Otway

Fire Department officials and hundreds of firefighters gathered at the Pitt St. firehouse earlier this month to unveil a plaque for Battalion Chief James J. Savastano.

Savastano suffered a heart attack on Oct. 9, 2007, while jogging in Marine Park, Brooklyn, with friends. He was 54. Four other plaques were dedicated to a number of firefighters from the past who had served and died attached to the Pitt St. firehouse in the 19th and early 20th century.

The Pitt St. firehouse a.k.a. “Fort Pitt,” home of Engine 5 and Ladder 18, is located just south of the approach to the Williamsburg Bridge.

Savastano’s 29-year Fire Department career was remembered in eulogies by his fellow Bravest. They described him as bravely leading his men amid danger, for example directing efforts against an out-of-control apartment fire from the roof, as the flames began to spread to that roof. His knowledge and courage saved the building.

When Chief James Gansi died during the World Trade Center collapse, Savastano replaced him as the chief of the Fourth Battalion, directing numerous units and saving one of the complex’s buildings that burned for more than a day. Chief John Rail, who now serves in the late Chief Savastano’s role, remembered him with jokes and stories of bravery. He described him as being first into danger, and with his wife, Lorraine, involved in the rich social life of the F.D.N.Y.

Savastano was very athletic, riding his bike to work over the Brooklyn Bridge year-round, skiing and playing hockey.

He loved to cook, both at home and the firehouse. He was an avid gardener and loved to sit in his garden reading novels and cookbooks, listening to classic rock.

https://www.amny.com/news/battalion-chief-savastano-remembered-at-fort-pitt/



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New York City Fire Department (FDNY)

October 19, 2018

“My father was a Battalion Chief, he worked in this Department for 30 years. He was a great man and he unfortunately passed away when I was 16. I know this is the best job in the world for me. I hope I am making him proud and making him happy. I’m looking forward to getting out there and helping people. There are so many opportunities in this Department and I want to take advantage of any that come my way. I would tell young girls who dream about being a Firefighter to go for it. I’ve been told by guys in the Academy that they want me as their back up, it’s a pretty cool feeling,” says FDNY Probationary Firefighter Laura Savastano, who graduates today from the FDNY Fire Academy following in the footsteps of her father, Battalion Chief James Savastano.

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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


2006 – POTUS VISITS FT PITT

NY: President Bush Commemorates 9/11 Attacks On World Trade Center

New York, UNITED STATES: US President George W. Bush shakes hands 11 September 2006, during a breakfast stop with First Responders commemorating the fifth anniversary of the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks at the Fort Pitt Firehouse in New York. The United States Monday mourned nearly 3,000 people killed in the September 11 attacks five years ago, as fresh warnings from Al-Qaeda bolstered global fears that the US "war on terror" has left the world a more dangerous place. AFP PHOTO/Tim SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP via Getty Images)

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2007 - FT PITT FIREHOUSE WALLS PAINTING

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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


2008 – FT PITT VS 7TH PCT FOOTBALL


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2008 – FF DAN DEFRANCO UFA BUILDING DEDICATED


FF Dan DeFranco served in Engine 17/Ladder 18 and was UFA Sergeant at Arms.


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The Firefighter Dan DeFranco Building
(1934-1996)


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The Firefighter Dan DeFranco Building plaque image. Click for full size.

By Larry Gertner, March 30, 2015

1. The Firefighter Dan DeFranco Building plaque Inscription.

It is with distinct honor the Uniformed Firefighters Association, Local 94, bestow the name “Dan DeFranco” on this building.

During his 35 year career with the New York City Fire Department, he played an active roll in the U.F.A.

Due to his tireless efforts as a union delegate and Sergeant-at-arms on the executive board countless safety and health initiatives resulted.

They will benefit firefighters for many years to come.

Uniformed Firefighters Association, F.D.N.Y.C.

DAN DEFRANCO UFO


https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=153971



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By Kelly Amberger

Italian Americans and the Fire Department of New York
ItalianAmerican2020
A Family within the FDNY


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The Firefighter Dan DeFranco Building is home to the Uniformed Firefighters Association and was named after my Grandfather, Dan DeFranco.

Dan DeFranco was a second generation Italian American who advocated for the health and safety of New York City Firemen. In an effort to protect his FDNY family, he took on the role of the UFA Sergeant at Arms, conducted research on exhaust and asbestos removal, and organized protests. “He stepped up for all things concerning the firehouse and made the members - both those in his firehouse, Engine 17, and throughout the job - an extension of his own family.” (Captain Liam Guilfoyle, Reduce Your Risk) His efforts helped to get new protective gear for firemen , and he was able to convince the Fire Department to implement diesel fume removal systems in every NYC firehouse. A plaque in his honor hangs on the wall of every New York City firehouse.

The Fire Department of New York has been home to many Italian Americans since it became a paid Department in 1865.

“For centuries, the members of the FDNY have been a mirror image of the communities they served; in ways of national origin, race, religion, etc. This has changed over time as the result of the growing population, often arriving in immigration waves due to worldwide conditions, like wars and famine.” (NYC Fire Museum)

The fire department was a great opportunity for new immigrants as it provided economic support . As new waves of immigrants entered the city, the population of the city increased dramatically, causing living conditions to become hazardous. This caused a new demand for firefighters throughout New York City. With this, firehouses became full of people with similar backgrounds and struggles, leading to a special bond among firemen, many of whom were Italian Americans. The structure of the firehouse had these men living together while they worked, working together to help save people, and ultimately fostered new communities throughout the city. For many people, the FDNY served as both an economic and social support system during times of hardship. For many new immigrants, the Fire Department became their new family, as they left their actual families behind in their native countries. However, this bond among firemen and idea of family is something that has been passed down through the department for many generations.

Even for me, the fire department holds a special place in my life. About 50 years ago, the members of my grandfather’s firehouse, Ladder 17 and Engine 18, purchased an old summer camp in Ellenville, New York. At this point in time, none of these men were exactly rich and many even struggled to support their growing families on a fireman’s salary. However, they all saw a great opportunity to create a very special place for each of their families, and made it work with the money they had while making some sacrifices. Since then, my family has spent every summer in this private community, of mainly Irish and Italian firemen families. I grew up spending every summer living in a crowded house filled with my parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents. The 30 other crowded houses in the community were filled with people that have become my best friends and my second family. These people have been there for my family in times of great hardship, and have supported me throughout my life as well.

When my Uncle David passed away, my grandparents received the tragic news at my summer house. David was a firefighter in Rescue 2, a specialized unit within the FDNY. He passed away at the young age of 26 due to a scuba diving accident while training on the job. From Ellenville, New York, firemen friends escorted my grandparents to their home in Staten Island where they were greeted and comforted by firemen from my grandfather’s and my uncle’s firehouse. This kind of support was extended to my family when my grandfather passed away due to lung cancer, likely caused by exposure to the hazardous materials he fought to protect firemen from. The fire department has made continuous efforts to support my family and have made sure that my uncle and grandfather are remembered within the FDNY.

A Family Tradition

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Future Firefighter Daniel Amberger, Age 3 (present)

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Firefighter James Amberger, Age 5

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Firemen David and Michael DeFranco, Age 1

In addition to the support system and feeling of family that the FDNY provided, overtime the department became familial in a literal sense, as the children of many NYC firemen chose to follow in their parent’s footsteps. This has contributed to the continuously large number of Italian American descendants within the FDNY. My Grandfather, Dan DeFranco, was followed by 2 of his sons, and 3 of his grandsons, with more of my cousins hoping to join the department soon. The hopes of becoming a fireman start at a very young age in my family, with my brothers and cousins dressing up to look just like their grandpa, dads, and uncles. This tradition continues with my 3 year old nephew following in their footsteps.

This has been a trend throughout many families in the FDNY leading to new traditions within the department. For example, many firemen try to get placed within companies that their relatives have worked in. My brother James Amberger works in Engine Company 28 and Ladder Company 11, the same firehouse that our Uncle David started out in.

“ Much has changed in this neighborhood since my uncle worked here, but the work we do continues the legacy of the men who worked here before us. It is nice knowing that someone in my family worked in this very building. Everyday while I’m at work, I can see the plaque of my grandfather on the wall of my firehouse, a house where both his son and grandson served as firemen, and remember that my family is always with me.” - Firefighter James Amberger

It is also common for younger generations to take on the badge numbers of their elders. In my family, my uncle Kenny wears the badge of his older brother David. My Uncle Kenny now works in Rescue 5, another specialized unit within the FDNY. My cousin Michael, is currently in the process of getting our grandfather’s badge number to add to the tradition.

Food in the Firehouse

For many Italian American families, food is a major part of their culture and tradition. Families pass down their recipes from generation to generation. Sundays are spent together in the kitchen working together to make a huge dinner. Mostly, it becomes a bonding experience and is one way to pass stories, knowledge, and traditions from generation to generation. Food is also a major part of life in the firehouse. So much so, that there is even a television series called Firehouse Kitchen.

“Each week Retired FDNY FireFighter Ray Cooney, Host of Firehouse Kitchen visits firehouses across the country, sharing recipes and stories of heroism with local Firefighters. Ray has combined his love and passion for food and his fellow firefighters together in this series taking you into the lives of firefighters, their mastery of culinary arts and heroic lifestyle.” (FoodyTV)

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“In a good portion of the northeastern United States, and in the FDNY specifically, many firefighters (including volunteers) call their place of work a firehouse for a reason: They’re a family. The firefighters of the FDNY have a long-standing reputation for treating each other like family; together, they have their good times, along with the occasional pains, squabbles and dysfunctions.” (Fire Rescue Magazine)

With firemen living together while they work, they must be able to eat regularly in the firehouse. They also must be ready to go on a call at any point in time. So, often they all pile into the firetruck and make their way to the grocery store to pick up ingredients to cook a big family style dinner. Everyone works together to cook a big dinner, as firemen can tend to eat a lot. There are often prank wars, like those among siblings, and elders may have their lessons to teach the “probies”. Stories are shared about past and present firemen. Ultimately, these dinners add to the identity of firemen, and aid in their bonding. This bonding, story telling, joking, and learning environment is what makes the firehouse, and being a fireman, so enjoyable. These men grow to see each other as family and gain trust in each other. This trust is often what allows them to put themselves in risky situations in order to help others. Like the big, loud, families of Italian Americans, the Fire Department of New York provides endless connections and support to its members and their families.

Kelly Amberger (atavist.com)
 

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


2015 – 150 YEAR ANNIVERSARY - ENGINE 15

May 1, 2015 Members of the #7pct with Ft Pitt Engine 15/Ladder 18/Battalion 4 celebrating 150 years of service.

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2015 - MANHATTAN BORO PRESIDENT VISITS FORT PITT

The Manhattan Borough President honored the firefighters of The Pitt in May 2015.


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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


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2017 - ASHLEY - FORT PITT MASCOT


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When animal rescuers Erica Mahnken and her fiancé, Michael Favor, found Ashley the pit bull inside an abandoned “crack house” in Staten Island, New York, last month, the dog was malnourished and covered in cigarette burns.

For at least two days in the middle of January, the dog was left without water, food or electricity.

“We didn’t ask any questions when the person called us and told us the dog was alone,” Mahnken told CBS News. “It was freezing out. There was nothing in the house. No, we didn’t think about it -- we just ran and got her and said we’ll figure out what we were going to do after we got her out of there.”

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FDNY firefighters say Ashley the pit bull loves to watch them cook in the firehouse kitchen.

Mahnken, Favor and their friend Lara Ribeiro started foster-based rescue No More Pain Rescue nearly a year ago. At the time, the pair didn’t have anywhere to house the shivering dog. So, they called up some firefighter friends from a Lower East Side FDNY station called “Fort Pitt.”

The firefighters, who used to house a rottweiler, agreed to temporarily welcome the dog on Jan. 9.

Three days later, they called up Mahnken and asked if they could adopt the nearly year-old pit bull. Of course, Mahnken said, “Yes!”

“My heart wants to explode,” Mahnken said. “Everyone’s so quick to judge a dog, especially a dog you don’t know where it came from or what kind of person they are and what kind... It is very satisfying.”

The “Fort Pitt” firefighters also seem to be enjoying their new official firehouse dog named Ashley, “Ash” for short.

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Ashley the pit bull rides in a fire truck in New York, New York.

The dog loves to hang out with the crew in the kitchen and goes on ride-alongs with the firefighters when they respond to a fire. She even has her own little spot on the fire truck, Mahnken added.

Ashley even has her own official Instagram account, which has already garnered more than 2,800 followers. Firefighters give almost updates -- almost daily -- on the dog’s adventures and whereabouts.

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“Hey cap! the rig is checked ready to go,” firefighters captioned an Instagram post.

“I love my new job!” they wrote in one post.

“Reporting for doodie... ready to ride...I got the woof! (Roof),” they joked in another.

Mahnken is happy to see Ashley doing so well, and says she tries to make frequent trips to the firehouse to visit.

“Whenever she’s there her tail is wagging, she’s super friendly and jumping on everybody,” Mahnken said. “She’s really loveable.”

When Mahnken found the dog in early January, veterinarians said she was about 25 pounds underweight. FDNY firefighters say the dog now weighs about 50 pounds and is on her way to becoming perfectly healthy.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/pit-bull-rescued-from-crack-house-gets-adopted-by-fdny-firefighters/



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Rescued pit bull finds new home at FDNY firehouse

By Natalie Musumeci
February 20, 2017 | 3:29pm

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This lucky rescue pooch has gone from a crackhouse to a firehouse.

A Lower East Side FDNY station nicknamed “Fort Pitt” has adopted an adorable pit bull named Ashley — “Ash” for short — who was saved from a Staten Island crack den by a nonprofit animal group.

The Bravest of Engine 15/Ladder 18 on Pitt Street brought home their new four-legged probie last month, and according to photos from the dog’s Instagram account, she is adjusting to her new life just swell.

The 1-year-old pup’s Instagram account, @probyash, which is maintained by the firehouse, shows the pooch hanging out in the Lower East Side firehouse’s kitchen, riding in the fire truck and hanging out with her new family.

From the crackhouse to the firehouse. Life is good,” her bio on the social media site reads.

The pooch can be seen posing in front of a fire truck in one photo along with the humorous caption: “Reporting for doodie… ready to ride…I got the woof! (Roof).”

Ash was the group No More Pain Rescue’s first saved dog of the year, according to its Instagram page.

When the group picked up the dog Jan. 9, she was “filthy,” “extremely malnourished” and about 25 pounds underweight with cigarette burns on her head, Erica Mahnken, the co-founder of No More Pain Rescue, told The Post on Monday.

“Despite all that, Ash was so happy to see us,” said Mahnken.

Mahnken said her fiancé had gotten a tip that junkies and crackheads who were living in an abandoned house on Staten Island had picked up and left last month, leaving the pup behind with no food or water.

“When we got the phone call that the people had been gone for at least two days, we ran and got Ash,” Mahnken said.

Mahnken said she and her fiancé have a few friends at the LES firehouse and knew they were looking to adopt a pup, so she contacted them right away.

Ash spent her first night away from the crackhouse at the firehouse.

“The minute we walked her through those doors, we knew that’s where she was meant to be,” Mahnken said. “Every single Fort Pitt firefighter instantly fell in love with her and she fell even more in love with them.”

The firehouse officially adopted Ash on Jan. 12 and she has gained a substantial amount of weight since her adoption.

“She’s such a happy girl and now weighs about 50 pounds!” Mahnken said. “I couldn’t have picked a better home for our sweet girl and I can’t thank the FDNY enough for allowing Ash to join New York’s Bravest.”

https://nypost.com/2017/02/20/rescued-pit-bull-finds-new-home-at-fdny-firehouse/
 

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


FIRES/INCIDENTS/EVENTS


2018 – SANTA VISITS FORT PITT


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December 16, 2018 ·

Santa made a stop at Fort Pitt Engine 15 Ladder 18 Battalion 4

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2019 – NY RANGERS VISIT FORT PITT

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New York City Fire Department (FDNY)

September 30, 2019

FDNY members of Engine 15, Ladder 18, and Battalion 4 held a moment of silence today with NYPD 7th Precinct members and players from the New York Rangers in memory of NYPD Officer Brian Mulkeen, who gave his life protecting our city. The Rangers visited the members ahead of this week’s home opener.


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Thank you to the brave men and women of the FDNY and NYPD for all they do for us. Special thanks to everyone at Fort Pitt for allowing Chris Kreider of the New York Rangers and myself to put on the gear.

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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


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2019 – NY RANGERS VISIT FORT PITT


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New York City Fire Department (FDNY)

October 3, 2019 ·

New York Rangers Chris Kreider, Brendan Lemieux, Rod Gilbert, and Tom Laidlaw celebrated Hockey Week in New York by visiting FDNY and NYPD members at Engine 15, Ladder 18, Battalion 4, and NYPD 7th Precinct.

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soda-acid

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Especially bad considering the North Bronx was a huge two-fare zone for those who remember.

I've heard stories that back in the 20's and 30's the UFA/City relationship was highly contentious and the UFA was much more activist compared to today. Being transferred a boro or two away as punishment was not usual from what I remember hearing. Transfers to Harlem were also a "punishment" then.
Engine 58 & Ladder 26 were always the busiest companies from the 20's into the 60's. They were considered a "punishment house" although not everyone who went there went for that reason, many wanted a busy house.
 

mack

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2020 - JOIN FDNY

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February 6, 2020 ·

Firefighters at Engine 15/Ladder 18/Battalion 4 are some of the brave members you can meet at Sunday’s Lunar New Year Parade in Chinatown. Join us to learn all about our heroic careers. For more information about this year’s festivities, please visit bit.ly/

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mack

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mack

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