FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

johnd248

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Thanks, Chief. Don't know how I forgot Whitefish. He was a LT in E 248, then Capt in E 247, before returning to the Heart of Flatbush.
 

mack

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When I rode with the 41 in the late 60s, as the aide to the aide, we had five houses, other than our own, to visit each night delivering the bag. We also delivered the bag to the Brooklyn CO on Empire Blvd. Made for a long night; sometimes we would swap bags at the scene of a call. Several battalions moved partially to reduce the 41's response area. The 58 was in with E 310 before moving to E 257; this reduced runs to the East. When the 38 moved from Bergen Street to St. John's Place, this reduced runs to the North. When the 48 moved from E 220 to E 240, this reduced runs to the West. Great Battalion with a lot of great Chiefs: Delaney, McPartland, O'Neill, Kaletta, Stehl, Gallagher, and Pritchard and many more.

John - My father made BC in 1970, worked in many battalions for a while, then was assigned Bn 41 while still in their old firehouse on Church Street in 1971. He liked working there - busy, good companies, a lot of fires. It had also been his 1st assignment as a firefighter - E 248. Bn 58 was created at Watkins Street in 1969, moved to E 310 in 1971 (firehouse closest to E 248) and had most BC runs for year - 7100. Bn 41 still busy with over 4600 runs in 1971.

Constant change with battalions during those late 1960s through 1970s War Years. Second sections created, new battalions created, battalions relocated, response areas and boxes changes, Adaptive Response, Discretionary Response, Bn 60 created to cover different Brooklyn battalions nightly, chief special call, no chief runs. All were unsuccessful efforts to manage and reduce the ever-growing battalion response workloads.

It was common for BCs to arrive at a working fire and not know what companies had arrived because of the high workloads and availability of units, interchanges, 2nd sections, relocations, spare unmarked rigs, limited radios etc. Handi-Talkie messages were typically "41 to 1st due engine..." or "41 to 2nd due truck".

I was fortunate to spend there and will always remember stacks of Ebinger Bakery boxes in the E 248/Bn 41 kitchen and housewatch. Bn 41 - always a good battalion.

Church Street firehouse - Flatbush FD:

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Church Street firehouse - paid Brooklyn Fire Department - E 48 & District Chief 11:

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Church Street firehouse - FDNY -E 248 & Bn 41 .

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Snyder Avenue firehouse ED 248 & Bn 41:

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mack

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John - Didn't E 248 exchange their 1959 Mack CF pumper with E 244's 1951 open-cab WLF pumper for Coney Island response area in the mid-1960s? And got their rig back in 1968 when E 244 was disbanded (even though War Years workloads were increasing dramatically).


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mack

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Steve "Whitefish" Ternlund BN*41 Commander until a few years ago....43 yrs OTJ .....Fish was the last Active member who had worked on Seigel St. in 108 & also was a former BKLYN Dispatcher......many on here who come to our nycfire.net get togethers have met Fish at our annual Seigel Eagle get togethers which he is the MC at.


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mack

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When I rode with the 41 in the late 60s, as the aide to the aide, we had five houses, other than our own, to visit each night delivering the bag. We also delivered the bag to the Brooklyn CO on Empire Blvd. Made for a long night; sometimes we would swap bags at the scene of a call. Several battalions moved partially to reduce the 41's response area. The 58 was in with E 310 before moving to E 257; this reduced runs to the East. When the 38 moved from Bergen Street to St. John's Place, this reduced runs to the North. When the 48 moved from E 220 to E 240, this reduced runs to the West. Great Battalion with a lot of great Chiefs: Delaney, McPartland, O'Neill, Kaletta, Stehl, Gallagher, and Pritchard and many more.
BC Pritchard 41 Bn:

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The most decorated firefighter in FDNY history
Jack Pritchard first joined the New York Fire Department in 1970 as part of Squad 4

Apr 18, 2014

By Xavier Jackson

From the 1970s through the 1990s, there were thousands of fires raging across New York City. And all those fires had one thing in common: they were likely to have faced the likes of Jack Pritchard, the most decorated firefighter in New York City history.
Pritchard first joined the New York Fire Department in 1970, as part of Squad 4. Four years later, not content with his current assignment, he finagled his way into Rescue 2, one of the most elite units in the FDNY.

Within weeks, Pritchard had proven himself a worthy member of the team, although his commanding officer was reportedly getting worried about his “near suicidal” tendencies when battling fires. For example, he found himself at the fire of a three-story building with a mentally-challenged child trapped on the third floor. He quickly charged in without oxygen and found the child, before he realized he was trapped. Left with no other exit — and by this point actually on fire himself — Pritchard smothered the child, and leaped to the first floor where he was doused with water and shipped off to the burn ward with the boy.

Pritchard escaped the burn ward before fully healing so he could get back to his unit quicker; this would become a regular occurrence for him.
Pritchard's next large inferno would be several years later, when he found himself rescuing fellow firefighters from a fire at Waldbaum's Supermarket in Brooklyn. It was a fire he didn't even have to go to, since his shift had actually already ended. But that wasn't going to stop him.
After several years worth of heroics, the FDNY awarded him his own command, giving him Engine 255 on Rogers Avenue in Brooklyn. They would soon be reputed as "Captain Jack's Jolly Rogers."

Pritchard drilled his men constantly, churning out the quickest response times across the city, a fact which he defended fiercely. He wasn't against racing other companies to fires, or actually charging at them with fire trucks to ensure he got there first.
It didn't take long for him to distinguish himself again. On March 27, 1992, Engine 255 arrived at a fire to find an injured firefighter being pulled from the building after unsuccessfully attempting to rescue a 70-year-old man. Impatient and realizing he didn't have to wait for orders as he was already in charge, Pritchard charged into the inferno, safety equipment be damned. He found the man, on fire, in his bed. Not hesitating, Pritchard extinguished the flames himself and dragged him out of the building.

He spent the next two months recovering from his burns in the hospital.

Then in July of 1998, Engine 255 pulled up to a fire where Jack Pritchard would perform the most famous heroics of his career. After learning there was an infant trapped in a crib on the fourth floor, Pritchard entered his Superman-mode and fearlessly leaped into the building to locate the baby.
After taking flames directly to his unprotected face, Pritchard located the baby, still alive. Unfortunately, flames were leaping above the crib, preventing him from lifting the baby to safety. Using his un-gloved hands — because safety was a word that still didn't exist in his vocabulary — Pritchard grabbed the melting crib and began dragging it out of the room. Breathing carbon monoxide and severely burning his hand the whole way, Pritchard dragged the crib to his fellow firefighters where they assisted in rescuing the infant. For this he was awarded his second Bennett medal — the first was for the Walbaum's fire — the highest award possible in the FDNY.

He finally retired from the department in 1999 with the rank of Battalion Chief, ending his career by simply stating “It's been a real honor to be a firefighter.”


 

johnd248

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Yes, Mack, they switched rigs with E 244. I was on the back step of the Ward LaFrance when we were hit by a car running a red light. No damage to the rig, but I always wondered what if we had our regular Mack. Our Captain had to use all of his "weight" to get the rig back in 1968.
 

nfd2004

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Thanks Brad.

Great photo of TWO of the FDNY War Years Greatest.

On left is Retired B/C Jack Kleehaas, B/C 46, aka "68jk09" and on the right is his good friend and Retired FDNY B/C Steve Ternlund, B/C 41, aka "Whitefish", as they gather at a "Seigel Eagles Reunion" of FDNYs Engine 216/Ladder 108/Batt 35.

Both worked Ladder Co 108 together during the very busy FDNY War Years.
 

mack

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JK.gif

Great picture of two legends that I am proud to call "friend".

I admire them for their courage, bravery and leadership saving lives and taking care of others.

Thank you and God bless you both!
 

mack

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RESCUE 2 LEAVES BERGEN STREET - BROTHERS INCLUDE CHIEF K

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FDNY Rescue 2 Hosts 'Last Tour' Before Move to New Station
Rescue 2 occupied the fire station on Bergen Street for 34 years and the building had been in use for 126 years.
Jim Regan Dec 1st, 2019

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Current and former Rescue 2 firefighters during the "Last Tour" at the Brooklyn fire station on Nov. 3, 2019. On the right is Chicago Battalion Chief Pat Maloney and Rescue 2 Capt. Liam Flaherty.

After 126 years of continuous operation as a fire station in Brooklyn, the quarters of FDNY Rescue 2 closed last month when firefighters moved to a modern station.

Rescue 2 was organized in the Brooklyn on March 1, 1925. Over the past 94 years the company has responded to major incidents throughout the borough of Brooklyn and became recognized as one of the most proficient units in the American fire service.

The company has responded to working fires and special incidents throughout Brooklyn and also as needed throughout the remainder of the cities four other boroughs.

The station was built in 1893 by the then Brooklyn Fire Department (BFD) for BFD Engine 34. Following consolidation of the five boroughs into the Fire Department, City of New York, the company was renumbered Engine 134 and later 234. Engine 234 operated from this location for 96 years before moving to new building in 1979. Salvage 1 then occupied the station for just over six years.

Capt. Raymond Downey was successful in obtaining the station for one of the city's five rescue companies when the salvage company was disbanded.

Rescue 2 moved into the two-story station at 1472 Bergen Street in the Crown Heights neighborhood on July 26, 1985.

The past 34 years have been very busy for Rescue 2 and with building being 126 years old, the building was showing its age.

A new firehouse was built at 1815 Sterling Place, less than two miles away.

On Nov. 3, the company invited all past and present members and their families to a symbolic “Last Tour” at the Bergen Street station.
The official move occurred on Nov. 14.

The company responded the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 as part of the second alarm assignment for Box 8087. All seven members of the company who responded to that alarm perished: Lt. Peter Martin and firefighters William Lake, Daniel Libretti, Lincoln Quappe, John Napolitano, Kevin O’Rourke and Edward Rall. Those firefighters are remembered, along with three others who died in the line of duty, on a memorial wall at the old station.


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Building of the Day: 1472 Bergen Street

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Sep 11, 2012 • 03:30pmby Suzanne Spellen (aka Montrose Morris)

Brooklyn, one building at a time.
Name:
FDNY Rescue 2, formerly Engine Company 234, formerly Fire Salvage 1
Address: 1472 Bergen Street
Cross Streets: Schenectady and Troy Avenues
Neighborhood: Crown Heights North
Year Built: Building on site since 1893, this one perhaps built in 1921.
Architectural Style: Classic late 19th century–style stable building
Architect: Unknown
Landmarked: No

The story: This simple building now houses one of the most famous and highly decorated units of the FDNY. There has been a fire department building here since 1893, but the official website of Rescue 2 says this particular building was built in 1921, one of 14 similar buildings built for the FDNY at the time, originally built to hold horses.

In 1893, Brooklyn Fire Department Engine 34 began here, becoming Engine 234 when Brooklyn became part of New York City. They remained at this house until 1979, when they relocated to nearby St. Johns Place. The next to move in was the now defunct Fire Salvage 1, which was a volunteer Federal Model Cities Program for disadvantaged youth. Their mission was to respond to residential calls of fire, water leaks, etc., and they were charged with the protection of property. The unit had older vans and trucks, chauffeured and commanded by FDNY officers. The program lasted until 1985 at this location, and 1991 in other parts of the city.

In 1985, Rescue 2 took over the building. Their history is a long and proud one, having been organized in 1925. The city originally only had one rescue unit in Manhattan, but when a fire in a submarine in the Brooklyn Navy Yard proved too far away for that unit to respond in time, the city chartered Rescue 2 in Brooklyn. Over the years, they have been headquartered at 160 Carlton and then at the fire headquarters building at 365 Jay Street before moving here.

The rescue units are the most elite companies in the FDNY, and are responsible for search and rescue, all kinds of special situation rescues, SCUBA rescues and HazMat situations. Rescue 2 is one of the most famous fire companies in the world. Since their inception over 80 years ago, 80 members have been awarded individual medals for valor, and the company has received 52 unit citations for acts of valor.

They participated in rescues in some of New York’s most famous and horrific fires, including the crash of the airplane in Park Slope in 1960 and both World Trade Center bombings. Ten members have died in the line of duty, including seven killed on 9/11. The building sits on the edge of St. John’s Park, a huge Robert Moses-created recreation center with three large ball fields, built in the 1950s. The lack of buildings near Rescue 2 makes it seem desolate and isolated, but the presence of this decorated group of firefighters is an honor and great boon to the community.
 

mack

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FDNY Rescue 2’s New Quarters

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Brooklyn rescue responds from brand new firehouse
Skyler Fire – First Run – FDNY Rescue 2 responding from brand new firehouse.

On Wednesday, November 13 Rescue 2 made it’s last run from its Bergen Street firehouse. On Thursday it began responding from a new state-of-the-art firehouse.


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Old: 1472 Bergen Street, Brooklyn



 

nfd2004

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Joe, aka "mack",

WHAT A CLASSIC STORY.

It was such a GREAT Time - BUT - An Extremely busy time for fire activity.

I can only relate to "My Younger Buff Years", of which sometimes I was invited into the firehouses and often rode along.

But in those firehouses, "I think a lot of these guys missed their calling". The firehouse kitchen comedy acts and shows were GREAT. To this day, I sure am glad that I got to see a part of it in between the hundreds of times, this generation of firefighters "turned up the notch" and put their lives on the line to save others.

Joe, I must also echo your words in reply number 2450.

"Two Legends that I am proud to call a friend"
"I admire them for their courage, bravery and leadership"
"Thank you and God Bless you both"

I would also like to add, that for both myself and Joe, as well as a few other members, this is right about the time of year that we would be getting ready to meet with Chief Kleehaas and Chief Ternlund. Plus several other friends, both active and retired members of 216/108/B35. BUT because of this coronavirus pandemic, that is NOT happening this year. Something that so many of us enjoyed over the last several years.

Regarding Chief Ternlund, as he is the main organizer and speaker of those events, I think it was last year that as he began to talk to the entire group of guys, he tells us he has a "FEW" notes of what he wants to say. He reaches into his pocket and then pulls out a piece of paper that is about EIGHT FEET in length. At that point of course comes the laughs from the entire group of guys. "I thought to myself, this guy must have been GREAT to work with".

I believe Retired Chief Ternlund also has a son on the job and another son who is a police officer in New Jersey.
 

nfd2004

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Thanks Brad for posting these pictures.

The last official day that Rescue 2 would be located on Bergen St and move into their new quarters.

The pictures above include the following from Top to bottom

1) The Great tasting cake that was a part of Rescue 2s final days on Bergen St. As an invited guest, I can tell you - "It was Great".

2) On left is current Captain of Rescue 2, Captain Liam Flaherty. On right is Retired B/C Jack Kleehaas, aka "68jk09". Once a firefighter working the very busy Rescue 2.

3) Just "some" of the photos on one wall of the quarters of Rescue 2. There were many more, plus the unit citations and individual member citations as well. All of those photos and citations were safely packed and brought over to the new firehouse by the members of Rescue 2, both on duty as well as off duty members as I understand it.

For me personally, it was Rescue 2, along with Engine 210 on Carlton Ave that I was first introduced to the FDNY back in the summer of 1968. It would introduce both myself, and my brother, now a retired B/C of Bridgeport, Ct to what we would later consider to be the Best Fire Dept in the World. For the rest of our lives, we would learn so much just by talking to the guys and watching them work.

Later, that first visit would also play an important part with other friends/buffs of mine who also learned from the FDNY, becoming firefighters and officers as well.

Of course a very Special THANK YOU goes to Chief Kleehaas for inviting me to that historic event. It was also attended by many Active and Retired Members of FDNYs Rescue 2, as well as a few other specially invited friends.
 

mack

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Stephen F. Ternlund, Battalion Commander, Battalion

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Battalion Chief Stephen F. Ternlund has worked for the City of New York for 45 years - three years as a fire alarm dispatcher in Brooklyn and 42 years with the FDNY. He is presently the Battalion Commander of the busy 41st Battalion in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Stephen’s life with the fire department all started when he was twelve years old. While waiting for the repair of his flat tire on his bicycle at the bike shop on Rogers Avenue and Farragut Road so he could finish his paper route, Engine Company 255 and Ladder Company 157 came flying out of their quarters across the street from the bike shop with their lights on and sirens blasting. Stephen found that to be an awesome sight. When the bike tire was repaired, Stephen wandered over to the empty firehouse and in those days, which was 1961, they left the apparatus doors open. Written on the chalk board was the address they had responded to. Being only four blocks away, Stephen also responded on his bicycle. What a sight! Fire was blowing out several windows of this private house with heavy smoke everywhere. The firefighters in their rubber coats, rubber boots and leather helmets were running around all over the place putting up ladders, breaking windows, pulling hoses into the house and squirting water. All of this was going on at the same time. Different firefighters flying all over the place all knowing their specific duties and areas of responsibilities with the utmost precision. This is when the love for the FDNY began and this could possibly be his dream for life

Stephen graduated from Erasmus Hall High School on Flatbush Avenue in 1966 and began working for Goodbody Brokerage House in Manhattan at 2 Broadway. Not too excited about that job, Stephen was thrilled when a phone call came from a very good friend of his asking him if he would be interested in becoming a provisional fire alarm dispatcher. What an offer! So the next day he resigned from his brokerage job and went to the New York City Department of Personnel on Thomas Street in Manhattan and for ten cents, the fee to get sworn in, Stephen began his new career as a provisional fire alarm dispatcher in Brooklyn on August 26, 1967. Two years later and after being tutored from dispatchers George Slattery and Murray Pearlman, he took the test for fire alarm dispatcher, passed it and became a permanent fire alarm dispatcher and remained in Brooklyn for one more year.

In 1968 the New York City Department of Personnel lowered the age to take the firefighters test from twenty years old to eighteen years old so Stephen, at 19 years old, filed for the exam, passed and had to wait until he was 21 years old to be hired as a firefighter. On May 15, 1970 Stephen resigned from the fire alarm dispatcher’s job and was sworn in the next day to probationary school on Welfare Island, now called Roosevelt Island.

Two months later in July of 1970, Stephen was assigned to Ladder Company 108 on Seigel Street in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. On his arrival at the firehouse he wondered why would he at 21 years old and 147 pounds be assigned to this elite, always in the top five busiest truck companies in the city. On entering quarters there was Eddie Hand standing 6 foot 7 inches tall and Dick Bonadio standing 6 foot 5 inches tall. What was this little 21 year old doing here? Then Stephen saw Pudgie Walsh and he knew there might be a possibility that he could make it here. (Only kidding … Pudgie was an excellent firefighter!) Well, it wasn’t easy. The job was “fire” and 108 truck was doing it. He’ll never forget his first run because Stephen had to bag a DOA that was burned on 90% of his body. What a place to learn the job and learn it quick! Many night tours you would go out at 5 pm and not see the firehouse again until after midnight and that was a regular occurrence. Several all hands, vacant buildings, occupied row frames, rear tenements, factories, loft buildings, you name it, 108 truck’s area had it all. It was not uncommon to do thirty to forty runs on a night tour. The work load was huge. Stephen remembers one 15 hour tour in 1971 which they had over 50 runs.

During his time in 108 truck in the early 1970’s Stephen also remembers having objects thrown at them while responding to alarms and this happened quite often. Being that this happened often, the job installed plywood canopies over the open front cab and the tillerman’s seat. He also remembers being in the tiller responding down Broadway during the 1977 blackout and hearing the gun shots in the area while arson fires and extensive looting was taking place. He remembers arson fires in occupied buildings always seemed to be set on the top floor so firefighters would cut the roof with axes, so now all the occupants had to be relocated to hotels. He remembers 108 truck had a tiller rig and in order to raise the wooden aerial ladder, you had to remove the tillerman’s steering wheel and swing the tillerman’s seat out of the way. All the portable ladders were made of wood and were heavy. There were no radios and we had to use hand signals to start and shut down water, we wore old dungarees and gloves that we bought from the glove factory in the area. We had no quartermaster.

After 14 years Stephen decided to study. Fires were slowing down in 108’s area so it was time to move on. Stephen’s girlfriend Linda helped him out for many years typing his 3x5 index cards with vital information for him to study. Stephen later married Linda in 1986 and came out number 63 on the lieutenant’s list and got promoted on August 8, 1987. After a period of bouncing Stephen was assigned to the Heart of Flatbush, Engine Company 248. Engine Company 248’s area was becoming overpopulated and the fire duty was good.

While continuing to study and passing the captain’s exam, it was hard to leave 248 Engine but your career path moves on. Stephen was promoted to captain on September 25, 1993 and after bouncing he was assigned to Engine Company Two Forty Heaven (Engine Company 247), a five man engine in Borough Park Brooklyn that was consistent with fire duty and a great place to teach newer, younger firefighters which Stephen definitely knew was a necessity to keep this job great. He took pride in drilling and teaching the younger men. They were the future of the FDNY.

Stephen continued to study and on August 21, 1999 was promoted to battalion chief and assigned to the 15th Division. After a period of bouncing, he was assigned to the 41st Battalion. Stephen knew in the early days that this job of being a firefighter was full of adventure but you could never take that lightly. You must study, read, train and retrain to stay knowledgeable of your job as a firefighter. You must stay up-to-date to changes to stay safe and be the best you can be. There is no second chances in this dangerous job.

During Stephen’s career he worked under six mayors and twelve fire commissioners and has seen many changes. He is the only active member in the FDNY that worked in the Seigel Street firehouse and at this time he is the second senior man in the FDNY.

He was cited for bravery on nine occasions and received the Emerald Society Pipes and Drum Medal in 1990 for the rescue of a 68 year old man while he was a lieutenant in Engine Company 248. It’s been a great and rewarding career. One of Stephen’s favorite quotes is “Do what you love and you will not work a day in your life” and that has been exactly how he has felt about his career with the FDNY. Stephen can never remember a day that he did not want to go to work. It was always a pleasure looking forward to working with the professional and courageous men in this department and the anticipation of what was in store for you on your next tours of duty.

The suspense, feelings of accomplishment, happiness, sadness and sorrow all come at times in your career. They all somehow make you stronger, a better firefighter and give you the opportunity to teach and to pass on to the newer men the tricks of the trade that you have learned which hopefully will keep them out of harms way with the passing of your knowledge. There is no greater reward and satisfaction in this dangerous job than to know that the knowledge you have passed on has helped a brother from injury or even death or just made him a better firefighter.

Being the commander of the 41st Battalion is extremely rewarding and a pleasure. The other three chiefs assigned are John McEneaney, Barry Brandes, Joe McKie and covering chief Joe Callan all taking care of business during their tours of duty which makes Stephen’s job easier. The entire complement of men in Engine Companies 248, 250, 255, 281 and Ladder Companies147 and 157 are the most knowledgeable and professional in the city and perform to the highest standards of the FDNY at all times. Stephen was one of the organizers of the first annual firefighters ski race in Hunter Mountain which started with just two teams of five men each thirty-nine years ago, and it continues to take place each year with hundreds of firemen that race down the mountain. The firefighters’ races have raised thousands of dollars for various charities over the thirty-nine years. Stephen and Linda have two sons, Kenneth, 23, and Gregory, 21. Kenneth is a 2011 graduate of Rutgers University and Gregory is in his senior year at Rutgers.



FF Kenneth Ternlund

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mack

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Lt. Gary Howard - Retired - Rescue 2


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Garry Howard - FDNY Warrior


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He Was a 9/11 Rescue Worker, He Got Cancer, And He Wouldn’t Change a Thing

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Gary Howard, a retired Lieutenant from FDNY Rescue Company 2, says there’s no doubt in his mind that the cancer he has is a direct result of the time he spent cleaning up after the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 – but even so, he says he wouldn’t change a thing about how he came to New York City’s aid after the attacks.

Gary says that during the time he spent helping with the clean up efforts, he rarely wore any protective equipment. At most, he wore a surgical mask. “There’s no doubt in my mind that’s what caused the cancer. I myself, I wouldn’t change a thing if I had to do it all over again. I’d be there.”
Gary’s word of warning to fellow firefighters? Always wear your mask, and get your 9/11 medical screening every year.

 

68jk09

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^^^^^ Gary Howard was appointed to the FDNY in 1970 & went to SQ*3....when SQ*3 was disbanded in 1976 he went to ENG*28 in Alphabet City ....after several years there he went to 108 then to R*2....when he made LT he went to ENG*75 then was an Charter Member as a LT when we opened SQ*41 then after awhile he went back to ENG*75 as a LT.....then he went to LAD*136 then next he became a LT back in R*2 until the big Rig collision with 111 & afterwards he was put out of the Job....Gary never spent a slow day OTJ....at one point when he was a FF in R*2 he worked with his Brother Bruce who was also a FF in R*2 & came by way of ENG*17 & SQ*1.....Gary's Son Eric (pictured with him a few posts above ) was in FDNY EMS then a FF in ENG*54 & is currently a FF in LAD*4.
 
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