FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 firehouse 31 Richards Street Red Hook, Brooklyn Division 11, Battalion 32 "Red Hook Raiders"


Engine 2 BFD organized Van Brunt and Carroll Streets former volunteer firehouse 1869
Engine 2 BFD new firehouse 199 Van Brunt Street w/Ladder 1 BFD 1872
Engine 2 BFD became Engine 2 FDNY 1898
Engine 2 became Engine 102 1899
Engine 102 became Engine 202 1913
Engine 202 new firehouse 31 Richards St. w/ Ladder101 1960


Ladder 1 BFD organized 19th Street west of 4th Avenue former volunteer firehouse 1869
Ladder 1 BFD new firehouse 199 Van Brunt Street w/Engine 2 BFD 1872
Ladder 1 BFD became Ladder 1 FDNY 1898
Ladder 1 became Ladder 51 1899
Ladder 51 became Ladder 101 1913
Ladder 101 new firehouse 31 Richards Street w/Engine 201 1960


District Engineer 2 BFD organized 8653 18th Avenue w/Engine 43 BFD 1896
District Engineer 2 BFD became Battalion 12 FDNY 1898
Battalion 12 became Battalion 32 1898
Battalion 32 moved 533 Hicks Street at Engine 103 1906
Battalion 32 moved 199 Van Brunt Street at Engine 102 1912
Battalion 32 moved 533 Hicks Street at Engine 203 1922
Battalion 32 moved 299 DeGraw Street at Engine 204 1940
Battalion 32 moved 533 Hicks Street at Engine 203 1944
Battalion 32 moved 31 Richards Street at Engine 202 1974



Red Hook - Pre-Brooklyn Fire Department:

Fire protection for Red Hook was provided volunteer companies. Status prior to transition to paid BFD indicated:

Neptune Engine 2 Hicks Street and Atlantic Avenue 1797

Hope Hose 9 Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenue 1861
HOPE HOSE 9.jpg


Water Witch Engine 8 Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenue 1868
WATER WITCH 8  3.jpg

Sprague Ladder 6 Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenue 1868

SPRAGUE LADDER 6    2.jpg


Brooklyn Fire Department – New Firehouse 199 Van Brunt Street Engine 2/Ladder 1 BFD 1872:


E 202 FH 1958 2.jpg
View attachment 2489
 
Last edited:

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):



RED HOOK AND ITS FIRE DEPARTMENT 130 YEARS OF SERVICE 1869-1995

Donated to FDNY Home Page by: Dispatcher 350 Mike Boucher Staten Island CO http://nyfd.com


The first European settlers to this area of Brooklyn in 1636 were the Dutch. They gave this area the name of “Roode Hoek” or Red Hook, because of the color of the dirt and shape of the land. It would not be a thriving harbor until the early 1850’s. Before this, and the opening of the Atlantic Basin, this area remained marshy and sparsely populated. Red Hook grew into a major port that saw ships come and go to every corner of the globe. By this time, the population was mostly Italian and they worked at the docks.


Fire protection for this area was provided by Neptune Engine 2, which was organized in 1797 with a shed at Hicks Street and Atlantic Avenue. The next company in the area was Hope Hose 9 at Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenue in 1861; followed in 1868 by Water Witch Engine 8 and Sprague Ladder 6 on the same street.


Engine 2 and Ladder 1 were both placed in service on September 15, 1869 as part of the newly organized Brooklyn Fire Department. On that day the City of Brooklyn replaced its volunteer fire department with a fully paid force. The volunteers had grown from a single engine company in 1785 to twenty-six steamers, twenty-three hose companies, and nine ladders in the Western District and six steamers, ten hose companies and three ladder companies in the Eastern District. Brooklyn in 1869, did not include that which is Brooklyn today. The southern City limits went only to 51st Street and 5th Avenue. Prospect Park was the eastern boundary, and to the north were Williamsburgh and Greenpoint. The area around the waterfront was the most densely populated and had most of the fire companies. Bed-Sty area was just becoming a newly developed area. The outlying area was sparsely populated and had the least amount of coverage. Downtown Brooklyn was protected by six of the thirteen engines. The six ladder companies were thinly spread and included large areas to be protected.


Engine 2 was located in the former quarters of Engine 8 on Van Brunt Street. The first crew of nine men included of Forman James Doyle, Engineer Curran, Driver John Greary, Stoker Daniel Fitzpatrick and Privates John G. Noonan, A. Leonard, Robert O’Donnell, Henry Ryan and James Farrell.


Ladder 1 was placed in the former quarters of Degraw Ladder 4 on 19th Street just west of 4th Avenue. Their crew was under the command of Foreman Timothy Nolan, Driver James Currin, and Privates S.C. Brower, Michael McCarroll, James Donnolly, James Smith, Charles Speeden, John McGee and A. Bullin. Also placed in service with Engine 2 was District Engineer 1.


When Ladder 1 was placed in service it was believed that it was located in a strategic area only to find out that most of its running was to the north and west to the docks. It was decided that a new location closer to the dock would be needed for Ladder 1. All of the firehouses that the paid department used were from the volunteers. These were not built for horses or men living in them 24 hours a day. Engine 2’s quarters was one of the worst of all of them and the first to be replaced. Knowing this the Fire Department started looking for a lot to build a new firehouse. A corner lot on Van Brunt and Seabring Streets was purchased from Daniel Dougherty and his wife for $4,000 on July 20, 1871.


The lot measured 50 feet in the front and was 90 feet deep. On March 1, 1872 a new two bay, two story firehouse was opened with Engine 2, and District Engineer 1 in one bay and Ladder 1 in the other. The cost of the new building was $10,000 to complete with the latest and most modern features for firefighting and for the comfort of the men. Although it was one building on the outside, it was two separate houses on the inside. A wall split the house in two for the engine and truck. It would be the only such house to be built by the Brooklyn Fire Department.


The firemen of the 1870’s did not have to worry about mutual partners or if he had to work today or tomorrow. The work chart was quite simple; 24-hour tours for 14 days and one day off. A fireman could go home for meals for an hour at a time, three times a day. During the twenty-hours, a fireman had a watch at the front desk, then a walking patrol in the neighborhood. Then there was also the care of the horses, feeding, exercise, grooming and cleaning to keep one busy. Most companies had at least three horses to look after. Then a fireman could be detailed as a messenger to headquarters or to the battalion or to another firehouse. Occasionally a fire run would come in. A busy company would respond to maybe 100 runs a year. The pay for a fireman was $800 a year or ten cents an hour.


The Brooklyn Fire Department would turn to the New York City Fire Department for its rules and regulations, apparatus and harness. Brooklyn was a copy of New York except for its apparatus. New York’s rigs were painted red while Brooklyn’s was painted a two tone green. In 1883, Brooklyn purchased its first aerial ladders three years before New York. Before this, ladder trucks would carry only ground ladders on roller frame trucks.


Ladder 1’s truck, a Leverick, was rebuilt in 1886 with a new aerial placed on it. The Leverick ladder is believed to have been one of the volunteer ladders that were rebuilt for the paid department. In 1899, they received a new LaFrance/Hayes 85 foot aerial. Ladder 1 was still responsible for the southern end of Brooklyn and as it grew so did the number of responses to the south. In 1891, Ladder 9 was placed in service in Engine 1’s old quarters, 4th Avenue and 19th Street; around the corner from Ladder 1’s old quarters.


Engine 2’s first apparatus was an 1869 Amoskeag 2nd size steamer capable of pumping 700 to 800 gallons a minute. They also received a new two-wheel hose reel also built by Amoskeag. Three new Amoskeag steamers were assigned to Engine 2 over the years They included an 1871, an 1885 and an 1891 and a new four-wheel hose wagon in 1890.


On January 1, 1898, the City of Brooklyn along with Long Island City, parts of Queens County, Staten Island, Manhattan and the Bronx merged into City of New York. The Brooklyn Fire Department had grown to 56 engines, including two fireboats, 25 ladders, 14 District Engineers, a water tower and one chemical engine in its 29 years.


The Brooklyn Fire Department lost its identity and became part of the Brooklyn and Queens Fire Division of the New York City Fire Department on January 28, 1898. Company numbers remained the same. Members assigned to Brooklyn or Queens had B & Q listed after the company number in personal matters. The reason for this was that now there were two of the same numbers one in Manhattan, and the other in Brooklyn. This confusion lasted until October 1, 1899. Engine companies’ numbers were given 100; thus, Engine 2 became Engine 102. The ladder numbers received 50 and Ladder 1 became Ladder 51.


In 1905, the paid department was extended to Staten Island with Engine 201 thru 208 and Ladder 101 to 105. January 1, 1913, the companies were again renumbered. Brooklyn Engine 102 now became 202 while Brooklyn Ladder 51 became 101. The Staten Island companies adopted the 150 numbers for the engines and the trucks were numbered starting at 76. Ladder 101 on Staten Island became Ladder 76 and Engine 202 became Engine 152.


District Engineer 1 moved out of Engine 2’s quarters and in with Engine 3 on Hicks Street on February 12, 1896. When the cities merged, the District Engineer’s title was replaced by Battalion Chiefs and these numbers were changed. On April 13, 1898 Battalion 1 at Engine 3 was renumbered to Battalion 22. District Chief 12 at Engine 43 became Battalion 32 on the same date. The Battalions were renumbered again on April 15, 1906. Battalion 32 became the 42nd and Battalion 22nd became the 32. Battalion 32 moved back to Engine 202’s quarters on August 6, 1912 when Engine 103’s quarters were closed and torn down for a new building. They remained there until April 16, 1922 when they returned to Engine 203.


The firehouse on Van Brunt Street was starting to show signs of wear and tear after 85 years of service. The 1957 Capital Budget started a rebuilding program of replacing any firehouse that was over fifty years old. The report stated even though there were other firehouses older than Engine 202 and Ladder 101, none were in such bad shape. The second floor had a tilt to it. The windows were sagging, doors were sticking because of the floor tilting, the walls were bowing out and the plaster had patches on top of patches.


The report also stated that Ladder 101 responded 61 blocks to the north, 20 to the south, 52 to the east and 10 to west, while the Engine only responded 10, 20, 8 and 2 blocks in the same directions. In 1935, the Engine responded to 179 runs and the truck went on 272 alarms. In 1955, the companies were responding to 454 runs for the engine and 616 for the ladder. Because of the size of the area and the number of runs the companies made, they could not be disbanded or relocated to a different area of Red Hook.


Located just one block away on Richards Street and Seabring Street the response of both companies would not change. The new two-story house had room for three pieces of apparatus on the large open apparatus floor. The house opened on March 10, 1960 with Engine 202’s two pumpers and Ladder 101. Battalion 32 moved in on December 20, 1974 from Engine 203’s quarters when that house was closed.

Each year the Fire Department honors the bravest of the bravest with a medal ceremony. The first medal winners date back to 1868 in Manhattan. Brooklyn had no medals until 1897.It was earned in 1900 and awarded in 1903. Three members of Ladder 101 have received medals. Fireman Martin J. McNamara, Jr., earned the Hurley Medal on December 18, 1918; Fireman Alexander J. Brown received the Delehanty Medal for a rescue made on January 1, 1954 and Lieutenant John P. R. McFarland earned the O’Dwyer Medal on March 25, 1955. Engine 202 has had one medal winner, Fireman Julias A. Deja earning the Hurley medal on December 16, 1912. Battalion Chief Patrick Hickey, Battalion 32, received the Hugh Bonner Medal for a rescue he made on October 2, 1939.


Since the Fire Department was formed in 1865, 790 members of the force have made the Supreme Sacrifice by losing their lives protecting the citizens of New York. In the 130 years of service, Engine 202 has had five members killed in the line of duty. Two members of Ladder 101 have died and one in Battalion 32 over the same time. The members of Engine 202 to make the Supreme Sacrifice were Fireman John Carbush of on June 8, 1905, Fireman James Casey on January 6, 1918, Captain Edward A. Dougherty on October 4, 1930, Fireman Joseph Dunn on November 3, 1936 and Fireman John P. Schwinteck on February 14, 1940. The members of Ladder 101 to lose their lives were Fireman John Keupp on December 29, 1920 and Fireman William Ormsby on September 7, 1931. Battalion Chief Anthony Jireck of Battalion 32 was killed on January 27, 1945


https://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_202/red_hook.pdf
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


A Brief Fire Department History of Red Hook - by “The Red Hook WaterStories” team

Ladder 2 was relocated to Red Hook in 1872 to fight the growing risk of fire at its busy piers and warehouses.


In 1797 the closest fire company to Red Hook was Neptune Engine 2, located a fair distance away at Hicks Street and Atlantic Avenue. It was not until 1861, well after the opening of Atlantic Docks, that the neighborhood got its own company, Hope Hose 9 at Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenue. Finally Red Hook got a full complement of firefighting equipment in 1868, when Water Witch Engine 8 and Sprague Ladder 6 were established on the same street.


A year later everything changes as the here-to-fore volunteer fire department was replaced by a paid service with new companies and new numbers. Engine 2 moved into Water Witch Engine 8's house on Van Brunt. The first crew of nine men included of Forman James Doyle, Engineer Curran, Driver John Greary, Stoker Daniel Fitzpatrick and Privates John G. Noonan, A. Leonard, Robert O’Donnell, Henry Ryan and James Farrell. Engine 2’s first apparatus was an 1869 Amoskeag 2nd size steamer capable of pumping 700 to 800 gallons a minute.


Red Hook was without its own ladder company until 1872. The Fire Department, realizing that there was a need for a company close to the docks, relocated Ladder 2 from its original location at 19th St and 4th Avenue to a corner lot on Van Brunt and Seabring Streets. Although it was one building on the outside, it was two separate houses on the inside. A wall split the house in two for the engine and truck. The Brooklyn Fire Department only built one fire house like this, all others were shared space.


After the City of Brooklyn merged with New York City in 1898, Brooklyn companies were renumbered Engine 2 became Engine 202 and Ladder 1 became Ladder 101.


After 85 years of hard use a new building was constructed for Engine 202/ Ladder 101 one block away on Richards Street and Seabring Street, in 1960.


The old building at 199 Van Brunt Street is now home to a non-profit, “Friends of Firefighters”.


https://redhookwaterstories.org/items/show/1474
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


Engine 2 BFD history – later became Engine 202 FDNY:

OUR FIREMEN : THE OFFICIAL HISTORY OF THE BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT Brooklyn, NY 1892

ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2, OF RED HOOK POINT


ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. Engine Company No. 2. located at Van Brunt and Seabring Streets, adjoining the house of Truck No. I. was organized when the Paid Department was created. The two-story, brick double house is familiar to thousands of people who have occasion to traverse Red Hook Point. There, for nearly a quarter of a century, the two companies, lying side by side, have protected millions of dollars of property.

The history of Engine No. 2 is the history of the early days of the Department. It is also closely identified with the history of the Twelfth Ward. The residents of that section have long looked upon it as one of their institutions, and without it Red Hook Point would not appear like itself. When the company was first located there, that section was sparsely settled, but it offered admirable facilities for manufacturing purposes. One of the finest water-fronts in the world was the inducement that attracted many large manufacturing firms in New York, and in fact from all over the country, to locate there. Besides that it was within five minutes' walk of Hamilton Ferry. In a short time immense factories and warehouses grew up with surprising rapidity. Now it is by far the greatest manufacturing centre in the city.

Among the large industries that give employment to hundreds, who live in, and go to make up the large resident population of the region, are the stove works of the Richardson & Boynton Company, the factory of the Chesboro Vaseline Manufacturing Company, Worthington's Hydraulic Pump Works, the Pioneer Iron Works, the Lidgerwood Iron Works, the South Brooklyn Machine Company, the India Wharf Brewing Company. J. M. William- son's Drop Forging Works, P. H. Gill's Elevator Works, Casey's Rosin Works, the South Brooklyn Fire Brick Manufactory, and many other large concerns. Besides these are the immense storehouses that line the water-front, including those of the Beard estate, the Robinson estate, the Atlantic Dock Company, the Erie Basin Stores, Findlay's Stores, and the Long Dock Stores.

Added to these are the large ship-building concerns located along the bay, and thousands of vessels, large and small, that are continually loading and unloading their cargoes there. It is estimated that more goods are handled at the Atlantic Dock and Erie Basin than at any other similar places in the country. Recently the Inman and White Star Steamship Companies have purchased property in the district, and before long it will be the headquarters of these and other large lines of transatlantic steamship companies.

When the company was started fourteen reliable and experienced men who had served in the Volunteer Fire Department made up the membership. The present District Engineer of that section, James DOYLE, was placed in charge of the company. He was one of the first Foremen appointed and was known as a fire fighter from the top of his head to the soles of his feet. And what a company it was! Every man was an athlete, fearless and enthusiastic in his new and novel calling. From the old system of the Volunteers to the new system, provided with every improved appliance and contrivance for suppressing fire, was a great change, bid timers tell of the valiant deeds of the original members of Engine No. 2.

"No fire," say they, "could get beyond the control of the boys." The small number of fires, and the comparatively small losses, certainly bear testimony to their efficiency. Under the old regime the company had a large district to cover. Not only was it obliged to cover the Twelfth and Sixth Wards, but its territory included all Gowanus as far as Bay Ridge. Until less than two years ago, when Engines Nos. 1 and 28 were placed in the lower end of the Eighth Ward, the company was compelled to do a great amount of duty. Since then it does not go over the Gowanus Creek unless a second alarm calls, and to a few special boxes. Its district now is bounded by Atlantic Avenue, the water-front, and Gowanus Creek. Altogether the company responds to 44 first alarm calls.

Foreman DOYLE continued in command of the company until his appointment as District Engineer in 1885. The company was known throughout the Department for its skill, and was many times complimented for good work performed at fires; and from this it has in no way retrograded. It still maintains the high standard set years ago, and is improving with the times. Better facilities are provided now than when the Paid Department came into existence.

When District Engineer DOYLE assumed his new duties, the command of Engine 2 was transferred to Foreman Platt VAN COTT, a veteran grown gray in the service. He had served in many companies, and had organized several. He was born at Rockaway, L. I. April 6, 1846, coming of the old Long Island family of his name. Before he attained his majority he came to Brooklyn, and during the war he served in the navy for fifteenth months. At the organization of the Department he was appointed a fireman and assigned to the company in Greenpoint, for three years, after which he was entrusted with the duty of organizing Engine Company No. 15. He started that with all new men and was the acting Foreman of it for seventeen months.

On May 10, 1873, he was appointed Foreman, and continued in command of Engine No. 15. Then he was sent to Truck No. 4, for a year, and from there he went to Truck No. 6, and spent about the same length of time. He was in command of Engine No. 13, for six years, until he was called to Engine No. 2, on Feb. 11, 1886. At the special desire of Commissioner Partridge he organized Engine Company No. 18. He has attended all the big fires and has never met with an accident.


Foreman VAN COTT is of medium height, well built, with an intelligent face and white hair. He is regarded as a strict disciplinarian, but is never harsh. He has in his command a fine lot of men, many of whom, like himself, have served since the Department was organized.

Assistant Foreman JAMES CULLEN is a fine specimen of a fireman. He was born in New York just half a. century ago, but looks much younger. At an early age he moved to this city and settled in the Twelfth Ward. On June 1, 1872, he was made a fireman, but had previously served in the Volunteer Department. His first duty was with his present company, and with the exception of three months he spent as a member of Engine No. 1, he has been a fixture in Engine No. 2 ; as a fireman he ranks with the best. He has had several narrow escapes from death from falling walls, but shows no marks as evidence.

Engineer FRANCIS CURRAN has served in that capacity since the company was organized. Before that he was an Engineer in the old Department. He is regarded as one of the best engineers that ever ran a machine, and can get as much service out of it as any man living. He was born in New York in 1844, but from early childhood has lived in the Twelfth Ward of this city. In stature he is below the average. His dean-shaven, thoughtful face is familiar to everyone in the ward, and there is no one more popular.

JOHN DWYER, the driver, is another old-timer. He was born in New York, in 1844, and was made a fireman, July 1, 1872. When the war broke out he entered the navy and served with credit for two years. He has been connected with Engines Nos. 2, 3, and 4, at different times, mostly as driver, and is in every sense a capable one.

JAMES KEMP was born in Ireland in 1849, and landed in Brooklyn when a youngster. At the age of twenty-one he was made a fireman, his appointment being dated July 20, 1870. Among his colleagues he is justly popular, and by his superior officers he is esteemed for his faithful services and good deportment.

LAWRENCE FAGAN is every inch a fireman. He would rather tackle a burning building than any sort of amusement. Born in this city in 1850, he knows every street and building and is looked upon as a walking encyclopedia. On Feb. 7, 1876, he was appointed a fireman and has done most of his duty with Engine No. 2.

FRANCIS H. MOLLOY was born in this city. Dec. 5, 1850, and was appointed a fireman. Dec. 28, 1876. During his long service he has been in many hot fires and has been complimented several times for heroic service. At a fire in a grain elevator at the Erie Basin in 1879, he had a close call. Just as he with several others, left an adjoining roof, the elevator fell over, striking the spot they had just abandoned. He has assisted in the rescue of several lives, notably among them being the removal of a woman and child from a burning building on Hamilton Avenue.

PETER DUNNE was born in Ireland in 1846, but is a thorough American. He was made a fireman on May 27, 1880, and has distinguished himself on several occasions by his coolness and bravery. Most of his service has been performed with the company he now serves so faithfully.

THOMAS P. SHEA has been a member of the Department and of Engine No. 2 for three years. He was born in this city on Nov. 29. 1865, and was made a fireman on May 20, 1889. He is spoken of as a good fireman, and he looks it.

JOHN MAHONEY is another veteran who has done a good deal of real service and performed it intelligently. He was born in New York City, May 26, 1844, and was made a fireman on June 10. 1870. a few months after the Department was organized. He has served faithfully as a member of several South Brooklyn companies, but for several years has been a fixture in Engine Company No. 2.

WILLIAM P. SKIDMORE was born in this city in 1853, and always had a liking for fire duty. On New Year's Day, 1883. he first reported for duty. Since then he has performed some creditable work and is looked upon as one of the best men in No. 2.

JOHN B. DONOVAN has been a fireman since Dec. 15, 1885, and is as enthusiastic to-day as he was the first day he wore a uniform. Born in this city on June 26, 1859, he knows the territory thoroughly. There is no fire so hot or smoke so dense as to keep him out of a building.

FRANCIS MONNAVILLE was born Jan. 20, 1859, and was appointed a fireman April 1, 1885. He is willing, intelligent and brave, and possesses every requisite necessary in a fireman. Most of his duty has been with Engine No. 2.

GEORGE J. RYAN was born in this city. Nov. 27, 1866 and was made a fireman on Dec. 10, 1891. Although young in years he is old in experience and promises to make his mark in the Department.

MICHAEL QUINLAN was born in Brooklyn on June 3, 1862, and was appointed to the uniformed force on July 1, 1892.

E 2 BFD.jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


Ladder 1 BFD history – later became Ladder 101 FDNY”

OUR FIREMEN : THE OFFICIAL HISTORY OF THE BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT Brooklyn, NY 1892

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO 1, THE FIRST TRUCK COMPANY ORGANIZED.



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO I. Truck No. 1. located at Van Brunt and Seabring

Streets, adjoining the house of Engine No. 2, was the first Hook and Ladder Company organized in the Paid Department. It has a record for efficiency unexcelled by any other company, and the officers and men have had encomiums heaped upon them time and again for yeoman service rendered in time of peril Until a year ago the company covered all the South Brooklyn District and responded to more first-alarm calls than any other truck-company in the city. Its territory included all that section bounded by Atlantic and Fifth Avenues, and the bay from Wall Street Ferry down to Bay Ridge. Until Trucks Nos. 9 and 10 were put in service, at Fourth Avenue and Nineteenth Street and on State Street near Smith Street, respectively it was one of the hardest worked companies in the Department. Truck No. 9 has relieved it of the Gowanus District, and Truck No. 10 of a large part of the Third, Sixth and Tenth Wards.

Before the change in the boundary lines. Truck No. I was frequently obliged to respond to two and three alarms in one day, often going nearly to the extreme end of the Eighth Ward, a distance of nearly two and a-half miles. This played havoc with the horses and severely taxed the physical endurance of the men,. Although the district covered by the company now is considerably smaller than formerly, it still has a very important territory, and responds to forty-six first-alarm calls.

There are several large manufactories and warehouses within its precincts, besides hundreds of vessels with valuable cargoes always at the Atlantic Dock and Erie Basin. Among the large industries are the hydraulic pump works of Worthington & Co., the Chesebrough vaseline works, Richardson & Boynton's stove works, the Lidgerwood Iron works' the South Brooklyn Engine Company J. M. Williamson & Co.'s drop forging works, Casey's rosin works and other large concerns. The mammoth warehouses of Beard & Co., Jeremiah Robinson, the Atlantic Dock Company, the Erie Basin Storage Company and Findlay-s stores line the water-front.

It will be seen, therefore, that the district covered by Truck No 1 is an important one, and requires great vigilance on the part of the men. Whenever fires have occurred there, excellent time has been made by the company, and with one or two exceptions they have been gotten under control with comparatively little loss The company as now organized is an excellent one. The men are willing, daring and intelligent. They like nothing better than fighting a good fire and have repeatedly demonstrated their ability to cope with one of any dimensions, even when the chances seemed entirely against them.

All the latest appliances for rescuing lives and saving property are in possession of the company. A large extension ladder that can be raised to the top of the highest building in the neighborhood has been provided thus, reducing the danger of loss of life to a minimum. When the company was first organized it was located on Fourth Avenue near Nineteenth Street, where Truck No. 9 is now stationed. In 1872 it was transferred to its present quarters on Red Hook Point, where it has long been looked upon as one of the institutions of that primitive district.


The first Foreman was TIMOTHY NOLAN who served only for a short time when he resigned, and shortly after died. He was succeeded by MICHAEL QUINN the present Foreman of Truck No. 9, who remained in charge for nearly ten years and was superseded by JAMES SMITH of Engine No 6 The latter was in turn succeeded by Foreman Quinn, who was again placed in charge but the last tune only remained for a few months when he was transferred to Engine No. 1. On Oct. 25, 1889 the present Foreman took command.

Foreman DANIEL J. GARRITY has the distinction of being the first Foreman appointed in the Paid Fire Department. On the day that the law abolishing the old system and creating the new went into effect, he, with the other appointees was summoned before the new Board of Fire Commissioners, and whether by accident or intent, he was the first man to receive an appointment as Foreman. Before that he was an active volunteer, running with Hose No. 9 from the time he was sixteen years of age. As a fireman he is regarded as one of the bravest and best in the entire Department. Perhaps no other member has a larger number of rescues or daring deeds to his credit. Time and again he has been commended for his heroism Among some of the more notable acts were the rescue of Mrs. Thomas HART and her four children from a burning building on Court Street, near Butler, in 1875. At a fire in the dwelling at No. 619 Fifth Avenue, on Feb. 14, 1885 he rescued John ANDERSON and his daughter from the third floor. The occupants were asleep in the house at the time and were nearly suffocated by smoke. On many other occasions he has distinguished himself. But for one act in particular he has endeared himself to the people of the Twelfth Ward. At an entertainment in the hall attached to St. Mary's Star of the Sea School, at the comer of Court and Nelson Streets, in June, 1887, someone raised the cry of fire. Instantly the children became excited and rushed for the doors and windows. Foreman GARRITY happened to be in the audience at the time and by' prompt action averted what otherwise might have been a panic. "Dan," as his friends call him, was born on Sept. 19, 1841. Since he was twenty-one his hair has been gray. When the war broke out he entered the navy and served for three years He is a member of the G. A. R. Before coming to Truck No. I, he had been for several years in charge of Engine No. 4 on Degraw Street.

The Assistant Foreman, who is frequently called upon to command the company while the Foreman is absent or acting as District Engineer, is DENNIS J. McKINNEY He was born in this city on Feb. 17, 1859, and was made a fireman on June 15 1885 After serving as a private for less than two years, he was in recognition of valuable services promoted to the rank of Assistant Foreman on March I. 1887, and has served with Truck No. 1 since. His name is on the roster of life rescuers. At a fire in Columbia Street he removed a child from the third floor just as the flames entered the apartment. He also assisted in the rescue of others, and is regarded by his superiors as a cool, daring and conscientious fireman.

PATRICK HANLEY, the oldest member of the company, and one to whom the younger men look for advice, has grown gray in the service. He was born Jan. 10 1835, in Ireland, but came to this country when a young man. On Oct. 1, 1872 he was appointed a fireman and has done duty with Engines Nos. 2, 3, and 4, and Truck No 1 Recently, however, he was detailed to the Kerosene Oil Bureau, but is still accredited to and connected with Truck No. 1. He has assisted in the rescue of several lives On one occasion he had a narrow escape. At a fire in one of the large storehouses at Erie Basin, the roof fell in just as he and several of his colleagues stepped off. Had they delayed thirty seconds longer they would have been buried under the ruins.

JAMES REILLY, the second in point of length of service in the company, was born Oct. 31, 1862, and although a comparatively young man has battled with fires for nearly eight years. During that length of service he has proven himself to be one of the best men in the command and one who promises to be heard from later. He has spent most of the time with Truck No. 1.

JOHN J. CALLAGHAN is a Jersey man by birth, but a thorough Brooklynite by adoption, instinct and association. At the age of five, and long before the East River bridge was completed, he made his way to this city. which he says he finds good enough for him. On Dec. 15, 1885, he donned a blue suit, silver buttons, and a fireman's badge and started out to make a record. That he has been successful is attested by his superior officers. He spent a short time as a member of Engines Nos. 3 and 4, and was then transferred to his present company.

JAMES J. RYAN was born within a few hundred feet of the house of Truck No 1 thirty-six years ago, and was made a fireman on March 21, 1888. Before that he was a truck driver and his knowledge of horses made him valuable to the company. He was promptly placed in charge of the splendid team of horses that is the pride of the company, and he treats them with as much consideration as though they were human.

RICHMOND J. TRUPP, although in the Department less than three years, is regarded as one of the most valuable members. He is thirty-one years of age, and was appointed on July 15, 1889. By good faithful work he has commended himself to his superior officers, and is personally popular among his colleagues.

PATRICK TOMAN was born on Dec. 7, 1866, and long before he attained his majority aspired to be a fireman. His ambition was satisfied on March 12, 1891, when Commissioner ENNIS appointed him and assigned him to Truck No. 1.

DANIEL BOYNE is a perfect athlete in appearance. He stands five feet eleven inches and is splendidly developed. On the 10th day of Nov. 1862, he first saw light and on July 17, 1891, he was appointed a fireman. Since then he has performed duty with Truck No. 1, and is spoken of in high terms by his Foreman.

SIMON TRACY is one of the oldest members of the company in age, but one of the youngest in point of service. He was born in Pennsylvania, Dec. 4, 1848, and served creditably during the war with the 5th Regiment, Heavy Artillery, Pennsylvania Volunteers. After the war he located in this city and on July 17, 1891, was appointed a fireman. Although past the age of eligibility, the fact that he was a veteran removed that obstacle. Although forty-four years of age, in running, jumping and other athletic contests, he is able to give the young men points.

CHARLES H. FUREY is a member of the old family of that name in this city He was born in the Sixth Ward' Brooklyn Dec. 3, I867 and was appointed a fireman and assigned to Truck No. 1 on Nov. 16, 1891.

JOHN J. THORNTON was born March 25, 1863, and like his colleague, FUREY was appointed a fireman and assigned to Truck No. 1 on Nov. 16, 1891 and he has proved entirely satisfactory to his superiors.

JAMES KERRIGAN was born in Brooklyn on June 20, 1865, and was appointed on July 1, 1892.

L 1 BFD 2 (2).jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


1st District BFD history - later Battalion 32 FDNY:


OUR FIREMEN : THE OFFICIAL HISTORY OF THE BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT Brooklyn, NY 1892

DISTRICT ENGINEER DOYLE, HIS WAR AND FIRE SERVICE



District Engineer James DOYLE, in command of the First District, was born in Brooklyn on March 14, 1842, and received his education at the parochial and public schools. In Oct., 1862, he enlisted in Company G. 9th Reg't, N. Y. Vols., (Hawkins Zouaves,) which took part in all the principal engagements in the early days of the struggle between the North and the South, and whose ranks were so depleted by killed and wounded as to necessitate its consolidation later in the conflict with the 3d Regiment. New York Vols. At the battle of Pleasant Hill, N. C., in 1864, Private DOYLE was severely wounded in the left shoulder. While lying in the Lincoln General Hospital in Washington he was promoted to the rank of corporal. Having recovered from his wound he rejoined his regiment just as they were setting out for the second attack upon Fort Fisher. After this engagement. Corporal DOYLE was advanced to the rank of sergeant for meritorious conduct on the field. In June, 1865, he was honorably discharged from the army, and returned to his home in Brooklyn.

He joined Hope Hose Company No. 9, then located in Van Brunt Street, near Carroll. which later was furnished with a steam fire-engine, and had its name changed to Hope Engine Company No. 8. The present Chief Engineer of the Department was made Foreman of the new company, and Mr. DOYLE continued to do duty under him until the new Fire Department came into existence. Mr. DOYLE was one of the first Foremen appointed, and he was put in command of Engine Company No. 2. He continued in command of the company up to 1877 when the first "Three-headed" Commission was appointed, and he with other members of the force was discharged. When the Commission of 1879 came into power, Mr. DOYLE was reinstated and placed in command of his old company.

In 1884, when Commissioner Richard H. POILLON created two new districts. Foreman DOYLE became a candidate for District Engineer of one of them, and on July 1, 1885, Commissioner POILLON promoted him to that office and assigned him to the First District, which then comprised that portion of the city extending from Union Street south to the city line, and from Prospect Park to the East River. In this District were located Engine Companies Nos. 1, 2, 20 and 28, and Hook and Ladders Nos. 1 and 9. The action of Commissioner POILLON in making this promotion met with favor from the residents of the district, in which Mr. DOYLE had long been a popular resident.

In Fire Department and Grand Army circles he is held in the highest regard. As a soldier he proved himself worthy of promotion, and as a fireman he has been advanced on his merits. As a District Engineer, in the early morning hours of June 28. 1886, at a fire in the three-story brick building. No. 464 Fifth Avenue, he assisted in saving the lives of Elizabeth HAWES and her three children, who lived on the top floor, and had been overcome by the smoke and badly burned.

Doyle.jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


Van Brunt St Fire House (H & L Engine Co 101, Engine 202) - Brooklyn, New York:

Where there’s manufacturing, there’s fire!

As the industries that clustered around the docks in Red Hook boomed, this 1872 firehouse became the first all-paid fire unit in Red Hook.

The double-bay firehouse had space for a Ladder Company, an Engine Company, and a total of 25 firemen who worked 24-hour shifts for weeks at a time.

Some of the notable incidences that the companies responded to include: an exploding schooner loaded down with ammunitions and salt parked in the Erie Basin in 1916; a collapsing tenement building on Smith Street on an unusually stormy night in 1920; cotton bale fires on the New York Dock Company piers in 1932; the Barber Steamship Company pier fire of 1934 which completely destroyed pier 38 in Red Hook; a Brooklyn warehouse fire that spread into the 7th Ave IRT subway line (now the 1,2,3 trains) in 1935, requiring over 500 firemen to control.

Engine Company 202 and Ladder Company 101 operated out of this building until 1960, when they relocated around the corner at Richards St and Seabring St. Both companies responded to the September 11th World Trade Center attacks. All 7 members of Ladder 101 were killed. Both the Engine and Ladder trucks were destroyed.

The old firehouse is now home to the non-profit Friends of Firefighters, formed in the aftermath of the terrorist attack. The organization offers free and low-cost health services to current and retired FDNY members.

Unopened for decades, what looks like a small brownstone randomly placed on the station’s roof is in fact the hose building, where firefighters would store their hoses when not in use.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/van-brunt-st-fire-house-h-l-engine-co-101-engine-202
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


199 Van Brunt St firehouse:

E 202 1959 a.jpg

E 202  1959 (2).jpg



1945 - Battalion 32:

April 1945 FDNY Organizational Chart.jpg



1960 - Battalion 32 boundary:

1960 Div Bn Boundaries b.jpg
 
Last edited:

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


31 Richards Street firehouse:


E 202 FH13.jpgE 202 fh.jpgE 202 fh 11.jpg

E 202 FH 40.jpg

E 202 FH 49.png

E 202 FH 45.jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


31 Richards Street firehouse:

E 202 FH 48.jpg

E 202 FH 46.jpg

E 202 FH 47.jpg

E 202 FH DOOR.jpg

E 202 FH 42.jpg

E 202 FH 41.jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


Ladder 101:



L 1 BFD 2 (2).jpg

Lt. Robert Lindgren w/Ladder 101 mascot "Bum"
Dad with 'Bum'  L 101 001_crop 2 (2).jpg

Dad with 101's crew & Rig 001_crop.jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):



Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32:


E 202 L 101 WTC.jpg

E 202 L 101 AP 3.jpg

L 101 AP 17.jpg
 

mack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
8,379
Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32 (continued):


Engine 202/Ladder 101/Battalion 32:





 
Top