FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)

Engine 28/Ladder 11 Members:

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   
 

mack

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)


Engine 28/Ladder 11 Fires:


April 13, 1875 138 1/2 Pitt Street:

Ladder 11 rescued the Kuhne family, 2 adults and 5 children, who were trapped by fire on an upper floor. Members of Ladder 11 noted on the Roll of Merit were: FFs John McClane, Thomas Larkin and Michael McAvoy


Box 33-439 October 20, 1978:

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Ladder 11 received a Unit Citation for outstanding performance at this 3rd alarm.


Box 460 September 9, 1981:

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Box 55-608 November 9, 1983 - "Division 7 Training and Safety Newsletter" July 2016 - DC Jay Jonas

On November 9, 1983, quiet of the early morning hours would be shattered in the Grammercy Park area of Manhattan. Units would be challenged by a fire in a renovated multiple dwelling that almost claimed the lives of two firefighters.

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The Building: The fire building at 321 East 22nd Street was a renovated multiple dwelling. It was a series of six, 5-story buildings built in the 1800s. They were former commercial buildings. In 1972, these six building underwent a major renovation. A new fa?ade was installed. The rear walls of each of these buildings were removed and the depth of the buildings were either extended or shortened to become uniform in length. The brick bearing walls that separated the former buildings were removed. In their place, walls built with 4?x 4? wood studs were installed. These walls were not in line with the former masonry bearing walls. These walls were located as the apartment designs dictated. All the former building?s stairways were removed and replaced with one center hall stairway which divided the building, front half and back half. This design created 70 foot dead-end hallways. The renovation also included the addition of a 6th floor to the building. This 6th floor also had a mezzanine which made the building essentially a 7-story building. The sloping roof for the mezzanine was not visible from the street. It was only visible from the rear.

Inside the renovated building, the ceilings were lowered. The center hall, which was constructed out of concrete block, separated the front and rear apartments. This essentially created two 4,500 square foot cocklofts on each floor, one on each side of the hallway. Utility shafts that connected plumbing and electric, opened into these combustible voids. These utility shafts had no fire stopping. The horizontal voids were interconnected with the vertical voids. These voids were framed out with wood studs.

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There were no sprinkler systems in the renovated building. The building therefore was equipped with fire escapes that went the length of the building. This arrangement looked similar to party-wall balconies but with only one ladder for the entire length of the fire escape. The fire escape balconies were 150 feet long, the length of the building. The newly renovated building now contained 116 apartments.

The Fire: At 0525 hours, the Manhattan Fire Dispatcher received a telephone call reporting a fire in apartment 2H on the second floor of 321 E. 22nd Street. Manhattan Box 608 was transmitted sending Engines 16, 5, Ladders 7, 3, and Battalion 6 to the scene. In quick succession, other phone calls were received reporting a fire in apartment 3W and apartment 1A. At 0528 hours, Capt. John Tobin of Engine 16 arrived. There was no fire or smoke visible from the exterior. Upon entry into the first floor, a light haze and a slight smell of burning wood could be sensed. Capt. Tobin transmitted a 10-75. Engine 14 was sent with the transmission of the 10-75.

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Engine 16 stretched an 1 ? inch hand line to the first floor and operated in apartment 1U on the 1st floor. Ladder 7 and Ladder 3 went to the first floor as well. The fire appeared to be a small fire around an electrical outlet. While an examination was being made, Lieut. Peter Hayden of Ladder 3 noticed fire coming from the floor/carpeting in the apartment. Ladder 3 went to determine the limits of fire extension. They found fire extending toward the exposure 4 side of the building.

Working in Battalion 6 for the tour was Battalion Chief Michael Scirica. Battalion 6 arrived at 0529 hours as Engine 16 was stretching the first hand line. B.C. Scirica had Ladder 7 open up the ceiling in the rear apartment. Fire was spotted extending toward the floor above. B.C. Scirica determined the fire condition as a light fire condition. As Ladder 7 continued to open up the ceilings, it became apparent that the fire was more advanced than originally thought. Everywhere that hooks were put into the ceiling, showed fire.

At 0537 hours, Battalion 6 requested and additional Engine and Truck. Engine 21 and Ladder 9 were dispatched. At 0540 hours, Battalion Chief Scirica of Battalion 6 transmitted the ?All-Hands? for box 608. Battalion 4, Rescue 1, and Division 1 were dispatched as well.

Ladder 3, commanded by Lieut. Peter Hayden, went to the floor above for vent, entry and search (VES). While operating in apartment 2A, they discovered fire extending into the apartment via the utility shaft. Ladder 3 opened up behind a bathroom mirror and found heavy fire behind it. Lieut. Hayden radioed a report to B.C. Scirica telling him of the volume of fire that was in the voids and to transmit a second alarm. At 0542 hours, a full 2nd Alarm was transmitted. Engines 33, 28, 1, Ladders 11, Engine 9/Satellite 1 were sent.

Deputy Chief Gene Dockter of the 1st Division arrived at 0548 hours and assumed command of the fire. After a quick size-up of conditions, he requested the response of two additional ladder companies. Ladders 24 and 12 were sent to the scene. Deputy Chief Dockter spotted the voids within the renovated building and knew that the fire was probably well advanced. The fire was racing within the voids of this renovated building. The wood used to lower the ceilings on each floor created a highway for the fire. The utility shafts were not fire stopped. Fire quickly found these vertical voids and extended upward. The fire was kept to the rear of the building with the hallway acting as a fire wall.

The heavy fire in the voids was beginning to erupt. Engine 5 commanded by Capt. Jack Boyle stretched an 1 ? inch hand line to the second floor. Engine 14 commanded by Lieut. Eugene Flynn also stretched an 1 ? inch hand line to the second floor. Engine 21 arrived commanded by Lieut. DiPietro and were ordered to stretch a hand line to the third floor.

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Fire was now starting to show out multiple windows in the rear of the building. A heavy smoke condition filled the entire building. They moved to the 3rd floor, extinguished fire, and then moved to the 4th floor. Ladder 3 and Engine 5 at one point were forced out onto the rear fire escape balcony. They found themselves in a precarious position with fire coming out windows below them. The one fire escape ladder was a distance from them. Engine 5 and Ladder 3 were cut off. Capt. Jack Boyle of Engine 5 made a memorable radio transmission: ?Better get a line back here, we are barbequing like 5 franks on a grill.?

Ladder 9 commanded by Lieut. William Gray arrived at the fire. They were ordered to check the second floor along with Ladder 3. In seeing that there was fire on the second floor, they proceeded to the third floor to perform VES and check for extension. There was fire on the third floor also. A hose line was called for and was stretched by Engine 1 via a fire escape stretch. Engine 1 was commanded by Lieut. Richard Judson.

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Engine 33 was assigned first due on the 2nd alarm commanded by Lieut. James McDermott. They were ordered to stretch a hand line to the rear fire escape. Fr. John Rack from Ladder 9 was detailed to Engine 33 for the tour. He was sent back to Engine 33?s pumper to obtain rolled-up lengths of hose so they could stretch to the upper floors. Upon his return to the rear of the building, he saw that there was a 35 foot portable ladder placed from the roof of a one-story set back to the third floor balcony of the fire escape. There was a gap between the fire building and this one-story extension. Fr. Rack started to climb the portable ladder with the hose to the third floor fire escape balcony. He handed the hose to Fr. John Thompson of Engine 33. He began his descent of the ladder to obtain the remaining lengths of hose. The ladder was not supported at the tip or the base. As he was climbing down the ladder, the portable ladder started to slide. Realizing that the portable ladder was going to fall, Fr. Rack jumped toward the roof set-back. He fell 21 feet and fractured one of his ankles. If he had not made it to the roof and fell to the ground, he would have fallen 40 feet. The first Firefighter to reach Fr. Rack was Fr. Angelo Figueroa of Ladder 9. He was later joined by other firefighters in assisting in removing Fr. Rack to the ambulance.

Second alarm units were now arriving at the fire. Engine 28 commanded by Lieut. Andy Trabanco was ordered to stretch a hand line to the top floor. Lieut. Trabanco ordered his members to stretch a 2 ? inch hand line. Working in Engine 28 was Fr. Bob Daly, Fr. Patrick McDade, Fr. Bob Kuehlewein, Fr. Frank Morrisano, and Fr. John Boyer. Engine 28 utilized a rope stretch to accomplish their task.

Ladder 11 arrived at the fire. Working in Ladder 11 was Lieut. Jerry Kelly, Fr. Fred Schwarzrock, Fr. John Salka, Fr. Billy Beyer, Fr. Paul Casey, and Fr. Mike Peterson. Deputy Chief Dockter ordered them to operate on the top floor for VES.

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Fire was erupting in the building in the rear apartments. Deputy Chief Dockter transmitted a 3rd alarm at 0600 hours. Fire was now coming out windows in the rear of the building on several floors. The front of the building looked completely different from the rear of the building. The concrete block hallway kept all the fire in the rear of the building. Setting up a Tower Ladder stream in the front of the building was not an option. It would have been ineffective because all the fire was in the rear of the building. At one point, Battalion Chief James Manahan of the Safety Battalion radioed Deputy Chief Dockter and told him that he needs two hand lines, two ladder companies and a Battalion Chief on every floor. Units were being assigned as soon as they arrived. Deputy Chief Dockter transmitted a 4th alarm at 0625 hours.

As Engine 28 brought their 2 ? inch hose line to the 6th floor, the smoke condition throughout the building was heavy. Lieut. Trabanco, Fr. Kuehlewein, Fr. Morrisano, Fr. Daly and Fr. McDade started operating their hose line on the 6th floor. While Engine 28 was operating and extinguishing fire, a trapped woman was discovered. She was removed to the front of the building by Fr. Daly and Fr. McDade, and she was removed by Tower Ladder 7?s bucket.

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Lieut. Trabanco was awaiting the return of Fr. Daly and Fr. McDade to the hose line. They did not return. They became disoriented in the heavy smoke and went to the 7th floor/mezzanine floor. Lieut. Trabanco became concerned. Lieut. Trabanco radioed to Deputy Chief Dockter that he had two members missing as he commenced a search for the two missing members. Battalion Chief Arthur Meadows of the 4th Battalion fought his way up the stairs through the heat and smoke and told Lieut. Trabanco that he was there to help him find his missing members.

Ladder 11 was performing primary searches on the top (7th) floor. (The top floor was a mezzanine that had an entrance off the hallway.)

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They divided into two teams. Lieut. Kelly, Fr. Schwarzrock, and Fr. Salka comprised one team. Fr. Beyer, Fr. Peterson, and Fr. Casey comprised the second team. All the apartment doors were locked and blocked with furniture making forcible entry and arduous task. (Unbeknownst to the operating Firefighters, the 7th floor doors were not used by the occupants. They used the doors on the 6th floor for entry into their apartments. These 7th floor doors were locked and blocked with furniture.) Upon forcing entry to apartment 6K, Ladder 11 found two trapped occupants, Diane Steen and Peter Steen. Lieut. Kelly took Diane Steen to the public hallway toward the scuttle ladder that lead to the roof.

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Lieut. Kelly was sharing his mask facepiece with Ms. Steen as the smoke condition was debilitating. She was removed to the roof via a scuttle ladder at the end of the public hallway. Fr. Schwarzrock grabbed Mr. Steen and took him out to the hallway. Mr. Steen was in a state of panic as Fr. Schwarzrock was sharing his facepiece with the trapped civilian. Lieut. Kelly helped Fr. Schwarzrock in bringing Mr. Steen up the scuttle ladder to the roof. The two missing members of Engine 28 were found near the scuttle ladder. They assisted Lieut. Kelly with Mr. and Ms. Steen. Fr. McDade and Fr. Daly of Engine 28 followed Lieut. Kelly down to the top floor. Lieut. Trabanco of Engine 28 and the rest of his unit found Fr. McDade and Fr. Daly on the top floor.

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The Rescue of Diane Steen and Peter Steen: Fr. Salka and Fr. Schwarzrock from Ladder 11 continued to perform a search in these difficult conditions. They were in the process of forcing another apartment door to seek refuge from the heavy smoke condition.

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Fr. Schwarzrock was out of air and he was beginning to feel the effects of smoke inhalation. He started to lose control of his body. His head made contact with Fr. Salka?s. He said: ?Sammy, you gotta get me into an apartment.? (?Sammy? was Fr. Salka?s nickname in Ladder 11.) Fr. Schwarzrock then fell to the floor, unconscious. Fr. Salka took his mask facepiece off and began mask sharing with Fr. Schwarzrock. Fr. Salka began calling out for help. Fr. Salka?s body was beginning to feel the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning while he gave his mask facepiece to Fr. Schwarzrock.

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(Historical Note: In 1983, the Forcible Entry Firefighter and the Can Firefighter did not have handi-talkies.) Lieut. Kelly was making his way back toward the other members of his team when he heard Fr. Salka?s calls for help. He told him to keep calling out so they could be found. Lieut. Kelly found Fr. Salka semi-conscious and Fr. Schwarzrock unconscious. The smoke condition was acrid.

Lieut. Kelly of Ladder 11 took his mask facepiece off and started mask sharing with Fr. Salka. Fr. McDade and Fr. Daly of Engine 28 made their way to the two endangered Firefighters who were 30-35 feet away. Lieut. Kelly ordered them to drag Fr. Schwarzrock to the only sure exit he knew of, the scuttle ladder to the roof.

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Lieut. Kelly assisted Fr. Salka to the scuttle ladder. He assisted him up the ladder and to the roof. At this time, Lieut. Kelly transmitted a ?MAYDAY? message. He reported to Deputy Chief Dockter that they have an unconscious firefighter and they needed a resuscitator on the roof. As Fr. Schwarzrock was unconscious, he could not be assisted onto the scuttle ladder. A rope was called for to be dropped from the roof. The rope was tied around the chest of Fr. Schwarzrock and Firefighters on the roof hoisted Fr. Schwarzrock to the roof.

When Fr. Fred Schwarzrock was hoisted to the roof, he had a weak pulse and shallow breathing. The resuscitator was applied to him.

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By now, fire was breaking through the roof. In front of the building, Deputy Chief Dockter requested EMS personnel go to the roof. EMS Specialist Kevin Finn was hoisted to the roof via Tower Ladder 7?s bucket with his equipment, which was operated by Fr. Richard Schultz of Ladder 9. A stokes basket stretcher was brought to the roof and Fr. Schwarzrock was placed in the stretcher. He was removed to the street via Tower Ladder 7?s bucket.

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He was removed to Bellevue Hospital where he was admitted for smoke inhalation and a fractured vertebrae. Fr. Salka was also admitted with smoke inhalation. The time was approximately 0640 hours.

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The other team from Ladder 11 was performing primary searches in other top floor apartments. Their air supply was becoming depleted. In the heavy smoke condition, Fr. Peterson and Fr. Casey made their way to the roof. Fr. Billy Beyer continued to search on the top floor.

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Fr. Beyer ran out of air and he made his way to the rear fire escape on the 6th floor. Fr. Beyer?s escape from the top floor put him in another dangerous situation. He was trapped on the top floor fire escape balcony with another Firefighter, Angel Vasquez from Ladder 9. Fire was coming up through the fire escape balcony. They called for a life-saving rope to be dropped down to them from the roof. Ladder 3?s life-saving rope was dropped to them by Fr. Richard Schultz of Ladder 9. They tied the rope off to a substantial object. Fr. Beyer and Fr. Vasquez performed a single slide evolution and rappelled down to the rear yard to escape their predicament. Once down on the ground, Fr. Beyer notified Lieut. Kelly of his location.

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Available units were quickly being used up. The fire was racing throughout the building with fire on every floor of this occupied building. There was heavy fire in the cockloft and fire was coming through the roof where ventilation holes were cut. Deputy Chief Dockter transmitted a 5th alarm at 0702 hours.

The fire required 18 hose lines to eventually extinguish the fire. The fire was placed ?Probably Will Hold? at 0817 hours and ?Under Control? at 0824 hours. There were 29 apartments involved in fire, all of which were in the rear of the building. There were 26 Firefighters injured at this fire and two civilians were treated for smoke inhalation (Mr. and Ms. Steen). Fr. Fred Schwarzrock remained in Bellevue Hospital for 15 days. He had 29%-31% carboxyhemoglobin in his blood when he was admitted.

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The Board of Merit met and considered the actions taken at this fire. Fr. John Salka L-11, Lieut. Jerry Kelly L-11, Fr. Fred Schwarzrock L-11, Fr. Michael Joyce L-3, Fr. Reid Jantz L-3, Lieut. Robert Crozier L-9 and Fr. Peter Guidetti E-33 were awarded ?Class A awards? for their actions at Manhattan Box 5-5-608. (A ?Class A award? is awarded for an act that requires personal bravery in conjunction with initiative and capability.) Fr. John Salka received the ?Fire Bell Club Medal? on Medal Day 1984 for his actions in saving the life of Fr. Fred Schwarzrock. EMS Specialist Kevin Finn was awarded the ?Life Saving Medal?, the second highest award presented by the NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation. (Historical Note: The NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation was the agency that administered the Emergency Medical Service prior to the merger with the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) in 1994.)


The Engine 28/Ladder 11 - 18th Battalion Connection

Two of the Firefighters mentioned in this essay from Ladder 11, John Salka and Billy Beyer, reconnected later in their careers. They were both assigned to the 18th Battalion as Battalion Chiefs. In addition, Battalion Chiefs Billy Oehm and Kevin Loughran of the 18th Battalion were also alumni of Engine 28/Ladder 11. All four Battalion Chiefs retired out of the 18th Battalion.

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Division 7 Newsletters (DC Jay Jonas):

https://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/division-7-newsletters/
 
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mack

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)


Engine 28/Ladder 11 Fires (continued)

Box 458 October 19, 1986 - "Division 7 Training and Safety Newsletter" September 2017 - DC Jay Jonas

Lieutenant William E. McGinn III

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William Edward McGinn III (Billy) was born on June 18, 1958. He lived on Staten Island and was one of six children. Billy?s father was a history teacher and the Dean of Boys at Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan. Billy graduated from New Dorp High School in 1976.

Billy worked in a funeral home at the age of 18. He continued working at the funeral home part time as he was going to college. Billy?s Uncle, Kevin McGinn, was a Firefighter in the FDNY assigned to Ladder 43. Billy?s Uncle Kevin decided to open a monument and florist business near Mount Loretta Cemetery on Staten Island, called ?the Mount?. Billy started working in the monument business and continued working there for many years.

Billy?s Uncle, Kevin McGinn was influential in the life of young Billy. He looked up to him and admired him. He loved that he was a Firefighter and would visit him periodically at Ladder 43?s firehouse in Spanish Harlem. Lieutenant Kevin McGinn assigned to Ladder 76 would perish from a line-of-duty heart attack in 1989.

Billy started going to Hunter College in 1976. Billy was a Physics major. He was very good at mathematics. It is here that he met his future wife, Anne Golden. They had classes together and ended up commuting together to school. During their Sophomore year, Billy asked Anne about him becoming a New York City Firefighter.

In 1980, Anne had graduated from Hunter College and Billy had transferred to City College to take Civil Engineering. Billy was fascinated with building construction and what made them stand or collapse. Later in his adult life, he was honored to have met Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn who was the FDNY?s expert in building construction and collapse. Billy was an avid reader of Chief Dunn?s books.

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In 1984, Anne moved to North Carolina to attend graduate school. It was at this time that Billy was called to become an FDNY Firefighter. Billy was sworn in on March 5, 1984.

Upon graduation from Proby School, Billy was assigned to Ladder 11 on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. It was an active firehouse with some very accomplished Firefighters that would ?break him in.? One of the firefighters that took an interest in Billy was John Salka. He would call him ?College Boy.? The relationship between the two became strong. This friendship and respect between the two would continue throughout their careers. John Salka would later recruit Billy to transfer to Squad 1 where John was a Lieutenant. John would also recruit Billy to be one of his Lieutenants when John was the Captain of Engine 48.

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Later in 1984, Anne moved back to New York. Billy and Anne were married on August 4, 1984. They would move to the Riverdale section of the Bronx. Billy would support Anne?s pursuit of her Doctorate Degree at Columbia University. They started a family and had a son (Liam) and a Daughter (Cordelia). Billy became very active in raising his and Anne?s children. He was a parent representative in the school leadership team at PS 81. He was also a Little League coach and a Cub Scout leader.

I was one of Billy?s Lieutenants in Ladder 11. Billy had tremendous drive and enthusiasm as a Firefighter in Ladder 11. He would be a sponge for any information that the officers in Engine 28 and Ladder 11 would impart.

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On a Sunday day tour on October 19, 1986, Billy was detailed to Engine 28 which shares the firehouse with Ladder 11. Engine 28 was commanded by Lieutenant Andy Trabanco and they were out inspecting hydrants. Suddenly, Manhattan box 458 was transmitted at 1145 hours. Engine 28 was close by and would arrive at the box first due. When Engine 28 arrived, they found fire on the first floor of 611 East 11 Street. Flames were licking out of a plywood covering of a window on a supposedly vacant apartment in the 7 story New Law Tenement. Lieutenant Trabanco transmitted a 10-75. Since they were so close to the reported location, they would be operating by themselves for a while.

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Smoke was filling the interior halls and stairs of the tenement. Screams could be heard from trapped occupants in the stairway above the fire. Lieutenant Trabanco ordered a hose line stretched to the narrow hallway of the first floor. He also ordered Fr. Ed Yany (Ladder 11 detail) to ascend the stairway to rescue the trapped occupants on the upper floors. Fire was lapping out of the fire apartment into the hallway. Fr. John Malley had the nozzle and was able to knock down the fire in the hallway which allowed Fr. Yany to remove the to remove the trapped occupants.

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While moving the hose line into the fire apartment, the ceiling collapsed onto the nozzle team of Engine 28. Firefighters John Malley and Michael Pace were injured. Firefighter William McGinn (Ladder 11 Detail) had the ?Door Position.? He saw the situation and he entered the apartment to assist the injured Firefighters to safety. Fr. Billy McGinn then moved up on the hose line to take the nozzle. Fr. Ed Yany came down from the stairway to back-up Fr. McGinn. The two, along with Lieutenant Trabanco restarted their advance of the hose line within the fire apartment and knocked down the three remaining rooms of fire.

According to Captain Andy Trabanco (Ret.), Fr. Billy McGinn saved the day. He had the initiative and capability to assist the injured firefighters out of the fire apartment and then, continued the extinguishment of the fire.

The members of Engine 28 who were on for that tour of duty, Lieutenant Andy Trabanco, Fr. Kevin T. Loughran, Fr. William E. McGinn, Fr. Edward Yany, Fr. John P. Malley, and Fr. Michael E. Pace, were awarded the ?New York Firefighters Burn Center Foundation Medal? for their actions that day.

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Note: LODD - CAPTAIN WILLIAM MCGINN SQUAD 18 September 11, 2001 World Trade Center


Box 22-261 July 21, 1991 - "Division 7 Training and Safety Newsletter" September 2017 - DC Jay Jonas

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The last tour I worked with Billy McGinn as his Lieutenant was memorable. It was July 21, 1991, 6x9 tour. Billy would be detailed to Squad 1 after this tour. Ladder 11 responded to Manhattan Box 261 for a reported fire at 118 Eldridge Street at 0530 hours. The fire was a 2nd alarm on arrival for heavy fire coming out of a store occupancy on the ground floor of an occupied old law tenement.

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Ladder 11 would be assigned the 2nd due ladder position. Fr. Billy McGinn was the Chauffeur. There were numerous people endangered on the front fire escape. Billy would raise Ladder 11?s aerial ladder and then place portable ladders to the fire escape balconies. He ascended the ladders and the fire escape to assist the trapped occupants down the fire escape and the portable ladders to the street. He helped remove several people.

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Upon my return to the apparatus, I spoke to Billy McGinn. His face was smoke stained and he had a big smile.

He filled me in as to what his actions were while we were on the floor above the fire. I asked him: ?Are you sure you want to transfer to Squad 1??

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?Division 7 Training and Safety Newsletter" September 2017:

http://www.fdnysbravest.com/Division7NewsletterSept2017.pdf
 
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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)

Engine 28/Ladder 11 Medals:

JOHN MCGOUGH FF. ENG. 28 DEC. 12, 1902 1903 TREVOR-WARREN

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GARY R. HOWARD FF. ENG. 28 APR. 16, 1979 1980 KANE

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ALL MEMBERS ENG. 28 OCT. 19, 1986 1987 BURN CENTER

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VINCENT ROMERO, JR. CAPT. ENG. 28 MAY 28, 1992 1993 HONOR LEGION

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JOHN T. OAKLEY FF. LAD. 11 FEB. 18, 1907 1908 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

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PATRICK J. KISSANE FF. LAD. 11 MAR. 31, 1923 1924 BROOKLYN CITIZENS

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ALBERT B. WHITLEY FF. LAD. 11 FEB. 29, 1936 1937 CRIMMINS

GEORGE J. DONNELLY LT. LAD. 11 FEB. 29, 1936 1937 KENNY

FREDERICK B. VOIGT FF. LAD. 11 NOV. 12, 1943 1944 DELEHANTY

HUGH ELVET LEWIS FF. LAD. 11 MAY 3, 1946 1947 LA GUARDIA

JOSEPH H. GIUNTA LT. LAD. 11 FEB. 14, 1947 1948 BROOKMAN

FREDERICK B. VOIGT FF. LAD. 11 NOV. 26, 1949 1950 FDR

SASHA W. BURAK FF. LAD. 11 JUL. 9, 1952 1953 COMMERCE

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SASHA W. BURAK FF. LAD. 11 FEB. 27, 1952 1953 COMMERCE

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NICHOLAS SHARKO FF. LAD. 11 JAN. 1, 1957 1958 JAMES GORDON BENNETT

JAMES F. MURPHY FF. LAD. 11 L-9 NOV. 28, 1961 1962 CRIMMINS

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BENJAMIN F. FRIES FF. LAD. 11 APR. 9, 1965 1966 EMERALD

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DONALD RICKERT FF. LAD. 11 DEC. 4, 1971 1972 CRIMMINS

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JOHN J. SALKA FF. LAD. 11 OCT. 11, 1981 1982 COLUMBIA

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JOHN J. SALKA FF. LAD. 11 NOV. 9, 1983 1984 FIRE BELL CLUB

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DONALD V. SHIELDS FF. LAD. 11 AUG. 8, 1989 1990 LANE

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JOHN J. HODGENS (2) FF. LAD. 11 AUG. 12, 1992 1993 EMERALD

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THADDEUS K. JANKOWSKI FF. LAD. 11 MAY 28, 1992 1993 PULASKI

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Appointed Director Public Safety Stamford CT -2012

https://www.stamfordadvocate.com/po...s-N-Y-experience-to-public-safety-3436024.php

MICHAEL J. TANSEY FF. LAD. 11 2008 LAUFER

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)


Engine 28/Ladder 11 LODDs:

     


    LIEUTENANT MICHAEL QUILTY LADDER 11 September 11, 2001

          LT Quilty lost his life at the World Trade Center.

         

         

          https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/michael_quilty_42_fdny_hero_in.html

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=146411


    FIREFIGHTER RICHARD JOHN KELLY LADDER 11 September 11, 2001

          FF Richard John Kelly lost his life at the World Trade Center.
 
         

         

         


          https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/richard_kelly_50_firefighter_c.html

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/richard-j-kelly-jr/


    FIREFIGHTER EDWARD JAMES DAY LADDER 11 September 11, 2001

          FF Edward James Day lost his life at the World Trade Center.

         

         

         

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/story.aspx?personid=127868

          http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-edward-day/


    FIREFIGHTER JOHN F. HEFFERNAN LADDER 11 September 11, 2001

          FF John F. Heffernan lost his life at the World Trade Center.

         

         

          http://www.legacy.com/sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=147185&location=2

          http://betterangels911.com/firefighter-john-heffernan/


    FIREFIGHTER MATTHEW ROGAN

          FF Matthew Rogan lost his life at the World Trade Center.

         

         

         

          http://marjvke.50megs.com/MatthewRogan.html

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/matthew-s-rogan/


    FIREFIGHTER MICHAEL F. CAMMARATA LADDER 11 September 11, 2001

          FF Michael F. Cammarata lost his life at the World Trade Center.
   
         

         

          https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/michael-f-cammarata/

          https://www.silive.com/september-11/2010/09/michael_cammarata_22_firefight.html


    FIRE MARSHAL CHRISTOPHER ZANETIS March 15, 2018
         

         

         

         

    Major Christopher "Tripp" Zanetis of the 106th Rescue Wing, New York Air National Guard, was killed on March 15, 2018 when a United States Air Force helicopter crashed during a mission along the Iraq-Syria border.  Tripp joined the Fire Department of the City of New York in 2004 and served on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at Engine 28 Ladder 11. Tripp was promoted to Fire Marshal and, in the course of his duties, was recognized for his bravery as part of the FDNY's Bureau of Fire Investigation's Citywide South.

    Fire Marshal Zanetis was appointed Firefighter in September of 2004 and assigned to Engine Company 28 on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. In 2007 he transferred to Ladder Company 11, located in the same firehouse. In April, 2013, he was promoted to Fire Marshal and assigned to the Bureau of Fire Investigation?s Citywide South in Brooklyn. In 2014, he was recognized for his bravery as part of an investigative unit.


         


    New York City Fire Department (FDNY) March 21, 2018:
?
          ?When Tripp was promoted to Fire Marshal, I was one of the training officers at the academy and I occasionally worked with him in the field after that. His intelligence stood out. He was one of the most brilliant and intellectually gifted people I had ever met. The more you talked to him, the more you realized anything he attempted, he excelled at,? says FDNY Fire Marshal Tom Sabella. Fire Marshal Christopher ?Tripp? Zanetis died on March 15 in an Air Force helicopter crash in Iraq. He was on military leave from the Department, and died alongside FDNY Lt. Christopher Raguso and five other military service members, while supporting Operation Inherent Resolve. Fire Marshal Zanetis and Lt. Raguso were assigned to the 106th Rescue Wing at the Francis S. Gabreski Air National Guard Base in New York. Fire Marshal Sabella says, ?He was a person willing to help, step up, always do the right thing, and always put others before himself. That was his personality. He was genuine and that is how he lived his life. Seeing that kind of intelligence along with the ability to be so humble at the same time was truly an amazing thing to witness.?

         

    https://www1.nyc.gov/site/fdny/news/fa1918/fdny-the-line-duty-death-lieutenant-christopher-j-raguso-fire-marshal#/0


    Maj. Christopher Zanetis, 101st Rescue Squadron pilot, 106th Rescue Wing, New York Air National Guard, is honored during a procession led by the Fire Department of New York through lower Manhattan March 29, 2018.

         

       


Engine 28 WTC-Related Death:

    FIREFIGHTER ROY W. CHELSEN ENGINE 28 January 9, 2011

         

         

         

    Firehouse.com News:
   
    01-12-2011, 01:57 PM  9/11 Hero Leaves Legacy Following Cancer Battle
          By Heather Caspi and Susan Nicol

    Firefighter Roy Chelsen died from bone-marrow cancer believed caused by his time at Ground Zero.

    An FDNY firefighter and 9/11 response hero passed away on Jan. 9 after battling bone-marrow cancer believed to be caused by his time at Ground Zero.

    Roy Chelsen of Engine 28 is credited by his colleagues for saving numerous members of his company by ushering them out of the North Tower before its collapse. He was also known by many in the fire service for his efforts to establish a registry of potential bone-marrow donors both for himself and for others.

    The date of his death was 1/9/11, a poignant coincidence, noted friend and colleague Kevin Murray.

    "Personally, he saved my life on 9/11 so I have a different feeling about Roy than most guys. He was probably the toughest guy in the firehouse," Murray said. "To see him get stricken was a big deal to us."

    Chelsen retired in 2006 due to the cancer, and his death came despite the discovery of a long sought-after match and transplant administered on Dec. 3, 2010. He was 51.

    "We thought he would pull out of it but it didn't work out that way," Murray said.

    Fellow firefighter Bob Alverson added, "He fought harder than I ever saw anyone fight for anything, and never complained about anything." He would get chemotherapy one day and be out chopping wood the next, Alverson said.

    Chelsen had wanted the registry efforts to continue on to help others, so those friends and family involved hope to do so in some form, Murray said. There are a few thousand people on the registry now, he said.

    Chelsen was also on the forefront of trying to get legislation passed so other people wouldn't have to go through what he did, Alverson said. His death came just eight days after the signing of President Obama's 9/11 bill to provide five years of free healthcare and compensation to thousands of sick responders and survivors.

    Within weeks after Sept.11, FDNY had established an office to track personnel health for those worried about what they may have came in contact with, said Jim Long, an FDNY spokesman.

    To date, Chelsen and 25 other FDNY firefighters and one FDNY EMS provider who were sickened at the World Trade Center site are receiving benefits from the department. Two other cases are pending, he said.

    On Monday, Chelsen's name was added to the USFA on-duty firefighter database -- a first for a firefighter cancer death.

    "Some people use the word 'hero' very easily," Murray said, "but Roy definitely was a hero."


    WORLD TRADE CENTER TASK FORCE INTERVIEW - FIREFIGHTER ROY CHELSEN

          https://static01.nyt.com/packages/pdf/nyregion/20050812_WTC_GRAPHIC/9110475.PDF


    https://www.silive.com/news/2011/01/time_runs_out_on_hero_roy_chel.html

    https://www.firehero.org/fallen-firefighter/roy-chelsen/


    RIP.  Never forget.


   
 

mack

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)


CAPTAIN JOHN CAPILLO ENGINE 28 - Died in quarters - November 24, 1934

   

   

    Founder FDNY Columbia Association


          John Capillo (Giovanni) was born in 1886, in Scilla, Italy.

          John's Parents were: Bruno Capillo and Maria A. Fidele, they had three sons: John, Pasquale (Pat), & Tony. They emigrated to America on 1 Jun 1895, sailing from Genoa, Italy.

          They moved to 148 Mulberry Street with his Brother, Pasquale at the age of 9.

          On December 16, 1906, Giovanni Married Rose Romano, Pasquale Capillo and Antoinette Magre were the Best Man and Brides Maid/witnessed signed. They married at St. Boniface church in Manhattan in 1906, then located at 304 East 47th Street NYC. John and Rose had Seven Children: Angela in 1907, Joe in 1908, Domenick in 1911, John in 1912, Mary in 1915, Edward in 1916 & Rosemary in 1920. All 7 children were born and raised in the same home in Woodhaven, Queens.

          John Capillo was a Fire Chief, and founded the very first Italian-American Fire Fighters guild in New York City.
    On November 21, 1934, Giovanni Capillo died during a false alarm, one day after fighting a fire, and suffering from smoke inhalation a day before. He died at 3:20PM on Nov 19, 1934 at the Fire House located at 604 East 11 Street Manhattan

          He left behind his wife, Rose and (7) Children.


    NY State Supreme Court - Capt. Capello Widow LODD Appeal

    https://books.google.com/books?id=se67BRv5NHgC&pg=PA21&lpg=PA21&dq=john+capillo+november+21,+1934+fire+captain&source=bl&ots=bkV-CTdbcp&sig=ACfU3U1bxJ_l4il7zw80SsNJllDa-zukag&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi5nZeg8q7pAhWBhHIEHY5KB3sQ6AEwAXoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=john%20capillo%20november%2021%2C%201934%20fire%20captain&f=false


    Columbia Association - Established 1934

         

          On March 23, 1934 the honorable John J, McElligott, Fire Chief and Commissioner and the Honorable Deputy Fire Commissioner Francis X. Giaccono approved a request made by Fire Captain John Capillo of Engine 28. The nature of the request was as follows: I herewith submit for your approval, a brief to be used by myself and other members of this department, for the purpose of instructing people of this city, what to do in case of fire.

          What prompted Captain Capillo to make such a request was his concern about the serious losses of life from recent fires in tenement houses and especially among Italian Occupants. He formed a group of fire department members of Italian extraction who could understand and speak the Italian language. This group of men under the instruction of Captain Capillo adopted a set of simple rules, which would instruct these recent immigrants on what to do in case of a fire, which could save their lives.

          The original group present on that day with the fire Commissioner were: Commissioner Giaccone, Captain Capillo, Lieutenant Nicholas J. DiGiacomp of Engine 66, Fireman Anthony Pepe of Engine 17 and Fireman Charles Pentola of Engine Company 19.

          This concern for the citizens of the city became the impetus, which started the Columbia Association.

              https://www.fdnycolumbia.com/about-us/history

    FIREFIGHTER STEPHEN G. SCHWARTZ LADDER 11 JUNE 26, 2010

         

         

         
 

mack

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)


Lower East Side/Alphabet City - 1960s-1980s:












1978 2nd Alarm:













1980s:



1988 Tompkins Park Riot:



http://projects.nyujournalism.org/s...ns/2017/04/18/tompkins-square-park-riot-1988/


FDNY - FF Martin Celic Ladder 18 killed Box 439 July 2, 1977 - arson fire.



Fire Service Line of Duty Deaths - July 10, 1977 - LODD - Firefighter Martin Celic, 25 - FDNY, New York

At 3:10 pm, a fire broke out on the fifth floor of an abandoned building located on East Eight Street between Avenues C & D. This location is now home to the Fireman's Garden, which honors all New York City Firemen who were killed in the line of duty. The garden pays particular tribute to Firefighter Celic. On July 2, Firefighter Celic, who was working an overtime tour with Engine Company 15, spotted the smoke on the way back to the firehouse after a false alarm. When Celic and the other FDNY members arrived at the warehouse, the blaze was spreading up the building. After the men entered the building, the teenager who had started the fire went back in and set another fire, on the second floor, trapping the firemen in the blazing structure. Ladder Company 11 raised its tower ladder to the fifth-floor window, and the firemen had to crawl onto the fire escape and jump to the tower ladder. Struggling through smoke and with heavy equipment on his back, Celic missed the bucket of the tower ladder and fell 70 feet to the ground. He was taken to Bellevue Hospital, where he died eight days later, on July 10, 1977. On Sept. 11, 2001, Celic's brother Thomas, 43, who worked for Marsh McLennan, died in Tower 1 at the World Trade Center.

https://www.facebook.com/fireservic...-yorkat-310-pm-a-fire-broke-/597673060393643/


NYPD - Officers Laurie and Foster assassinated January 27, 1972.



https://www1.nyc.gov/site/nypd/news/f0719/the-war-home-remembering-foster-laurie#/0
 
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mack

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Engine 28/Ladder 11 (continued)


Old Lower East Side map:

   


Engine 28/Ladder 11 location:

   


   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   
 

doneleven

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Thank you, Mack.  Great job, as usual.  Proud to play a small role in the history of a storied firehouse.  Humbled by some of the guys that broke me in...proud to have worked alongside all of them.  Tell ya what though...they sure did have a few handsome Medal winners....lol.  Stay safe.
 

68jk09

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Excellent presentation as usual Joe...i grew up not too far from 28 & 11 & i remember many of the tenements & other bldgs being demoed for "Urban Renewal" in the area ....always plenty of work there vacant & occupied ....i had many close friends who worked there...Gary Howard FF 28 ...Andy Trabanco LT 28 & CPT 11...Rich Hickey LT 28...Bernie "Moon" Mullin aka Black Barney LT 28...Jack Doherty CPT 11 ....Wayne Ward FF 28 ....Kenny Pogan Sr FF 28 RIP .....Dave DeFranco 11 RIP ...Bill Feehan Cpt 28 KIA 9-11 ...Bill McGinn FF 11 KIA 9-11...i know i may have left some out sorry ......& i also in later years got to know several other great guys who had worked there..... ENG*28 & LAD*11 a Great & well Respected place in our FDNY History.
 

mack

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Early 1950s "Signal 9-2" video. Queens companies and 46 Bn responding. Lots of changes over the years: alarm boxes that work; dispatching; uniforms; housewatch; apparatus; commo; etc.

 

fdhistorian

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On the northern tip of Manhattan Island, Battalion 13 is another geographically isolated battalion. The ridge which dominates its geography includes the highest land elevation on the island at 265 feet above sea level. Surrounded by parks, it includes the Inwood and Washington Heights neighborhoods. Similar to the Rockaway Peninsula, it is accessible by bridges and a few local arterial streets. Its four firehouses are mostly lined up near Amsterdam Avenue.

Historically, Battalion 13 included Riverdale in the Bronx and was housed with Engine 38 when it was located in Manhattan on Amsterdam Avenue. When originally organized, Battalion 13 encompassed all of the companies in the Bronx at the time, until renumbered as Battalion 14. Immediate first alarm support is more easily provided from Bronx companies.

Battalion 13Organized1907 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan1898with Engine 38, from Battalion 11
Battalion 13Renumberedas Battalion 10 (temporary)1903
Battalion 13Relocated1907 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan1904with Engine 38
Battalion 13Relocated515 W 181st St, Manhattan1916with Ladder 45
Battalion 13Temporary513 W 161st St, Manhattan2001with Engine 84
Battalion 13Renovated515 W 181st St, Manhattan2003with Engine 93
 
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fdhistorian

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On the northern tip of Manhattan Island, Battalion 13 is another geographically isolated battalion. The ridge which dominates its geography includes the highest land elevation on the island at 265 feet above sea level. Surrounded by parks, it includes the Inwood and Washington Heights neighborhoods. Similar to the Rockaway Peninsula, it is accessible by bridges and a few local arterial streets. Its four firehouses are mostly lined up near Amsterdam Avenue.

Historically, Battalion 13 included Riverdale in the Bronx and was housed with Engine 38 when it was located in Manhattan on Amsterdam Avenue. When originally organized, Battalion 13 encompassed all of the companies in the Bronx at the time, until renumbered as Battalion 14. Immediate first alarm support is more easily provided from Bronx companies.

Battalion 13Organized1907 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan1898with Engine 38, from Battalion 11
Battalion 13Renumberedas Battalion 10 (temporary)1903
Battalion 13Relocated1907 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan1904with Engine 38
Battalion 13Relocated515 W 181st St, Manhattan1916with Ladder 45
Battalion 13Temporary513 W 161st St, Manhattan2001with Engine 84
Battalion 13Renovated515 W 181st St, Manhattan2003with Engine 93
Companies in Battalion 13

1897 - 1898Battalion 13E41E42E45E46E48E50E52E60L17L19
1898 - 1905Battalion 13E37E38cE52E67L23
1905 - 1906Battalion 13E37E38cE52E67E80E80-2L23L28L28-2
1906 - 1907Battalion 13E37E38cE67E80E80-2L23L28L28-2
1907 - 1908Battalion 13E37E38cE67E80E80-2E84L23L34
1908 - 1909Battalion 13E38cE67E80E80-2E84L23L34
1909 - 1913Battalion 13E38cE67E84L34
1913 - 1915Battalion 13E38cE67E84E93E93-2L34L45
1915 - 1918Battalion 13E38cE67E84E93E93-2E95L34L36L45
1918 - 1922Battalion 13E38E67E84E93E95L34L36L45
1922 - 1968Battalion 13E67E84E93E95L34L36L45
1968 - 1969Battalion 13E67E84E93E95L34L36L45RS3
1969 - 1975Battalion 13E67E93E95L36L45RS3
1975 - 1995Battalion 13E67E84E93E95L34L36L45RS3
1995 -Battalion 13E67E84E93E95L34L36L45

c = combination company
 
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mack

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BATTALION 13 MANHATTAN LOCATIONS & QUARTERS

ORG. 1907 Amsterdam Ave. at E-38 Oct. 1, 1898

RELOC. 126 E. 50th St. at L-2 Dec. 26, 1903

RELOC. 1907 Amsterdam Ave. at E-38 Mar. 1, 1904

RELOC. 515 W. 181st St. at L-45 Jan. 1, 1916

RELOC. 513 W. 161st St. at E-84 Jul. 10, 2001

RQTRS. 515 W. 181st St. w/ E-93 Feb. 25, 2003
 

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mack

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Battalion 13 LODD:

BATTALION CHIEF ANTHONEY R. MARTUCCI BATTALION 13 March 9, 1961

RIP. Never Forget.
 

mack

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Engine 38/Ladder 51 firehouse 3444 Eastchester Road

Quarters 1928-present
 
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