LAFD To Purchase First Electric Fire Engine In North America

Bulldog

Bulldog
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
1,900
While I'm all for controlling pollution etc. at least in my opinion this is a terrible idea! Imagine getting to a scene of a major fire and not being able to use your truck because the batteries are discharged!! Maybe it would work for a rescue or something like that but it certainly doesn't seem appropriate for anything that would be in constant use while fighting a fire.
 

raybrag

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
2,635
Menlo Park CA considered this rig last year, and decided to pass (smart decision, in my opinion).  Rosenbauer rep in Southern CA must be very active to talk LAFD into this purchase.  Here's my idea of how FDNY would support a thng like this . . . Ferrara would probably get a contract to build a dozen of them.



 

soda-acid

Active member
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Messages
153
LAFD as well as most other departments in CA respond on Mutual Aid sometimes a distance of 150 miles or more. What kind of range would this rig have? It might be a modern version of the ALF Turbo Chief that San Francisco had in the early 60's and didn't last very long.
 

raybrag

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
2,635
Seattle had a 1960 ALF Turbo Chief TDA with a Boeing turbine engine, also. It lasted for ONE year before they repowered it with a Hall-Scott 1091 gasoline engine. Photo credit to Last Resort Fire Dept.

272-1961-tractor%20-%20Copy.jpg
 

nfd2004

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 22, 2007
Messages
6,164
raybrag said:

Ray, as we have discussed, I'm sure the guys at "Battery Pack 238" (BP238) have enough to do without some buffs like myself going down there asking a MILLION Questions about it.

So on behalf of the "BUFFS Across America" Org., PLEASE DON'T Go Down there yet to check it out. I'm sure the guys there, as well your Uncle Wilfred, aka "NFD2004", would appreciate that.

THANKS Mike, "mikeindabronx" for posting this. Interesting discussion and certainly something to think about.

Is Battery Powered Fire Trucks a possibility for the future of the fire service ? Those of us that have been around for awhile have seen many changes over the decades when it comes to fire equipment and the fire service.

Like:
1) From standard transmission to automatic transmission
2) From open cabs to closed cabs
3) From tiller ladder trucks to rear mount ladder trucks
4) From gasoline to diesel operated engines
5) The use of handie talkie radios, air packs, computers in the firehouse, and on the rigs

Could technology bring about a Battery Operated Fire Truck that can operate for hours or even days at a time ?

Did we ever think we could go on a computer to pay our bills ?
Or put a plastic card into a machine at a bank and give us money back.
Or talk on a small phone from anyplace we want.

Will a Battery Operated Fire Truck be in the future ? We may get the answer within the next few years.
 

fltpara16

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2007
Messages
285
I am heading out to the FDIC conference in Indianapolis in April.  This new battery operated fire truck will be displayed at the exhibit hall.  I will file on-scene reports and pictures once I get a chance to look at this new apparatus. 
 

JohnnyGage

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2018
Messages
842
fltpara16 said:
I am heading out to the FDIC conference in Indianapolis in April.  This new battery operated fire truck will be displayed at the exhibit hall.  I will file on-scene reports and pictures once I get a chance to look at this new apparatus.

Look for the rig with an extension cord plugged into a wall outlet 8)
 

Lebby

Active member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
460
DCFD, who plans for 1/3 of thier fleet to be electric by 2030 are exploring this route also, as seen at a demonstration today.

 

skiLB

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
1,044
While I'm all for controlling pollution etc. at least in my opinion this is a terrible idea! Imagine getting to a scene of a major fire and not being able to use your truck because the batteries are discharged!! Maybe it would work for a rescue or something like that but it certainly doesn't seem appropriate for anything that would be in constant use while fighting a fire.
True
 

Lebby

Active member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
460
Yesterday the Madison Fire Department beat LAFD to the punch, putting an electric engine built by Pierce in service at E*8. E*8 is one of the busiest companies in all of Wisconsin. Additionally, it has a traditional engine for if/ when the batteries drain out.

 

EdMc

Active member
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
146
Yesterday the Madison Fire Department beat LAFD to the punch, putting an electric engine built by Pierce in service at E*8. E*8 is one of the busiest companies in all of Wisconsin. Additionally, it has a traditional engine for if/ when the batteries drain out.

I didn't see a run time for the apparatus on the batteries. Meaning, how long do the batteries last before it switches over to combustion engine. I know my daughters car is a hybrid and it only gets about 100 miles on a full battery, weather permitting ( cold weather it is less), and now some are getting much more but it seems that operating a pump or aerial device at a scene it will drain the batteries sooner. My thoughts
 

Bulldog

Bulldog
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
1,900
I didn't see a run time for the apparatus on the batteries. Meaning, how long do the batteries last before it switches over to combustion engine. I know my daughters car is a hybrid and it only gets about 100 miles on a full battery, weather permitting ( cold weather it is less), and now some are getting much more but it seems that operating a pump or aerial device At a scene it will drain the batteries sooner. My thoughts
It has to be one of the worst applications possible for an electric vehicle! You respond to a fire where you are first in, so the rig is parked in front of the building. It ends up being a multiple alarm long-duration call and guess what, the batteries die! Now you've got the front of the fire building tied up with the rig that's totally useless. Certainly makes a lot of sense to me. Okay, it has an IC engine to use after the batteries die so now you are paying for both the electric and the IC systems which raises the purchase price of the unit as well as having additional maintenance considerations.
 

jtsjc1

Active member
Joined
Jul 29, 2019
Messages
174
I don't get it either. When there's a chance it may be hours of work for the engine its useless. A diesel can be refueled on the spot you obviously can't plug in the batteries to recharge during an incident. Last year my sister's house was lost in a 3 alarm fire on SI. E162 was first due and operated for about 3 1/2 hrs. E167 was I believe 2nd due and operated for about 5 1/2 hrs. Its just an example of how long those batteries would need to last. Larger fires even more so. And as Bulldog stated hybrids are always more expensive.
 
Top