FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies - 2nd Section

3511

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Regarding the Chiefs quarters at old E71, this was occupied by a deputy chief in the early 1900s, subsequently numbered Division 4, 5, and 6, between 1903 and 1907, when it became permanently Div.7. As told by my father, who grew up in that neighborhood in the early 19teens and eventually was OTJ, those Chiefs quarters were actually an apartment where the deputy could live with his family. In those days there was only one chief assigned to each Division or battalion. This changed with the introduction of the 2 and later 3 platoon systems and the practice of families living in quarters went by the boards. (Some on this forum may remember a similar arrangement for the old quarters of L2 on 8th Avenue across from MSG. There are some in Brooklyn as well, entirely separate quarters from the main firehouse.)

In the 1950s Hugh Halligan was the senior chief of Division 7. He had been my father’s rabbi when they were both in east Harlem’s Division 4. Like Jonny Gage, Hallligan started his FDNY career on Belmont Avenue in E88 and was responsible for getting my father assigned there when he was promoted in 1945.
As a very young lad I recall visiting E71 with my father and he explained the history of the tiny firehouse on the side street. R3 was in the house then with an ancient Mack apparatus and I remember looking head on at the chain drive that propelled the rear axle, so I was a preschooler at the time. E71 had been assigned an Ahrens Fox rig after the1939 Worlds fair, but it was so long it had difficulty getting in and out of that Park Avenue firehouse, which sits at an odd angle to the street. The rig was eventually swapped out with E65 in Manhattan.

I later met Halligan outside E48 after Division 7 moved there in 1956 as my dad and I happened to walk by the old house.
 
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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


Engine 15 organized 269 Henry Street former volunteer firehouse 1865
Engine 15 moved 180 Clinton Street former firehouse Ladder 6 1883
Engine 15 new firehouse 269 Henry Street 1884
Engine 15 disbanded 1975
Engine 15 reorganized 269 Henry Street 1975
Engine 15 moved 25 Pitt Street at Ladder 18 2001

Engine 17 organized 91 Ludlow Street former volunteer firehouse 1865
Engine 17 moved unknown location 1879
Engine 17 new firehouse 91 Ludlow Street 1880
Engine 17 new firehouse 185 Broome Street w/Ladder 18 1939
Engine 17 new firehouse 25 Pitt Street w/Ladder 18 1973
Engine 17 disbanded 1991

Engine 17-2 organized 91 Ludlow Street at Engine 17 1917
Engine 17-2 disbanded 1918

Ladder 18 organized 491 E 166th Street Bronx former volunteer firehouse 1874
Ladder 18 moved Old Post Office E 167th Street 1881
Ladder 18 new firehouse 491 E 166th Street 1882
Ladder 18 disbanded to organize Combination Engine 50 1882
Ladder 18 reorganized 84 Attorney Street Manhattan 1887
Ladder 18 new firehouse 185 Broome Street w/Engine 17 1939
Ladder 18 new firehouse 25 Pitt Street 1973

Squad 5 organized 340 E 14th Street at Engine 5 1959
Squad 5 moved 185 Broome Street 1966
Squad 5 moved 269 Henry Street 1969
Squad 5 moved 55 East Broadway former firehouse Engine 9 1970
Squad 5 moved 330 E 150th Street at Engine 41 1974
Squad 5 disbanded 1975
Squad 6 reorganized 330 E 150th St at Engine 41 1975
Squad 6 disbanded 1976 1976

Battalion 4 organized 77 Canal Street w/Division 2 1869
Battalion 4 moved 180 Clinton Street former firehouse Ladder 6 1875
Battalion 4 new firehouse 91 Ludlow Street w/Engine 17 1880
Battalion 4 moved 180 Clinton Street former firehouse Ladder 6-2 1884
Battalion 4 new firehouse 84 Attorney Street w/Ladder 18 1887
Battalion 4 moved 108 E 13th Street at Ladder 3 1903 1903
Battalion 4 moved 84 Attorney Street at Ladder 13 1904
Battalion 4 new firehouse 185 Broome Street w/Engine 17 1939
Battalion 4 new firehouse 25 Pitt Street w/Engine 17 1973
 

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


PRE-ENGINE 15 FDNY - VOLUNTEER ERA - ENGINE 6 AMERICUS - AKA "THE BIG SIX"


Engine 6 Neptune located Liberty Street & Nassau Street 1765-1776
Engine 6 Neptune located King Street 1784-1796
Engine 6 Neptune located College Wall on Murray Street 1796-1832
Engine 6 Neptune Located Reade Street near West Broadway 1832-1845
Engine 6 Neptune located 106 Reade Street 1845-1846
Engine 6 Americus located 23 Gouverneur Street 1848-1854
Engine 6 Americus located 269 Henry Street 1854-1865

Note - It was common practice for NYC volunteer fire companies to adopt nicknames popular to the era. Nicknames were painted on apparatus and worn on helmet frontpieces. Many companies changed their company nicknames when reorganized, or relocated, or when company leadership changed.


HISTORY

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NYC Fire Wire
September 6, 2017 ·

In 1848, William "Boss" Tweed organized Americus Fire Company 6, also known as the "Big Six". Their symbol was a snarling red Bengal Tiger, a symbol that remained associated with Tweed & Tammany Hall. (Volunteer) Engine 6 started at Gouverneur Street but moved in to their new firehouse at 269 Henry Street. Volunteer fire companies competed with each other. Some were connected with street gangs & had strong ethnic ties to various immigrant communities. The competition could be so fierce that buildings would sometimes burn down while the fire companies fought each other. Tweed became known for his ax-wielding violence, and was soon elected the Big Six foreman. Pressure from Alfred Carlson, the chief engineer, got him thrown out of the crew, but fire companies were also recruiting grounds for political parties at the time; Tweed's exploits came to the attention of the Democratic politicians who ran the Seventh Ward, who put him up for Alderman in 1850, when Tweed was 26. He lost that election to the Whig candidate Morgan Morgans, but ran again the next year and won, garnering his first political position. Tweed eventually took control of NYC Government and became a corrupt politician but his work caught up to him and he was put behind bars until the end of his life.
When NYC took over Americus, they were made Engine 15. Engine 15 occupied the firehouse until 1883 when they moved out for a year while this house was built. July 1st 1884, Engine 15 moved in & occupied this house until November 2001, when they moved in with Ladder 18 & Battalion 4 on Pitt Street.

(2) NYC Fire Wire - Posts | Facebook


VOLUNTEER ENGINE 6 AMERICUS - APPARATUS

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AMERICUS ENG 6 2.jpg



VOLUNTEER ENGINE 6 AMERICUS - TIGER LOGO

"Tiger's Head" Engine Panel Painting

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In the nineteenth century, volunteer fire companies often commissioned paintings to decorate their hand-pumped fire engines for parades, competitions, and community events. Sometimes framed with elaborate carvings, they adorned the tall air chamber located at the middle or rear of a pumper. The paintings would often feature patriotic, heroic, or allegorical images to associate the volunteer companies with these lofty ideals.
This panel painting belonged to the Americus Company No. 6 of New York, New York which operated from 1848 to 1865. The panel is unsigned, but it is attributed to Joseph Hoffman Johnson, a founding member of the Americus Company and artist who painted the company’s famous “Big Six” engine. This tiger was the Americus Company’s mascot. William Marcy “Boss” Tweed was elected foreman of the Americus Company, and his influence and connections in New York led to his position of power in Tammany Hall and control over New York’s political system. The Americus Company’s use of the tiger as a mascot eventually led to its use as a symbol for Tweed’s Tammany Hall. The panel’s design is notable for the absence of patriotic or neoclassical imagery so prevalent in engine panel paintings. This painting and its companion would have adorned either side of the company’s engine.

"Tiger's Head" Engine Panel Painting | National Museum of American History (si.edu)

Note - Engine 6 FDNY is nicknamed the "Beekman Tigers" and continued the tiger tradition of Americus Engine 6.



269 HENRY STREET FIREHOUSE - BUILT 1854

AMERICUS ENGINE 6 FH HENRY STREET.jpg

AMERICUS 6 FH.jpg



FOREMAN - WILLIAM "BOSS" TWEED

AMERICUS 6 TWEED.jpg


William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878) … and widely known as "Boss" Tweed, was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th-century New York City and State. At the height of his influence, Tweed was the third-largest landowner in New York City, a director of the Erie Railroad, a director of the Tenth National Bank, a director of the New-York Printing Company, the proprietor of the Metropolitan Hotel, a significant stockholder in iron mines and gas companies, a board member of the Harlem Gas Light Company, a board member of the Third Avenue Railway Company, a board member of the Brooklyn Bridge Company, and the president of the Guardian Savings Bank.

Tweed was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1852 and the New York County Board of Supervisors in 1858, the year that he became the head of the Tammany Hall political machine. He was also elected to the New York State Senate in 1867, but Tweed's greatest influence came from being an appointed member of a number of boards and commissions, his control over political patronage in New York City through Tammany, and his ability to ensure the loyalty of voters through jobs he could create and dispense on city. Tweed was convicted for stealing an amount estimated by an aldermen's committee in 1877 at between $25 million and $45 million from New York City taxpayers from political corruption, but later estimates ranged as high as $200 million. Unable to make bail, he escaped from jail once but was returned to custody. He died in the Ludlow Street Jail.

Tweed … joined a volunteer fire company, Engine No. 12. In 1848, at the invitation of state assemblyman John J. Reilly, he and some friends organized the Americus Fire Company No. 6, also known as the "Big Six", as a volunteer fire company, which took as its symbol a snarling red Bengal tiger … from a French lithograph, a symbol which remained associated with Tweed and Tammany Hall for many years. At the time, volunteer fire companies competed vigorously with each other; some were connected with street gangs and had strong ethnic ties to various immigrant communities. The competition could become so fierce, that burning buildings would sometimes be ignored as the fire companies fought each other. -from Wikipedia



FOREMAN TWEED W/COMPANY MEMBERS

AMERICUS MEMBER W TWEED.jpg


Tweed seated in middle of front row.



TWEED HELMET FRONTPIECE

WMT FRONTPIECE.jpg



POLITICIAN TWEED

220px-William_Magear_'Boss'_Tweed_(1870)_crop.jpg
 
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kidfrmqns

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I liked 15's old house on Henry Street.
15's old house was great. I stopped in once or twice for a cup of coffee when I worked down there. They used to talk about how the station was built by Boss Tweed. I remember the stairs to the kitchen on the 3rd floor were really long and steep. Wouldn't have wanted to miss your step near the top.
 

mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


PRE-ENGINE 17 FDNY - VOLUNTEER ERA - ENGINE 8 ESSEX


Engine 8 Manhattan located foot of Maiden Lane 1776
Engine 8 Manhattan located Jail Yard Chatham Street 1784-1824
Engine 8 Manhattan located Corporation Yard Leonard Street 1824-1831
Engine 8 Essex located Essex Street 1831-1835
Engine 8 Essex located Ludlow Street near Broome Street 1835-1845
Engine 8 Essex located 91 Ludlow Street 1845-1865


ENGINE 8 ESSEX GIF.gif

Note - Engine 8's steamer, The Elephant, is depicted on the left of this Currier and Ives The Life of a Fireman - The New Era. Steam and Muscle 1861 print. - from As You Pass By



1860 SHIP FIRE - ENGINE 8 MEMBER ATTACKED WHILE RESPONDING

ENGINE 8 SHIP FIRE.jpg



1865 - ENGINE 8 ESSEX DISBANDED

Engine 8 Essex was replaced by paid Metropolitan Fire Department Engine Company No. 17 in their Ludlow Street quarters in 1865
 
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mack

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



1865 - PAID METROPOLITAN FIRE DEPARTMENT ESTABLISHED


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MFD.jpg



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THE FIRE DEPARTMENT.; Completion of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade of New-York. Difficulties in the Work of Reorganization. Catalogue of the City and Suburban Companies. Thirty-five Steam and Five Hand Engine Companies, and Fifteen Hook and Ladder Companies. THEIR ORGANIZATION AND LOCATION Present Condition of the Paid Fire Department. The Fire Telegraph System--The Board of Engineers. THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. SUBURBAN ORGANIZATION. MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS. NO MORE BELLS. STATUS OF VOLUNTEER FIREMEN. VOLUNTEER COMPANIES DISCHARGED.



Nov. 3, 1865

The organization of the Paid Fire Department is at last perfected, and the Fire Commissioners, being no longer perplexed with the duties pertaining to the work of changing from the old system to the new, will devote their energies to making the department thoroughly efficient and a credit to the city. That our readers may fully understand the subject, we present a detailed account of the new organization as it now stands.

The work of reorganization has been a task of no small dimensions for apart from the necessary amount of routine business coming before the board, they have been obliged to devote a large portion of their time to the examination into the capabilities of the old department, and to determine upon the best and most economical system for the new organization. The apparatus and hose had to be examined, and more and better provided; applications for appointments on the new force were to be carefully considered alterations to buildings were to be determined upon, and the financial basis of the entire department arranged. All these several duties occupied time, but the Board of Commissioners kept steadily at their work, and now they find the Paid Fire Department substantially complete, only one or two additional companies having yet to be organized. As at present arranged the new department will soon become compact and manageable, and no doubt seems to exist in the minds of those interested in the department of its final and complete success.

ORGANIZATION OF THE BRIGADE.

The entire force of the Metropolitan Fire Department consists of thirty-five steam fire-engine companies and twelve hook and ladder companies for the city proper. One hook and ladder and two engine companies are to be organized immediately. For duty in the suburban districts there will be five hand engine companies and two hook and ladder companies, and they are now organized under the direction of three assistant-engineers.

In the city organization each engine company consists of twelve members, a foreman, assistant-foreman, engineer, driver, stoker and seven privates. The hook and ladder companies have the same number of members, but not requiring an engineer or stoker, the privates are increased to nine men. To each steamer there is attached a tender. Each steamer and hook and ladder truck will be drawn by a powerful team of horses, and the tenders by one horse each, thus employing 129 horses. Each tender is provided with a reel capable of carrying one thousand feet of hose, and a fuel box calculated for three hours' consumption; in front of the tender is placed a wide seat for the driver and three men.

In the suburbs the companies consist of fifty members, and are not paid, a company fund being given them for incidental expenses, the machines being drawn by hand.

The down-town companies are governed by eleven assistant engineers, while the Chief-Engineer holds command over the entire department.

SALARIES.

The expenses of the department for salaries of the force will be as follows:

Chief-Engineer............................... $3,000
Eleven Engineers (each $1,200)................ 13,200
Three suburban Engineers (each $400)........ 1,200
Forty-seven foremen (each $800).............. 37,000
Forty-seven assistant foremen (each $750)..... 36,250
Thirty-five steam engineers (each $900)........ 36,500
Forty-seven drivers (each $700)................ 32,900
Thirty-five stokers (each $700)................. 24,500
Three hundred and fifty-three privates ($700)..247,100

Total....................................$426,250

Company funds for six suburban companies, ($1,000 each)................................ $6,000

Grand total..............................$432,250


THE WHOLE DEPARTMENT

Consists of a Board of Commissioners and the Board of Engineers, with forty steam, engine and thirteen hook and ladder companies. The following list comprises the officers of the department:

President of the Board -- CHAS. C. PINCKNEY.
Fire Commissioners -- MARTIN B. BROWN, PHILIP W. ENGS and JOSHUA G. ABBE.
Secretary -- CHAS. E. GILDERSLEVE.
Chief-Engineer -- ELISHA B. KINGSLAND.
Board of Engineers -- Joseph L. Perley, First Assistant; G.J. Orr, Eli Bates, Thomas Sullivan, William Shaunessy, Peter Y. Everett, Bernard Sheridan, Wm. Banham, Jr., W.M. Rhodes, John Conley, Joseph D. Coster.
Suburban Engineers -- Michael Halloran, Abraham Howe and John Hunt.

The working force of the brigade consists of the following divisions:

CITY ORGANIZATION

The following comprises the fire companies for duty in the city proper. Each company consists of twelve men. The total salaries of each engine company will be $8,750 per annum. Those of the hook and ladder companies will be $8,550 each:

Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 1, (with horses.) -- WM. CORGAN, foreman, in Park-walk.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 2, (with horses.) -- ROBT. ROBERTS, foreman, No. 304 West Forty-seventh-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 3, (with horses.) -- JOHN MCNEIL, foreman, in West Seventeenth-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 4, (with horses.) -- THOS. MCCAULEY, foreman, No. 39 Liberty-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 5, (with horses) -- DAVID B. WATERS, Foreman, No. 186 East Fourteenth-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 6, (with horses) -- JOSEPH J. MALLEN, Foreman, No. 100 Cedar-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 7, (with horses) -- JOSEPH POYNTON, Foreman, corner of Chambers and Centre streets.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 8, (with horses) -- JOHN H. VAN TASSELL, Foreman, No. 106 East Fifty -- first-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 9, (with horses) -- STUART CARSON, Foreman, No. 55 East Broadway.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 10, (with horses) -- JOHN BATTERSBERRY, Foreman, No. 28 Beaver-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 11, (with horses) -- JULIAN C. HARRISON, Foreman, No. 437 East Houston-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 12. (with horses) -- JAMES OATES, Foreman, William-street, near Pearl.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 13, (with horses) -- J.F. GIRAUD, Foreman, No. 99 Wooster-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 14 (with horses) -- W.H. WILSON, Foreman, No. 15 East Eighteenth-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 15 (with horses) -- JAS. LITTLE, Foreman, No. 269 Henry-street
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 16 (with horses) -- WM. SANDBEG, Foreman, No. 109 East Twenty-fifth-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 17 (with horses) -- ROBT. V. MACKEY, Foreman, No. 91 Budlow-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 18 (with horses) -- W.H. HOUSNER, Foreman, No. 26 West Tenth-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 19 (with horses) -- STEPHEN MITCHELL, Foreman, No. 227 West Twenty-fifth-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 20 (with horses) -- HUGH BONNER, Foreman, No. 47 Marion-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 21 (preparing for horses -- JAS. B. HUNT, Foreman, No. 142 East Fortieth-street.
Metropolitan Steam-Engine Company, No. 22 (preparing for horses) -- JOHN B. DUNHAM, Foreman, Eighty-fifth-street, near Third-avenue.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 23, (preparing for horses) -- HENRY A. LINDEN, foreman, Sixty-eighth-street, near Tenth-avenue.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 24, (preparing for horses) -- W.H. WARD, foreman, No. 84 Morton-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 25, (with horses) -- JOHN ALLEN, foreman, No. 148 East Fifth-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 26, (preparing for horses) -- W.M. MITCHELL, foreman, No. 138 West. Thirty-seventh-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 27 -- (with horses) -- LUKE A. MURPHY, Foreman, No. 171 Franklin-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 28 -- (preparing for horses) -- WM. DONNELLY, Foreman, No. 211 East Eleventh-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 29 -- (drawn by hand) -- ARNOT SPENCE, Foreman, temporarily at No. 300 Washington-street, to go to No. 193 Fulton-street, and obtain horses.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 30 -- (preparing for horses) -- WM. SIMPSON, Foreman, No. 253 Spring-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 31 -- (preparing for horses) -- PETER WEIR, Foreman, No. 116 Second-street
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 32 -- (Drawn by hand) -- WILLIAM BUCKLEY, temporarily at No. 18 Burling-slip.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 33 -- (Preparing for horses) -- HENRY M. VANWORT, Foreman, No. 226, Mercer-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 34 -- (Preparing for horses) -- WM.P. DANIELS, Foreman, No. 286 Thirty-third-street.
Metropolitan Steam Engine Company No. 35 -- Not yet organized.

Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 -- (With horses) -- WM. BRANDON, Foreman, No. 28 Chambers-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 2 -- (With horses) -- A.J. BRADY, Foreman, corner of Fiftieth-street and Lexington-avenue.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 3 -- (With horses) -- JAMES TIMONEY, Foreman, No. 78 East Thirteenth-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 4 -- (With horses) -- MICHAEL SYNDER, Foreman, corner of Forty-eighth-street and Eighth-avenue.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 5 -- (With horses) -- CHARLES O. SHAY, Foreman, No. 96 Charles-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 6 -- (With horses) -- ABRAHAM C. HURD, Foreman, No. 180 Clinton-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 7 -- (Preparing for horses) -- ROBERT KING, Foreman, No. 119 East Twenty-eighth-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 8 -- (With horses) -- GEO. W. QUACKENBUSH, Foreman, No. 159 Franklin-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 9 -- (Preparing for horses) -- WM. ROE, Foreman, No. 195 Elizabeth-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 10 -- (Drawn by hand) -- WM.H. BOWLES, Foreman, temporarily at No. 28 Ann-street, going to No. 193 Fulton-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 11 -- (Preparing for horses) -- C.H. REYNOLDS, Foreman, No. 548 East Fifth-street.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 12 -- Not yet organized.

It will be seen that there are one hook and ladder and one steam engine company yet to be organized. These companies are now under consideration, and in all probability they will be placed in service by the 10th. The proper localization of the companies appears to be the cause of the delay, as the board wish to put these additional machines where they are most needed. As regards the localization of the companies now in active service, the utmost care has been exercised, so as to divide the duty properly and at the same time afford all necessary protection to property. Fault has been found with the Board of Commissioners because they have removed one of the steamers from Ann-street, and fears are expressed that the change will prove dangerous. We learn that the reason of the changes in locality was the difficulty of ingress and egress to and from that already crowded street. The railroad now running through Ann-street makes the risk great. In case of a fire in that neighborhood help will be found speedily at hand, as steamers now are at Fulton and adjacent streets, and can be brought up speedily.

As already stated, the Board of Metropolitan Fire Commissioners have organized a system of fire companies for the uptown districts. Each company will consist of fifty members, and in lieu of regular individuals compensations the organization to have a company fund of $1,000 per annum. So far there have been organized seven of these out-of-town companies. Harlem is now complete, as are likewise Manhattanville, Yorkville, Bloomingdale and Carmansville. Those organized are as follows:

Metropolitan Hand Engine Company No. 36 -- ROBT. C. BROWN, in Fourth-avenue, between One Hundred and Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Twenty-seventh streets, Harlem.
Metropolitan Hand Engine Company No. 37 -- G.B. Foreman, in One Hundred and Twenty-second-street, between Second and Third avenues, Harlem.
Metropolitan Hand Engine Company No. 38 -- JOHN HAY, Foreman, in Eighty-fifth-street, between Third and Fourth avenues, Harlem.
Metropolitan Hand Engine Company No. 39 -- JNO. E. POOLE, Foreman, in Lawrence-street, between Ninth and Tenth avenues, Manhattanville.
Metropolitan Hand Engine Company No. 40 -- WM. HARRIS, Foreman, at Carmansville.

Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 13 -- CYRUS T. FROST, Foreman, in Eighty-seventh-street, near Third-avenue, Harlem.
Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company No. 19 -- MICHAEL MCDERMOTT, Foreman, at Carmansville.


Among the proposed improvements in the department is a contract just completed by the board for ten second-class steam engines, of the Amoskeag pattern, the whole number to be ready for delivery next March. The department will then contain twelve new second-class and three first-class steamers. Thirty thousand feet of hose is now in process of manufacture, and will be soon delivered. The uniform of the firemen while on duty consists of a dark blue suit of pilot cloth, red flannel shirt, and the old fire helmet. On ordinary occasions the members will wear a neat forage cap, of a similar pattern to the navy cap, with glazed cover. In front of the cap will be embroidered the initials "M.F.D.," and the number of the company. Each member is required to be in uniform at all times, except when excused. The engineers will wear a white helmet, with gilt front, and on their forage cape is embroidered the word "Engineer," in the form of an arch, and the letters "M.F.D." beneath. The design is neatly made of gold bullion, similar to the style worn by Captains of police. The engineers are also constantly in uniform.

The men appointed on the force are of first-class character, every one an experienced fireman in the old volunteer department, several of the old assistant engineers now serving as foremen. The condition of the apparatus is also first-class, every machine being put into the best of running order before it left the shop. Improvements in several of the steamers have been introduced while in progress of alteration. The appearance of the houses is also good, for the alterations necessary for the new system caused many important changes for the better. Every man has his tedding and everything necessary for cleanliness and comfort. The horses provided for the companies are of the finest description of draught animals, and their appointments are in perfect keeping.

Very soon there will be a complete revolution in fire-alarm system. Instead of the bell-towers and their attendant ringers, the city will be watched by a telegraph system, at once simple and complete. Each fire company will form a telegraph station, in direct communication with the central office at Firemen's Hall. Each station will have a number, and in each station will be placed an alarm-box. In case of a fire occurring, the foreman or acting foreman of the company nearest its location pulls a knob, and so sounds the number of his station. On receipt of the alarm at headquarters the operator pulls another knob controlling every station in that district, and so gives the exact locality of the fire. If, for instance, "No. 4" is sounded at the central office, that number is at once communicated to every company liable for duty, and the plan is so simple that no mistake can possibly occur. Police stations remote from engine-houses will also be made regular stations, but in general the police will be notified by the firemen. In some, cases, of course, the police telegraph will be of use, but the fire alarm, will be relied on as a general rule.

It may be well to mention in this connection that the board have fixed upon the status of volunteer firemen, and by resolution have determined that the term "good standing" shall be construed and mean only those persons who were members of the New-York Fire Department on the 30th day of March, 1865, and who have performed at least fifty per cent. of fire duty, as the same may appear from the company's roll from July 1, 1865, to Sept. 15, 1865, who are free from all charges, and who were not members of any company which has withheld any property belonging to the City of New-York in use by said company, or permitted the same to be injured, defaced or destroyed. This will effectually stop any attempts by delinquents to obtain honorable discharges.

The following companies, comprising the entire old Volunteer Department, have been relieved from duty, and the members in good standing will be discharged as soon as the necessary blanks are ready:

Engine Companies. -- Hudson No. 1, Excelsior No. 2, Forrest No. 3, Protection No. 5, Americus No. 6, Lexington No. 7, Manhattan No. 8, Marion No. 9, Water Witch No. 10, Oceanus No. 11, Knickerbocker No. 12, Eagle No. 13, Columbia No. 14, Marion No. 18, Lafayette No. 19, Washington No. 20, Fulton No. 21, Protective No. 22, United States No. 23, Jackson No. 24, Cataract No. 25, Jefferson No. 26, Washington No. 27, Guardian No. 29, North River No. 80, Peterson No. 31, Black Joke No. 33, Pete Masterson No. 32, Howard No. 34, Columbus No. 35, Harry Howard No. 36, Tradesman No. 37, Southwark No. 38, Lady Washingington No. 40, Clinton No. 41, Empire No. 42, Manhattan No. 43, Live Oak No. 44, Aurora No. 45, Valley Forge No. 46, New-York No. 47, Mazeppa No. 48. Pocahontas No. 49, Mutual No. 51, Undine No. 52, Hudson River No. 53, Niagara No. 4, Chatham No. 15, Mo. hawk No. 16, East River No. 17, Pacific No. 28, Franklin No. 39.

Hose Companies. -- Niagara No. 2, Independent No. 3, Marion No. 4, Edwin Forrest No. 5, Croton No. 6, Ringgold No. 7, City No. 8, Columbian No. 9, Liberty No. 10. Jackson No. 13, Atlantic No. 15, Tompkins No. 16, Clinton No. 17, Franklin No. 18, American No. 19, Humane No. 20, Hudson No. 21, Phoenix No. 22, Perry No. 23, United States No. 25, Neptune No. 27, Pearl No. 28, Metamora No. 29, Laurel No. 30, Putnam No. 31, Crystal No. 35, Oceana No. 36, Madison No. 37, Mohawk No. 39, Empire No. 40, Alert No. 41, Mazeppa No. 42, Pioneer No. 43, C.G. Gunther No. 45, Americus No. 48, Lady Washington No. 49, Hope No. 50, Relief No. 51, Harry Howard No. 55, Nassau No. 56, M.T. Brennan No. 60, Zephyr No. 61, Eagle No. 1, Gulick No. 11, Washington No. 12, Excelsior No. 14, Naticnal No. 24, Rutgers No. 26, Warren No. 33, Amity No. 38, Washington Irving No. 44, Mechanics, No. 47, Manhattan No. 59.

Hook and Ladder Companies. -- Mutual No. 1, Chelsea No. 2, Eagle No. 4, Union No. 5, Mechanics No. 7, Empire No. 8, Washington No. 9, C.V. Anderson No. 10, Harry Howard No. 11, Friendship No. 12, Columbian No. 14, Baxter No. 15, Liberty No. 16, Hibernia No. 18, Phenix No. 3, Lafayette No. 6, Marion No. 13, John Decker No. 1



1866 - METROPOLITAN FIRE DEPARTMENT PARADE


MFD PARADE.jpg
 
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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



1865 - ENGINE COMPANY NO. 15 ORGANIZED

Company No. 15 organized September 18, 1865, at No. 269 Henry Street, in quarters of Americus Engine No. 6. Had a steamer, built by Silsby Mynderse & Co. in 1861, and tender drawn by horses.



ENGINE 15 MEMBERS

Foreman, James Little ; assistant foreman, Thomas Henry ; engineer, Thomas Mulligan ; stoker, James Riley ; driver, George W. Erb ; firemen, Thomas Lahey, Albert Shick, David Peffers, William Hyland, Daniel McCauley, Edward Quinn, Thomas Bannan.



ORIGINAL QUARTERS - 269 HENRY STREET - FORMER AMERICUS ENGINE 6 FIREHOUSE

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Note - Engine 15 Driver George Erb became Foreman (Captain) of fireboat William F. Havemayer, Engine 43, berthed at the foot of Pike Street, East River. The Havemayer served 1875-1901.

Foreman Erb in Engine 43 journal Roll of Members - Aughust 1, 1890.

ERB HAVEMAYER.jpg
 

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



ENGINE 15 - HISTORY


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Engine Company No. 15 -- No. 269 Henry Street


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To the left of the 1884 fire house an elegant Federal home survives.

Before 1865 New York City’s fire fighting depended on a disorganized collection of volunteer companies. When a fire broke out, young men in the neighborhood called “laddies” would scramble to the fire house. Nearby fire houses would vie with one another to arrive at the fire first, or to become more skilled at extinguishing it. Most of the volunteer groups gained a reputation as rowdy, boisterous gangs whose fire houses were essentially social clubs.

But Americus Engine Company No. 6 was a bit more refined. In 1854 an upscale home at No. 269 Henry Street was converted to a firehouse. It was situated in the midst of one of Manhattan’s most exclusive residential neighborhoods. The renovated interiors retained many of their luxurious details.

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This engraving was made shortly after the house was converted to a fire station. Well dressed ladies and a gentleman admired the handsome steam engines. from the collection of the Museum of the City of New York

Nevertheless, its members—10 of whom lived permanently in the building in 1855--held blue-collar jobs; many of them maritime due to the nearby seaport. That year the roster listed occupations like spar-maker, caulker, sail-maker, ship joiner, and stevedore. Among the others were cartman, butcher, blacksmith, carriage-maker, cabinet-maker, marble-cutter and piano forte hardware.

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A gasolier and oil paintings made the Americus "bunk room" home-like. Our Fire Firemen, 1887 (copyright expired)

In 1861 there were 48 members of Americus Engine Company No. 6, popularly known as the “Big Six.” That year the firehouse received a shiny new steamer, built by Silsby, Mynderse & Co. in Seneca Falls, New York. The Board of Aldermen’s inspection noted that the company’s 200 feet of rubber hose and 300 feet of leather hose were “in good condition.”

The days of American Engine Company No. 6 were numbered by now. The devastating fire that destroyed Barnum’s Museum in 1865 along with pressure on the State Assembly by reformers resulted in the Act of 1865 that coupled Brooklyn and New York with a paid, united “Metropolitan District” fire department.

On September 5 that year The New York Times reported that the Big Six, in preparation “to give up housekeeping” was selling off its “furniture and adornments of their house” that day. The items up for sale gave a hint of the comfortable accommodations here. “Among the furniture are two cooking-stoves and a chowder-pot, a piano, music and stool, thirty velvet-cushioned chairs, and no less than five sofas. Among the decorations are about one hundred oil paintings, some of them of considerable value.”

Two weeks later, on September 19, the Committee on Appointments and Discipline recommended “an engine company be organized, to be known as Metropolitan Engine Company No. 15, in the house formerly occupied by Americus Engine Company No. 6, stationed at No. 269 Henry-street.”

The professional Engine Company would make do of the aging accommodations for two decades. In 1882 the first steps were taken to replace it with a modern fire house. In December requests for “sealed proposals for furnishing the materials and labor, and doing the work required” for construction a fire house were made by the Fire Department. Nearly a year later, in September 1883, the proposal of $18,200 by Mahony Bros. was accepted and the contract awarded.

The plans for Engine Company No. 15 had been filed on May 11. For four years Napoleon LeBrun & Son had been the official architects for the New York Fire Department. The firm’s designs were as handsome as they were utilitarian. For Engine Company No. 15 it mixed Romanesque Revival with the newly-emerging Queen Anne style. The cast iron base followed the customary fire house arrangement—two openings flanking a large central engine bay. The lively capitals incorporated torches—emblematic of the fire department—and stylized sunflowers, an important Queen Anne and Esthetic Movement motif. The sunflowers reappeared below the cornice, lining up as large terra cotta tiles.

Panels of saw-tooth brick separated the upper levels and created tactile interest. The arched openings of the top floor, the nod to Romanesque, were joined by a single vaulting brick eyebrow. On either side, ambitious brick console brackets embraced the cornice. Here, too, was an important Queen Anne element, the sunburst.

The architects were apparently pleased with their design. They used it two more times in the identical Engine Company No. 53 on East 104th Street and Engine Company No. 54 on West 47th Street.

The firefighters living and working from late 19th century firehouses faced great danger, not only from the fires and dangerous illuminating gas in the buildings; but from the steam-powered engines and the galloping horses that drew them. And the public was often placed in peril as well.

On January 19, 1903 the Heyward Brothers & Wakefield Company chair factory on Madison Street caught fire following an explosion of benzene. The New-York Tribune reported the blaze “was made exciting by falling walls, brilliant rescues and the jumping into a net of one of the victims.”

There were about 50 employees in the factory at the time, many trapped by the rapid spread of the flames following the explosion. When Engine Company No. 15 arrived, they saw 23-year old Frederick Zimmerman standing on a sixth floor window ledge with flames licking close behind him.

With no time to run a ladder up to him, the firemen rushed to pull the life net from the hose wagon. Civilians helped pull it taut over the sidewalk and Zimmerman was instructed to jump. He thought about the six-floor plunge for a few seconds, then stepped off the ledge. The Tribune reported “He kept his balance well in the air, and as he neared the net threw himself backward and landed in the net on his back.”

The crowd expected to see him bounce slightly in the net; but to their shock and horror he crashed through the net onto the sidewalk. He was taken to Gouveneur Hospital with suspected internal injuries.

The other trapped employees were far more fortunate. Daring rescues were made that night, at least one man being carried down a ladder on a fire fighter’s back.

Later that year, on July 22, Engine Company No. 15 responded to an alarm. A crowd of children were playing on the sidewalk on Clinton Street when the fire engine tore around the corner from Henry Street. Five-year old Sarah Adelman, unaware of the danger, started across the street. The New-York Tribune reported “As unconcerned as if she were still playing on the sidewalk, she stood in the middle of the street. On hearing the cries of women and seeing the swaying tender approaching, she became paralyzed with fear and made no effort to get out of the way.”

Michael Martin, driving the engine, realized that the team of horses was going so fast he could not slow them in time, nor even swerve to avoid the girl. Taking a desperate change, he aimed directly for her, “trusting to luck that she would pass between the horses.”

Martin’s gamble worked. Sarah stood motionless as the horses galloped by on either side of her. She was knocked down by the pole and the tender passed over her without the wheels touching her body. The little girl escaped with a cut on the head and a lesson learned.

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Burning torches are incorporated into the leafy capitals, and flames erupt from behind the round medallion.

The once-elegant neighborhood around the firehouse had substantially changed by now. Fine homes had been replaced by tenements and the Henry Street area was one of immigrants, many German Jews. Near the fire house, on Gouverneur Street, between Henry Street and East Broadway, was the East Side Kindergarten and Industrial School. When an overheated stove set fire to the building during school hours on March 17, 1908, the principal did some quick and resourceful thinking.

Before Engine Company 15 could arrive, Mrs. Hill prevented the 500 children from being panic-stricken by announcing that classes were being let out early “as it was Purim.” The New York Times reported “The children marched out quietly” and the fire fighters put out the blaze.

In the fall of 1910 an arsonist was determined, for whatever reason, to destroy the tenement building at No. 170 Clinton Street. During the first week of November four unsuccessful attempts were made to set fire to the structure. After those attempts failed, he apparently turned to the building next door at No. 172. This time he was rewarded.

The fire started in the basement and spread rapidly through the airshaft. It was discovered then 19-year old Jacob Andrer started down the stairway with his three younger siblings. The residents of the building, mostly impoverished immigrants, were thrown into a panic.

When Engine Company 15 reached the scene, tragedy had already occurred. Jacob Andrer had alerted his parents, 60-year old Rebecca Andrer and Rabbi Samuel Andrer, of the quickly growing danger. There was no way down, so the family of six, who lived on the third floor, started up the fire escape to the roof. Part way up Rebecca lost her footing on the rickety stairs and fell, nearly taking the rabbi with her. Her body smashed on the courtyard pavement.

Fire Engine Company 15 rescued the other residents of the building, including the rest of the Andrer family and four children trapped in a fourth floor flat.

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Boys play in the street in front of the fire station in 1939. from the collection of the New York Public Library

The heroism of the fire fighters was not reserved to conflagrations. When the United States entered World War II, fireman Peter J. Dannhardt left Engine Company No. 15 to fight for his country. He never returned. The men of the station house pooled their money to pay for a bronze plaque in his memory. Affixed to the firehouse wall, it was unveiled by his parents on his 30th birthday, July 6, 1946.

The station lost another firefighter in a bizarre accident that year. At around 3:30 on the morning of December 30, the Company responded to a ground floor grocery store fire at No. 234 Henry Street, just one block away. The blaze was under control an hour later, but Engine Company No. 15 remained for “overhauling” operations. At 5:25 the fire truck was just pulling into the firehouse when somehow 34-year old Daniel Krauss was thrown from the truck. He died in the hospital at 6:49 that morning.

In 1975 the City was on the verge of financial collapse. City employees, like sanitation workers, were being laid off or their number of work days cut back. The closing of fire stations was seen as another cost cutting method. When Mayor Abraham Beame’s administration announced that Engine Company No. 15 was on the list of stations to be closed, the neighborhood rebelled. On July 11 more than 200 demonstrators marched in front of the Fire Department Headquarters on Church Street in protest.

Rather surprisingly, the protestors, many of whom were elderly, were heard. Engine Company No. 15 remained active. But then in 2002 the Company moved to a firehouse on nearby Pitt Street. The old LeBrun-designed building sat vacant, its cast iron tag ENGINE COMPANY NO. 15 removed from above the bay doors.

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In 2007 the City transferred ownership to the Henry Street Settlement. A repurposing plan designed by preservation architects J. Lawrence Johns & Associates and Beyer Blinder Belle Architects will result in a multi-function community and Settlement space while preserving the historic integrity of the design.

http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2016/04/engine-company-no-15-no-269-henry-street.html


269 HENRY STREET ENGINE 15 FIREHOUSE 1884-1975

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This LeBurn house is the second station to sit on this location over the years. The first house was opened on January 28, 1854 for Americus Engine 6. This company was known as Big Six or Tiger. One of the Foremen in this company was the famous William "Boss" Tweed who was the political boss of New York City during the 1850`s through 1871. He was arrested for corruption and died later in prison. The first house was located at 23 Gouverneur Street. The new house on Henry Street was the first known house to have sleeping quarters for the members and was the grandest of all the houses in the City at the time. Engine 15 of the paid department replaced Engine 6 on September 18, 1865 in this building. Engine 15 moved to 180 Clinton Street on November 15, 1883 and the old house was torn down for the new building. To make room for Engine 15 in Clinton Street, the second section of Ladder 6 was taken out of service. Engine 15 moved into its new home on June 1, 1884 making this the fifth oldest active house in New York City. Engine 9 relocated here from 55 East Broadway on January 10, 1966, while Ladder 6 moved into Engine 9`s former quarters. Once the new house on Canal Street was built Engine 9 moved in with Ladder 6 on May 6, 1969. Squad 5 shared the house from May 15 1969, until January 10, 1970, and then moved to 185 Broom Street. During the financial crisis of 1975, Engine 15 was disbanded on July 2, 1975 and placed back in service on July 19th.
 
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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"




269 HENRY STREET FORMER FIREHOUSE

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Sale of former firehouse approved by Commission

City Planning Commission • Disposition • Lower East Side, Manhattan

04/15/2007

Sale limited to community-use buyer. On March 14, 2007, the Planning Commission approved DCAS’ application to sell the lot at 269 Henry Street in Manhattan containing a four-story firehouse used by FDNY Engine Company No. 15 until 2001 when it moved to Pitt and Delancey Streets.

In the land use review process, Community Board 3 and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer opposed an open-ended sale. Stringer requested a restriction on the sale requiring the new use to provide a clear community benefit. The board wanted DCAS to immediately withdraw the application to allow the Department of Housing Preservation and Development to continue negotiations toward a final sale of the firehouse to the Henry Street Settlement, a community group started in the late 1890s by Lillian Ward, located immediately adjacent to the building.

When the application reached the Planning Commission, DCAS explained that negotiations with HPD and Henry Street Settlement were ongoing. DCAS offered to place a hold on the sale if the Commission approved its application. Community Board 3’s District Manager, a representative for Council Member Alan Gerson, and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer’s Land Use Director Anthony Borelli remained opposed with both Gerson and the board asking for DCAS to withdraw the application.

The Commission ultimately approved after adding a restriction that the site be disposed only for use as a community facility. Commissioners Angela Cavaluzzi and Dolly Williams remained opposed. The Commission found that the restriction would aid discussions for the sale of the property to the Henry Street Settlement. The City Council must now vote on the disposition.


https://www.citylandnyc.org/sale-of-former-firehouse-approved-by-commission/




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Dale Jones Burch Neighborhood Center at Henry Street Settlement Opens
November 06, 2019



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BBB joined the Henry Street Settlement in celebrating the opening of the Dale Jones Burch Neighborhood Center, a new home for their community “first responders.”

On October 23, a festive ribbon-cutting marked the opening of Dale Jones Burch Neighborhood Center in a restored historic firehouse at 269 Henry Street. Founded in 1893 by reformer Lillian Wald, Henry Street Settlement provides social service, arts, and health care programs to more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually at 17 sites on the Lower East Side, now joined by the Dale Jones Burch Neighborhood Center. BBB converted the 4-story 19th century firehouse designed by Napoleon LeBrun into a vital new facility offering a range of essential community services, an on-site parent center, and a ground-floor community room.

Dale Jones Burch Neighborhood Center at Henry Street Settlement Opens - Stories - Beyer Blinder Belle
BBB’s project team joined community leaders and project donors along with members of Engine 15 in an outdoor celebration marking the occasion.
 
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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


1865 - ENGINE 17 ORGANIZED


Company No. I7 organized September 29, 1865, at No. 91 Ludlow Street, in quarters of Manhattan Engine No. 8. Had a steamer, built in 1861 by the Portland Company, and tender drawn by horses.


E 17 1.jpg



ENGINE 17 ORIGINAL MEMBERS

Foreman, Robert V. Mackey ; assistant foreman, Noah L. Chamberlain ; engineer, James Hamilton ; stoker, William H. St. John ; driver, Thomas H. Griffith; firemen, James Neville, William Wood, David Close, William Long, William Sheeban, Henry Brengel, William H. Ranson, Thomas Harrington.
- from Our Firemen. A History of the New York Fire Departments, Paid and Volunteer
 

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"


91 LUDLOW STREET ENGINE 17 FIREHOUSE - 1880-1939


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91 LUDLOW STREET - CURRENT

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



LADDER 18 - ORGANIZED 1874 W/CHEMICAL ENGINE 2 - BRONX

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1874 - LADDER 18 - 491 E 166TH STREET FORMER VOLUNTEER FIREHOUSE

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1882 - NEW FIREHOUSE - 491 E 166TH STREET

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1882 - LADDER 18 DISBANDED TO ORGANIZED COMBINATION ENGINE COMPANY 50



1887 - LADDER 18 REORGANIZED 84 ATTORNEY STREET - MANHATTAN

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1939 - NEW FIREHOUSE W/ENGINE 17 - 185 BROOME STREET


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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



185 BROOME STREET FIREHOUSE

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FORMER 185 BROOME STREET FIREHOUSE

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City Taking Possession of Former Firehouse on Broome St.


A chapter is ending in the history of 185 Broome St., a 1930s-era firehouse, as the city’s Seward Park redevelopment project looms.


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The firehouse at 185 Broome St. is destined to be demolished eventually, as part of the Seward Park redevelopment project.

The firehouse at 185 Broome St. is part of the Seward Park redevelopment project.

Last week, the city’s Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), which owns the building, served notice on longtime tenant Angel Aerial that it would assume possession of the premises as of July 19, and ordered the company to vacate. The property sits squarely in the seven-acre Seward Park redevelopment area, which is destined for a major construction project in the next few years.

According to the notice posted on the door, Angel Aerial’s lease expired in December 2012. Angel Aerial, which provides support vehicles and equipment for film production in and around the city, moved its main base of operations to Long Island City about three years ago, but continues to store trucks and materials in the two gated lots on either side of the property, which stretches from Clinton Street to Suffolk Street along the south side of Broome.

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The Seward Park redevelopment parcels include 185 Broome St., here labeled as site number 4.

The Seward Park redevelopment parcels include 185 Broome St., here labeled as site number 5.

In 2010, before the Seward Park redevelopment plan was approved, Angel Aerial co-founder Jim Miller, floated a proposal to set up a sound stage in the blocks around the firehouse, saying it would draw economic development to the neighborhood. In recent years, Miller, who lives in the East River Housing co-op just a few blocks away, has hosted garage sales featuring former movie props and other eclectic items at the building. Angel Aerial employees did not respond to an inquiry from The Lo-Down.

Detailed plans for the Seward Park redevelopment project call for Broome Street to be a neighborhood-scaled retail corridor, the NYC Economic Development Corporation’s David Quart said last year. As part of the project, loading zones and curb cuts will be located on side streets, freeing up Delancey, Essex and Broome to be “active retail corridors,” Quart said at the time. “It allows for Broome Street, which is the most intimate street in the middle of the development, to become a real neighborhood amenity more along the scale of the Lower East Side streets that everyone knows and loves. We see Broome Street as an opportunity to create an active corridor and we would encourage a retail corridor.”

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http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/2...session-of-former-firehouse-on-broome-st.html


185 BROOME STREET - CURRENT

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



SQUAD 5 - MANHATTAN 1959-1970 BRONX 1970-1976 - FIREHOUSES

Squad 5 was located at Engine 17/Ladder 18/Battalion 1966-1969 and at Engine 15 1969-1970.



1959- ORGANIZED 340 E 14TH STREET AT ENGINE 5

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1966 - 185 BROOME STREET AT ENGINE 17/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4

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1969 - 269 HENRY STREET AT ENGINE 15

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1970 - 55 EAST BROADWAY AT FORMER FIREHOUSE ENGINE 9

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E 9 a.jpg



1974 - 330 E 150TH STREET AT ENGINE 41

E 41 fh 1 (2).jpg

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ENGINE 15/LADDER 18/BATTALION 4 (ENGINE 17 DISBANDED) FIREHOUSE 25 PITT STREET LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN DIVISION 1, BATTALION 4 "FORT PITT"



25 PITT STREET FIREHOUSE BUILT 1973

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Notes:
- Lettering for Engine 17, Ladder 18, Squad 5 and Battalion 4 - Squad 5 never relocated to new Fort Pitt firehouse. Squad 5 remained at 55 East Broadway and then relocated to Engine 41 in the Bronx.
- NYPD 7th Precinct also located with FDNY on Pitt Street - RMPs were older white/green/black style and the newer white/blue model.
 

CVILLE7111

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There was also discussion at some point of moving Satellite 1 and the Satellite Officer car from Engine 9's old quarters at 55 East Broadway to the new quarters of Engine 17.
 

kidfrmqns

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Kinda surprising that they built the house on Pitt Street with a firehouse when the Broome St firehouse was only 34 years old at the time. It's also amazing looking at the pictures just how much Broome Street has changed over the years.
 
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