FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

Signal73

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Willy D asked me to post these

Photo 1. Is Retired FDNY Lt Gary Howard standing in front of his home with the American Flag and the FDNY Flag on display


2nd Photo A good friend Retired FDNY Battalion Chief Steve Ternlund


3rd Photo A gathering of some good friends
Left to right:
Elwood E., “CFDMarshall”
Frank D., “fdce54”
Retired Chief Steve Ternlund
Joe M., “Mack”
Willy D., “NFD2004”
Declan B., “Irish” displaying 108 tee shirt

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nfd2004

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 22, 2007
Messages
5,859
Willy D asked me to post these

Photo 1. Is Retired FDNY Lt Gary Howard standing in front of his home with the American Flag and the FDNY Flag on display


2nd Photo A good friend Retired FDNY Battalion Chief Steve Ternlund


3rd Photo A gathering of some good friends
Left to right:
Elwood E., “CFDMarshall”
Frank D., “fdce54”
Retired Chief Steve Ternlund
Joe M., “Mack”
Willy D., “NFD2004”
Declan B., “Irish” displaying 108 tee shirt

View attachment 7012View attachment 7013View attachment 7014

Thank you Brad for posting those photos of TWO Highly Respected Retired "FDNY War Years" Members.
Lt Gary Howard and B/C Steve Ternlund.

As well as some great guys who are members on this site; Elwood Erwin, Frank Donahue, Joe Materia and Declean Byrne.
 

mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 FIREHOUSE 75 RICHARDSON STREET, WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN DIVISION 11, BATTALION 32 "THE MUTHA OF ALL ENGINES" "WE WALK THE LINE" "READY TO RIDE"


Engine 29 BFD organized new firehouse 246 Frost Street 1890
Engine 29 BFD became Engine 29 FDNY 1898
Engine 29 became Engine 129 1899
Engine 129 became Engine 229 1913
Engine 229 new firehouse 75 Richardson Street w/Division 11 1915

Water Tower 7 never organized

Ladder 146 organized 75 Richardson Street at Engine 229 1916

Division 11 located at 75 Richardson Street at Engine 229 1915-1927, 1930-1948, 1951-1990

Hi-Ex Foam 91 located at 75 Richardson Street at Engine 229 1996-1998

Purple K Unit 229 organized 75 Richardson Street at Engine 229 1995



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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


PRE-BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT

Williamsburg Fire Department (volunteer) 1823-1855


Williamsburg was independent city



Brooklyn Fire Department - Western District (volunteer) 1855-1869

Williamsburg part of City of Brooklyn

Brooklyn Fire Department - Western District badge

BFD WESTERN DISTRICT 1860S.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT
1869-1898 (PAID)


ENGINE COMPANY NO. 29 : ON THE LINE OF THE MANHATTAN BEACH RAILROAD


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Engine Company No. 29, although of comparatively recent organization, has among its members those who have saved life in the hour of peril, and others who have been seriously injured while in the discharge of duty. When the company was organized on Nov. 1, 1890, it took immediate possession of the new house built expressly for it in Frost Street, between Humboldt Street and Kingsland Avenue. No company in the Department has finer quarters, and the men individually and collectively have taken especial pride in fixing up the interior in a tasteful and artistic manner.

The engine team consists of a large bay horse and a bald-faced sorrel, both young and handsome, while "Dick." a beautiful bright bay, and his mate, a fine young gray horse, pull the hose-cart. For beauty, speed and endurance they cannot be excelled. A very important attack of the company, and a great favorite among the men is " Spot," an English coach-dog. He. is seven months old, but during this brief existence he has acquired an insight into the habits of the men and horses. The company is provided with a second-class Amoskeag engine, which, as she stands on the floor resembles a mass of highly burnished gold and silver. The hose-cart is of the latest pattern and is equipped with all the best appliances for fire service.

Foreman MICHAEL McGINNESS was born in this city, June 29, 1856. He was appointed to the uniformed force on March 8, 1881, and rose to the rank of Assistant Foreman on Sept. 1, 1888, while connected with Hook and Ladder Company No. 4. On June 1, 1891, he was promoted to the grade of Foreman and placed in command of Engine Company No. 29. Mr. McGINNESS is married and lives at No. 182 Devoe Street. He is a brave man and has been many times in positions where his own life was in peril. While responding to an alarm of fire from box 487 on the night of Oct. 3, 1891, he received severe injuries by being thrown violently between the suction and the boiler of the engine, when the latter came in collision with a house which was being moved, and which had been left standing in the centre of Oakland Avenue without, as is alleged, having any danger lights upon it. Transferred, August, 1892, to Engine Co. No. 13.

Assistant Foreman OWEN S. CAMPBELL is a relative of several well-known CAMPBELLs who are prominent in Brooklyn public life. Superintendent and Captain CAMPBELL, of the Police Department, Ex-Congressman Felix CAMPBELL, and the famous, "Tim" CAMPBELL. He was born in Ireland on Sept. 20, 1839. In 1861 he enlisted in the United States Navy and served on the " Iroquois " and " Montauk." He was severely wounded during the war and in consequence received an honorable discharge in the early part of 1864. He was made a fireman on Sept. 15. 1869, when the Department was organized, and was promoted to the grade of driver on May 1, 1870. His promotion to the post of Assistant Foreman occurred March i. 1887. Mr. CAMPBELL is a widower and has four children living, one of whom, a daughter, is a well-known contralto singer in the choir of a New York church. A son holds the position of Professor of Music under the Board of Education of this city. Mr. CAMPBELL was badly burned- about the hands in the fire at Stover's dry goods store on April 29, 1887, and at a fire on Dec. 14, 1888, he fell from the second story to the cellar of the building and would have been instantly killed had it not been that the cellar was partially filled with water at the time, which broke his fall. As it was, he received severe injuries to his body and legs in the descent. Promoted to be foreman of No. 29. August 11, 1892.

Engineer JOHN M. PRATT is a man of whom the company is proud. He was born in New York State on Feb. 18, 1865. He received a good education and turned it to account, when he started out in life. He is well read, methodical in his ways, and to his comrades is a perfect encyclopedia of information. He carries a diary in which is kept a record of all that has transpired since he was appointed a fireman, even to the minutest details. Fifteen years ago he commenced the collection of ancient coins and relics, and at the present time has over 700 coins of various denominations, including gold, silver, brass, copper and pewter, some dating as far back as 1793. One of the most valuable pieces in the collection is a Judea Shekel, made of pewter and issued in the reign of Simon Maccabees, 145 B. C. Engineer PRATT was made a fireman Dec. 3, 1887, and since that time has been attached to Engines Nos. 18, 26 and 29. He was promoted to the grade of engineer on Jan. 9, 1888. He is married and lives at No. 271 Lorimer Street. At a fire in a four-story frame tenement on Atlantic Avenue near Nevins Street, on the night of Aug. 31, 1890, Mr. PRATT made a brave rescue of Mrs. SWIETZER and her child, whom he brought safely to the street from the second floor, down a burning stairway. About a month prior to this event, while going to a box factory fire at the foot of Nevins Street, he was injured by the engine colliding with a heap of upturned earth from a sewer.

HENRY M. HELLEN has twice met with serious misfortunes since he was appointed on April 1, 1885, and to-day he is a cripple, and will be for the remainder of his life. He was born in New York City on Nov. 11, 1860, and during his career as a fireman has seen active service with Engines Nos. 12,13, 15 and 29, the last of which companies he is still a member. He is married and lives at No. 96 Jackson Street, and was the driver of Engine No. 29 when he was last injured. At the great fire at Pratt's oil works, he was so severely burned about the face and hands, that he was not able to perform duty for several months. He sat on the driver's seat of Engine No. 29 when she rolled out of the house on the night of Oct. 3, 1891, in response to a call from box 487. The horses were dashing swiftly down Oakland Avenue, when without the slightest warning they turned quickly to the left, and the right front wheel, axle and forward part of the engine came in collision with a house in course of removal which stood in the middle of the street. The axle broke and Driver HELLEN'S right leg was crushed between the house and his engine. He was conveyed as quickly as possible to the City Hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the leg.

THOMAS J. McGlNNESS the second engineer of the company, and the brother of the Foreman. He was born in Philadelphia on July 4, 1848, and was appointed a member of the Fire Department Sept. n, 1883; since which time he has been attached to Engines Nos. 5, 12, 19 and 29.' He is married and lives at No. 182 Conselyea Street. He was riding with his brother on the back of the engine on the night of Oct. 3,1891, when Driver HELLEN had his leg crushed, and was thrown so violently against the hand rail of the boiler that his face and head were severely injured.

JOHN F. ASMUS has been the driver of the engine since Driver HELLEN was injured, and was born in Albany on July 4, 1851. He lives at No. 499 Graham Avenue with his family. He secured his appointment through Ex-Fire Commissioner POILLON, then Deputy Fire Commissioner, on Feb. 1, 1882, and was assigned to duty with Engine No. 15. He is a fearless man in discharge of duty and one well-liked by his superior officers and by his brother firemen. Mr. ASMUS helped to rescue Foreman Fanning of Engine No. 15, now District Engineer, when the latter fell Sept. 1, 1884, from the roof to the second floor of a furniture factory at Leonard and Devoe Streets, and received injuries which laid him up for three months. During the time Foreman Fanning was on the sick list, Mr. ASMUS was Acting Foreman of the company. It was through the bravery of Mr. ASMUS at the Pratt's oil works fire that Foreman Joseph McCORMICK, then in command of Engine No. 15, was saved from being burned to death when he was cut off from escape by the flames which had well nigh enveloped him. Mr. ASMUS saw McCORMICK's hand stretched out toward the window near which ASMUS was at the time. He seized it and the roasted flesh fell off in his grasp. He held on to the unconscious man although the heat was terrific, until assistance came and McCORMICK was pulled out from the seething caldron of oil into which he had fallen, and hurried away to the hospital.

CHARLES FRANKLIN WAY is a second-grade fireman, and was appointed Feb. 11, 1891. He was born in this city May 2, 1867, is married, and resides at No. 173 Ainslee Street. Mr. WAY distinctly remembers his first fire, for he was called on to help remove bodies from the ruins.

PATRICK HEAD is among the life-savers of the company, and the act of bravery which placed his name on the roll of honor, was one difficult to perform and attended with great peril to himself. The fire broke out in a bakery on the ground floor of a three-story frame building on Kingsland Avenue on the night of July 26, 1891. On the top floor was Mrs. GAFFNEY and her child, who were cut off from escape by the stairway, which was in flames, and had been overcome with the smoke. The truck company had not arrived, and Fireman HEAD knowing that there was not a moment to lose, found a thirteen-foot ladder, ran up to the cornice, drew the ladder up with the assistance of comrades, and then placing the foot of the ladder on the cornice mounted to the third story and got the unconscious woman and child out and lowered them down to the men below. At the Waterbury rope works fire, Mr. HEAD was completely overcome by smoke, and was laid up for some days after. He was born in this city on March 7, 1854, and has a family with whom he resides at No. 198 Kingsland Avenue. His appointment was made on June 15, 1885, and since that time he has served with Trucks Nos. 4 and 6, and Engines Nos. 12, 24 and 29.

MARTIN JOSEPH SMITH occupies the driver's seat of the hose-cart, and handles the fleet-footed bay and gray which draw it. He was born in this city, Jan. 30, 1867, and has been quite a traveller in his day. He was made a fireman April 16, 1890, and served for a short time with Truck No. 6 before being transferred to this company. He assisted in the rescue of Mrs. GAFFNEY and her child at the Kingsland Avenue bakery fire on July 26, 1891. He lives at No. 61 Driggs Avenue.

PATRICK F. CARROLL was born in this city, April 16, 1858, and has been a fireman since Jan. 3, 1888. He has been connected during the time with Truck No. 6 and Engines Nos. 16 and 29. Mr. Carroll lives with his family at No. 382 Leonard Street.

CHARLES STOTHARD was born in New York City, Aug. 21. 1857 and was appointed July 16, 1891. Prior to becoming a member of this company he was attached to Engine No. 30. Mr. STOTHARD is a widower and has five children and resides at No. 506 Driggs Avenue.

HENRY W. REICKENBERG was born in the city of New York on Feb. 22,1869. He began life in the merchant marine service, and when he left it was second mate of the " Nova Scotia." In 1886 he entered the United States Navy and served for four years on board the men-of-war Minnesota," "New Hampshire," "Quinebaug" and " Galena." He was the coxswain of the " Galena" cutter which captured the Navassa Island negro rioters, three of whom are now serving terms in the Kings County penitentiary. Mr. REICKENBERG has been once and a-half around the world, and a description of the places he has visited and incidents that have occurred are highly interesting. He is still a bachelor and lives at No. 104 North Henry Street. He became a fireman Nov. 16. 1891, and was assigned at once to this company, where he has made a good record for himself.

MICHAEL MARKS was born in this city on Oct. 4, 1863, and was made a fireman Jan. 3, 1888. He has done duty with Truck No. 8 and Engines Nos. 22 and 29 respectively. He is married and lives at No. 275 Humboldt Street. Mr. Marks was overcome by smoke at the Waterbury rope works fire.

JOHN F. HICKEY. a comparatively new member of the company, was appointed May 4, 1892. He is a native of Brooklyn, where he was born June 5, 1858.

JOHN J. McCARTHY was born in the State of New Jersey on April 24, 1868 and was appointed on July 1, 1892.

As this history goes to press, announcement is made of the transfer of, Assistant Foreman JAMES S. JONES from Engine Co. No. 27 to Engine Co. No. 29, of which he now Becomes second in command. The details of his service will be found under Engine Co. No. 29.

The territory covered by this company is an extremely large one. On the first, Alarm they respond to calls from 73 boxes and on the second from 124. The boundaries are Hunter's Point Bridge, the city line, Graham Avenue and Meserole Street and Bedford Avenue and North Eleventh Street. Among the large buildings in this district are two public schools and several churches. Besides these there are the Chelsea jute mills, several buildings belonging to the Standard Oil Company, the New York cordage works, Logwood works and Eagle pencil works, Church's soda works, Continental Iron Works, Kalbfleisch's chemical works. Hardy & Voorhis' lumber yard, .Bossett's lumber yard, the New Haven cooperative fur factory, St.Catharine's Hospital, Waterbury rope works, Lawrence's rope works, Brookfield's. glass works, Reynolds' coal yards, a large tannery, Seitz's brewery, Huber & Abbott's brewery, Graham's pottery, Peter Cooper's glue factory, a refrigerator manufactory, Fisher's furniture factory, Gallon's moulding mills, Orr's lumber yard, Reeves & Church's lumber yard, Charles Havemeyer's sugar house. Safety Boiler Manufacturing Company works and Palmer's cooperage and barrel yard.

  • from OUR FIREMEN : THE OFFICIAL HISTORY OF THE BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT FROM THE FIRST VOLUNTEER TO THE LATEST APPOINTEE. COMPILED FROM THE RECORDS OF THE DEPARTMENT. BROOKLYN, N. Y. 1892.
 
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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT 1869-1898 (PAID)


BFD BADGE

BROOKLYN FD.jpg


BFD PUMPER (2).jpg



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 29 BFD

HENRY HELLEN

HELLEN (3).jpg


He sat on the driver's seat of Engine No. 29 when she rolled out of the house on the night of Oct. 3, 1891, in response to a call from box 487. The horses were dashing swiftly down Oakland Avenue, when without the slightest warning they turned quickly to the left, and the right front wheel, axle and forward part of the engine came in collision with a house in course of removal which stood in the middle of the street. The axle broke and Driver HELLEN'S right leg was crushed between the house and his engine. He was conveyed as quickly as possible to the City Hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the leg.

Henry Helen BFD.jpg


ENGINE COMPANY NO. 29

PRATT OIL WORKS FIRES


PRATTS OIL WORKS.jpg


1884 FIRE

By late 1884, Pratt’s new Astral Oil Works in Williamsburg was on Bushwick Creek in the Eastern District of Brooklyn in Northern Williamsburg. The main building of the oil company ran from First-street about 300 feet to “the width of the block" from North Twelfth to North Thirteenth street. On December 21, 1884, a fire at Astral Oil was first noticed when an explosion shook houses and “broke windows for 300 feet" in front of the new Williamsburg Gas Works along North Twelfth Street. The tank on North 12th Street then had a body of flames shoot up from two naphtha tanks, each with the quantity of 2,500 barrels of naphtha in them. The fire then spread.[15] On December 22, 1884, Pratt’s Astral Oil Works in Greenpoint burned down. While the naptha storage house burned, the tin shop and refinery were saved by firemen. According to Pratt, much of the damages were insured.


1889 FIRE

1889 PRATT OIL WORKS.jpg
 
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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT
1869-1898 (PAID)

ENGINE COMPANY NO. 29



1896 FIRE

1896 FIRE.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


246 FROST STREET FIREHOUSE - ENGINE 29/ENGINE 229 - 1890-1915


FORMER FIREHOUSE 1940s:

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FORMER FIREHOUSE 1980s

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FORMER FIREHOUSE 2000s

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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


75 RICHARDSON STREET FIREHOUSE - ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 - DEDICATED 1915

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F 3.jpg
 

mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


75 RICHARDSON STREET FIREHOUSE - ENGINE 229/LADDER 146

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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


75 RICHARDSON STREET FIREHOUSE - ENGINE 229/LADDER 146


E-229-fh-10.jpg

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E 229 fh 13.jpg

E 229 fh 21.jpg

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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


75 RICHARDSON STREET FIREHOUSE - ENGINE 229/LADDER 146



E-229-k.jpg

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F 32.jpg

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mack

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ENGINE 229/LADDER 146 (CONTINUED)


LADDER 146 - 1976 - 2ND ALARM SEIGLE STREET

L 146 22 270 SIEGLE 1976.jpg
 
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